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The Magician

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Alternative Cover Edition of ISBN 9780552562539 other edition found here After fleeing Ojai, Nicholas, Sophie, Josh, and Scatty emerge in Paris, the City of Lights. Home for Nicholas Flamel. Only this homecoming is anything but sweet. Perenelle is still locked up back in Alcatraz and Paris is teeming with enemies. Niccolo Machiavelli, immortal author and celebrated art coll Alternative Cover Edition of ISBN 9780552562539 other edition found here After fleeing Ojai, Nicholas, Sophie, Josh, and Scatty emerge in Paris, the City of Lights. Home for Nicholas Flamel. Only this homecoming is anything but sweet. Perenelle is still locked up back in Alcatraz and Paris is teeming with enemies. Niccolo Machiavelli, immortal author and celebrated art collector, is working for Dee. He’s after them, and time is running out for Nicholas and Perenelle. For every day spent without the Book of Abraham the Mage, they age one year-their magic becoming weaker and their bodies more frail. For Flamel, the Prophecy is becoming more and more clear. It’s time for Sophie to learn the second elemental magic: Fire Magic. And there’s only one man who can teach it to her: Flamel’s old student, the Comte de Saint-Germain-alchemist, magician, and rock star. Josh and Sophie Newman are the world’s only hope-if they don’t turn on each other first.


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Alternative Cover Edition of ISBN 9780552562539 other edition found here After fleeing Ojai, Nicholas, Sophie, Josh, and Scatty emerge in Paris, the City of Lights. Home for Nicholas Flamel. Only this homecoming is anything but sweet. Perenelle is still locked up back in Alcatraz and Paris is teeming with enemies. Niccolo Machiavelli, immortal author and celebrated art coll Alternative Cover Edition of ISBN 9780552562539 other edition found here After fleeing Ojai, Nicholas, Sophie, Josh, and Scatty emerge in Paris, the City of Lights. Home for Nicholas Flamel. Only this homecoming is anything but sweet. Perenelle is still locked up back in Alcatraz and Paris is teeming with enemies. Niccolo Machiavelli, immortal author and celebrated art collector, is working for Dee. He’s after them, and time is running out for Nicholas and Perenelle. For every day spent without the Book of Abraham the Mage, they age one year-their magic becoming weaker and their bodies more frail. For Flamel, the Prophecy is becoming more and more clear. It’s time for Sophie to learn the second elemental magic: Fire Magic. And there’s only one man who can teach it to her: Flamel’s old student, the Comte de Saint-Germain-alchemist, magician, and rock star. Josh and Sophie Newman are the world’s only hope-if they don’t turn on each other first.

