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Git Version Control Cookbook - 90 Recipes to Transform your Development Workflow and Boost Productivity

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Key Features Filled with practical recipes that will teach you how to use the most advanced features of the Git system Improve your productivity by learning to work faster, more efficiently, and with more confidence Discover tips and tricks that will show you when and how to use the advanced features of Git Book Description Starting with the Git data model Key Features Filled with practical recipes that will teach you how to use the most advanced features of the Git system Improve your productivity by learning to work faster, more efficiently, and with more confidence Discover tips and tricks that will show you when and how to use the advanced features of Git Book Description Starting with the Git data model, you will learn how Git stores files and how it looks at commits. You will then learn how you can recover from mistakes; from committing on the wrong branch to recovering lost commits/files. Next, you will discover how you can force rebase on some branches and use regular Git merge on other branches. You will also learn how to extract information from the repository.As you progress through this book, you will learn how you can automate the usual Git processes by utilizing the hook system built into Git. The book also covers advanced repository management, including different options to rewrite the history of a Git repository. Finally, you will discover how you can work offline with Git, how to track what is going on behind the scenes, and how to use the stash for different purposes. What you will learn Understand the Git data model and how you can navigate the database with simple commands Learn how you can recover lost commits/files Discover how you can force rebase on some branches and use regular Git merge on other branches Extract metadata from a Git repository Familiarize yourself with Git notes Discover how you can work offline with Git Debug with Git and use various techniques to find the faulty commit About the Authors Aske Olsson has worked for Nokia for 6 years, where he was one of the leading forces behind complex tool transformation and renewal projects. Among them was a broad adoption of Git SCM, Gerrit Code Review, and Jenkins CI. Currently, Aske works at Schantz, a company developing advanced IT solutions for the financial sector. He develops and maintains their continuous delivery pipeline.Rasmus Voss specializes in continuous integration, software releasing, and process automation. His vast knowledge on these areas has been built by a 10-year career in Nokia mobile phones in Copenhagen, Denmark and Beijing, China, where he started optimizing autotesting for the Series 30 platform. Today, Rasmus has his own company VossCon, where he consults with companies on how to make the most of developers and testers by optimizing software releasing, providing visibility in the delivery chain, upgrading the tool chain, automating tedious processes, and training developers. He also holds courses on Git, Gerrit, and Jenkins. Table of Contents Navigating Git Configuration Branching, Merging, and Options Rebase Regularly and Interactively, and Other Use Cases Storing Additional Information in Your Repository Extracting Data from the Repository Enhancing Your Daily Work with Git Hooks, Aliases, and Scripts Recovering from Mistakes Repository Maintenance Patching and Offline Sharing Git Plumbing and Attributes Tips and Tricks


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Key Features Filled with practical recipes that will teach you how to use the most advanced features of the Git system Improve your productivity by learning to work faster, more efficiently, and with more confidence Discover tips and tricks that will show you when and how to use the advanced features of Git Book Description Starting with the Git data model Key Features Filled with practical recipes that will teach you how to use the most advanced features of the Git system Improve your productivity by learning to work faster, more efficiently, and with more confidence Discover tips and tricks that will show you when and how to use the advanced features of Git Book Description Starting with the Git data model, you will learn how Git stores files and how it looks at commits. You will then learn how you can recover from mistakes; from committing on the wrong branch to recovering lost commits/files. Next, you will discover how you can force rebase on some branches and use regular Git merge on other branches. You will also learn how to extract information from the repository.As you progress through this book, you will learn how you can automate the usual Git processes by utilizing the hook system built into Git. The book also covers advanced repository management, including different options to rewrite the history of a Git repository. Finally, you will discover how you can work offline with Git, how to track what is going on behind the scenes, and how to use the stash for different purposes. What you will learn Understand the Git data model and how you can navigate the database with simple commands Learn how you can recover lost commits/files Discover how you can force rebase on some branches and use regular Git merge on other branches Extract metadata from a Git repository Familiarize yourself with Git notes Discover how you can work offline with Git Debug with Git and use various techniques to find the faulty commit About the Authors Aske Olsson has worked for Nokia for 6 years, where he was one of the leading forces behind complex tool transformation and renewal projects. Among them was a broad adoption of Git SCM, Gerrit Code Review, and Jenkins CI. Currently, Aske works at Schantz, a company developing advanced IT solutions for the financial sector. He develops and maintains their continuous delivery pipeline.Rasmus Voss specializes in continuous integration, software releasing, and process automation. His vast knowledge on these areas has been built by a 10-year career in Nokia mobile phones in Copenhagen, Denmark and Beijing, China, where he started optimizing autotesting for the Series 30 platform. Today, Rasmus has his own company VossCon, where he consults with companies on how to make the most of developers and testers by optimizing software releasing, providing visibility in the delivery chain, upgrading the tool chain, automating tedious processes, and training developers. He also holds courses on Git, Gerrit, and Jenkins. Table of Contents Navigating Git Configuration Branching, Merging, and Options Rebase Regularly and Interactively, and Other Use Cases Storing Additional Information in Your Repository Extracting Data from the Repository Enhancing Your Daily Work with Git Hooks, Aliases, and Scripts Recovering from Mistakes Repository Maintenance Patching and Offline Sharing Git Plumbing and Attributes Tips and Tricks

