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Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases (Illustrated): Including "The Red Record" and "Mob Rule in New Orleans"

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• Illustrated edition • Ten new original drawings and art that starkly illustrate the message of this work • Appendix with public domain photos of lynchings • Includes two additional essays: "The Red Record," and "Mob Rule in New Orleans" This is perhaps the most important civil rights classic you have never read. First published in 1892, Ida B. Wells' scathing essay on • Illustrated edition • Ten new original drawings and art that starkly illustrate the message of this work • Appendix with public domain photos of lynchings • Includes two additional essays: "The Red Record," and "Mob Rule in New Orleans" This is perhaps the most important civil rights classic you have never read. First published in 1892, Ida B. Wells' scathing essay on the horrors of lynching and, more importantly, the upholding of these atrocities by law in the southern United States years after the Civil War had already been won, serves now as an important reminder of our not-too-distant past and its effects on our present racial tensions. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, so it is appropriate that we remember one of the early leaders of the African-American Civil Rights Movement with her own first-hand account of lynching and her eloquent outrage expressed here. This book includes her famous essay of 6 short sections along with a preface by the author and a letter from Frederick Douglass praising her for her courage in writing this. This edition includes an appendix of several public-domain photographs of lynchings, which, however disturbing, show how little time has passed since these atrocities occurred. Recent events beg us to ask ourselves, how far have we come? It may be time to reexamine this, beginning with Ms. Well's treatise. This edition of Southern Horrors includes two other important essays by Ida B. Wells on the same subject of lynching. The two essays that follow “Southern Horrors” elaborate and strengthen the argument Wells lays out in her first, more famous tract and readers deserve to have all three available within the same book. SOUTHERN HORRORS: Lynch Law in All Its Phases THE RED RECORD: Tabulated Statistics and Alleged Causes of Lynching in the United States MOB RULE IN NEW ORLEANS: Robert Charles and His Fight to Death, the Story of his Life, Burning Human Beings Alive, and Other Lynching Statistics


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• Illustrated edition • Ten new original drawings and art that starkly illustrate the message of this work • Appendix with public domain photos of lynchings • Includes two additional essays: "The Red Record," and "Mob Rule in New Orleans" This is perhaps the most important civil rights classic you have never read. First published in 1892, Ida B. Wells' scathing essay on • Illustrated edition • Ten new original drawings and art that starkly illustrate the message of this work • Appendix with public domain photos of lynchings • Includes two additional essays: "The Red Record," and "Mob Rule in New Orleans" This is perhaps the most important civil rights classic you have never read. First published in 1892, Ida B. Wells' scathing essay on the horrors of lynching and, more importantly, the upholding of these atrocities by law in the southern United States years after the Civil War had already been won, serves now as an important reminder of our not-too-distant past and its effects on our present racial tensions. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, so it is appropriate that we remember one of the early leaders of the African-American Civil Rights Movement with her own first-hand account of lynching and her eloquent outrage expressed here. This book includes her famous essay of 6 short sections along with a preface by the author and a letter from Frederick Douglass praising her for her courage in writing this. This edition includes an appendix of several public-domain photographs of lynchings, which, however disturbing, show how little time has passed since these atrocities occurred. Recent events beg us to ask ourselves, how far have we come? It may be time to reexamine this, beginning with Ms. Well's treatise. This edition of Southern Horrors includes two other important essays by Ida B. Wells on the same subject of lynching. The two essays that follow “Southern Horrors” elaborate and strengthen the argument Wells lays out in her first, more famous tract and readers deserve to have all three available within the same book. SOUTHERN HORRORS: Lynch Law in All Its Phases THE RED RECORD: Tabulated Statistics and Alleged Causes of Lynching in the United States MOB RULE IN NEW ORLEANS: Robert Charles and His Fight to Death, the Story of his Life, Burning Human Beings Alive, and Other Lynching Statistics

30 review for Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases (Illustrated): Including "The Red Record" and "Mob Rule in New Orleans"