30 review for The Magician

  1. 4 out of 5

    Choko

    OK, the story is not bad, but that boy is bugging the heck out of me!!! He is annoying and the sister is just a very little tad better... Will give a chance to the next one...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Okay, well I gave two stars to The Alchemyst which is book one in the series and basically thought that it was a bit childish and I probably would not read book 2. The I saw book 2 has a group rating over 4 and thought "well it can't be that bad". So I read it and it was certainly better than book 1. It still wasn't really good though. The story is okay. The magic is that irritating kind where people can do incredible things but then they have to eat or sleep before they can do anything else. An Okay, well I gave two stars to The Alchemyst which is book one in the series and basically thought that it was a bit childish and I probably would not read book 2. The I saw book 2 has a group rating over 4 and thought "well it can't be that bad". So I read it and it was certainly better than book 1. It still wasn't really good though. The story is okay. The magic is that irritating kind where people can do incredible things but then they have to eat or sleep before they can do anything else. And the baddies never seem to have those issues. Some of the characters are a bit out there too. Machiavelli? Joan of Arc? Why? Sorry - I am running away with criticisms again. This is not a bad book. It is really okay. And in a while I might be able to read book 3.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Magician, (The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel #2), Michael Scott The Magician is a fantasy novel by Michael Scott. It is the sequel to The Alchemyst, and the second installment in the six part book series, The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel. Sophie and Josh Newman – 15-year-old twins – are in Paris with the alchemyst, Nicholas Flamel, and his friend, Scathach. They now face Niccolò Machiavelli and his colleague, but also rival, John Dee, who both work for the Dark Elders. Ma The Magician, (The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel #2), Michael Scott The Magician is a fantasy novel by Michael Scott. It is the sequel to The Alchemyst, and the second installment in the six part book series, The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel. Sophie and Josh Newman – 15-year-old twins – are in Paris with the alchemyst, Nicholas Flamel, and his friend, Scathach. They now face Niccolò Machiavelli and his colleague, but also rival, John Dee, who both work for the Dark Elders. Machiavelli is plotting to capture the twins and Flamel with the missing pages of the Codex – or Book of Abraham the Mage – before Dee can arrive in France from San Francisco. The twins seek out a friend and student to Nicholas, Comte de Saint-Germain, who teaches Sophie to use the elemental magic of Fire. Saint-Germain's wife, Joan of Arc, helps Sophie to learn to control her aura and to sort out the Witch of Endor's memories from her own. Josh is given the legendary stone sword Clarent, twin blade of Excalibur, by Nicholas. Clarent is an ancient Fire Elemental sword. Josh, Joan, and Scathach encounter three Disir, more commonly referred to as Valkyries. The Disir are ancient enemies of Scathach and bring along the soul-devouring Nidhogg, a ferocious monster once trapped in the roots of Yggdrasil – the world tree. The monster was freed after Dee destroyed Yggdrasil and attacks Scathach but fails to slay her. Instead, it captures Scathach in its claws, but flees with Scathach when the ancient sword Clarent, wielded by Josh, wounds it. Meanwhile, Nicholas' wife, Perenelle Flamel, who had been captured, is taken to Alcatraz as a prisoner. ... تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز چهارم ماه سپتامبر سال 2012 میلادی عنوان: جادوگر؛ نویسنده: مایکل اسکات ؛ مترجم: پونه اشجع؛ تهران: بهنام، ‏‫1390؛ در 487 ص؛ شابک: 9789645668738؛ چاپ دوم 1392؛ چاپ سوم 1395؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان ایرلندی - سده 21 م من در حال مرگ هستم. پرنل هم در حال مرگ است. طلسمی که ششصد سال ما را زنده نگه داشته است، رفته رفته رنگ می‌بازد و هر روز که می‌گذرد به اندازه‌ ی یک سال پیر می‌شویم. برای ساختن معجون جاودانگی به کودکس، کتاب آبراهام دانشمند، احتیاج دارم. بدون کتاب تنها کمتر از یک ماه فرصت زندگی خواهیم داشت. اما اتفاقهای زیادی در یک ماه میتواند رخ دهد، دی و اربابان خبیثش سرانجام کتاب را به چنگ آورده‌ اند؛ پرنل عزیز مرا ربوده‌ اند؛ و به‌ خوبی می‌دانند که من و او زمان زیادی زنده نخواهیم ماند. اما مسلما آرام نخواهند نشست. هنوز تمام کتاب را به دست نیاورده‌ اند. نقل نمونه متن: (شنبه 2 ژوئن: فصل اول: مزایده ی بنیاد خیریه بعد از نیمه شب و در پایان ضیافت شام شروع شده بود؛ حالا ساعت چهار صبح بود و مزایده رو به اتمام. آنطور که صفحه نمایش پشت سر مجری معروف ـ بازیگری که سالها در فیلم ای جیمز باند نقش اول را بازی میکرد ـ نشان میداد مجموع ارزش اجناس به مزایده گذاشته شده از مرز یک میلیون یورو گذشته بود. - کالای شماره ی دویست و ده، یک جفت نقاب کابوکی ژاپنی متعلق به اوایل قرن نوزدهم. موجی از هیجان، جمعیت حاضر در سالن را فراگرفت. نقابهای کابوکی که با سنگهای قیمتی تزیین شده بودند، بهترین وسیله ی به مزایده گذاشته شده ی آن شب بودند و انتظار میرفت با قیمتی بیش از نیم میلیون یورو به فروش برسند. اما مرد لاغر، بلندقد و موسفیدی که در انتهای سالن ایستاده بود، حاضر بود تا دو برابر آن قیمت را برای نقابها پیشنهاد بدهد. نیکولو ماکیاولی دور از جمعیت، دست به سینه ایستاده بود و مواظب بود تا کت و شلوار مشکی دست دوز ابریشمی اش چروک نشود. چشمان سرد و طوسی رنگش روی بقیه ی پیشنهاد دهنده ها میچرخید و با دقت آنها را ارزیابی میکرد. از بین همه ی خریدارها فقط پنج نفر بودند، که واقعاً طالب نقابهای ژاپنی بودند: دو نفر کلکسیونر شخصی مثل خودش، یک نفر از افراد دون پایه ی دربار یکی از کشورهای اروپایی، یک بازیگر معروف آمریکایی و یک دلال عتیقه جات کانادایی. بقیه شرکت کننده ها یا خسته بودند یا تمام پولهایشان را خرج کرده بودند و یا علاقه ای نداشتند برای چنان ماسکهای غیرجذابی هزینه کنند. ماکیاولی به ماسکها علاقه داشت. مدتها بود که به جمع کردن آنها مشغول بود و برای کامل کردن کلکسیونش به این یک جفت ماسک ژاپنیِ خاص نیاز داشت. این ماسکها یک بار در سال 1898 میلادی در وین به مزایده گذاشته شده بودند. آن سال ماکیاولی مزایده را به یک شاهزاده ی روس باخته بود. اما او با صبوری بسیار منتظر مانده بود؛ و حالا ماسکها بعد از درگذشت شاهزاده و تمام بازمانده هایش، دوباره به مزایده گذاشته شده بودند. ماکیاولی خوب میدانست که در مزایده ی بعدی هم شرکت خواهد کرد: این یکی از مزایای جاودانگی بود. - نظرتون چیه که مزایده رو با قیمت صدهزار یورو شروع کنیم؟ ماکیاولی با حرکت سر موافقتش را به مجری اعلام کرد. مجری هم در جواب، سری تکان داد و گفت: «مزایده رو با پیشنهاد صدهزار یورویی موسیو ماکیاولی که یکی از حمایت کننده های سخاوتمند موسسه هستن شروع میکنیم.» صدای دست زدن حضار در اتاق پیچید. عده ای برگشتند و عینکها را بالا زدند تا ماکیاولی را ببینند. نیکولو با لبخند مودبانه ای به کنجکاویشان پاسخ داد. مجری پرسید: «صدوده؟» یکی از کلکسیونرهای شخصی، دستش را به آرامی بالا برد. - صدوبیست؟ ماکیاولی بلافاصله سرش را به نشانه ی تایید تکان داد. در سه دقیقه ی بعد، قیمت پیشنهادی به دویست و پنجاه هزار یورو رسید. فقط سه خریدار واقعی باقی مانده بودند: ماکیاولی، بازیگر آمریکایی و مرد کانادایی؛ لبهای باریک ماکیاولی به لبخند باز شد؛ چیزی نمانده بود که نتیجه ی صبر و شکیبایی طولانیش را ببیند، و صاحب ماسکها شود. اما وقتی ویبره ی گوشی موبایل را در جیب پشتی شلوارش حس کرد، لبخند روی لبش ماسید. یک لحظه تصمیم گرفت آن را نادیده بگیرد؛ به کارمندانش دستور اکید داده بود که جز در موارد ضروری به او زنگ نزنند، و خوب میدانست آنها آنقدر از او میترسند که جرات نمیکنند جز در شرایط اضطراری با او تماس بگیرند. دستش را در جیب شلوارش کرد، گوشی فوق العاده باریکش را بیرون آورد و نگاهی به آن انداخت. تصویر یک شمشیر به آرامی روی صفحه نمایش گوشی، روشن و خاموش میشد. لبخند ماکیاولی محو شد، و فهمید که این قرن هم نمیتواند ماسکها را از آن خودش کند. با عجله از اتاق بیرون رفت. صدای مجری را شنید که روی میز زد و گفت: «فروخته شد به قیمت دویست و شصت هزار یورو...» ماکیاولی به زبان ایتالیایی گفت: «به گوشم... خط تلفن خش خش کرد و مردی که ایتالیایی را با لهجه ی انگلیسی حرف میزد از آن طرف خط گفت: «به کمکت احتیاج دارم.» به گویشی حرف میزدند که بیش از چهارصد سال بود در اروپا از آن استفاده نشده بود. مردی که آن طرف خط بود خودش را معرفی نکرد، نیازی هم نداشت این کار را بکند؛ ماکیاولی میدانست او جادوگر و ساحر جاودان، یکی از قدرتمندترین و خطرناکترین آدمهای روی زمین، دکتر جان دی است. نیکولو ماکیاولی از هتل کوچک بیرون رفت و قدم در خیابان سنگفرش شده ی پلس دو ترت گذاشت. ایستاد. در هوای سرد پاریس نفس عمیقی کشید و کنجکاوانه پرسید: «چی کار میتونم برات بکنم؟» از دی بدش میآمد و خوب میدانست این حس، دوطرفه است. اما هر دوی آنها برای باستانیان خبیث کار میکردند و این بدین معنی بود که مجبور بودند قرنها و قرنها با هم کار کنند. این که دی از او جوانتر بود و ظاهرش هم جوانتر نشان میداد، تا حدی حس حسادت ماکیاولی را برمیانگیخت. ماکیاولی سال 1469 میلادی در فلورانس به دنیا آمده بود؛ یعنی 58 سال قبل از تولد جادوگر انگلیسی. در تاریخ ثبت شده بود که او در سال تولد دی، 1527 میلادی از دنیا رفته است. - فلامل اومده پاریس. ماکیاولی صاف ایستاد و گفت: «کی؟» - همین الآن. از طریق دریچه جادویی وارد پاریس شده ولی نمیدونم از کجای پاریس سر درآورده. اسکاتاچ هم باهاشه... ماکیاولی چهره اش را در هم کشید. در آخرین ملاقاتش با زن جنگجو، اسکاتاچ او را به سمت یک در بسته هل داده بود و ماکیاولی تمام هفته ی بعد از آن حادثه را صرف خارج کردن خرده شیشه از شانه ها و سینه اش کرده بود. - دو تا بچه ی آدم آمریکایی هم باهاشونن. صدای دی میپیچید. اضافه کرد: «دوقلو.» ماکیاولی پرسید: «چی گفتی؟» - میگم دوقلوان. با هاله های طلایی و نقره ای خالص. میدونی این یعنی چی؟ ماکیاولی آهسته گفت: «معلومه که میدونم.» دوقلوهایی با هاله های طلایی و نقره ای خالص یعنی دردسر. لبخند کمرنگی روی لبهای ماکیاولی نشست؛ شاید هم شانس. ...»)؛ پایان نقل. ا. شربیانی

