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Our contemporary horror stories are written in a world where there seems little faith, lost hope, and no salvation. All that remains is the fragmentary and occasionally lyrical testimony of the human being struggling to confront its lack of reason for being in the vast cosmos. This is the terrain of the horror genre. Eugene Thacker explores this situation in Tentacles Long Our contemporary horror stories are written in a world where there seems little faith, lost hope, and no salvation. All that remains is the fragmentary and occasionally lyrical testimony of the human being struggling to confront its lack of reason for being in the vast cosmos. This is the terrain of the horror genre. Eugene Thacker explores this situation in Tentacles Longer Than Night. Extending the ideas presented in his book In The Dust of This Planet, Thacker considers the relationship between philosophy and the horror genre. But instead of taking fiction as the mere illustration of ideas, Thacker reads horror stories as if they themselves were works of philosophy, driven by a speculative urge to question human knowledge and the human-centric view of the world, ultimately leading to the limit of the human thought undermining itself, in thought. Tentacles Longer Than Night is the third volume of the "Horror of Philosophy" trilogy, together with the first volume, In The Dust of This Planet, and the second volume, Starry Speculative Corpse."


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Our contemporary horror stories are written in a world where there seems little faith, lost hope, and no salvation. All that remains is the fragmentary and occasionally lyrical testimony of the human being struggling to confront its lack of reason for being in the vast cosmos. This is the terrain of the horror genre. Eugene Thacker explores this situation in Tentacles Long Our contemporary horror stories are written in a world where there seems little faith, lost hope, and no salvation. All that remains is the fragmentary and occasionally lyrical testimony of the human being struggling to confront its lack of reason for being in the vast cosmos. This is the terrain of the horror genre. Eugene Thacker explores this situation in Tentacles Longer Than Night. Extending the ideas presented in his book In The Dust of This Planet, Thacker considers the relationship between philosophy and the horror genre. But instead of taking fiction as the mere illustration of ideas, Thacker reads horror stories as if they themselves were works of philosophy, driven by a speculative urge to question human knowledge and the human-centric view of the world, ultimately leading to the limit of the human thought undermining itself, in thought. Tentacles Longer Than Night is the third volume of the "Horror of Philosophy" trilogy, together with the first volume, In The Dust of This Planet, and the second volume, Starry Speculative Corpse."

30 review for Tentacles Longer Than Night

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela Ventura

    Eu gosto muito do Thacker, e acho essa série "Horror of Philosophy" nada menos que excelente; uma investigação das relações entre filosofia e o gênero horror. Não exatamente para extrair uma filosofia do horror mas, antes, para encontrar o horror na filosofia, tratando inclusive textos literários como peças potencialmente filosóficas. Acho essa inversão diabólica muito esperta, e é o tipo de coisa que me faz sorrir. No terceiro volume - Tentacles longer than night - Thacker discute tropos da tra Eu gosto muito do Thacker, e acho essa série "Horror of Philosophy" nada menos que excelente; uma investigação das relações entre filosofia e o gênero horror. Não exatamente para extrair uma filosofia do horror mas, antes, para encontrar o horror na filosofia, tratando inclusive textos literários como peças potencialmente filosóficas. Acho essa inversão diabólica muito esperta, e é o tipo de coisa que me faz sorrir. No terceiro volume - Tentacles longer than night - Thacker discute tropos da tradição do horror cósmico - coisa que muito me interessa, porque eu talvez esteja escrevendo um conto ~cthulhunesco~ para o Halloween. (Dscp, galera.) De Poe a Miéville, passando, é claro, por Lovecraft e toda a tchurma clássica do Weird Fiction, esse livro é um prato cheio para fãs do gênero. O tom não chega a ser acadêmico e, apesar de excessivamente fragmentário em certas passagens, permanece interessante ao longo de toda a leitura. Pesquei algumas referências ótimas. :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rafael Munia

