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The short story is often viewed as an inferior relation to the Novel. But it is an art in itself. To take a story and distil its essence into fewer pages while keeping character and plot rounded and driven is not an easy task. Many try and many fail. In this series we look at short stories from many of our most accomplished writers. Miniature masterpieces with a lot to say The short story is often viewed as an inferior relation to the Novel. But it is an art in itself. To take a story and distil its essence into fewer pages while keeping character and plot rounded and driven is not an easy task. Many try and many fail. In this series we look at short stories from many of our most accomplished writers. Miniature masterpieces with a lot to say. In this volume we examine some of the short stories of GK Chesterton. Gilbert Keith Chesterton was born in Campden hill, Kensington on May 29th 1874. Originally after attending St Pauls School he went to Slade to learn the illustrators art and literature. In 1896 he joined a small London publisher and began his journalistic career as a freelance art and literary critic. In 1901 he married Frances Blogg, to whom he remained married for the rest of his life. Thereafter he obtained weekly columns in the Daily News and The Illustrated London News. For many he is known as a very fine novelist and the creator of the Father Brown Detective stories which were much influenced by his own beliefs. A large man – 6’ 42 and 21st in weight he was apt to be forgetful in that delightful way that the British sometimes are – a telegram home to his wife saying he was in one place but where should he actually be. But he was prolific in many other areas; he wrote plays, essays, loved to debate and wrote hundreds of poems. But in this volume we concentrate on his short stories especially those concerning a certain Father Brown. Chesterton died of congestive heart failure on 14th June 1936 and is buried in Beaconsfield just outside of London. