web site hit counter The Lone Drow - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Lone Drow

Availability: Ready to download

Alone on the battlefield. Surrounded by death. Cornered by enemies. And ready to die. Drizzt Do'Urden has become the Hunter, the bane of the orc hordes still ravaging the North. Cut off, alone, convinced that everything he ever valued has been destroyed, all that's left is to kill, and kill, and kill, until there are no enemies left. But there are a lot of enemies, and even th Alone on the battlefield. Surrounded by death. Cornered by enemies. And ready to die. Drizzt Do'Urden has become the Hunter, the bane of the orc hordes still ravaging the North. Cut off, alone, convinced that everything he ever valued has been destroyed, all that's left is to kill, and kill, and kill, until there are no enemies left. But there are a lot of enemies, and even the Hunter is just one lone drow.


Compare

Alone on the battlefield. Surrounded by death. Cornered by enemies. And ready to die. Drizzt Do'Urden has become the Hunter, the bane of the orc hordes still ravaging the North. Cut off, alone, convinced that everything he ever valued has been destroyed, all that's left is to kill, and kill, and kill, until there are no enemies left. But there are a lot of enemies, and even th Alone on the battlefield. Surrounded by death. Cornered by enemies. And ready to die. Drizzt Do'Urden has become the Hunter, the bane of the orc hordes still ravaging the North. Cut off, alone, convinced that everything he ever valued has been destroyed, all that's left is to kill, and kill, and kill, until there are no enemies left. But there are a lot of enemies, and even the Hunter is just one lone drow.

30 review for The Lone Drow

  1. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    Middle book syndrome means something else for Drizzt Do'Urden. In the Legend of Drizzt, the middle books are quite frequently the best. Between Siege of Darkness, The Spine of the World and The Lone Drow, I count three in a row. The key is that they're slightly different. In his middle books, Salvatore appears to force himself to think new. The first book of every Drizzt trilogy always more or less follows the same recipe, and the same is true for the last. The middle book(s), however, often tell Middle book syndrome means something else for Drizzt Do'Urden. In the Legend of Drizzt, the middle books are quite frequently the best. Between Siege of Darkness, The Spine of the World and The Lone Drow, I count three in a row. The key is that they're slightly different. In his middle books, Salvatore appears to force himself to think new. The first book of every Drizzt trilogy always more or less follows the same recipe, and the same is true for the last. The middle book(s), however, often tell a different story, with a new and refreshed perspective. Here, with the story of a lost Drizzt devolving into an instinct-driven hunter on a rampage of retribution, and of the rise of an Orc demigod providing intriguing insights into the cultural and societal forces behind the formation of an Orcish horde, the middle Drizzt syndrome strikes again.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Greg Strandberg

    I enjoyed this book a lot more the second time than the first. There are lots of windpipes getting slashed in this book, lots of angry dwarves, and quite a few orcs skewered on helmet spikes. I liked how the drow hunting Drizzt thought he might be an agent of destruction for Lloth. Those were the best parts – the fights between the drow. Very vivid scenes, and they’re the best part of this book. I will say that there are some bad parts to this book. They include the continual reminiscing on Ellif I enjoyed this book a lot more the second time than the first. There are lots of windpipes getting slashed in this book, lots of angry dwarves, and quite a few orcs skewered on helmet spikes. I liked how the drow hunting Drizzt thought he might be an agent of destruction for Lloth. Those were the best parts – the fights between the drow. Very vivid scenes, and they’re the best part of this book. I will say that there are some bad parts to this book. They include the continual reminiscing on Ellifain, though that seems to finally be over. Pikel was another that I could do without. I was also losing track of Nesme and some of the other cities and the human/dwarf politics. Maybe there’s too much at times, but in the end, the fighting always plows right over those plot holes, or just the parts you got bored with and can’t remember. This is another good showing by Salvatore and if you’re this far into the series, it’s what you’ve come to want and expect.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    It is not a bad book, but the last few titles in the Drizzt campaign have been lackluster--including this one. The main problem is the lack of growth in the series. While events happen that should change things, everything eventually remains the same. Wulfgar and Bruenor should rightfully be dead at this point (or in Wulfgar's case he should be busy raising a kid instead of out gratuitously adventuring), and Drizzt should have had the courage to either love Catti-brie as he should or give a defi It is not a bad book, but the last few titles in the Drizzt campaign have been lackluster--including this one. The main problem is the lack of growth in the series. While events happen that should change things, everything eventually remains the same. Wulfgar and Bruenor should rightfully be dead at this point (or in Wulfgar's case he should be busy raising a kid instead of out gratuitously adventuring), and Drizzt should have had the courage to either love Catti-brie as he should or give a definite no so she can move on. He may be long-lived, but she is not. Instead, we have a repetitive plot where things happen but in the end nothing changes much. Everyone is still there constantly dwelling on their problems that they seem to have had since the beginning, and Drizzt himself has developed a bad case of righteousness, without a doubt. This may be comforting, but I lost my ability to be surprised by the characters. I also feel they won't die, thus my excitement when they get to a fight is diminished. Ten orcs attack; ten orcs die. Sure there is some flashy footwork, but we have seen it all before. Also, Drizzt needs to be fighting more than just orcs, ogres, etc., etc. He used to face off with dragons, demons, deadly swordsmen, and high-end wizards. That has definitely tapered off of late, and that has also dampened my interests as well. I am hoping that the third book actually changes some things and causes growth. it looks like Salvatore is setting up a new love for Drizzt, but we will have to wait and see.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aja: The Narcoleptic Ninja