  4. 4 out of 5

    Y

    Book Two suffers from most of the same weaknesses I mentioned in the review for The Alchemyst: the odd sort of dryness to the writing (don't know if that's quite the word I'm looking for, but no other word is really coming to mind) that causes the book to feel rather dull in places, even when it's during a scene with lots of action, and the bad habit of repeating facts that we've already established over and over. First, we need to relisten to all the main points of what occurred in The Alchemys Book Two suffers from most of the same weaknesses I mentioned in the review for The Alchemyst: the odd sort of dryness to the writing (don't know if that's quite the word I'm looking for, but no other word is really coming to mind) that causes the book to feel rather dull in places, even when it's during a scene with lots of action, and the bad habit of repeating facts that we've already established over and over. First, we need to relisten to all the main points of what occurred in The Alchemyst, which I find unnecessary, since a reader's enjoyment of this book is going to be quite hindered if they didn't read the first book to begin with, and then, everything that we learn within this book is hammered into our heads time and time again. The constant reminding of auric smells, or powers that everyone can use. This isn't helped when someone will make a comment about something they need to do or referring to some immortal's abilities in a roundabout way, but which the answer for is glaringly obvious to the reader (because, again, due to REPETITION), and Sophie or Josh will act all "Durrrr, what you mean?!?!?", even though it should be obvious to them too. Speaking of the twins, Josh annoyed the hell out of me in book one while Sophie was alright. By the end of book two, I now hate them both. In fact, this is supposed to be a book series about Nicholas Flamel, so the importance constantly place upon Sophie and Josh, giving them the right to be the Spotlight-Stealing Squad makes things all the more unbearable. It's a young adult series, so of course the main characters need to be teenagers, right? Actually, I think the series would've been a lot stronger, and no less entertaining to youths, had it actually focused more on Flamel and his adventures. (Truthfully, though, I imagine if an author did try to sell a YA story with no minors in it, most publishers would refuse to buy it, saying it needs kids for kid readers to identify with, or some BS like that.) Though to be honest, so far the only characters I particularly like and enjoy seeing the adventures/antics of are Scathach (sometimes), Machiavelli, the spider elder (hey, the narrator gave it this adorable lisp, okay?), and Perenelle...though Perenelle herself sort of falls into the "too perfect" category. (She's incredibly strong, more so and more worthy of fear than Nicholas, so far she hasn't made any serious blunders, she can constantly pull out some brand new trick from her ass when she's in a dire situation, and Nick himself constantly bemoans her not being there, because "Perenelle would know what to do" in even the most bizarre situation.) Really now, we already know all these non-humans and immortal humans have ridiculous amounts of power. They can still have some actual flaws, too.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tamora Pierce

    More actiony than the first book, and not quite as gripping for me, as the characters just tumbled from chase to chase, and weird enemy creature to weird enemy creature. Readers who like that, however, will eat the book up, and I'm still fascinated enough to read the next book. I admire Scott's grasp of world myth and legend--in that respect he's up there with Neil Gaiman, Jane Lindskold, and Guy Gavriel Kay! More actiony than the first book, and not quite as gripping for me, as the characters just tumbled from chase to chase, and weird enemy creature to weird enemy creature. Readers who like that, however, will eat the book up, and I'm still fascinated enough to read the next book. I admire Scott's grasp of world myth and legend--in that respect he's up there with Neil Gaiman, Jane Lindskold, and Guy Gavriel Kay!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Saga

