web site hit counter Rolling Rocks Downhill: The Agile Business Novel which never mentions Agile - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Rolling Rocks Downhill: The Agile Business Novel which never mentions Agile

Availability: Ready to download

You want it when? Rolling Rocks Downhill is a fast, entertaining and often funny read. It's a business novel, just like Eli Goldratt's classic "The Goal", where you sit on the characters' shoulders, watching them fight to save their jobs and their baby - a large software-intensive project that's been running late since day 1, but now, suddenly, needs to deliver on an imposs You want it when? Rolling Rocks Downhill is a fast, entertaining and often funny read. It's a business novel, just like Eli Goldratt's classic "The Goal", where you sit on the characters' shoulders, watching them fight to save their jobs and their baby - a large software-intensive project that's been running late since day 1, but now, suddenly, needs to deliver on an impossibly early date, or else. You feel their pain, and their joy, as they battle problem after problem until, slowly, torturously, they rediscover the few - but fundamental - principles underlying successful commercial software development. Sometimes you're a step ahead, sometimes a step behind. Sometimes you feel like you're sitting in the room with them ... Successful Commercial Software Development This is NOT a technical book. It doesn't mention "Agile". It doesn't ram techniques and practices down your throat. There are many other books for that. Rolling Rocks downhill will help you rediscover the handful of principles required to deliver commercial software projects ON TIME or, if you prefer, EARLY. It's a book about building-quality-in and then running as FAST as you can. You might think you already know how it ends ... you're wrong.


Compare

You want it when? Rolling Rocks Downhill is a fast, entertaining and often funny read. It's a business novel, just like Eli Goldratt's classic "The Goal", where you sit on the characters' shoulders, watching them fight to save their jobs and their baby - a large software-intensive project that's been running late since day 1, but now, suddenly, needs to deliver on an imposs You want it when? Rolling Rocks Downhill is a fast, entertaining and often funny read. It's a business novel, just like Eli Goldratt's classic "The Goal", where you sit on the characters' shoulders, watching them fight to save their jobs and their baby - a large software-intensive project that's been running late since day 1, but now, suddenly, needs to deliver on an impossibly early date, or else. You feel their pain, and their joy, as they battle problem after problem until, slowly, torturously, they rediscover the few - but fundamental - principles underlying successful commercial software development. Sometimes you're a step ahead, sometimes a step behind. Sometimes you feel like you're sitting in the room with them ... Successful Commercial Software Development This is NOT a technical book. It doesn't mention "Agile". It doesn't ram techniques and practices down your throat. There are many other books for that. Rolling Rocks downhill will help you rediscover the handful of principles required to deliver commercial software projects ON TIME or, if you prefer, EARLY. It's a book about building-quality-in and then running as FAST as you can. You might think you already know how it ends ... you're wrong.

30 review for Rolling Rocks Downhill: The Agile Business Novel which never mentions Agile

  1. 5 out of 5

    Vlad

    A very fun read, that does a better job explaining agile and the way we can implement it than a lot non-fiction books on the topic. A definite must-read for anyone working with an agile team, especially if they're not part of the development process. Not going to give away anything from the book because honestly you just have to read it. Oh and it's very well written as well, which makes it well worth the time invested, even for people familiar with the subject matter. A very fun read, that does a better job explaining agile and the way we can implement it than a lot non-fiction books on the topic. A definite must-read for anyone working with an agile team, especially if they're not part of the development process. Not going to give away anything from the book because honestly you just have to read it. Oh and it's very well written as well, which makes it well worth the time invested, even for people familiar with the subject matter.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    I found the book entertaining. It is everything it says. It is a novel it doesn't go into details about Agile, but I think it was better that way. It kept me hook and I finished faster than usual. I found the book entertaining. It is everything it says. It is a novel it doesn't go into details about Agile, but I think it was better that way. It kept me hook and I finished faster than usual.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Victor

    Concepts that can me a bit vague and intangible are made concrete via practical anecdotes that we can all relate to. However, I didn't leave the book feeling like I was comfortable with the scrum process. Very enjoyable read though, especially for a technical book. Concepts that can me a bit vague and intangible are made concrete via practical anecdotes that we can all relate to. However, I didn't leave the book feeling like I was comfortable with the scrum process. Very enjoyable read though, especially for a technical book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Adam Griffiths

    I would recommend this book to anyone who’s looking for complimentary reading to The Phoenix Project, specifically anyone looking for a more Development Manager view of things. There are some great analogies - the story about soup for me is one of the best metaphors for low risk releases that I’ve come across and I’ll never forget The French Fry Revolution! As an added bonus I even laughed in a couple of places... dude. The dude, in case you were wondering, was ironic!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marcus Hammarberg

    Wonderful storytelling start to finish This is a great engaging story that teaches anyone in the software business some valueable things. For me, except the great writing, this stands out; - cutting scope is the best way to meet deadlines. Period. - look for the bottleneck before optimizing the system. Or you might only be making the value chain heavier. - focus on flow of finished features Great book. Thanks.

  6. 5 out of 5

    F. Stephan

    Fantastic read ! This is a great business novel. OK, the genre is very specific. I loved it. I knew the theory of constraints through the Goal and Critical Chain but this is a revised modern approach that sounds so real. It got me thinking as it is meant to be !!! Congratulation

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Entertaining. Makes the case for agile development methods without being too preachy. Might be worth giving to someone who is skeptical of anything but the waterfall, but more as a conversation starter than a definitive argument for agile because that’s not what the book is.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mike Burke

    Realistic! Good book. Realistic; conforms to actual software development problems. Less TOC than I expected, and also less Agile than I expected. But the story moves along (I read it one evening), and left me with some valuable thinking to do.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Blundell

    good read, it's a shame it never mentions agility - yes they learn something but it would be nice to have more concrete references. good read, it's a shame it never mentions agility - yes they learn something but it would be nice to have more concrete references.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Thierry de Pauw

    If you have read The Goal and you are working in the software industry, this is a must-read book. Clarke very well applies the theory of constraints to software delivery.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Simon Taplin

    Interesting software development story An interesting read on agile software development in a fictional company. Doesn’t mention any of the pitfalls but still a good read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Frieda

    I really loved this, got so caught up in the story I read it in one night!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I thought this was a really good Business Novel, well worth reading if you are working in Software delivery.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mylene

    A nice and educational business novel (and all problems are very familiar :))

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mark Polino

    Good book. Cleaner story than some of the other business parables I’ve read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bob Wallner

    4-1/2 stars if that was an option. I really enjoyed the story line about turning a project around using Agile & TOC together! I am a true believer in using TOC with Lean and 6 Sigma but I didn't know much about Agile to know how they would fit. The book doesn't go into a lot of detail about the details of Agile or TOC but much like the Goal it makes you go out and think how the problem could be solved. What I enjoyed most was the coach, didn't tell our protagonist what to do. Stories like this re 4-1/2 stars if that was an option. I really enjoyed the story line about turning a project around using Agile & TOC together! I am a true believer in using TOC with Lean and 6 Sigma but I didn't know much about Agile to know how they would fit. The book doesn't go into a lot of detail about the details of Agile or TOC but much like the Goal it makes you go out and think how the problem could be solved. What I enjoyed most was the coach, didn't tell our protagonist what to do. Stories like this really help enforce how a coach is supposed to act. He listened - He asked questions - He let our manager think and discover on his own. I listened to the audiobook and was quite pleased with the content of both the story, it was entertaining, and the power of the learning, it was educational. I found myself staying in the car for a few minutes when I got to my destination to hear the end of the chapter. The chapters are short (< 15 minutes if you are listening) but packed with inspiration. In the spirit of Dr Goldratt, Mr. Ching leaves the ending open for sequal. I have read many of Dr. Goldratt's novels and I think would be proud of Rolling Rocks Downhill.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Horia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read this book because it was presented to me as an updated and easier to read version of "The Goal". I can relate a big part of it with "The phoenix Project" which is more comprehensive, but admittedly a longer read. The Phoenix Project includes concepts from devops and lean manufacturing. Back to the review: It was funny to see that all the problems Steve had were solved at the managerial level and the culture change was so easy and straightforward (basically everyone started working in "the n I read this book because it was presented to me as an updated and easier to read version of "The Goal". I can relate a big part of it with "The phoenix Project" which is more comprehensive, but admittedly a longer read. The Phoenix Project includes concepts from devops and lean manufacturing. Back to the review: It was funny to see that all the problems Steve had were solved at the managerial level and the culture change was so easy and straightforward (basically everyone started working in "the new way" immediately and there were no problems there). There were a couple of arguments here and there, but all the stakeholders were more than happy to listen to Steve's orders. I wonder if it is the same in reality. But it's a novel and the author wanted to explain the principles behind "The goal" and that purpose was definitely achieved. It became very clear to me how every process can be improved by breaking it down into parts and looking for the bottlenecks. This was a major takeaway for me. To sum up, the book is easy to read, ITers will relate to it easily and it explains well the bottleneck theory. But don't expect to get a lot more than that.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gustav Bertram