    Not a philosophy of horror, but a horror of philosophy From the beginning of the book, the author already establishes an important distinction to his project: This is not a book about the philosophy of horror, but a book about the horror of philosophy. Through the book, the author shows a vast domain about the literature from all kinds of philosophy and all kinds of horror stories (books, movies, and others), which he does not use simplistically to establish show-off connections, but in order to Not a philosophy of horror, but a horror of philosophy From the beginning of the book, the author already establishes an important distinction to his project: This is not a book about the philosophy of horror, but a book about the horror of philosophy. Through the book, the author shows a vast domain about the literature from all kinds of philosophy and all kinds of horror stories (books, movies, and others), which he does not use simplistically to establish show-off connections, but in order to create his own philosophy about the horror of philosophy, that which it can't comprehend, the wholly otherness to thought. An amazingly interesting book that works to move contemporary philosophy forward into interesting new directions.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aung Sett Kyaw Min

    At this point I feel like Thacker is repeating himself. The motifs from the first two volumes make their appearance again in this final volume in which Thacker promises to read horror fiction as if they were serious works of philosophy. As with the previous two volumes, the wealth of references supplied by Thacker make for a dizzying if not an encyclopaedic reading experience. In the grand scheme of things Thacker does succeed in drawing out and making explicit the specific philosophical problems At this point I feel like Thacker is repeating himself. The motifs from the first two volumes make their appearance again in this final volume in which Thacker promises to read horror fiction as if they were serious works of philosophy. As with the previous two volumes, the wealth of references supplied by Thacker make for a dizzying if not an encyclopaedic reading experience. In the grand scheme of things Thacker does succeed in drawing out and making explicit the specific philosophical problems posed by, to give but a few examples, Dante's Inferno, Lautréamont's Maldoror or Ligotti's Conspiracy Against the Human Race. Other times it is less of a specific problem than an certain spirit of unhumanism, for example, in the fictional verse of H.P Lovecraft. How does thought think the paradoxical extinction of thought, or the limit of thought? There are four stages, as outlined by Thacker in section 4 under the heading Black Matheme. At least for me this typography are the main takeaway of this whole volume. (1) The unhuman exists for the human, and can be integrated within the ambit of anthropocentric or terrestrial rationality (2) The unhuman is revealed to be not only autonomous but as mischeviously employing human rationality and human agency for its own ends, nonetheless some semblance of intentionality and intelligence (categories of human understanding) are still attributed to the unhuman forces (3) Everything human is exposed as an instantiation of the unhuman, in other words, in unhuman within us stages an escape (4) The final stage in which all representational apparatuses (language, sensibility and understanding) collapse into aphophantic catastrophism (“nameless,”“formless,” “lifeless")

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    It feels somewhat disjointed, starting off with in-depth examinations of Dante’s Inferno and Lautreamont’s Maldoror (neither of which are horror to me). But he hits his marks when he dives into more familiar Thacker subjects like cosmic horror and the uncanny vs. the marvelous. He makes a pretty convincing case that there is useful information to be gleaned from critiquing horror texts as philosophical treatises.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    A beloved college teacher of mine once told me about a roommate he had in grad school who used to watch professional wrestling on TV and minutely analyze the drama he saw unfolding before his eyes: the delineation of good and evil personified in the two fighters' behavior, the fickle crowd's ever-changing attitude, and much more, while all his roommates told him to just relax and enjoy the fights. This anecdote/memory of long ago came to mind as I decided to stop reading Eugene Thacker's Tentacl A beloved college teacher of mine once told me about a roommate he had in grad school who used to watch professional wrestling on TV and minutely analyze the drama he saw unfolding before his eyes: the delineation of good and evil personified in the two fighters' behavior, the fickle crowd's ever-changing attitude, and much more, while all his roommates told him to just relax and enjoy the fights. This anecdote/memory of long ago came to mind as I decided to stop reading Eugene Thacker's Tentacles Longer Than Night, in his Horror of Philosophy series. Professor Thacker likes horror movies, likes watching them and clearly would like to talk about them, and so they've become the basis of his Horror of Philosophy series. Since I don't like seeing horror movies, or even reading horror stories, reading about them is not an attractive activity, and I finally gave it up. It took me a long time to recognize this, though. Essentially, I realized the horror of philosophy that gives the series of film discussions its overall title is that nothing means anything, and the more you think and think about anything, the clearer this meaninglessness becomes. Everyone who reads pretty much knows that in one way or another anyway, which makes Professor Thacker's project not only subtly self-indulgent but also unnecessary. Let him look at and contemplate and write about horror as much as he wishes -- happily I now know I don't need to read it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Lupián