    Egads, what a moronic bullturd this book was. I wanted to see whether the sequel might have possessed any redeeming qualities, but didn't meet any on the way. It's as if the author fished out some sleazy Mary Sue fanfiction from of the pits of FF.net, squashed it together with some hideously sodomized bits of world mythology, and went off begging for publishing rights. I don't understand the abundance of 5-star reviews here. Seems like people's tastes have REALLY sunk these days. Plot? I once *t Egads, what a moronic bullturd this book was. I wanted to see whether the sequel might have possessed any redeeming qualities, but didn't meet any on the way. It's as if the author fished out some sleazy Mary Sue fanfiction from of the pits of FF.net, squashed it together with some hideously sodomized bits of world mythology, and went off begging for publishing rights. I don't understand the abundance of 5-star reviews here. Seems like people's tastes have REALLY sunk these days. Plot? I once *thought* the narration was supposed to tell the story of the title character, but instead we get these horrible Mary Sue twins gamboling about, and the author just has to remind the reader in every other sentence how their silver and gold auras are so magnificent and how they're the Super Speshul Uber Cool Twinsies of Legend and yada yada blah blah. Yes, we got that the first time round. Also nobody needs to be re-told 575972873 times how their auras smell of vanilla and strawberry and whatever other completely ridiculous tripe. Seriously, that's just about the stupidest attempt at "originality" I've come across in a while. Several times, it threw me into fits of snerking (No, truthfully, in many places the descriptions are so idiotic that they become involuntarily hilarious. I'm not even starting on the unintended innuendo between the twins...). Like this passage, which was probably supposed to sound all brooding and ominous: "And the scent of vanilla filled the catacombs." Cue bucketfuls of lol'ing. Apparently also good people smell good, and bad people in the lines of rotten eggs. Black-and-white generalizations, much? I guess I could ramble on about the imbecility of this concoction for hours, but I have better things to do with my time. I'm vaguely tempted to pick up the next volume to see whether it might induce as much laughter, though. On the other hand, that would mean wading through more swamps of abused mythology: think I had quite enough with the whole dísir/Yggdrasil codswallop here. Who the hell gave this guy a permission to ravage our cultural inheritance? *eyeroll*

  7. 4 out of 5

    kartik narayanan

    Read the full review at my site Digital Amrit 'The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel' ranks among the most innovative and atypical Young Adult series I have read. While the series is named after the character Nicholas Flamel, the main characters are actually a set of twins - Sophie and Josh Newman. The books - set of 6 with an additional two novellas (last I checked) - chart the life and events of these twins over a period of a month after they discover that magic is real. While this type of Read the full review at my site Digital Amrit 'The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel' ranks among the most innovative and atypical Young Adult series I have read. While the series is named after the character Nicholas Flamel, the main characters are actually a set of twins - Sophie and Josh Newman. The books - set of 6 with an additional two novellas (last I checked) - chart the life and events of these twins over a period of a month after they discover that magic is real. While this type of plot device is common in the YA genre (magic is real/the chosen ones), Michael Scott excels in where he takes this premise. The world-building is fantastic - it is a great combination of the myths we know but with an additional twist on top. Add to this, Read the full review at my site Digital Amrit

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    The only complaint that I have about the Magician is the same complaint that I had about the Alchemyst - where is the next book? Michael Scott deftly picks up Sophie and Josh's story where the Alchemyst left off. And although it had been over a year since I had read Alchemyst, I was never lost or feeling that I needed to go back and re-read the first book. Mr. Scott did a wonderful job of weaving pieces of book 1 into the Magician. In this story, Sophie and Josh are in Paris with Nicholas Flamel a The only complaint that I have about the Magician is the same complaint that I had about the Alchemyst - where is the next book? Michael Scott deftly picks up Sophie and Josh's story where the Alchemyst left off. And although it had been over a year since I had read Alchemyst, I was never lost or feeling that I needed to go back and re-read the first book. Mr. Scott did a wonderful job of weaving pieces of book 1 into the Magician. In this story, Sophie and Josh are in Paris with Nicholas Flamel and Scatty trying to fine-tune Sophie's new skills and have Josh's Awakened. The evil Dee is still chasing them and trying to retrieve the last 2 pages of the Codex, while possible swaying the Twins to his side of the fight. And just like the Alchemyst, I kept my laptop close by so that I could stop and look up information about the various new cast of legeandary figures and myths that Michael weaves into this fast paced adventure.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Marie

    This series is actually shaping up to be pretty good. And I like how the book title seems to refer to more than just one character, at least in this instance -- going in, we assume 'the Magician' refers to Saint-Germain, but Dee is a magician as well. Nicely done, Mr Scott. I'm assuming 'the Sorceress' will be Perenelle, but we'll see. This was a decent installment. Not a fan of the changing narrators, but whatever. There was lots of action and I loved the inclusion of historical figures like Joa This series is actually shaping up to be pretty good. And I like how the book title seems to refer to more than just one character, at least in this instance -- going in, we assume 'the Magician' refers to Saint-Germain, but Dee is a magician as well. Nicely done, Mr Scott. I'm assuming 'the Sorceress' will be Perenelle, but we'll see. This was a decent installment. Not a fan of the changing narrators, but whatever. There was lots of action and I loved the inclusion of historical figures like Joan of Arc and Niccolo Machiavelli. The overall story seems rather predictable (and as such, makes Dee a rather predictable villain) but Machiavelli is delicious. And I was impressed, things didn't turn out the way I'd imagined they would -- yes, there are cliches, but they don't swallow the story. There were several times, even amid all the action, where I simply didn't have any interest in listening to this though; not sure if that was me or the narration or what. I would go for one or two-day stretches where I ignored the audiobook completely, so it wasn't nearly as gripping as Ready Player One or Billy Joel or some of the other audios I've listened to lately. Ah well. Still a great story, and I'm wishing I was in eighth or ninth grade again so I would perhaps appreciate it more :)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Arabey

