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Sin Boldly!: Justifying Faith for Fragile and Broken Souls

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Can faith as trusting God make a difference? Absolutelyby relieving our anxiety over self-justification and the need to scapegoat others. Sin Boldly! provides an experiential analysis of the contrast between self-justification and justification by God. We must pose the question: how can the gospel of grace provide transformation for both fragile and broken souls? This book Can faith as trusting God make a difference? Absolutelyby relieving our anxiety over self-justification and the need to scapegoat others. Sin Boldly! provides an experiential analysis of the contrast between self-justification and justification by God. We must pose the question: how can the gospel of grace provide transformation for both fragile and broken souls? This book proposes the following answer: trusting in the God of grace relieves anxiety and provides a divine vocation that transcends our moral universe with the promise of forgiveness, renewal, and resurrection. Winner of the 2017 Patricia Codron Memorial Book Award from the Pacific Coast Theological Society!


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Can faith as trusting God make a difference? Absolutelyby relieving our anxiety over self-justification and the need to scapegoat others. Sin Boldly! provides an experiential analysis of the contrast between self-justification and justification by God. We must pose the question: how can the gospel of grace provide transformation for both fragile and broken souls? This book Can faith as trusting God make a difference? Absolutelyby relieving our anxiety over self-justification and the need to scapegoat others. Sin Boldly! provides an experiential analysis of the contrast between self-justification and justification by God. We must pose the question: how can the gospel of grace provide transformation for both fragile and broken souls? This book proposes the following answer: trusting in the God of grace relieves anxiety and provides a divine vocation that transcends our moral universe with the promise of forgiveness, renewal, and resurrection. Winner of the 2017 Patricia Codron Memorial Book Award from the Pacific Coast Theological Society!

31 review for Sin Boldly!: Justifying Faith for Fragile and Broken Souls

  1. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    ”It is God’s will that our daily lives be imbued from dawn until dusk with love, compassion, care, and the pursuit of justice in an unjust world. Sometimes we miss the mark, and other times our active pursuit of justice will result in someone getting hurt.” p. 19 Peters’ book is so different from my normal reading. Usually when I read about religion, I would say it was theology for the under-educated. This is not to disparage those writers that I read, but they do not usually assume that you have ”It is God’s will that our daily lives be imbued from dawn until dusk with love, compassion, care, and the pursuit of justice in an unjust world. Sometimes we miss the mark, and other times our active pursuit of justice will result in someone getting hurt.” p. 19 Peters’ book is so different from my normal reading. Usually when I read about religion, I would say it was theology for the under-educated. This is not to disparage those writers that I read, but they do not usually assume that you have a PhD in theology, philosophy or psychology. However, thanks to the good people at Fortress Press, I was able to read a pre-publication copy of this treatise. Given that I am a life-long Lutheran, I could not pass up a book with the title Sin Boldly. I have heard that phrase for decades and I even use it now and again when someone is unsure of a decision. What Luther actually said is this ”God does not save those who are only imaginary sinners. Be a sinner, and let your sins be strong, but let your trust in Christ be stronger, and rejoice in Christ who is the victor over sin, death, and the world." Peters takes this well-worn Lutheran phrase and shows his readers that sinning boldly is an essential part of being a Christian. This book tackles the question, “Can faith make one’s daily life better?” I believe that Peters does show us that faith is indispensable to a life well lived. This book is not for the faint-hearted. Peters has a very logical argument and he explains it well. However, it is written for theologians and others who study in this area. I suspect that readers who are presently in seminary would have fewer problems reading this. They have been using their brains in their class work. I had trouble with this book, but that is not Peters’ fault. My brain is a bit rusty. I really had to work to follow all that Peters has to say – it was worth every minute. I appreciate what Peters is telling us. His words about self-justification and God’s actual justification hit home for me. I can’t do life by myself – which for me means I need God’s help. I realize that there are plenty of readers who are not interested in religion or spirituality. This book is not for them. If you are interested in knowing more about what Lutherans believe or what contemporary theology looks like, this may be for you.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Marr

    This book is written in a flamboyant style by a committed Lutheran who likes his church's founder a lot. The exuberance is a bit over the top for my tastes but that is a lot better than a monotone that puts me to sleep no matter how interesting theology could be. The two categories Peters uses the most are "fragile souls" and "broken souls." Calling some (many) people "frail souls" has the danger of being condescending & it sort of us, but there is a strong paradox in what this frailty entails. This book is written in a flamboyant style by a committed Lutheran who likes his church's founder a lot. The exuberance is a bit over the top for my tastes but that is a lot better than a monotone that puts me to sleep no matter how interesting theology could be. The two categories Peters uses the most are "fragile souls" and "broken souls." Calling some (many) people "frail souls" has the danger of being condescending & it sort of us, but there is a strong paradox in what this frailty entails. "Fragile souls" are people who try too hard to be "strong souls" and it is precisely this that makes them "fragile." That is, "fragile souls" try to justify themselves which is about the biggest No-No in Martin Luther's books. Luther & Peters are quite right that true strength comes from what God gives us when we stop trying to prove to ourselves how virtuous and wonderful we are & falling on our faces every time we go that route. Peters's discussion of "broken souls" is the most helpful part of the book & the most compassionate. Here he deals with people who are broken through trauma, with quite a strong emphasis on war trauma, something the U.S. has specialized in creating the past few decades. There is much fruitful interaction with major modern thinkers which is fruitful but it adds to the challenges many readers outside of academia may find with this book. For those interested in René Girard (or who might become so) there is and extended discussion of Girard's thesis about what he called the scapegoating mechanism.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

  4. 5 out of 5

    Beau

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mike Elliott

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  9. 4 out of 5

    Neil White

  10. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rev. Haberer

  12. 5 out of 5

    Harley Mathews

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cat

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Svihel

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emilu

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christina Miller

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Cuellar

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Luebbe

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Grumbling

  20. 5 out of 5

    Noah Dunsmore

  21. 4 out of 5

    Noah

  22. 5 out of 5

    Clare

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mark Cappetta

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nou

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Olkowski

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  28. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Hall

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robby Jones

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  31. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Kroelinger

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