    ¡Vaya forma de cerrar esta trilogía! Los tentáculos se ciernen sobre nosotros para reflexionar sobre el Infierno de Dante y Los cantos de Maldoror del Conde de Lautréamont, pasando por Blackwood, Lovecraft, Ligotti y un sin fin de libros y películas (busca el corto "Outer Space" de Peter Tscherkassky y el libro _Vampyrotheutis Infernalis_ de Vilém Flusser). Sólo tengo dos quejas: la primera, que mencioné en el Vol. 2, es que no me gustaron varias decisiones editoriales como el tipo de fuente y s ¡Vaya forma de cerrar esta trilogía! Los tentáculos se ciernen sobre nosotros para reflexionar sobre el Infierno de Dante y Los cantos de Maldoror del Conde de Lautréamont, pasando por Blackwood, Lovecraft, Ligotti y un sin fin de libros y películas (busca el corto "Outer Space" de Peter Tscherkassky y el libro _Vampyrotheutis Infernalis_ de Vilém Flusser). Sólo tengo dos quejas: la primera, que mencioné en el Vol. 2, es que no me gustaron varias decisiones editoriales como el tipo de fuente y su tamaño (sobre todo en las citas) y el acomodo del texto. Y en cuanto a Thacker, a quien admiro, me decepcionó un poco que sólo utilizara a Todorov para definir lo fantástico.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Philip Athans

    A thought provoking end to a fascinating series, Tentacles Longer Than Night opened me up to a number of ideas that will occupy me for a long time. I can’t recommend these three books strongly enough.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    It took a while into this series for it to really win me over, but eventually it did. A must for anyone like me who is going through an attempt to smash as much of the received wisdom anthropocentric hegemony that is they have imbibed...and of course for horror fans too.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Housley

    Simply fascinating. I will be reading more of Eugene in the future.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    maldoror could very well be future heartsong

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Raymond

    I don't have a lot more to say about this volume that I didn't say for the first, but I will say that the switch (in a way) toward philosophy gave an interesting argument and that this continues to be a pretty high-quality series. Hopefully I can get my hands on the middle volume soon. I don't have a lot more to say about this volume that I didn't say for the first, but I will say that the switch (in a way) toward philosophy gave an interesting argument and that this continues to be a pretty high-quality series. Hopefully I can get my hands on the middle volume soon.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Franklin Ridgway

    Horror and thought This is thought-provoking and wide-ranging study of the limits of thought and its relation to horror in literature. Especially insightful were the discussions of Lautréamont and Junji Ito's Uzumaki. Horror and thought This is thought-provoking and wide-ranging study of the limits of thought and its relation to horror in literature. Especially insightful were the discussions of Lautréamont and Junji Ito's Uzumaki.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Evan

    Great, especially towards the end when it got more into Lovecraft. Gave me some ideas of other books to look into.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stirling

  15. 5 out of 5

    Billy Middleton

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Zeischegg

  17. 4 out of 5

    MM

  18. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Rottenberg

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris Via

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mike Thorn

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Grefe

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rhiannon

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Jane

  25. 5 out of 5

    John P.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eleanor

  27. 4 out of 5

    Troglofil

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Montgomery

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Ryan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Baker

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