  1. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    Major Fields: 13/133 (10% done!) "Men and women of America, are you proud of this record which the Anglo-Saxon race has made for itself? Your silence seems to say that you are. Your silence encourages a continuance of this sort of horror." The facsimiles of "Southern Horrors" (1892), "A Red Record" (1895), and "Mob Rule in New Orleans" (1900) act as an alternative archive to reframe the predominance of Lynch Law and the unlawful murder of black men, women, and children in the American South. Wells Major Fields: 13/133 (10% done!) "Men and women of America, are you proud of this record which the Anglo-Saxon race has made for itself? Your silence seems to say that you are. Your silence encourages a continuance of this sort of horror." The facsimiles of "Southern Horrors" (1892), "A Red Record" (1895), and "Mob Rule in New Orleans" (1900) act as an alternative archive to reframe the predominance of Lynch Law and the unlawful murder of black men, women, and children in the American South. Wells primarily uses the Chicago Tribune to source her facts in order to use white publications and news outlets so as not to be accused of exaggeration or fabrication. By placing the statistics of lynchings next to the more narrative accounts of many different lynchings, Wells intends to dismantle the myths and justifications given for lynchings, notably the rape of white women by black men. She proves through repetition and an journalistic objectivity that the majority of black citizens killed by lynch mobs were innocent and that their murders are left unpunished. These documents prove that "objectivity" it itself subjective, and that how facts and events are framed and presented results in drastically different conclusions.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paula W

    This edition includes two lesser known works by the author around the same subject. As a woman born and raised in Mississippi, I am well aware of the southern lynching history, and this is a very powerful work written by a dedicated woman.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gordon

    Every high school child should read this book. In places it might be glossed over because it is redundant. Lynching was a way of life in America at the turn of the Twentieth Century. As Wells-Barnett points out, although most whites tried to say that they didn't want to discuss lynching because it would drag the reputations of outraged white women through the mire, the large majority of lynchings were done, well they were done because white people felt like lynching or shooting or burning some b Every high school child should read this book. In places it might be glossed over because it is redundant. Lynching was a way of life in America at the turn of the Twentieth Century. As Wells-Barnett points out, although most whites tried to say that they didn't want to discuss lynching because it would drag the reputations of outraged white women through the mire, the large majority of lynchings were done, well they were done because white people felt like lynching or shooting or burning some black people just to teach them their place. I won't ruin the book or the lively language for the reader. For the first time in years, I wanted to write a screenplay that starred one of the men described in the section Mob Rule in New Orleans, Robert Charles. Ida B. allows the white press to describe him as a desperado and cur and then in a few, clear, sharp pages she shows a man of quiet, solid courage who just wanted to be left alone before he was attacked by police for sitting while being black. Oddly enough, he does not respond with cowering fear but with solid determination to take a lot of white people with him. The ensuing pages is ripped for an adventure novel. That alone is worth the read. However, it is the character of Wells-Barnett, who was born to slaves in 1862, and rose to chafe WEB Dubois with her radicalism, that made me amazed and proud to be an American. Her charming assertion that many black men were lynched because Southern women liked their "charms" was enough for the South to guarantee that she would be lynched if she returned home. It made me love her.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dreamybee