    This one was a bit of a slog for me... review to follow.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kyleigh

    I really enjoyed this book. Recently I have been re-reading through the Drizzt books. At the time that I read this I was between Streams of Silver and The Halfling’s Gem. This book is quite different from the older books, but it was still very enjoyable. It took a while for the book to build up, but once it got going it was fantastic. I got tired of Drizzt being all mopey. The alter-ego of the Hunter wasn’t as strong as I was expecting. In Exile, the Hunter took over Drizzt’s life. He couldn’t t I really enjoyed this book. Recently I have been re-reading through the Drizzt books. At the time that I read this I was between Streams of Silver and The Halfling’s Gem. This book is quite different from the older books, but it was still very enjoyable. It took a while for the book to build up, but once it got going it was fantastic. I got tired of Drizzt being all mopey. The alter-ego of the Hunter wasn’t as strong as I was expecting. In Exile, the Hunter took over Drizzt’s life. He couldn’t turn it on and off as he pleased. In this one he used it to his gain, and then maybe felt bad afterwards. I was looking forward to that struggle with the Hunter taking control. The plot with Bruenor had been spoiled for me by reading a poorly written review, so I missed out on some of the suspense that should have been there. Still it was a great book. I liked the groove that you see Catti-Brie and Wulfgar falling into. Also, I like the twist introduced by the relationship between Drizzt and Innovindil.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eric Class

    In The Lone Drow, R.A. Salvatore goes back and reintroduces something that has been rarely seen in the Legend of Drizzit series, an angry Drizzit. Very few times has he slipped into such madness that he is willing to risk life and limb just to kill all enemies that are in front of him and around him. However, that is what he does since he saw his true friends fall, along with the entire tower they were standing on. Now he is a man on a mission, to get revenge. There is nothing scarier than an el In The Lone Drow, R.A. Salvatore goes back and reintroduces something that has been rarely seen in the Legend of Drizzit series, an angry Drizzit. Very few times has he slipped into such madness that he is willing to risk life and limb just to kill all enemies that are in front of him and around him. However, that is what he does since he saw his true friends fall, along with the entire tower they were standing on. Now he is a man on a mission, to get revenge. There is nothing scarier than an elf with nothing to lose. This book focuses heavily on Drizzit's state of mind while balancing what is happening with the ongoing war that he is a part of that began in the first book. Sometimes the transition is rather shaky, but Salvatore pulls it off beautifully.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Branwen Sedai *of the Brown Ajah*