    A great combination of Agile and the Theory of Constraints This book is great at applying Goldratt's theory of constraints as a framework for understanding what Agile practices are valuable to adopt. It's a bit application specific, and I think it could be better at explaining the underlying concepts, but you could get those by studying The Goal. It does have a marvelous mnemonic device to remember the evaporating cloud technique, which I'm immediately adopting. It's also very funny. A great combination of Agile and the Theory of Constraints This book is great at applying Goldratt's theory of constraints as a framework for understanding what Agile practices are valuable to adopt. It's a bit application specific, and I think it could be better at explaining the underlying concepts, but you could get those by studying The Goal. It does have a marvelous mnemonic device to remember the evaporating cloud technique, which I'm immediately adopting. It's also very funny.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jack Vinson

    Clarke Ching's "Rolling Rocks Downhill" is a great business novel, primarily about TOC and Agile. I like how it combines a number of perspectives and shows how real value can be obtained in surprisingly short time horizons. That said, it helps when there is outside pressure. More on my blog: https://www.jackvinson.com/blog/2016/... Clarke Ching's "Rolling Rocks Downhill" is a great business novel, primarily about TOC and Agile. I like how it combines a number of perspectives and shows how real value can be obtained in surprisingly short time horizons. That said, it helps when there is outside pressure. More on my blog: https://www.jackvinson.com/blog/2016/...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sean Craig

    A modern day parable I am fond of using analogies to explain things. What struck me most about what Clarke has done here is wrap up a powerful idea in an accessible, engaging story with lots of insight on offer. I will be recommending it to colleagues and of course I loved the cafeteria analogy ☺

  21. 5 out of 5

    Francesco Sacchi

    I really enjoyed reading this book although with a moderate agile experience most of the discoveries of the main character are well known practices. there are lots of references to "the goal" which I recommend to read first. there are though some interesting points about the theory of constraints and its application so I found this to be a good reading I really enjoyed reading this book although with a moderate agile experience most of the discoveries of the main character are well known practices. there are lots of references to "the goal" which I recommend to read first. there are though some interesting points about the theory of constraints and its application so I found this to be a good reading

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nima

    This book is a true agile beta version! it's a little bit unpolished, mostly in first chapters but still high quality and shipable! I have read many agile text books, but this book to me was like walking in the company seeing implemented agile and lean. But applying TOC was not good enough! This book is a true agile beta version! it's a little bit unpolished, mostly in first chapters but still high quality and shipable! I have read many agile text books, but this book to me was like walking in the company seeing implemented agile and lean. But applying TOC was not good enough!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Øystein

    Wonderful engaging story Lot's of good advice packed in an interesting business story. I xould easily recognize the problems the characters are faxing, despite having worked in small companies most of my carreer. Recommended. Wonderful engaging story Lot's of good advice packed in an interesting business story. I xould easily recognize the problems the characters are faxing, despite having worked in small companies most of my carreer. Recommended.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Graham Hay

    nearly as enjoyable as The Goal!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marcin

    A little cheesy, nice story nevertheless.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gary Watts

    Not as good as the Phoenix Project but a good story around the importance of Agile in IT delivery

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nikola Brežnjak

    Good, but Phoenix Project is few leagues above it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Russ

    Good, but I may not be a good judge. Already read The Goal and Phoenix Project, so far, neither beats The Goal, and neither goes far enough in mapping lean to software in my judgement, but not bad, worth reading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Edward Dahllöf

    "The Goal" in IT-setting. A trubbled Poduct Manager gets help from Flow Coach. All of that is good. However it's one person doing the thinking, and what I would like to know is how the knowledge is spread, how do you get the whole team on the right track. As I understand it, the Project Manager got it and then just made it so. Would like to know more about how he got his whole team onboard. "The Goal" in IT-setting. A trubbled Poduct Manager gets help from Flow Coach. All of that is good. However it's one person doing the thinking, and what I would like to know is how the knowledge is spread, how do you get the whole team on the right track. As I understand it, the Project Manager got it and then just made it so. Would like to know more about how he got his whole team onboard.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pavleras

    It is a readable novel in which you will learn a little bit about Theory Of Constraints and batch sizes. It's worth reading it if you are a newbie in Agile. It is interesting the evaporatuing clouds thinking of ToC. It is a readable novel in which you will learn a little bit about Theory Of Constraints and batch sizes. It's worth reading it if you are a newbie in Agile. It is interesting the evaporatuing clouds thinking of ToC.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...