    I picked this up after reading The Defender: How the Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America because Ida B. Wells-Barnett's writings and her activism were cited throughout, and I wanted to get a more in-depth look at her work. After three of her acquaintances were lynched for standing up to an attack on their store, Wells-Barnett became very active in her anti-lynching campaign. She took on the then-popular notion that lynching was only done to protect the honor of women who had been "outraged I picked this up after reading The Defender: How the Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America because Ida B. Wells-Barnett's writings and her activism were cited throughout, and I wanted to get a more in-depth look at her work. After three of her acquaintances were lynched for standing up to an attack on their store, Wells-Barnett became very active in her anti-lynching campaign. She took on the then-popular notion that lynching was only done to protect the honor of women who had been "outraged," the term that Wells-Barnett uses throughout her writings--I'm not sure if this meant rape or if it was meant to cover physical assaults in general, but the implication often seemed to be of rape. Of course, it wasn't women's honor, but white women's honor that everyone was hell-bent on protecting, as very few white men ever went to trial or were sentenced for outraging black women or children. Wells-Barnett cites many cases illustrating this fact, like the lynching of Eph. Grizzard, a black man charged with raping a white woman. "He was taken from the jail, with Governor Buchanan and the police and militia standing by, dragged through the streets in broad daylight, knives plunged into him at every step, and with every fiendish cruelty that a frenzied mob could devise, he was at last swung out on the bridge with hands cut to pieces as he tried to climb up the stanchions." As Wells-Barnett points out, "At the very moment when these civilized whites were announcing their determination 'to protect their wives and daughters,' by murdering Grizzard, a white man was in the same jail for raping eight-year-old Maggie Reese, a colored girl. He was not harmed." (118) And why would he have been? As "[a] leading journal in South Carolina" pointed out, "'it is not the same thing for a white man to assault a colored woman as for a colored man to assault a white woman, because the colored woman had no finer feelings nor virtue to be outraged.'" (117). The prevailing mentality at the time insisted that no consensual relation could exist between a white woman and a black man. One case cited from 1892 reads "If Lillie Bailey, a rather pretty white girl, seventeen years of age, who is now at the city hospital, would be somewhat less reserved about her disgrace there would be some very nauseating details in the story of her life. She is the mother of a little coon. The truth might reveal fearful depravity or the evidence of a rank outrage. She will not divulge the name of the man who has left such black evidence of her disgrace, and in fact says it is a matter in which there can be no interest to the outside world." (111). So those were the only options when a mixed-race baby was born, mental illness on the part of the mother or rape. Ida B. Wells-Barnett called bullshit on that and put forth the theory that some white women might willingly be with black men. This got her paper, The Memphis Free Speech, burned to the ground and probably would have gotten her killed as well had she not been out of town at the time of publication. She then proceeded to lay out her case, often using newspaper reports from white writers in white publications (in other words, reports that other white people couldn't refute), that not only were there cases of white women willingly engaging in relations with black men, but that rape was not the only accustion that could get someone lynched (only about a third of lynchings reported were rape-related). Lynchings were also linked to other serious crimes like murder and arson, but were also carried out for things like "enticing servant away," "writing letter to a white woman," "conjuring," or for "no offense." So...that excuse about the honor of women and children...a little shaky. Wells-Barnett goes on to excoriate the hypocrisy of this excuse with the following (on which my notes just say, "Daaaaaaaamn!"): "To justify their own barbarism they assume a chivalry which they do not possess. True chivalry respects all womanhood, and no one who reads the record, as it is written in the faces of the million mulattoes in the South, will for a minute conceive that the soutern white man had a very chivalrous regard for the honor due the women of his own race or respect for the womanhood which circumstances placed in his power. That chivalry which is 'most sensitive concerning the honor of women' can hope for but little respect from the civilized world, when it confines itself entirely to the women who happen to be white." (62). It is striking to me that "protecting our women and children" is still the refrain that gets trotted out whenever people want to pass laws which blame targeted groups for criminal activity while ignoring that same activity amongst its own. While lynching itself was not legal, many people were