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Boss Life: Surviving My Own Small Business

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When columnist Paul Downs was approached by The New York Times to write for their “You’re the Boss” blog, he had been running his custom furniture business for twenty-four years strong. or mostly strong. Now, in his first book, Downs paints an honest portrait of a real business, with a real boss, a real set of employees, and the real challenges they face.             Fresh When columnist Paul Downs was approached by The New York Times to write for their “You’re the Boss” blog, he had been running his custom furniture business for twenty-four years strong. or mostly strong. Now, in his first book, Downs paints an honest portrait of a real business, with a real boss, a real set of employees, and the real challenges they face.             Fresh out of college in 1986, Downs opened his first  business, a small company that builds custom furniture. In 1987, he hired his first employee. That’s when things got complicated. As his enterprise began to grow, he had to learn about management, cash flow, taxes, and so much more. But despite any obstacles, Downs always remained keenly aware that every small business, no matter the product it makes or the service it provides, starts with people. He writes with tremendous insight about hiring employees, providing motivation to get the best out of them, and the difficult decisions he’s made to let some of them go. Downs also looks outward, to his dealings with vendors and to providing each client with exemplary customer service from first sales pitch to final delivery. With honesty and conviction, he tells the true story behind building and sustaining a successful company in an ever-evolving economy, often airing his own failures and shortcomings to reveal the difficulties that arise from being a boss and a businessperson. Countless employees have told the story of their experience with managers—Boss Life tells the other side of that story.


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When columnist Paul Downs was approached by The New York Times to write for their “You’re the Boss” blog, he had been running his custom furniture business for twenty-four years strong. or mostly strong. Now, in his first book, Downs paints an honest portrait of a real business, with a real boss, a real set of employees, and the real challenges they face.             Fresh When columnist Paul Downs was approached by The New York Times to write for their “You’re the Boss” blog, he had been running his custom furniture business for twenty-four years strong. or mostly strong. Now, in his first book, Downs paints an honest portrait of a real business, with a real boss, a real set of employees, and the real challenges they face.             Fresh out of college in 1986, Downs opened his first  business, a small company that builds custom furniture. In 1987, he hired his first employee. That’s when things got complicated. As his enterprise began to grow, he had to learn about management, cash flow, taxes, and so much more. But despite any obstacles, Downs always remained keenly aware that every small business, no matter the product it makes or the service it provides, starts with people. He writes with tremendous insight about hiring employees, providing motivation to get the best out of them, and the difficult decisions he’s made to let some of them go. Downs also looks outward, to his dealings with vendors and to providing each client with exemplary customer service from first sales pitch to final delivery. With honesty and conviction, he tells the true story behind building and sustaining a successful company in an ever-evolving economy, often airing his own failures and shortcomings to reveal the difficulties that arise from being a boss and a businessperson. Countless employees have told the story of their experience with managers—Boss Life tells the other side of that story.

30 review for Boss Life: Surviving My Own Small Business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul Downs

    Well, I wrote this book so of course I'm going to give it 5 stars. But here's why: I've been running a small business for the last 29 years. And all that time I've been reading business journalism. And I never see anything that reflects my own experience: that business is confusing, difficult, and nerve-wracking. I've never arrived at a point where I suddenly have a lot of money and the wisdom to match. My days are filled both with ordinary duties and random catastrophes. That's the story I want Well, I wrote this book so of course I'm going to give it 5 stars. But here's why: I've been running a small business for the last 29 years. And all that time I've been reading business journalism. And I never see anything that reflects my own experience: that business is confusing, difficult, and nerve-wracking. I've never arrived at a point where I suddenly have a lot of money and the wisdom to match. My days are filled both with ordinary duties and random catastrophes. That's the story I wanted to tell. What it's actually like to be the boss. As it happens, the same year I was invited to write a book, 2012, was chock full of events that told that story. The book is a straightforward and honest account of what it's like to guide a small factory through a difficult year. This is not a book of advice. It's a narrative. I went through some very bad months, and I wasn't sure how any of it would turn out. I've done my best to take you along with me, not knowing what will happen next. I hope you enjoy the ride.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This is hands down the most readable and enjoyable book about business I've encountered. The structure read similar to a novel for me. I was eager to find out if deals were going to come through, if consultants would pay off, customers would pay up, and employees would pan out.. if the company would stay financially afloat. Paul Downs is a decent writer and seems like an all-around decent human being. He takes us through a year of his business - his work, his life, his challenges- honestly and ca This is hands down the most readable and enjoyable book about business I've encountered. The structure read similar to a novel for me. I was eager to find out if deals were going to come through, if consultants would pay off, customers would pay up, and employees would pan out.. if the company would stay financially afloat. Paul Downs is a decent writer and seems like an all-around decent human being. He takes us through a year of his business - his work, his life, his challenges- honestly and candidly. I think all small business owners (particularly those making payroll.. aka "bosses") will relate to what he has to say at some point. "I hope that I can promote a better understanding of the factors that drive the behavior of small business owners and, by extension, show how a significant part of our economy functions. There's a lot of chatter about "job creators" from people who have never created a job. Politicians make rules, but aren't required to follow them. Employees complain without understanding why bosses act the way they do. And prospective entrepreneurs gamble their future without a clear picture of the challenges they will face. All these people need to know the other side of the story. This book is for them."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cam Waller