    The Adventure continue.. even with the quarantine. This time in Paris, More Historical characters that turned out to be immortals, still living among us... the story action packed too , may be a little "too action-ed", over 120 pages in one action scene was a bit too much for me.. yet I appreciate the rest of the plot.. the trilling situations the characters face... and of course the catacombs of Paris scene.. and the "Sleeping god" It's really a good series and fantastic imagination , mixing the my The Adventure continue.. even with the quarantine. This time in Paris, More Historical characters that turned out to be immortals, still living among us... the story action packed too , may be a little "too action-ed", over 120 pages in one action scene was a bit too much for me.. yet I appreciate the rest of the plot.. the trilling situations the characters face... and of course the catacombs of Paris scene.. and the "Sleeping god" It's really a good series and fantastic imagination , mixing the mythology, history and fantasy in a fast paced modern thrilling story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    The first book in this series, The Alchemyst, was not that great, and the second book is proving to be equally disappointing. However, I am not one to stop reading a book right in the middle, so I am trudging onward. It's not that this book, or this series, is entirely terrible, it's just that it lacks something that would make it enjoyable. I've been pondering what is missing and I think I've figured out a few things. First of all, the characters are not in any way people you feel sympathy or c The first book in this series, The Alchemyst, was not that great, and the second book is proving to be equally disappointing. However, I am not one to stop reading a book right in the middle, so I am trudging onward. It's not that this book, or this series, is entirely terrible, it's just that it lacks something that would make it enjoyable. I've been pondering what is missing and I think I've figured out a few things. First of all, the characters are not in any way people you feel sympathy or concern for or interest in. I can put this book down and walk away and not really care what happens next. Second, I've read that the author is a leading authority on mythology and folklore, and I have no reason to doubt that because it seems that his purpose in writing these books is trying to cram every bit of mythology and folklore he knows about into the books, then trying to write a fictional story around them. It's a little self-indulgent if you ask me. It makes for OK, but not fantastic, reading. Not entirely entertaining which is usually why I read these days. Don't get me wrong, it has some interesting elements to it, but when one of the reviews says a lot of the info will send you running for your encyclopedia, that says a lot about this book. I will finish the book just because I am not a quitter, but I don't plan to read the next book when it comes out.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This one was even better than the first. I really love the new characters introduced and I love that they are such prominent members from history. Scott does an excellent job of weaving imagination into known history. Many of the problems that existed in the first book were gone from this one and the action was even better. My only slight problem with this book was the pacing. I kept thinking it was about to end, because I was listening on audiobook and wasn't sure how much was left. But the boo This one was even better than the first. I really love the new characters introduced and I love that they are such prominent members from history. Scott does an excellent job of weaving imagination into known history. Many of the problems that existed in the first book were gone from this one and the action was even better. My only slight problem with this book was the pacing. I kept thinking it was about to end, because I was listening on audiobook and wasn't sure how much was left. But the book kept going and going with more and more action. Not a problem, it's just that it kept me unsure. And the actor for the audiobook was excellent. Really great job. Overall I loved this book and all the magic. Onto the next one.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mimi 'Pans' Herondale

    Not as good as the first book, but what I wanted to happen came true, so I'm happy. Not as good as the first book, but what I wanted to happen came true, so I'm happy.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Saul the Heir of Isauldur

    Originally published in Phantases and Other Funny Words Note: Below, my review is split into two parts. The first gives my general thoughts on the book, and the second details spoilers and major plot points. Be warned. Part One: Overview This book is a noticeable improvement over the first one. For starters, there are very few pop-cultural references that date the novel, and the action is a bit more spread out. Whereas the first book was only an action scene followed by another action scene, which Originally published in Phantases and Other Funny Words Note: Below, my review is split into two parts. The first gives my general thoughts on the book, and the second details spoilers and major plot points. Be warned. Part One: Overview This book is a noticeable improvement over the first one. For starters, there are very few pop-cultural references that date the novel, and the action is a bit more spread out. Whereas the first book was only an action scene followed by another action scene, which could be exhausting, The Magician takes a few breaks. There are a few points in the story where the characters take a break and just talk to each other. However, they only talk about exposition or about the plot. I guess talking about themselves was asking too much. We finally get a little bit of background information on Flamel’s character, but it’s not enough to make him compelling. He’s still just some guy who does magic and who keeps telling these two teenagers to trust him. Scathach is roughly the same. She has an open-hearted conversation with Sophie about halfway into the book. But the problem is that it’s a single conversation. Beyond that, Scathach is little more than her epithet, the Warrior. Josh and Sophie do have a little bit more personality here, and they do start to become separate people. Josh is still sad and glum because his powers weren’t Awakened in the last book, and he’s jealous of his sister. Sophie just wants to go back to normal, because she feels that her Awakened senses are too much for her mind to deal with. But, I’m sad to say, this is the extent of their development. The prose and the writing style are both fairly standard, leaning towards the simplistic. This leads to quick and easy reading, but it leaves little impact on the mind and allows for very limited vivid imagery. However, the biggest issue I had with the writing was the repetition. Scott really repeats himself a lot in this book, especially when describing the age of mythological beings and Josh’s fear of his sister leaving him behind. The ages of mythological creatures always follow the same formula: “she looked young, but was more ancient than the world” or “he looked like he was in his thirties, but he came from a time before humanity even existed,” etc. It grows exhausting. We get it, myths are old, the Elder Race is called Elder for a reason, please stop trying to tell us about the myths and please show us (I’ll come back to this later). As for Josh’s fears, not only are they acknowledged every time he so much as looks as his sister, but they’re also addressed and discussed at length, usually with the same words. Again, Scott tells us that Josh is afraid instead of showing us. He doesn’t distance himself from his sister, he doesn’t snap at her, and he only verbally acknowledges his feelings once. Instead, the narrative explains that Josh is afraid, and that he’s going to lose Sophie, and that there’s no place for him in this mythical world, and because of that he’s afraid. It’s tiresome. One final note before I get into spoilers. Nearly every mythological creature that shows up is either a fifty-something year old, or seventeen. Scathach is supposed to look seventeen, and both Flamel and Dee look like they’re in their mid-fifties. It makes most of the characters, who already have little to distinguish them from one another, to blend together. Overall, an improvement from the last book, but still not what I would have liked. Yet again, the potential comes from the way that Scott mixes all these mythologies together, and yet, as I’ll discuss below he wastes that potential at every single opportunity he gets. If I had to describe this book in one word, it would be “frustrating.” It’s frustrating that so many opportunities are missed, and that we, the readers, don’t get to watch some of the most popular myths of all time interact with each other properly. I already told myself I’d read the entire series, so I will, and I still hold the hope that the books will get better. Part Two: Spoilers and In-Depth Discussion There was one major plot hole that I noticed on the first book, as many others have before me: if Nicholas Flamel has lived for over 600 years, how does he not have the recipe for the Immortality Juice memorized by now? Well, luckily for us, Mr. Scott explains that the formula changes every month, and that it works only once ever. We get an additional villain in this book, Niccolo Machiavelli, and he’s supposed to be scary and creepy and vile and evil. But quite frankly, there’s hardly any difference between him and Dee, who we already know and who is a flat and shallow villain. Both Machiavelli and Dee dress the same in the same colors, have the same attitude, and they even speak the same way! The only major difference between them is that Dee is supposed to have a temper and Machiavelli is supposed to be more controlled. But in the end, they’re basically carbon copies of each other to the point that it becomes boring having them both in the same scene. And now, ladies and gentlemen, the biggest letdown since the release of A Phantom Menace! After an entire chapter of Machiavelli, Dee and Dagon discussing the Nidhogg, building it up as a primordial creature that the Elders themselves used as a weapon, the legendary monstrosity that was trapped at the roots of Yggdrasil, the ancient dragon of Norse mythology prophesized to be set free at the End of Times, and we finally get to see it. And it is……….!! A big lizard. Granted, it’s a very big lizard, but it’s just a lizard nonetheless. Josh even compares it to a Komodo dragon. [Insert disappointed weeping here]. By Odin’s beard, is this really the best you could come up with? The Nidhogg was supposed to have destroyed countless cities in the time before the humani, and it took several Valkyries (or Disir, as they’re more often called in this book) to keep it in check. But no, he’s just a big lizard who runs through Paris and breaks a few buildings. From the prelude we were getting and the buildup the characters were providing, I expected something along the lines of Godzilla or King Ghidorah to come rampaging through a city, knocking buildings down with every step and making the ground quake, but no. Yet again, we have the great potential of something colossal and mythological in scale (emphasis on the word “mythological”) that is wasted with something mundane and blasé. It was taking me some time to figure it out, but after reading the scene with the Nidhogg, it finally hit me. I finally realized what these books have been lacking so far, and that is spectacle. The plot involves some of the greatest myths in the world, as well as some of the most enigmatic characters in human history. And yet, it all feels dull and weak and bland. Why? Because the books have no spectacle, no sense of wonder or scale. Nothing is ever grand or larger than life because the author won’t let it. He stubbornly sticks to the idea that mythological beings behaving like everyday people is cool, but believe me, it’s not. The Disir as they’re described, the Nidhogg, Mars Ultor, they’re not the creatures that people used to fear or worship or tell legends about! They’re pale, weak, cheap facsimiles with little in common with the myths that inspired them. The Nidhogg rampages through the city of Paris and it’s not even half as impressive as Godzilla is in his 1954 debut. For me, the best part of the book was when Saint-Germain lit up the Eiffel Tower and that’s because it’s the only part of the book that is allowed to be impressive and simply cool. The writing style provides a few vivid images and the entire section is memorable. The rest of it feels just like a low-budget, generic TV show that tries to tackle cool ideas but ends up falling short. The type of TV show that sells time travel as its core, but only has its characters end up in cheap, easily-reproduced time periods like the late 1800s, or the 80s or the 70s or virtually any time in human history that doesn’t require creativity to put on set. And if this was a TV show, I may almost excuse it. But it’s not, it’s a book, and books aren’t limited by budgetary needs. They charge the same to edit or publish a scene with gods and magic and storming weather as they would for a scene with three people sitting in a room debating who could win the FIFA World Cup. If the author had wanted to have impressive things, cool things, in his book, all he needed to do was write them! But he simply keeps trying to ground these myths, trying to make them fit in our world, only to have them end up unrecognizable and unsatisfactory.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Meera K.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. So, I look down at all the reviews, and I see all these five stars. WOW. This book started out with TONS of promise, introducing Machiavelli with the Kabuki masks. But then the book progresses.. you start to predict the next thread in the story line. Sophie continues her magical training, and learns fire magic from Saint Germaine, who in turn stole it from Promethius; Saint Germaine is coincidentally married to THE Joan of Arc, the last person to have a silver aura (besides Sophie.) Josh stays in So, I look down at all the reviews, and I see all these five stars. WOW. This book started out with TONS of promise, introducing Machiavelli with the Kabuki masks. But then the book progresses.. you start to predict the next thread in the story line. Sophie continues her magical training, and learns fire magic from Saint Germaine, who in turn stole it from Promethius; Saint Germaine is coincidentally married to THE Joan of Arc, the last person to have a silver aura (besides Sophie.) Josh stays incredibly jealous.. and finally gets Awoken by Mars, the God of War, before Dee kills Mars. Dee kills everyone. Flamel continues to age, and Perenelle manages to escape Alcatraz, and in turn traps the Morrigan in a deep, dark cave, with no exit... and no way to fly again. I honestly wish this book series just stopped with The Alchemyst.. because that one was pretty good. This book sounded too forced on. The story line was way too predictable.. nothing interesting happened except when Scatty was dragged into the lake by Dagon. I swear, I almost gasped when I got to that part. But the rest of the book continued to DRONE... and the way he added Joan of Arc in was too awkward. I really love Joan of Arc, but she's a terrible character addition. I must admit.. Machiavelli wasn't bad. So.. why did I give this book three stars? I felt generous. Considering how it wasn't terrible.. and that I just have lofty standards for the books that I read. I used my history teacher's policy..where he still gives you half credit on an essay even if you miss the point entirely. I mean.. at least there's a book. With a really cool cover.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Laharnar