31 review for Git Version Control Cookbook - 90 Recipes to Transform your Development Workflow and Boost Productivity

  1. 4 out of 5

    Venkatesh-Prasad

    Having read "Git in Practice" and "Git for Teams", I was familiar with most of the content of this book. That said, I did learn some new bits in this book, e.g., git scripts. However, there two issues with this book. First, the way the code is typeset in book was a big obstacle to learn from the book. I hope PacktPub will improve their code typesetting schemes -- do not use the same font/color/styling for both commands and their outputs. Second, the exposition seemed hard to follow. Again, this Having read "Git in Practice" and "Git for Teams", I was familiar with most of the content of this book. That said, I did learn some new bits in this book, e.g., git scripts. However, there two issues with this book. First, the way the code is typeset in book was a big obstacle to learn from the book. I hope PacktPub will improve their code typesetting schemes -- do not use the same font/color/styling for both commands and their outputs. Second, the exposition seemed hard to follow. Again, this is more an artifact of the format of Cookbooks from PacktPub. I'd rather they used a cookbook format (i.e., problem, solution, discussion) used by Oreilly and Manning publishers.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jascha

    Git is one of those technologies that has been there since like forever and, for a developer, it is one of the the best things invented since sliced bread. Among the most widely used version control systems, it stands out for being distributed and for how easy it makes it to create, merge and destroy branches. The spotlight it deserves since years resulted in many blog posts introducing the technology, as well as in more advanced ones covering how to best use it depending on the size and distrib Git is one of those technologies that has been there since like forever and, for a developer, it is one of the the best things invented since sliced bread. Among the most widely used version control systems, it stands out for being distributed and for how easy it makes it to create, merge and destroy branches. The spotlight it deserves since years resulted in many blog posts introducing the technology, as well as in more advanced ones covering how to best use it depending on the size and distribution of a team. On top of this, it also resulted in many titles made available to us at any decent book store. While there are indeed tons of titles to choose from, only a very limited number of them are really outstanding and deserve the title of must have. Git Version Control Cookbook is the first book that tackles the subject with the winning problem-solution approach, and is thus a good candidate to be part of that short list. Before getting into the details of the book, which, spoiler, deserves some praise, a quick note: as the title itself suggests, it's a cookbook, not an introductory text. As such, it does not teach the reader what is Git and how to clone a remote repository. The reader is expected to have a good knowledge of Git and know by heart how to clone, branch, merge, fast-forward and tag, among other things. Spanning through some twelve chapters, this co-authored book is one of those that you won't finish in an afternoon. Not unless you simply walk quickly through the pages. This book, as typical of a cookbook, is best used when sitting in front of a terminal, with a coffee cup next to the keyboard and enough time to try out the examples, writing down precious notes. As a cookbook, it delivers. The authors follow the consolidated problem-solution approach and cover different subjects, ranging from the global configuration up to patching, passing through edgy topics such as rebasing. Each recipe follows a specific pattern: the problem is introduced; the solution is presented and then explained. Finally, each recipe ends with a paragraph where the authors extend the solution adding more flavors, redirecting the reader to either online resources or the man pages. Technically the book is well written, easy to follow (as long as the concepts are already known). Proofreaders did their job. While not all the recipes will be interesting to everyone, anyone, independently of his skills, will walk away learning something new. Among the concepts that I have particularly enjoyed is pruning. Very clear and exhaustive. Despite the many good things about this book, and the fact that overall is a good pick, there are a couple of things that I did not like: first, I think way too much time is dedicated to the configuration, which is something very basic; similarly, more often than not, the same recipe is presented twice, one solved with the terminal and one with a GUI, which is instead something that I would have added to that extra paragraph at the end of each recipe. Some recipe, moreover, felt way too edge case to happen in real life. Before tying it all up, a final note: this title, just like most of the other books covering Git out there, lacks something: presenting different real life scenarios where, based on the project, team and distribution, we are presented with guidelines and best strategies to model branches and deliveries. But maybe this would deserve a book on its own. A very good book, no doubts. While not outstanding, it definitely serves well anyone working with Git. As usual, you can find more reviews on my personal blog: http://books.lostinmalloc.com. Feel free to pass by and share your thoughts!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ferdinando Santacroce