    Worth the read for small business owners, those who work for them, and those blissfully ignorant enough to want to become them. ;)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Randal White

    I Never Knew! Boss Life is the story of one man's small business experiences. Down's is the owner of a woodworking shop, and this is his chronicle of a year in the life of that business. Except it is so much more. Down's bares his soul and discusses all aspects of running the shop, and of his own personal life. I admit to being very surprised by this book. I know very little about running a business, having been employed by the government almost my entire life. I always thought it would be easy I Never Knew! Boss Life is the story of one man's small business experiences. Down's is the owner of a woodworking shop, and this is his chronicle of a year in the life of that business. Except it is so much more. Down's bares his soul and discusses all aspects of running the shop, and of his own personal life. I admit to being very surprised by this book. I know very little about running a business, having been employed by the government almost my entire life. I always thought it would be easy to start, and run my own business. I had NO idea! Down's lays out the nuts and bolts of what happens on a daily basis, from employee relations, advertising, production, shipping, taxes, and on and on. Things that I never even considered. But don't think that this is a technically driven instruction book, because it is not at all. It reads and unfolds like a great story. He has a way of making you feel like you are there with him, wondering what the next day will bring. I really could not put it down. I learned so much from his story, and hope that he keeps writing, as he has a wonderful gift for doing so. Highly recommend this book to all of us salaried, secure in our next paycheck, wage slaves; so that you get an idea of the life of a small businessman!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Two Readers in Love

    This is a very rare book: an honest business memoir. Even rarer: a business book that is a page-turner. I read this in one sitting. Most books for entrepreneurs are heavy on hype and low on reality. This book is presents the bewildering, frequently gut-wrenching, high-stakes *banality* of the month-to-month running of a business. Forget taking a "do you have the entrepreneurial spirit" quiz, just read this book and if you are still all-in then you can be sure you have it. (To be fair: small busi This is a very rare book: an honest business memoir. Even rarer: a business book that is a page-turner. I read this in one sitting. Most books for entrepreneurs are heavy on hype and low on reality. This book is presents the bewildering, frequently gut-wrenching, high-stakes *banality* of the month-to-month running of a business. Forget taking a "do you have the entrepreneurial spirit" quiz, just read this book and if you are still all-in then you can be sure you have it. (To be fair: small business owners are frequently caught up in their own, peculiar methods of crises management, and I bet that business authors who communicate a single simple idea that promises instant relief from a pain point sell more books. ) I spent my early career sitting in the boardrooms of large corporations in and around the greater Philadelphia area, and now as the owner of a small consulting business I'm sitting on the other side of those tables; I'm almost certain that I've sat at one of the beautifully veneered boardroom conference tables created by Paul Downs Cabinetmakers, the business featured in this book. Somehow it's nice to know that the people who made those tables were going through the same struggles as I went throught to have the privilege of sitting at it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sonya Mann