willing to look the other way when they thought that it was only being done to the most heinous criminals, but Wells-Barnett's reporting forced people to admit that perhaps vigilante justice was getting a bit out of control. She addressed the subject of vigilante justice itself as well. She was not arguing that white people should not be able to exact justice for wrongs done to them by black people, but she did insist that it be done within the scope of the law. Not only did many lynchings take place based on the mere charge of a crime having been committed, before any sort of legal trial had taken place, but they were often advertised in the local papers (so they were not surprise attacks that nobody knew to guard against); and in the case of Henry Smith, "[e]xcursions were run by all the railroads, and the mayor of the town gave the children a holiday so that they might see the sight." (199). "The sight" was a man who had been deemed an imbecile being burned alive after the father, brother, and uncle of his victim spent nearly an hour using red-hot irons to burn out his eyes and cook his toungue. You know, good old-fashioned, wholesome family fun. The last section of the book focuses mainly on an event in New Orleans where a black man was sitting on a stoop when a police officer approached him and became abusive. He shot the officer in what was claimed to be self-defense. He ran away from the scene, the cop later died, and a manhunt was on. The town went insane and numerous black citizens were brutally murdered; some were just unfortunate enough to be present when a vindictive mob rolled through and some were actively sought out for abuse. The man was eventually found and gunned down after having shot many others in pursuit, and while many people would say, "Why didn't he just cooperate with the cop?" or "If he hadn't run in the first place, none of this would have happened," this case exemplifies the worst of what can happen when citizens don't think they will receive a fair trial and when vigilante justice is allowed to run amok. This man knew that as a black man who had shot a white cop in 1900 New Orleans there was NO WAY he was going to receive a fair trial if he even got a trial at all. From that point on, he was running for his life. When Wells-Barnett tried to bring attention to lynching in America, it fell on many deaf ears. Thinking that international pressure would help, she began to plead her case abroad. While she did gain some support, she also ran up against "criticism of the movement appealing to the English people for sympathy and support in our crusade against Lynch Law that our action was unpatriotic, vindictive and useless." (121). It seems to me that when pointing out atrocities being done to your people gets you labled as unpatriotic and vindictive, it's a fairly good indication that you're on the right path. This book is a compilation of three of Wells-Barnett's writings that were published between 1892 and 1900, so there was a lot of overlap--one case might be listed in one writing as an example of mob rule and in another as a case of a human being being burned alive. By the way, there's an entire section called "Burning Human Beings Alive" because that was a thing that happened often enough to earn its own category. There also seem to be some discrepacies in numbers. For example, the Chicago Tribune's lynching records from 1882-1899 show 2,533 lynchings (201-2). Near the beginning of the book, Wells-Barnett claims there were about 10,000 lynchings between 1864-1894 (58). In another section she breaks out 1894's lynchings by offense (134 total) and by month (197 total), neither number of which agrees with the Chicago Tribune's number of 190. So, I wish there had been some more explanation to how she came up with these figures, but given the time and manner of this publication and the importance of its subject, I'm willing to allow some leeway here. This is one of those points in history that I know about...generally. I know lynchings happened, I know they were brutal, I know they were outside the law, but anytime I read about the specifics of these cases, it is shocking, not because I don't think that people are capable of this kind of thing or because I am surprised that it happened, but because I think that people are still capable of this kind of thing, because I can't imagine telling somebody who comes from this type of history to "get over it already." White people did this shit. While none of us today can be held personally accountable for any of the things that happened 100 years ago...or 50 years ago for that matter--well, OK, maybe some of us COULD be held personally responsible--we also need to be much better about acknowledging that it happened, acknowedging that it was awful, understanding that while your history might consist of stories of your great-great-grandfather who was a decorated general in the Civil War, other people's history is that their ancestors, the people of whom they are a part, were brutally beaten, burned alive, and had pieces of their bodies cut off and taken away as souvenirs because of the color of their skin and that the attitudes that allowed it to happen then are not that far below the surface in a lot of places now.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sirad