    This Git cookbook is a great companion. Like every cookbook, this tool is pretty useless if you don’t know “how to cook”; the purpose of this collection of recipes is to help a good cook to become a great chef, supplying a wide range of recipes. This book is not a “from beginning to end” kind of book; you can read it in a random way, looking for the right recipe for the situation. I really enjoyed how Aske Olsson and Rasmus Voss taken care about the “explanation” part of recipes; this is no This Git cookbook is a great companion. Like every cookbook, this tool is pretty useless if you don’t know “how to cook”; the purpose of this collection of recipes is to help a good cook to become a great chef, supplying a wide range of recipes. This book is not a “from beginning to end” kind of book; you can read it in a random way, looking for the right recipe for the situation. I really enjoyed how Aske Olsson and Rasmus Voss taken care about the “explanation” part of recipes; this is not a book where you find only commands to type mechanically, but there are wide explanations and graphics to help the reader understand what the command is about to do. The book is organized in 12 chapters, grouped by working areas. In 1st chapter there are a bunch of good recipes to improve the way you sail in the sea of a Git repository; in 2nd chapter we finally get explained the “have-to-know” config options; 3rd chapter is for the trees lovers: branching and merging will have no more secrets after this. The 4th chapter is for rebasing, a powerful feature in Git, sometimes hard to master. Have you ever heard about Git notes? If not, 5th chapter is for you. 6th chapter is for data diggers: if you like grepping data here and there, now you can learn how to do it in a Git repository. The 7th chapter illustrates Git hooks, while 8th chapter helps us to deal with common mistakes (I found this chapter very useful!). In the 9th chapter you can reach the title of “master”: you will find recipes to pruning branches, split repositories, deal with submodules and related merge operations. 10th chapter is for patching, while 11th is for low level commands. A the end, in the 12th chapter you will find a much appreciated collection of tips and trick like aliases, auto completion, stashes and so on. I recommend this book for Git users who wants to improve their skills, going deep to realize what happens under the hood when needed. If you are a newcomer, if you have little or no experience with Git you'd better read this book at a later time. For the rest, I really enjoyed the book layout: you can easily distinguish command lines from descriptive part; titles and paragraphs are highlighted properly and illustrations appears just where they are needed. Good job guys, and good job Packt too! :)

  4. 4 out of 5

    K

    If you already know Git and want to push yourself to the next level, I can definitely recommend this book. I already applied some of the techniques described in the book at my company to improve our work flow and all the developers love it. It's not the book you should get if you're new to Git of version control systems. There are no deep explanations to the techniques and the authors seem to assume you've worked with the command line and Git before. So if that's you, and you want to get better, If you already know Git and want to push yourself to the next level, I can definitely recommend this book. I already applied some of the techniques described in the book at my company to improve our work flow and all the developers love it. It's not the book you should get if you're new to Git of version control systems. There are no deep explanations to the techniques and the authors seem to assume you've worked with the command line and Git before. So if that's you, and you want to get better, then this is the book for you. The tips and tricks chapter should not be the last one, though, as it's one of the more interesting ones.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tuan Truong

  6. 5 out of 5

    Yury Antonov

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Schroeder

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shashank Sharma

  9. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Asensio

  10. 5 out of 5

    Iván

  11. 5 out of 5

    James

  12. 5 out of 5

    David

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jack Littleton

  14. 4 out of 5

    Njtrue

  15. 5 out of 5

    Manjunath Kabadi

  16. 4 out of 5

    Siddharth Mark Joseph

  17. 4 out of 5

    Peter Kahn

  18. 4 out of 5

    Q

  19. 4 out of 5

    Arijit

  20. 5 out of 5

    Fernando Matusz-coutinho

  21. 5 out of 5

    shashank

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dean D

  23. 4 out of 5

    Denis

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vikarti

  25. 5 out of 5

    Juju106

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Userbit

  29. 5 out of 5

    Fernando Sanchez

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Lalumiere

  31. 4 out of 5

    Colorado

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