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Finding Triathlon: How Endurance Sports Explain the World

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Training for and completing a triathlon is one of the most grueling life experiences anyone can have, requiring a degree of personal commitment, individual strength and iron will that few people possess. A true test of your ability to find, and then surpass your physical, mental and emotional limits, the only real analogue to triathlon…is the challenge of life itself.   I Training for and completing a triathlon is one of the most grueling life experiences anyone can have, requiring a degree of personal commitment, individual strength and iron will that few people possess. A true test of your ability to find, and then surpass your physical, mental and emotional limits, the only real analogue to triathlon…is the challenge of life itself.   In Finding Triathlon, professional athlete Scott Tinley explores the world inside and outside endurance sports, seeking answers to age-old questions. Part memoir, part cultural exploration, Tinley uses the language of sports to speak universal truths. Told through anecdotes, both personal and shared, with a critical, inquisitive, and often humorous interpretation of a life lived through the medium of sports, Tinley reflects on the sport of triathlon, honest competition, and the drive to improve ourselves as a whole, looking to understand how and why we live our lives.   Finding Triathlon is not a self-help book, and it’s not a fitness guide. Nor is it just about triathlons and triathletes. It’s about a lifestyle, a perspective, a way of looking at the world and its challenges, as you strive to better yourself and better understand yourself. Whether you’re training for the next big race or you’ve never run a mile in your life, Finding Triathlon speaks to the champion in each of us, demonstrating how making the decision to push ourselves to succeed in our dreams can affect our life, our world, and our future.


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Training for and completing a triathlon is one of the most grueling life experiences anyone can have, requiring a degree of personal commitment, individual strength and iron will that few people possess. A true test of your ability to find, and then surpass your physical, mental and emotional limits, the only real analogue to triathlon…is the challenge of life itself.   I Training for and completing a triathlon is one of the most grueling life experiences anyone can have, requiring a degree of personal commitment, individual strength and iron will that few people possess. A true test of your ability to find, and then surpass your physical, mental and emotional limits, the only real analogue to triathlon…is the challenge of life itself.   In Finding Triathlon, professional athlete Scott Tinley explores the world inside and outside endurance sports, seeking answers to age-old questions. Part memoir, part cultural exploration, Tinley uses the language of sports to speak universal truths. Told through anecdotes, both personal and shared, with a critical, inquisitive, and often humorous interpretation of a life lived through the medium of sports, Tinley reflects on the sport of triathlon, honest competition, and the drive to improve ourselves as a whole, looking to understand how and why we live our lives.   Finding Triathlon is not a self-help book, and it’s not a fitness guide. Nor is it just about triathlons and triathletes. It’s about a lifestyle, a perspective, a way of looking at the world and its challenges, as you strive to better yourself and better understand yourself. Whether you’re training for the next big race or you’ve never run a mile in your life, Finding Triathlon speaks to the champion in each of us, demonstrating how making the decision to push ourselves to succeed in our dreams can affect our life, our world, and our future.

30 review for Finding Triathlon: How Endurance Sports Explain the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Pennylope

    Ugh. I so badly wanted this to be good. It was not. It was essentially nonsense slathered together by too many Joyce-esque sentences and reusing phrases that he thinks makes him sound smart. At one point, he uses the phrase "mutual detente" 3 times within a span of about 15 pages to describe 3 separate things. It's like a kid who learns a phrase that he thinks makes him sound smart so they overuse it. Not to mention, the sub title "how endurance sports explain the world" is really not substantiv Ugh. I so badly wanted this to be good. It was not. It was essentially nonsense slathered together by too many Joyce-esque sentences and reusing phrases that he thinks makes him sound smart. At one point, he uses the phrase "mutual detente" 3 times within a span of about 15 pages to describe 3 separate things. It's like a kid who learns a phrase that he thinks makes him sound smart so they overuse it. Not to mention, the sub title "how endurance sports explain the world" is really not substantively addressed at all. If he wanted to write a memoir on his triathlon career (while simultaneously griping about being slow and old now), that is what he should have done and billed it as such. Because that is what this was. And even worse, he is a shockingly vehement Lance Armstrong apologist.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Terri Schneider

    Amidst the bling and the masses Tinley, once again, clears the way revealing foundational truths in sport. Thanks ST for your continued wisdom.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Hesse

    Slower to read than I wanted it to be, a lot of stream of consciousness about the early days of triathlon.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura Skladzinski

    The title of this book sounded so promising, but the content had nothing to do with it. This was basically a book of essays by Scott Tinley on triathlons, but in each chapter, he sounded so incredibly bitter about the sport. I get it, he's burned out... but maybe don't force yourself to write a book on something you so clearly hate? There were a few passages that I thought were interesting, but for the most part, this book was a complete dud. The title of this book sounded so promising, but the content had nothing to do with it. This was basically a book of essays by Scott Tinley on triathlons, but in each chapter, he sounded so incredibly bitter about the sport. I get it, he's burned out... but maybe don't force yourself to write a book on something you so clearly hate? There were a few passages that I thought were interesting, but for the most part, this book was a complete dud.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    One of the inventors of extreme sport writes of his participation in and his separation from Ironman triathlon. Scott Tinley wore out his body, and now balances the pain remaining against the nature of sport embedded in the modern world's collective mindset. Residual pain is easy to explain: our bodies are just not set to be put through the accumulation of insults which is the nature of most sports. Continued desire to participate, or for the spectators, to watch, is a bit harder to explain, but Tinl One of the inventors of extreme sport writes of his participation in and his separation from Ironman triathlon. Scott Tinley wore out his body, and now balances the pain remaining against the nature of sport embedded in the modern world's collective mindset. Residual pain is easy to explain: our bodies are just not set to be put through the accumulation of insults which is the nature of most sports. Continued desire to participate, or for the spectators, to watch, is a bit harder to explain, but Tinley gives some good light into the "hook" sports have on us, which is mainly that sports give us a break from time's hold on us all. This book was a Goodreads First Reads book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rob P

    Cliche after cliche. Catch phrases everywhere. I can't continue reading this, unfortunately. Every sentence seems to contain way more words than necessary. Cliche after cliche. Catch phrases everywhere. I can't continue reading this, unfortunately. Every sentence seems to contain way more words than necessary.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I have not had a chance to read this but am looking forward to kicking back and reading in one session.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan Csoke

    If you are a Sports Fanatic, this book is for you. A Very Good Read. THANK YOU GOODREADS FIRSTREADS FOR THIS FREE BOOK !!!!!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erik

  11. 5 out of 5

    John Graham

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hatherleigh Press

  13. 4 out of 5

    Justin Model

  14. 4 out of 5

    Will Perdue

  15. 4 out of 5

    Krystofer

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kay Saffe

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hasan Suel

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Clelland

  21. 5 out of 5

    kevin

  22. 5 out of 5

    Leon

  23. 5 out of 5

    John Harris

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rob Foster

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anneqrogers

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Grocock

  27. 4 out of 5

    Scott Suba

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rodney Inciong

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steve O'Connor

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Murphy

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