    "I did everything right. Every step of my journey out of Menzoberranzan was guided by my inner map of right anf wrong, of community and selflessness. Even on those occasions when I failed, as everyone must, my missteps were of judgment or simple frailty and were not in disregard to my conscience. For in there, I know, reside the higher principles and tenets that move us all closer to our chosen gods, closer to our definitions, hopes, and understandings of paradise. But now...now I know only the "I did everything right. Every step of my journey out of Menzoberranzan was guided by my inner map of right anf wrong, of community and selflessness. Even on those occasions when I failed, as everyone must, my missteps were of judgment or simple frailty and were not in disregard to my conscience. For in there, I know, reside the higher principles and tenets that move us all closer to our chosen gods, closer to our definitions, hopes, and understandings of paradise. But now...now I know only the pain of memory and the pleasure of the hunt. I will take that pleasure, to the end. Poor Drizzt! In this second book of R.A. Salvatore's Hunter's Blades trilogy, Drizzit finds himself alone in the wilderness believing that Bruenor, Wulfgar, Regis, and Catti-brie, his most beloved companions, are dead. So he has reverted back into the killing machine he refers to as the hunter, and hunts down bands of orcs and trolls and slaughters them endlessly. Meanwhile, the companions of the hall are NOT dead, they are in fact holed up deep within Mithral Hall along with hundreds of dwarves from Mirabar fighting off the orc armies who are trying to annihilate them all once and for all. This book is amazing! But then, I might be biased as I am a huge fan of this series. ;) The thing I love most about these books is the wonderful balance between serious character development and the rip roaring action sequences. R. A. Salvatore has a perfect knack for drawing you into a story and making you feel such an emotional depth for the characters. Every time I pick up one of these books I feel like I am coming home again and meeting up with old friends. It's such a warm feeling! And just all in all its just a fun fantasy story. I would really recommend this book to any fan of the fantasy genre.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

    Another well-written Drizzt tale. Salvatore demonstrates his usual fine bility to convey the intensity of emotion and the intriguing interaction between various well-drawn characters. Drizzt is vaguely plotting some sort of revenge following the death of his friends, and Salvatore does a fine job conveying the toll this takes on Drizzt. Interesting and smoothly written. Of course, the book is packed with the usual action, but this can get a little overwhelming at times. Also some of the Cattie-B Another well-written Drizzt tale. Salvatore demonstrates his usual fine bility to convey the intensity of emotion and the intriguing interaction between various well-drawn characters. Drizzt is vaguely plotting some sort of revenge following the death of his friends, and Salvatore does a fine job conveying the toll this takes on Drizzt. Interesting and smoothly written. Of course, the book is packed with the usual action, but this can get a little overwhelming at times. Also some of the Cattie-Brie-Wulfgar dialogue is a bit too cheesy, and character development takes a back seat to action a lot of the time. And Salvatore’s attempts to craft internal dialogue are just too cumbersome. And the names, please. Where did Salvatore come up with “Muffinhead”?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paulo "paper books always" Carvalho

    I enjoy the novel. IT took me a while to finish but in the end it was a nice reading that really made me wanna read the next novels in a row. The tale we follow Drizzt as he tries to recover from the supposedly loss of all his friends. Meanwhile Catti-brie & Wulfgar try to make a stand against the Orcs while Bruenor is almost non-existent since he is in a coma. We also follow Regis as he tries to unite the dwarves in war. Probably a third of the novel we follow other characters that added to a al I enjoy the novel. IT took me a while to finish but in the end it was a nice reading that really made me wanna read the next novels in a row. The tale we follow Drizzt as he tries to recover from the supposedly loss of all his friends. Meanwhile Catti-brie & Wulfgar try to make a stand against the Orcs while Bruenor is almost non-existent since he is in a coma. We also follow Regis as he tries to unite the dwarves in war. Probably a third of the novel we follow other characters that added to a almost epic fantasy series but unfortunately I don't care about most of them. We follow the drows, Obould, the two elves & other minor characters... Overall a nice addition but I wished more Drizzt the Hunter.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Netanella