    I love anything to do with Alchemy and having recently spent time in Paris this adventure was doubly entertaining for me. It's about twin teenagers who find their own magic and deal with the magic that surrounds them in the modern day streets of Paris. The author's wildly imaginative concepts are dark and dangerous. This is fun read for those who are still in touch with the child within. I love anything to do with Alchemy and having recently spent time in Paris this adventure was doubly entertaining for me. It's about twin teenagers who find their own magic and deal with the magic that surrounds them in the modern day streets of Paris. The author's wildly imaginative concepts are dark and dangerous. This is fun read for those who are still in touch with the child within.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jewel

    Actual rating: 4.5 stars

  18. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    What a great book! The Magician, the second book in the Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel series, totally rocked my world! Josh, Sophie, Nicholas, and Scatty have used the leygate in Ojai to get to Nicholas' home in Paris, France and escape the evil Dr. John Dee. Sophie has already been Awakened by Hekate and has learned the secrets to the magic of Air. She is now ready to master the next elemental magic: fire. But when they arrive in Paris they don't receive a warm welcome. Dee's partner, What a great book! The Magician, the second book in the Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel series, totally rocked my world! Josh, Sophie, Nicholas, and Scatty have used the leygate in Ojai to get to Nicholas' home in Paris, France and escape the evil Dr. John Dee. Sophie has already been Awakened by Hekate and has learned the secrets to the magic of Air. She is now ready to master the next elemental magic: fire. But when they arrive in Paris they don't receive a warm welcome. Dee's partner, Niccolo Machiavelli is after the group and has the entire RAID squad chasing after them. Anything but a warm welcome... Seeking help, Nicholas calls the Witch of Endor. She tells him that she will try to contact someone in Paris who is not an enemy of Nicholas. She succeds and sends Comte de Saint-Germain to meet them at the Eifel Tower. They encounter Niccolo once again, but manage to escape. They group goes back to Saint-Germain's home where they meet his wife (and friend of Scatty's), Joan of Orleans. I liked this book because Michael Scott made it seem SO real, that readers are basicly flying through the book, wanting to know what will happen. I say that The Magician was very successful and great for anyone who enjoys a good fantasy novel.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Regitze