    One of the best (political theory) books I've read. Ever. Wells is very purposeful in her writing style and explains how the guise of lynchings to protect white women is merely a pretext for maintaining the patriarchy of the white man. One of the best (political theory) books I've read. Ever. Wells is very purposeful in her writing style and explains how the guise of lynchings to protect white women is merely a pretext for maintaining the patriarchy of the white man.

  6. 4 out of 5

    P

    Boring. Read for class.

  7. 5 out of 5

    R.K. Byers

    the Robert Charles story is one of the most incredible things I've ever read anywhere. the Robert Charles story is one of the most incredible things I've ever read anywhere.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Viola

    Ida B. Wells was a journalist, public speaker, and community activist. See also three pamphlets that constitute her major works during the anti-lynching movement: Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases, A Red Record, Mob Rule in New Orleans. Paperback, 228 pages Published August 15th 1996 by Bedford/St. Martin's (first published May 1st 1996) Southern Horrors and Other Writings: The Anti-Lynching Campaign of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1900 ISBN 0312116950 (ISBN13: 9780312116958) See also (Ida B Well Ida B. Wells was a journalist, public speaker, and community activist. See also three pamphlets that constitute her major works during the anti-lynching movement: Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases, A Red Record, Mob Rule in New Orleans. Paperback, 228 pages Published August 15th 1996 by Bedford/St. Martin's (first published May 1st 1996) Southern Horrors and Other Writings: The Anti-Lynching Campaign of Ida B. Wells, 1892-1900 ISBN 0312116950 (ISBN13: 9780312116958) See also (Ida B Wells ) https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/auth... https://archive.org/search.php?query=... ++++++ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ida_B._... Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931) was an investigative journalist, educator, and early leader in the civil rights movement. She was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People(NAACP). [1] Over the course of a lifetime dedicated to combating prejudice and violence, and the fight for African-American equality, especially that of women, Wells arguably became the most famous Black woman in America. [2] Born Ida Bell Wells July 16, 1862 Holly Springs, Mississippi, U.S. Died March 25, 1931(aged 68) Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Burial place Oak Woods Cemetery Ida Bell Wells-Barnett "Iola" (pen name) Born into slavery in Holly Springs, Mississippi, Wells was freed by the Emancipation Proclamation during the American Civil War. At the age of 16, she lost both her parents and her infant brother in the 1878 yellow fever epidemic. She went to work and kept the rest of the family together with the help of her grandmother. Later, moving with some of her siblings to Memphis, Tennessee, she found better pay as a teacher. Soon, Wells co-owned and wrote for the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight newspaper. Her reporting covered incidents of racial segregation and inequality. In the 1890s, Wells documented lynching in the United States in articles and through her pamphlet called Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in all its Phases, investigating frequent claims of Whites that lynchings were reserved for Black criminals only. Wells exposed lynching as a barbaric practice of Whites in the South used to intimidate and oppress African Americans who created economic and political competition—and a subsequent threat of loss of power—for Whites. A White mob destroyed her newspaper office and presses as her investigative reporting was carried nationally in Black-owned newspapers. Subjected to continued threats, Wells left Memphis for Chicago. She married Ferdinand L. Barnett in 1895 and had a family while continuing her work writing, speaking, and organizing for civil rights and the women's movement for the rest of her life. Wells was outspoken regarding her beliefs as a Black female activist and faced regular public disapproval, sometimes including from other leaders within the civil rights movement and the women's suffrage movement. She was active in women's rights and the women's suffrage movement, establishing several notable women's organisations. A skilled and persuasive speaker, Wells traveled nationally and internationally on lecture tours. (3] In 2020, Wells was posthumously honored with a Pulitzer Prize special citation "for her outstanding and courageous reporting on the horrific and vicious violence against African Americans during the era of lynching." [4]

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leif Kurth

    To better understand America's culture, a culture based in large part on the idea of White superiority, one must learn the history of our nation. Ida B. Wells-Barnett provides a look into the harsh realities faced by Communities of Color, in the former Confederate States. On top of the numerous policies/laws/regulations that were implemented to prevent full inclusion, African Americans constantly had to worry about being caught up in the mob justice that controlled most rural areas. The mere act To better understand America's culture, a culture based in large part on the idea of White superiority, one must learn the history of our nation. Ida B. Wells-Barnett provides a look into the harsh realities faced by Communities of Color, in the former Confederate States. On top of the numerous policies/laws/regulations that were implemented to prevent full inclusion, African Americans constantly had to worry about being caught up in the mob justice that controlled most rural areas. The mere act of being accused of a crime, if Black, was often enough to warrant a lynching. The 1000's of Black Americans who were killed in this way, with no legal representation, not even a kangaroo type court, testifies to a cultural legacy that has yet to answer for the crimes they've committed against all of humanity.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kw