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. For a book called The Lone Drow, this book had a lot of descriptions of fighting dwarves, fighting orcs, fighting giants, etc. There was not a lot of character development, since Bruenor was comatose and Cattie-Brie and Wulfgar barely left the same spot, and there were several obvious story developments - the deaths of Sceptrana Shoudra and that of the Moonwood elf what's-his-name, for example. This book is definitely not Salvatore at his best. However, I am, like most fantasy readers, a huge fa For a book called The Lone Drow, this book had a lot of descriptions of fighting dwarves, fighting orcs, fighting giants, etc. There was not a lot of character development, since Bruenor was comatose and Cattie-Brie and Wulfgar barely left the same spot, and there were several obvious story developments - the deaths of Sceptrana Shoudra and that of the Moonwood elf what's-his-name, for example. This book is definitely not Salvatore at his best. However, I am, like most fantasy readers, a huge fan of Drizzt and will continue to push through the excellent and mediocre offerings alike.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kati

    Too long, too long-winded, too dragged out. At a certain point, I felt like strangling the author. I literally yelled at the story to finally move ON! Fight, retreat, talk. Fight, retreat, talk. Lather, rinse, repeat ad infinitum. The deaths surprised me, though, I didn't expect them. My favorite characters in this book: Regis and Nanfoodle. Too long, too long-winded, too dragged out. At a certain point, I felt like strangling the author. I literally yelled at the story to finally move ON! Fight, retreat, talk. Fight, retreat, talk. Lather, rinse, repeat ad infinitum. The deaths surprised me, though, I didn't expect them. My favorite characters in this book: Regis and Nanfoodle.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Macri

    Goodness. Angry Drizz't. Stupid Drizz't. Just go home and learn the truth. This book had several parts that bothered me. How did that miraculous recovery happen? When incapacitated, your muscles are weakened. How are you able to go to war that soon? So much of this book felt forced so that RA Salvatore could continue pushing the plot forward. Just... go home Drizz't! Stop being an idiot! Goodness. Angry Drizz't. Stupid Drizz't. Just go home and learn the truth. This book had several parts that bothered me. How did that miraculous recovery happen? When incapacitated, your muscles are weakened. How are you able to go to war that soon? So much of this book felt forced so that RA Salvatore could continue pushing the plot forward. Just... go home Drizz't! Stop being an idiot!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Read half of this (listened to) and probably won't return to it unless I'm somehow at a total loss of other things to read. I thought the Drizzt books would grab me, but I remained ungrabbed after my first listen. Maybe I started on too late a book in the mega series. We may never know Read half of this (listened to) and probably won't return to it unless I'm somehow at a total loss of other things to read. I thought the Drizzt books would grab me, but I remained ungrabbed after my first listen. Maybe I started on too late a book in the mega series. We may never know

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    Yet another surprisingly good entry into this series, if anything better then the first. The development and growth of the villains, specifically the orc king Obould was excellent. The brute turning into someone with a thought out plan was very entertaining. There is also some nice drama between emissaries from Mirabar and Mithral Hall, with Regis really coming into his own as a steward for the Hall. There is also an awesome, desperate plan that is done, with Pikel and the gnome working together a Yet another surprisingly good entry into this series, if anything better then the first. The development and growth of the villains, specifically the orc king Obould was excellent. The brute turning into someone with a thought out plan was very entertaining. There is also some nice drama between emissaries from Mirabar and Mithral Hall, with Regis really coming into his own as a steward for the Hall. There is also an awesome, desperate plan that is done, with Pikel and the gnome working together and while it was obvious what they were trying for, I think climax lived up to the hype. Yet again; however, several things kept this book from receiving a 4 star rating. The biggest one is Drizzt annoying and pointless section diary entries. Who needs this whiny introspection that basically repeats exactly what happened already in the story. We get it, you are torn and like your friends...! There is also an annoying chapter where Cattle-brie and Wulfgar have a very odd and forced conversation about her feelings about Drizzt, while in the middle of a battle, and their adoptive father is dying. Just seemed weird and pointless. We didn't need this sledgehammer style of romance, show me it, don't have awkward forced conversations. Finally, again the description of the fighting style, specifically of the elves is excessively hard to picture. I think in part because what they are doing doesn't actually seem possible. The dwarves battle descriptions make sense, I see them and enjoy it. But the elves are all unrealistic dashing, weird slashes, and things that aren't described well. Overall I think this was a strong addition to the Drizzt storyline, but still suffers from the central problem to Drizzt stories, their whiny and annoying main character, who bounces from being perfectly emotionally balanced, to crying, to raging, to "introspective" at the drop of a hat, an untouchable main characters (again Drizzt) who seems to get into extreme danger repeatedly and leave largely untouched, and finally combat descriptions that at times are extremely bad and impossible to visualize (again Drizzt).

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Sorry to say, but I have started to cheer for the orcs. I really don't get why the dwarfs or humans should have more right to these lands then the orcs. Especially now that king Obould has had his moment of great clarity and insight, I can't fail to see that his claim seems as valid as any other. As he seems to be leading his people towards a stable understanding and position in the region that does not include full on genocide off all others but rather a reshaping of power balances that will re Sorry to say, but I have started to cheer for the orcs. I really don't get why the dwarfs or humans should have more right to these lands then the orcs. Especially now that king Obould has had his moment of great clarity and insight, I can't fail to see that his claim seems as valid as any other. As he seems to be leading his people towards a stable understanding and position in the region that does not include full on genocide off all others but rather a reshaping of power balances that will result in a better life for orcs that have had the worst situation by far. nah I am all for the Orc claim here, no to random slaughter but yes for legitimate claims of land and prosperity.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leah Hester

    An audiobook I finally finished (as there was a huge pause in the middle of the year), I'm so glad my friend suggested this series! I love D&D, and stories that are based around it are incredible, and the Forgotten Realms is no exception- except in that it's a near perfect story. Drizzt's struggle is both heartbreaking and inspiring, and the events that are unfolding before the cast of characters is ground-shaking and brilliantly told. I'm excited to continue reading the stories of the Forgotten An audiobook I finally finished (as there was a huge pause in the middle of the year), I'm so glad my friend suggested this series! I love D&D, and stories that are based around it are incredible, and the Forgotten Realms is no exception- except in that it's a near perfect story. Drizzt's struggle is both heartbreaking and inspiring, and the events that are unfolding before the cast of characters is ground-shaking and brilliantly told. I'm excited to continue reading the stories of the Forgotten Realms, and look forward to the 3rd book in this trilogy!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tom Seely

    I really enjoyed this black elf book.All of them in the series is very good.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Second book in the trilogy. The setup: The orcs have come together along with the giants, goblins and trolls. They are united and are set to take Mithral Hall and kill all the dwarves. We really only have two plotlines in this book. One: There's a battle and it takes the entire book. Yup, one battle, one entire book. Two: Drizzt - he thinks all his loved ones are dead so he is alone with nothing more to do than kill and kill and kill. And reflect on those he lost, on the life he's lived. We've got al Second book in the trilogy. The setup: The orcs have come together along with the giants, goblins and trolls. They are united and are set to take Mithral Hall and kill all the dwarves. We really only have two plotlines in this book. One: There's a battle and it takes the entire book. Yup, one battle, one entire book. Two: Drizzt - he thinks all his loved ones are dead so he is alone with nothing more to do than kill and kill and kill. And reflect on those he lost, on the life he's lived. We've got all the characters (and please spend some time to enjoy the characters names) Drizzt Cattie-brie Wulfgar Regis (now the steward of Mithral Hall) Bruenor (in a coma for the entire book) Banak Brawnanvil Ivan Bouldershoulder Torgar Hammerstriker Shoudra Stargleam Nanfoodle Shingles McGruff Tred McKnuckles etc. Like always we've got Salvatore's strengths - characters are amazing, action and fight sequences are without equal. But Not much of a plot here - the book is really just Drizzt killing orcs and one major battle at Mithral Hall. Most of my friends think this is one of the strongest series in all of the Forgotten Realms but so far it's been one of the weakest (for me). But I love Salvatore and will keep reading because at the end of the day what I care most about are the characters and he does characters development and character interaction better than almost anyone.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brandon J.

    Drizzt has lost almost all he has ever loved or cared for, or so he thinks. In the second entry of the enthralling "The Hunter's Blades" trilogy. Drizzt finds himself alone, angry, depressed, and confused. With him believing his companions slain all he does, is kill, and kill, kill. Even in his sorrow he finds himself curiously drawn to a pair of surface elves that may teach him to love again. Even with this small hope he is trailed by more pain, but a hope of saving what is what is left of his Drizzt has lost almost all he has ever loved or cared for, or so he thinks. In the second entry of the enthralling "The Hunter's Blades" trilogy. Drizzt finds himself alone, angry, depressed, and confused. With him believing his companions slain all he does, is kill, and kill, kill. Even in his sorrow he finds himself curiously drawn to a pair of surface elves that may teach him to love again. Even with this small hope he is trailed by more pain, but a hope of saving what is what is left of his friends. I found this book to be one of the most enjoyable fantasy novels I have ever read. So if you are a nerd at heart who loves giants, dwarfs, and wizards this is definitely a book for you. But if you are a reader who is more into a slow read or if you just don’t overly enjoy pure fantasy books, you should maybe try a different series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nico

    Brilliant Drizzt book again. I really like this trilogy. It's a bit darker than the previous adventures. Very nonstop action with lots of battles, that are of course very predictable, but that's what you get when reading this series. Off to the next one! Brilliant Drizzt book again. I really like this trilogy. It's a bit darker than the previous adventures. Very nonstop action with lots of battles, that are of course very predictable, but that's what you get when reading this series. Off to the next one!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dante Carlisle

    Fantastic as always As he ever does Bob Salvatore absolutely astonishes with this story. No matter how much you read these characters they're always there to surprise. It's the mark of a true storyteller that even after fifteen books in every page is one you're eager to turn over. Fantastic as always As he ever does Bob Salvatore absolutely astonishes with this story. No matter how much you read these characters they're always there to surprise. It's the mark of a true storyteller that even after fifteen books in every page is one you're eager to turn over.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Robert Kemp

    Probably my favorite book of the trilogy. Drizzt is on the warpath, more so than usual, and wreaks revenge on any and all monsters in sight. Excellent action!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Another amazing addition from R.A. Salvatore.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Still getting exactly what I would expect to get from this series. These books scratch a certain itch for me. It's sort of like popping Legend into the old VCR every now and then. Still getting exactly what I would expect to get from this series. These books scratch a certain itch for me. It's sort of like popping Legend into the old VCR every now and then.

  25. 5 out of 5

    David

    While the Saga of Drizzt is still somewhat engaging at this point, The Hunter's Blades Trilogy is quite a departure from the previous books and it definitely shows signs of the overall saga slowing down. After 15 books, the story has naturally drifted away from its initial themes. It is less of a defamiliarized reflection on racial issues with fictional races or a vehicle for the main character to share his interesting personal philosophies on life, which are very poignant. The character of Driz While the Saga of Drizzt is still somewhat engaging at this point, The Hunter's Blades Trilogy is quite a departure from the previous books and it definitely shows signs of the overall saga slowing down. After 15 books, the story has naturally drifted away from its initial themes. It is less of a defamiliarized reflection on racial issues with fictional races or a vehicle for the main character to share his interesting personal philosophies on life, which are very poignant. The character of Drizzt, who has repeatedly been called one of the most beloved characters in all of Fantasy, continues to be the Fantasy version of Horatio Alger's Ragged Dick. Through good works and deeds, the character progressively overcomes the bad reputation that comes with his upbringing and transcends that upbringing by developing as an individual and continually gaining friends and allies through his individual reputation and overcoming the hardships of prejudice and discrimination. However, these themes are no longer at the forefront. The first two Hunter's Blades books were a little difficult to slog through as they have evolved into more straight up adventure stories with less emphasis on character and theme. Instead they are extremely plot driven and just offer pages and pages of action and violence that could really be condensed. Further, while the previous books focus strongly on a core group of six characters, here we see all of them, including Drizzt really begin to fade into the background in favor of newer and more peripheral characters. It is reminiscent of some parts of Star Wars where the beloved characters start to become part of a larger ensemble as new comrades are introduced. After fifteen books, it is natural that the story would lose its original focus. Rather than being about race and one's role in society, this trilogy is about war and about simply monsters. That is not to say it is without redeeming qualities, however. Monsters continue to fascinate the psyche of both children and adults because monsters represent adversity in life. They are a tangible embodiment of the unknown and of the frustrating difficulties in life that cause a person hardship. The various kinds of monsters joining forces horribly seems to represent the culmination of various problems that people face at once. Ultimately, you have a story here of people and nations of disparate backgrounds uniting together to overcome overwhelming adversity. Like I said, the plot can be focused on too much and the action is very overly descriptive, but it can be quite exciting and triumphant. The story is still continuing strongly enough that I will continue following it. It has not really "jumped the shark" yet, but the fins can be seen emerging.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Very deep, emotional and action packed At first The Lone Drow was a tough read, by all means it certainly is throughout but by the end I have found a deeper perspective than I had throughout the beginning and even middle of the epic, and there can be no lesser descriptor, middle piece of this Trilogy. There are MANY depressing notes in this book, themes that seem to repeat themselves from older books and even themes and plot lines that are driven home to the point where I often found myself in an Very deep, emotional and action packed At first The Lone Drow was a tough read, by all means it certainly is throughout but by the end I have found a deeper perspective than I had throughout the beginning and even middle of the epic, and there can be no lesser descriptor, middle piece of this Trilogy. There are MANY depressing notes in this book, themes that seem to repeat themselves from older books and even themes and plot lines that are driven home to the point where I often found myself in anger or frustration screaming GET ON WITH IT. Then I took a step back and realized that these weren't simply repeated plot lines for the sake of filling pages but each served the necessary function of driving the contemplations of each of our beloved characters deeper into themselves. In the case of Wulfgar who required several books to get back to his "normal" self it felt more as if he was a slave to plot and that at any real time he could have been brought back easily with the stroke of a few keys, whereas, spoiler warning, the events of that lead into this book and the events of the book itself were necessary to drive the characters into a wall, forcing them to contemplate their existence and question the morals and beliefs they had always upheld but had never before been truly tested against the weight of reality. This book signifies a loss of innocence for Drizzt and even for Cattie Brie. Both are forced to face not only their mortality but the mortality of those they truly care about and are driven to the very edge of their morals and question the truth and strength of their convictions. In this realization I have come to consider this book the best yet by my favorite author and I eagerly await the next chapter that I shall commence the moment I finish this review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    2.5 stars for the lamenting and contemplative Lone Drow, 2nd book of the Hunter's Blade Trilogy. Thousands of orcs press upon Mithral Hall from all sides, while the dwarf king lies near death. On the outskirts, the dark elf, Drizzt Do'Urden, finds allies in a pair of moon elves with whom they engage in guerilla warfare against the orc army. The Lone Drow is chock-full of battles of dwarves against orcs, dwarves against trolls, and dwarves against giants. The redundancy of the same enemies in simi 2.5 stars for the lamenting and contemplative Lone Drow, 2nd book of the Hunter's Blade Trilogy. Thousands of orcs press upon Mithral Hall from all sides, while the dwarf king lies near death. On the outskirts, the dark elf, Drizzt Do'Urden, finds allies in a pair of moon elves with whom they engage in guerilla warfare against the orc army. The Lone Drow is chock-full of battles of dwarves against orcs, dwarves against trolls, and dwarves against giants. The redundancy of the same enemies in similar environments becomes tiresome. However, interspersed in between the bigger battles are a handful of impressive duels that much better showcase Salvatore's creativity. Regis's character arc is the most interesting of the Companions. He finds himself in the position of steward of Mithral Hall and must learn to make decisions on it's behalf; including dealing with representatives of neighboring towns, and organizing the defense of Mithral Hall itself. When Drizzt is not battling, he is turning over and over again images in his mind of his lifelong Companions he assumes are doomed. If you've read this far into the Legend of Drizzt saga, you know as well as the rest of us do that Salvatore will not kill off any of his Companions of the Hall; therefore, all of Drizzt's lamentations do not resonate. Salvatore has stated in an interview that Obould (the orc king) is not his character. So how much more of this long, drawn-out story is a mandate passed down to Salvatore from the powers-that-be at Wizards of the Coast?

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth mK

    Honestly, I love Drizzt Do’Urden and his merry men (and women), but this book took me forever to slog through. I’ll admit to part of it being my fault, with life getting in the way every now and again, but so too was it the book. Starting my read near the end of February to coincide with my son reading the first trilogy for the first time, it should not have taken me through December to finish. Not when my son read the first trilogy in a week and the second trilogy in two weeks. I am happy he en Honestly, I love Drizzt Do’Urden and his merry men (and women), but this book took me forever to slog through. I’ll admit to part of it being my fault, with life getting in the way every now and again, but so too was it the book. Starting my read near the end of February to coincide with my son reading the first trilogy for the first time, it should not have taken me through December to finish. Not when my son read the first trilogy in a week and the second trilogy in two weeks. I am happy he enjoyed all the characters and Drizzt’s journey to a happier life. But as I read Drizzt’s devolution into the murderous Hunter again, it felt as though all hope was lost for all. They are still not out of the woods yet, and to be fair, I don’t think Salvatore knew at the time he originally wrote The Lone Drow just how enamored generations would be with his drow hero, but it all just dragged on. With Drizzt believing Bruenor to be well and truly dead, and Catta-brie and Wulfgar and Regis unsure of Drizzt’ wellness... gah. The constant lamentations of Drizzt grew tiresome. The whole book being consumed with Obould’s ascension to godlike status among the orcs, Gerti’s sniveling thoughts and cowardice, Urlgen’s feelings of inadequacy... they’re orcs and frost giants. We don’t care for their feelings and politics. They are the monster races and we don’t want to know their emotions or thoughts. On to Drizzt #19. Hopefully it takes less time than #18. Sheesh.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    2021 - Sibling Reading Challenge The term “unstoppable force” is often associated with natural forces that wreck untold devastation (typhoons, earthquakes, volcanos, et cetera). The idea being that no opposing force could have prevented or waysided such destruction and power. In colloquial terms “unstoppable forces” are often paired with an “immovable object.” The immovable object is incapable of diminishing the force yet somehow the object prevents its own destruction. In Salvatore’s novel he att 2021 - Sibling Reading Challenge The term “unstoppable force” is often associated with natural forces that wreck untold devastation (typhoons, earthquakes, volcanos, et cetera). The idea being that no opposing force could have prevented or waysided such destruction and power. In colloquial terms “unstoppable forces” are often paired with an “immovable object.” The immovable object is incapable of diminishing the force yet somehow the object prevents its own destruction. In Salvatore’s novel he attempts to create an unstoppable force and in doing so he ignored key cultural aspects that would discourage his own planning. The idea that a small and highly skilled force can hold out against a much larger force is a true idea that has been realized time and time again (most notably in military history, see the Seven Day War, the Alamo, and every way fought in Afghanistan). The absurdity comes from the idea that the orc population, being so large and powerful, is capable of sustained constructive behavior. Even with divine-support the idea that an entire culture would shift for such a sustained period of time is hard to believe. Additionally the logistics of providing for such a force is ridiculous. Unless the orcs were eating their dead, which is feasible, it would be impossible for the surrounding area to support such an army. + Combat was described on a much larger scale. + Wulfgar’s role is minimized; Regis’ is enhanced. + Realistic revitalization.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Alone on the battlefield. Surrounded by death. Cornered by enemies. And ready to die. Drizzt Do'Urden has become the Hunter, the bane of the orc hordes still ravaging the North. Cut off, alone, convinced that everything he ever valued has been destroyed, all that's left is to kill, and kill, and kill, until there are no enemies left. But there are a lot of enemies, and even the Hunter is just one lone drow. I think I will give this a 3.5 rounded up to 4 (because goodreads does not do halves). It star Alone on the battlefield. Surrounded by death. Cornered by enemies. And ready to die. Drizzt Do'Urden has become the Hunter, the bane of the orc hordes still ravaging the North. Cut off, alone, convinced that everything he ever valued has been destroyed, all that's left is to kill, and kill, and kill, until there are no enemies left. But there are a lot of enemies, and even the Hunter is just one lone drow. I think I will give this a 3.5 rounded up to 4 (because goodreads does not do halves). It started out with a bang and moved right along. The entire book was mostly fighting. I would have liked a little more character interaction, but this is fantasy and they don't always do character interaction. The book felt long in some places and really seemed to drag at parts. It speed up at the end and then moved. I did not like the guilt that Drizzt seemed to have, but again it was probably true to his character. I love Drizzt, but I am beginning to think his world is getting to big for me.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.