    This series is awesome. It's fast-paced, funny and intriguing. I love how there's so many different mythologies involved in this book and it's really a joy to listen to. I never want to stop once I start. One of the things I really like is how even though it's seemingly obvious who is good and who is evil, you're never really quite 100 percent sure. I need the next book as soon as possible, because it is totally adictive. This series is awesome. It's fast-paced, funny and intriguing. I love how there's so many different mythologies involved in this book and it's really a joy to listen to. I never want to stop once I start. One of the things I really like is how even though it's seemingly obvious who is good and who is evil, you're never really quite 100 percent sure. I need the next book as soon as possible, because it is totally adictive.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Nelson

    Thankfully, this book greatly picks up the action in the series, and I found it much more enjoyable than the first book. Instead of needing to introduce the strange, magical world of Nicholas Flamel, Scott focuses more on ramping up the stakes for his characters. The baddies who want to turn humans back into slaves are congregating to work together to bring down Flamel and the twins, but Flamel has friends of his own, who are able to help in fight back in this one. This book mostly takes place in Thankfully, this book greatly picks up the action in the series, and I found it much more enjoyable than the first book. Instead of needing to introduce the strange, magical world of Nicholas Flamel, Scott focuses more on ramping up the stakes for his characters. The baddies who want to turn humans back into slaves are congregating to work together to bring down Flamel and the twins, but Flamel has friends of his own, who are able to help in fight back in this one. This book mostly takes place in France, where they traveled to during the last book using a portal. Sophie is learning fire magic, and Josh is trying to remain patient about everything, but the situation of Sophie having powers and him not having any is wearing on him. Perenelle is still imprisoned, though her storyline also makes progress in this book. (That’s all I can say without revealing spoilers, sorry!) I was much happier with the plot in this one. Tons of action, and the stakes are high — Flamel and the twins are running for their lives, and up against incredible odds, which makes for a brilliant reading experience. The only thing that brought me down in this book was Josh’s character. It’s not a writing flaw or a story flaw, he’s just incredibly whiny and unlikeable, in my opinion. I get very frustrated during his parts, because I want him to get over himself and stop being such a whiny baby! Unfortunately, I don’t see that happening anytime soon. Aside from his character, everything else is great. We meet some FANTASTIC new characters and learn even more about the mythology that rules this world, which is one of my favorite parts of reading books like this. I love all the worldbuilding and connections to myths and legends that we have. If you’re into magic and mythology, definitely give this series a try. I was skeptical with book one, but this book is fantastic, and I’m excited to see what lies ahead. It’s a fairly easy/quick read for those who might get bored easily, too, so it might be a good fit for a reluctant reader. Also posted on Purple People Readers.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I still think of Michael Scott from The Office every time I pick these books up. These books are fine, but not at the top of my list for kids' literature. The character development was slightly better in this one for some of the characters -- St. Germain and Joan of Arc felt more fleshed out, and a little bit for Perenelle. Unfortunately, Sophie, Josh, and Flamel remain fairly bland, and Josh's jealousy over Sophie's "awakening" mixed with his fear of losing her has been beaten to death. Add in I still think of Michael Scott from The Office every time I pick these books up. These books are fine, but not at the top of my list for kids' literature. The character development was slightly better in this one for some of the characters -- St. Germain and Joan of Arc felt more fleshed out, and a little bit for Perenelle. Unfortunately, Sophie, Josh, and Flamel remain fairly bland, and Josh's jealousy over Sophie's "awakening" mixed with his fear of losing her has been beaten to death. Add in his tenuously written mistrust of Flamel, and Josh begins to seem petulent and annoying. Bizarrely, the non-stop action is honestly just a bit much, though I'm sure it thrills its target audience. They get chased here, at which point they're chased, then more things join into the chase, then there's an explosion....but THEN the chase is on!! The first two entire books take place within about 3-5 days, so there's very little movement of the larger plot of the story -- it's just non-stop escaping. On the plus side, it's interesting seeing the weaving in mythological and historical figures into this storyline, and I appreciate the inclusion of historical background on some of these settings, like the catacombs beneath Paris.

  22. 4 out of 5

    gelowmichael

    The Magician gives us more than better twist than the Alchemyst. It drives us in a new dimension than far better our imagination can travel with. With new characters than gives revelation within the story. New revelation within the lives of the characters. ------------------------------------------------------------------- Re-reading this made me dive again to my thoughts about this book. Quite half of the book was slow paced during Flamel's encounter with Saint Germain and Joan. Nonetheless, this The Magician gives us more than better twist than the Alchemyst. It drives us in a new dimension than far better our imagination can travel with. With new characters than gives revelation within the story. New revelation within the lives of the characters. ------------------------------------------------------------------- Re-reading this made me dive again to my thoughts about this book. Quite half of the book was slow paced during Flamel's encounter with Saint Germain and Joan. Nonetheless, this was a great book! I don't understand some readers to missed out this great series :(

  23. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Wow. Not just for kids. I loved this book. From the beginning it shot off at rocket speed and didn't slow at all. I usually find myself pondering the writing, the characters, etc., but there was none of that here. (Well hardly any. There was too much to absorb.) It gripped me from the beginning. I was sad when it ended, and I am excited to start the 3rd book in this series. The only thing that was annoying was the brother. I don't think it is completely necessary to turn him into a total little Wow. Not just for kids. I loved this book. From the beginning it shot off at rocket speed and didn't slow at all. I usually find myself pondering the writing, the characters, etc., but there was none of that here. (Well hardly any. There was too much to absorb.) It gripped me from the beginning. I was sad when it ended, and I am excited to start the 3rd book in this series. The only thing that was annoying was the brother. I don't think it is completely necessary to turn him into a total little whiner, but I feel like I know where that is going. It flashes like a neon sign on a very dark night.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rubi

    Nice one. The only thing I didn't like was: if they are talking in a certain language, why don't you put the sentence directly in that language instead of saying: "they spoke in french". It is quite weird and stupid. (view spoiler)[ Perenelle trapped in Alcatraz. The rest in Paris. New character: Machiavelli. New enemies, new adventures... Josh is Awakened by Mars. What was the mysteious gift? What about Perenelle and the Morrigan? (I wonder why Nicholas is so quiet knowing that his wife is trapped Nice one. The only thing I didn't like was: if they are talking in a certain language, why don't you put the sentence directly in that language instead of saying: "they spoke in french". It is quite weird and stupid. (view spoiler)[ Perenelle trapped in Alcatraz. The rest in Paris. New character: Machiavelli. New enemies, new adventures... Josh is Awakened by Mars. What was the mysteious gift? What about Perenelle and the Morrigan? (I wonder why Nicholas is so quiet knowing that his wife is trapped there... Hm.) What about Dagon and Scathach? Machiavelli and Dee joining forces... I will continue soon. :D (hide spoiler)]