    Important and necessary stepping stone in the history of Black Transformative Justice. This is not one continuous book, but three (sometimes repetitive) pamphlets orig. published approx. 1892-1900. I had trouble with: Wells-Barnett's appeals to American/ Christian exceptionalism; her trust that "law and order" world be fair to Black people; and her adherence to patriarchal gender roles. In short, it's worth reading Wells-Barnett since she was the leading anti-lynching activist of her time... but Important and necessary stepping stone in the history of Black Transformative Justice. This is not one continuous book, but three (sometimes repetitive) pamphlets orig. published approx. 1892-1900. I had trouble with: Wells-Barnett's appeals to American/ Christian exceptionalism; her trust that "law and order" world be fair to Black people; and her adherence to patriarchal gender roles. In short, it's worth reading Wells-Barnett since she was the leading anti-lynching activist of her time... but she was still very much of her time in her view of the larger context of lynching.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    Bone-chilling sickening details of lynching. She documents 100-200 cases for every year from 1882-1899. She also documents the alleged reasons from "no reason" to "being saucy" to "alleged rape". I like the way she matter-of-factly confronts the lies and the contradictions of the accusers' claims. This book should be required reading for all citizens. I assume that most or all of the victims mentioned in the book are honored in the recently opened National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgo Bone-chilling sickening details of lynching. She documents 100-200 cases for every year from 1882-1899. She also documents the alleged reasons from "no reason" to "being saucy" to "alleged rape". I like the way she matter-of-factly confronts the lies and the contradictions of the accusers' claims. This book should be required reading for all citizens. I assume that most or all of the victims mentioned in the book are honored in the recently opened National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama. This book may have served as a way to identify some of the victims.... I'm glad there is a monument to these people who were just trying to live in peace and were so unjustly and cruelly murdered.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Corin

    Brutal and necessary.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lovely Fortune

    For America in World Civ III Interesting take on racial double standards during the early 1900s from the voice of a prominent African-American figure in journalism and civil rights.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chuck

    Another one those books that rings as true today as it did when it was written.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hi Phan

    The seer horrors and injustice uncovered by this book is beyond infuriating. To think that this is only the scrap of the surface.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Leone Davidson

    Ida Wells was the editor of a small newspaper when she wrote this excellent history of lynchings in the United States after the Civil War. HIGHLY recommend!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Horrifying! This is a true accounting of "Lynch Law" in the South after the freeing of the slaves by President Lincoln via the Emancipation Proclamation. There was no "due process of law" for Negroes in the South. Many innocent people were murdered by mobs. The reality of "Lynch Law" was absolutely horrendous! Although this book was written well over 100 years ago, it is a testament to the horrors that took place in the lives of free men who just happened to be Negro. I highly recommend this boo Horrifying! This is a true accounting of "Lynch Law" in the South after the freeing of the slaves by President Lincoln via the Emancipation Proclamation. There was no "due process of law" for Negroes in the South. Many innocent people were murdered by mobs. The reality of "Lynch Law" was absolutely horrendous! Although this book was written well over 100 years ago, it is a testament to the horrors that took place in the lives of free men who just happened to be Negro. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has the courage to face the realities of Negro life in the last part of 19th century America.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephen V.

    Powerful & well informative.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Ida B. seriously ROCKS. Like Jonathan Swift, but tougher and fiercer.

  20. 5 out of 5

    rosalind

  21. 5 out of 5

    dlpoetx

  22. 4 out of 5

    Pink Ivory

  23. 5 out of 5

    I Green

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jackie (No Bent Spines)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Dunbar

  27. 5 out of 5

    hordur bergsteinsson

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kavitha Iyengar

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jacki

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brian Harris

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