    Paul Downs runs a furniture-making business, but Boss Life isn't about woodworking. It's about business, which means human nature and economics, but it's not a dry textbook examination of those topics. Boss Life fascinating because Downs is brutally honest about his own experiences and financial success (or lack thereof). Boss Life is really about sales. It’s about marketing and customer acquisition. It’s about cash flow, accounting, and management. It's about relationships. Downs brings the read Paul Downs runs a furniture-making business, but Boss Life isn't about woodworking. It's about business, which means human nature and economics, but it's not a dry textbook examination of those topics. Boss Life fascinating because Downs is brutally honest about his own experiences and financial success (or lack thereof). Boss Life is really about sales. It’s about marketing and customer acquisition. It’s about cash flow, accounting, and management. It's about relationships. Downs brings the reader through a year in the life of his company (specifically 2012), beginning each chapter by stating his bank account balance, the value of sales to date, and whether he’s lost money overall. Then he explains the month’s events and why they had the financial repercussions they did. Part case study and part memoir, Downs’ book is worth reading if you employ people, are employed, or work in any capacity, no matter the size of your operation.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jim Knight

    Entertaining book. Basically just a small business owner's story. Not a blockbuster but interesting. It reads like a diary. e.g. "June 10, we only have 50k in the bank and payroll is due next week..." I enjoyed it but wouldn't go out of my way recommending it. Entertaining book. Basically just a small business owner's story. Not a blockbuster but interesting. It reads like a diary. e.g. "June 10, we only have 50k in the bank and payroll is due next week..." I enjoyed it but wouldn't go out of my way recommending it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katie Bruell

    I really enjoyed this book. It was suspenseful and well-written. I sympathized with the main character, and wanted him to succeed!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mary Heller

    Quick & interesting read - a look into the life of a small business owner. My husband will be reading it next.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Steven Perry

    That was an extremely real and raw view of what is this on small business. He had owned the business for about 26 years and had had his best year ever in the prior year. I thought it was interesting how much he was trying to get funding or government aid for putting his kid into MIT and it was his only year ever that his give back an average $13 an hour. I believe he had an average $30 an hour working in the beginning of his business, but it also loaned his business back half a million dollars, That was an extremely real and raw view of what is this on small business. He had owned the business for about 26 years and had had his best year ever in the prior year. I thought it was interesting how much he was trying to get funding or government aid for putting his kid into MIT and it was his only year ever that his give back an average $13 an hour. I believe he had an average $30 an hour working in the beginning of his business, but it also loaned his business back half a million dollars, so his total revenue came out to about $3 an hour. Throughout the entire book he's looking for ways to grow his business and you have to come to grips with his willingness to accept what he's doing wrong and accept feedback and coaching from a sales coach that he hires. You have no written process and he just operated based off the systems that have just been developed over time. He also keeps track of the cash every day. I think it's very interesting and his focus is on driving his cash reserves and he keeps track of how many days he can operate in the future, which is usually somewhere between two and three weeks based on the tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars of cash he has in the bank. A couple months into the year he stopped taking his salary and continues that through the entire rest of the year to ensure that they have enough cash to continue offering. He up in states his team every day or every Monday morning on how much cash they have, how many sales they made last week, and how long they can operate with their current level is interesting. He's not afraid to invest into his business as he takes several business trips and spends thousands of dollars to do that. He also does everything he can to satisfy customers even though that means that at times he's losing money on deals. He also spends $37,000 which is far more than he took him salary that year to have a coach cup. It was interesting how this was the year where he started to invest in himself and his team and growing people versus machinery and infrastructure and how this made it so that he could grow the people he currently has developed and put systems in place. Another thing, another thing that I think this would be an important book for the agents of our office to read both as new agents, so I know what life should be like as a business owner, how it can be very difficult. I think this book does a great job of betraying what a true business owner goes through, trying to make their business get up and running. Also how blessed they are to have to not worry about a lot of the things this business owner has to worry about, such as inventory, having a system that they know works versus maybe it will, maybe it won't. Also, I think that helps them understand what their business owner clients go through as this is a great betrayal of the day to day struggles and how it's not guaranteed that they'll get the next paycheck. I also think that this is a great example of how important the work that an advisor does cause that for 20 years, Paul only had $90,000 in a retirement account. And if he had went to sold his business, it wouldn't have shown profitable. So his business was technically worth nothing. So all those years of investing money back into your business, yeah, idea. And that going to be profitable doesn't always work out, but if you set money aside, at least you have an asset. Okay. And with the meth that he uses of knowing whether he can make purchases or investments or grow his business, I. E. How much cash is in the bank? If he were to siphon off more cash, he would be able to invest it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Richard Natali

    Great book! I have been dreaming about starting my own business and reading as much as I can to prepare. Paul's book is fantastic because it really is a "day in the life" or more like a year in the life of a small business owner. The business lives or dies on cash flow. Very candid, very honest telling of a very interesting story! It is full of suspense; I couldn't put it down! Here are just some of my thoughts after reading the book: People who start a small business because they think they'll g Great book! I have been dreaming about starting my own business and reading as much as I can to prepare. Paul's book is fantastic because it really is a "day in the life" or more like a year in the life of a small business owner. The business lives or dies on cash flow. Very candid, very honest telling of a very interesting story! It is full of suspense; I couldn't put it down! Here are just some of my thoughts after reading the book: People who start a small business because they think they'll get rich WILL FAIL. And I don't mean 9 times out of 10, I mean 10 times out of 10. I have seen many small businesses that are failing, and you can tell within a few minutes of walking into the place why it's failing. One very big reason is ego. These people who think they know best are driving the business into the ground and will not take any advice. You can read Paul's struggles in his book. On one hand, he's the only one who is shouldering all the burden of the company. Not paying himself a salary, loaning the company money from his own pocket, and constantly worrying about cash flow. That's all on his shoulders. However, he knows enough and he's not so proud that he won't take good advice and seeks it out when he knows he needs it. I think that's why his business has survived so long and his employees stick around. I'm still thinking about this, and I don't feel Paul really answered this: Why keep going? If he knew how difficult it was going to be, would he do it again? This is oversimplified, but in my estimate, in the 23 years discussed in the book, the business overall, has done just better than breaking even. Personally for Paul, over the years, he has loaned the business $500K of his own money and been paid back $150K. His salary has averaged, what? $60K per year maybe? From strictly a spreadsheet standpoint, it makes no sense to even start a business like this, or several years in, to cut your losses and become an employee somewhere. However, Paul is still running this company, and lots of small business owners are continuing to run their small businesses. Why? Paul's company employees 15 or so employees and provides a lot of tables to happy customers. Paul himself works long hours, long weeks, stressful days full of worrying about cash flow... Why do it? I can only guess that he enjoys the challenge, enjoys being his own boss, enjoys providing quality goods to deserving customers, and employees good people - helping them with their lives. Paul said there are no lessons in his book, but I think the real lesson is, if you are going to start your own small business, do it for the right reasons. The "right" reasons being those reasons that mean enough to you personally to see you through some really rough times. Thank you, Paul for giving us a glimpse into your world and opening your kimono, as it were. I certainly haven't found any other book like this.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Brown

    A Peak Behind the Curtain As a fellow small business owner serving a similar clientele to Paul, I found this book to be a bit like looking into a mirror. If you've ever thought of starting and running your own small business, read this. This WILL be your experience. Not might. WILL. Not 100% identical of course, but these are the types of joys and headaches you'll be dealing with every day. The cash and employee troubles can be mindboggling and completely unpredictable. You can be the world's grea A Peak Behind the Curtain As a fellow small business owner serving a similar clientele to Paul, I found this book to be a bit like looking into a mirror. If you've ever thought of starting and running your own small business, read this. This WILL be your experience. Not might. WILL. Not 100% identical of course, but these are the types of joys and headaches you'll be dealing with every day. The cash and employee troubles can be mindboggling and completely unpredictable. You can be the world's greatest salesman, but what happens when your top employee just doesn't show up one day so you can't deliver on the product as promised? Or the buyer "forgets" to send in the deposit but still needs the project by a specific date? Do you risk losing a big sale and call the bluff or do you forge ahead and hope for the best, potentially risking bankruptcy? Large companies don't have these headaches usually. A few employees don't show up for a few days & things chug along just fine. Small shops can be crippled. I suspect that most people who fantasize about opening their own "Mom & Pop" operation have never been exposed to the raw experiences so honestly portrayed in Boss Life. It's a fantastic "warts & all" look at the reality of one way to make a living. I love running my own small business partly in spite of these challenges and party because of them. If you are similarly running your own small business, I guarantee that you will pull some good lessons out of this book even though that wasn't really Paul's intent in writing it. If you simply enjoy reading about how other people make a living, this one is right up your alley. If you have any interest in opening a small business, stop what you're doing right now and read this. Think about it. Your business maybe completely different, but many of the experiences here will be replicated in a huge variety of different enterprises. Highly recommend it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Minh Ngoc Pham

    What can I say? I love love books that come at the right moment in time and resonate so personally that it feels like Providence must be answering my questions and doubt in the voice of another human. I have started a small business last year. At that time, I read Shoe Dog & Rework. I have been in the business for a little while, getting excited to test my products everyday, receive direct feedbacks from customers, growing frustrated with money in, money out, labor, hours, supply, you name it. I What can I say? I love love books that come at the right moment in time and resonate so personally that it feels like Providence must be answering my questions and doubt in the voice of another human. I have started a small business last year. At that time, I read Shoe Dog & Rework. I have been in the business for a little while, getting excited to test my products everyday, receive direct feedbacks from customers, growing frustrated with money in, money out, labor, hours, supply, you name it. I read Boss Life. Ok, the business is so tiny and so new; also I am not anyone's boss at this stage. It's just the Surviving-my-own-small-business part that is really like, oh, "This is us". Other than being personal, I love it because 1. this is business so grounded and detailed, to the minute.; 2. It doesn't try to keep the person separate from the job. When one founds and runs a small business, the business is integrated with his/her life. And the author open his home's door to let us know what it takes. I think that is very very brave. I might have given it 4 star and not 5 because - sometimes it boils down to so much number and I was hoping for more of the craft. Otherwise, thank you so much for telling the story with such openness.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Angie Herrera

    Apparently I read this book in six days. That’s unusual for me because I get bored real quick with a vast majority of books. But this one was hard for me to put down, which is weird for me to say since it’s a business book. But what made it so good was the narrative; the way Paul Downs wrote it. That’s what made it incredibly good to read (dare I say fun?). He makes it clear from the beginning that he won’t give any tips or step by step type stuff - and he doesn’t really - but you can still pick Apparently I read this book in six days. That’s unusual for me because I get bored real quick with a vast majority of books. But this one was hard for me to put down, which is weird for me to say since it’s a business book. But what made it so good was the narrative; the way Paul Downs wrote it. That’s what made it incredibly good to read (dare I say fun?). He makes it clear from the beginning that he won’t give any tips or step by step type stuff - and he doesn’t really - but you can still pick up some things along the way. I did. And more importantly, the book made me think a bit more on various areas of my own business. My struggles are a bit different than Paul’s, not only due to completely different industries, but because I’m solo; no employees. Still, I found great value from this book and don’t hesitate to recommend it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Klenk

    An exceptional book about the year in the life of a small business owner. Paul Downs owns a custom furniture business making mostly custom conference tables. The book is the story of his decisions, experiences, and efforts to keep the business going through the trials that arise during the year. From customer rejection through employee challenges to a trip through the middle east looking for contacts and more, Paul lets us see what he is thinking and feeling. He opens the books and explains why An exceptional book about the year in the life of a small business owner. Paul Downs owns a custom furniture business making mostly custom conference tables. The book is the story of his decisions, experiences, and efforts to keep the business going through the trials that arise during the year. From customer rejection through employee challenges to a trip through the middle east looking for contacts and more, Paul lets us see what he is thinking and feeling. He opens the books and explains why buying an expensive finishing spray gun is worth the investment to save material and time. He also shares the hardship of his family life with a developmentally challenged son who has grown so large that his wife can't take him shopping anymore. It is all there for us to read and learn from.

  16. 4 out of 5

    NéNé Chan

    Well, why did I pick this book? Because I saw a subheadline "surviving my own small business", which totally tickled me to see how a boss handles every single problem from a lower to higher-level position in one humble company on his own. As I am about to start my own small business, I am delighted to find this handy book just in time. At first, I found a little bit confusing and tiring because most of the pages started with years (jumped back and forth), numbers, and cash (Apparently I'm terrib Well, why did I pick this book? Because I saw a subheadline "surviving my own small business", which totally tickled me to see how a boss handles every single problem from a lower to higher-level position in one humble company on his own. As I am about to start my own small business, I am delighted to find this handy book just in time. At first, I found a little bit confusing and tiring because most of the pages started with years (jumped back and forth), numbers, and cash (Apparently I'm terrible at maths). Later on I began to see how inspiring this book is because all the problems are well recounted plus simply practical solutions and Paul Downs's catchy phrase "Hope for the best" all the time:)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Guillaume Lbw

    This book is a brutally honest portrayal of the struggle in becoming and being a successful small business owner. Reading and experiencing how Paul Downs created his own woodworking company was a remarkably interesting inside look in being a small business owner. The main character is likeable and easy to sympathise with, but it is also easy to relate to him and to learn from his own experiences.

  18. 4 out of 5

    michael

    This book is straight to the point. For a small business owner, i found this book very insightful and inspiring. Not only does Paul talk about the day to day challenges of being a boss, he also talks about his Family. Written in a narrative form, this book is very hard to put down and very easy to read. Business principles, Family principles, and just being a great human being. The guy tell it all with a great sense of humor. My favorite read of the year!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jason Schrock

    If you love the nitty gritty of running a small business (which I do), this is the book for you. A very down to earth, honest & practical look at the day to day life of a small business owner....including all the day to day decisions to make, the delicate balance between work and home, employee issues, it's all here. I do not own a small business but I am fascinated by it. This book did not disappoint! If you love the nitty gritty of running a small business (which I do), this is the book for you. A very down to earth, honest & practical look at the day to day life of a small business owner....including all the day to day decisions to make, the delicate balance between work and home, employee issues, it's all here. I do not own a small business but I am fascinated by it. This book did not disappoint!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    I’m interested in starting a small business, and I’ve always known that most information out there covers up the ugly (actually, quite beautiful and raw) truth about being a boss. Nothing was more encouraging and refreshing than learning how Paul managed all the ups and downs. It’s given me more confidence than anything else because I now know what kind of obstacles—big, small, internal, and external—I will encounter.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    I really liked this. It's a window into one small business owner's daily (and sometimes mundane) struggle with management, cash-flow, and the uncertainty that comes with not knowing whether your business is going to make it into the next year. Very well written, suspenseful, and such a refreshing change from all the "success porn" that the self-help industry churns out. I really liked this. It's a window into one small business owner's daily (and sometimes mundane) struggle with management, cash-flow, and the uncertainty that comes with not knowing whether your business is going to make it into the next year. Very well written, suspenseful, and such a refreshing change from all the "success porn" that the self-help industry churns out.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Great book that shows the real side of running your own business. Excellent play by play throughout the course of a year with the incoming and outgoing cashflow detailed in each chapter. Highly recommend to anyone who has considered running their own business or to anyone just curious about the life of a small business owner.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    I learned that Paul Downs and I are business soul mates. Who would have guessed that a business biography of a cabinet maker back East would have such a parallel with me, an architect in Utah. I have appreciated the difficult lessons Paul learned and then taught me. Thank you.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cody

    Loved this book! A true-to-life journal of the struggle, success and hardship of running a business. Paul Downs does a great job of weighing all his options, making difficult decisions and going through the rollercoaster ride of a business owner! Highly recommend!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Gardella

    The brilliance of this book is in the plethora of details. Golden nuggets of wisdom and honesty were wrapped up in what, at times, appeared to be the reading of financial statements. Highly recommend for the pearls for sure.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gaisha Ogball

    I was very surprised how much I enjoyed this book. It’s like a memoir of a business. Downs follows 1 year of his business and its ups and downs. Not your typical business book but I thoroughly enjoyed it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Moeller

    It was hard to believe there was one whole cd of this much less ten however through the thinking out loud introspective way it was written overall it was quite interesting to experience all of the challenges the author faced and the way he decided to solve them.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    5 stars for any small business owner. Fast read and you feel for Paul and his challenges at times. Remember, you can be profitable without cashflows and that can put you out of business. Cash is king.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kwang Wei Long

    insightful. for all budding entrepreneur, this book provides a glimpse to the struggles and growth and the life of a small time business owner.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Fairus

    I can smell the honesty and struggle in every sentence he wrote. The most rewarding thing for him is being able to provide livelihood for his staff. Well done Paul.

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