  25. 4 out of 5

    Vignesh Kumar

    5 Magical Stars..... This book is everything I want from a mythical fantasy genre and I loved it to the core.Every new character from the myths and legends are extraordinary in their own sense and I love all the characters in it. I get to know more about the history of everything in a magical and detailed way. If you haven't started this series, then you have to definitely start this. 5 Magical Stars..... This book is everything I want from a mythical fantasy genre and I loved it to the core.Every new character from the myths and legends are extraordinary in their own sense and I love all the characters in it. I get to know more about the history of everything in a magical and detailed way. If you haven't started this series, then you have to definitely start this.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    Some magical young adult adventure and excitement...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jay The Crippled God

    Michael Scott is extremely talented in using people and places from real life and employing them in his plot. revolving them in an alluring manner. Here, the Use of Nicola Machaville WAS SIMPLE BRILLIANCE. Especially with his cunning (political) personality. Furthermore, the Use of France's underground Catacombs (a main attraction) as a place for the final showdown just tells you how you can take something that is out there and spell it in your own fun or intense terms <3. Michael Scott, in the be Michael Scott is extremely talented in using people and places from real life and employing them in his plot. revolving them in an alluring manner. Here, the Use of Nicola Machaville WAS SIMPLE BRILLIANCE. Especially with his cunning (political) personality. Furthermore, the Use of France's underground Catacombs (a main attraction) as a place for the final showdown just tells you how you can take something that is out there and spell it in your own fun or intense terms <3. Michael Scott, in the beginning I had my doubts. But Thank you. You made sure that I will keep reading through the entire series. Furthermore, I find myself relating to the Legendary brother A lot. Especially with the use of the (view spoiler)[Sword of Knowledge>> which I find myself wishing to wield (hide spoiler)] . Beloved readers, thanks for taking the time and liberty to go through this review and I wish you a happy day filled with love.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emmanuel

    I read this quite a while ago, but something I did today got me thinking about this series and I remembered I hadn't finished reviewing it! The thing, irrelevant, this review, very! Haha 'The Magician' is the thoroughly captivating sequel to 'The Alchemyst', and the second book of the series. It starts up where the first book ended, with the destruction of Hekate's shadowrealm. After an ending like that, you've got to make sure whatever comes next doesn't loose the readers' attention, and I thoug I read this quite a while ago, but something I did today got me thinking about this series and I remembered I hadn't finished reviewing it! The thing, irrelevant, this review, very! Haha 'The Magician' is the thoroughly captivating sequel to 'The Alchemyst', and the second book of the series. It starts up where the first book ended, with the destruction of Hekate's shadowrealm. After an ending like that, you've got to make sure whatever comes next doesn't loose the readers' attention, and I thought Scott succeeded there. You're barely given time to recuperate, before you're meeting new characters and being taken to whole new places.. and I loved it! Haha One thing I particularly loved about 'The Alchemyst' was the world building of shadowrealms. If you don't already know, shadowrealms are sort of alternate universes, created by the elders. They're all unique and I thoroughly enjoyed exploring Hekate's. In 'The Magician', though we did see a lot less of that, it was balanced out with the twins' being exposed to more magic in the real world. It's equally as magic-laden, what with Sophie's learning fire magic, being granted the Witch of Endor's memories, Josh's being awakened and gifted with the elder Mars' military knowledge. We're introduced to so many more characters in the second book. The awesome thing about it though, is that you don't get confused or forget any of them, which I gotta give the author props for! Scott further develops the protagonists, but along with that, is his bringing in and developing characters such as Saint-Germain, Joan of Arc, the Witch of Endor and Machiavelli. Also, how cool it is that Michael Scott used well known names like Joan of Arc, and Niccolo Machiavelli, and it still made complete sense? Joan was brave and heroic and Machiavelli was noble yet conniving. It was obvious that Scott had done his homework, because it percolated throughout his work, which was very satisfying to read. If I can say one thing, it's that Michael Scott has perfected his ability to end books. I say this because I know of a few books, which were good throughout, but the ending let me down. In 'The Magician' however, the ending couldn't have been more engaging and just plain awesome! Who else can make gargoyle statues coming to life, seem so realistic? Haha! This book is worthy of all the praise attributed, and even that isn't quite enough. If you like magical action-packed reads, this series is definitely for you!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Constantin

    I think this is the most interesting book series I've read so far. The author has created a whole new universe based on real historical figures, history and ancient lore, in such a way that reading it makes you think it could be actually plausible ! The character development is one of the finest I've seen in books of this genre, the plot is brilliant, almost every chapter ends on a cliffhanger or a very important part of the story and the plot twists as so well made that you almost never guess wh I think this is the most interesting book series I've read so far. The author has created a whole new universe based on real historical figures, history and ancient lore, in such a way that reading it makes you think it could be actually plausible ! The character development is one of the finest I've seen in books of this genre, the plot is brilliant, almost every chapter ends on a cliffhanger or a very important part of the story and the plot twists as so well made that you almost never guess what will happen next. Almost every time that I thought "ah this will happen it is so obvious" I was just surprised with the unfolding of the story. I wish I could get selective amnesia to read this all over again as if it was the first time.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Largo

    The Magician by Michael Scott was an amazing adventure-filled book that continues on from the end of The Alchemyst. I really love that in each individual book the twins learn a different element of magic and get trained instantly. I also love the fact that Josh was finally Awakened and when combined his aura with his sister's (Sophie) to create powerful magic. However, I don't really like how the Disir had to ruin everything that was going on at Paris. Overall, I think this was a good continuati The Magician by Michael Scott was an amazing adventure-filled book that continues on from the end of The Alchemyst. I really love that in each individual book the twins learn a different element of magic and get trained instantly. I also love the fact that Josh was finally Awakened and when combined his aura with his sister's (Sophie) to create powerful magic. However, I don't really like how the Disir had to ruin everything that was going on at Paris. Overall, I think this was a good continuation of the Alchemyst and I would recommend this book to people who like fantasy, adventure/action, mystery, and a little bit of magic.

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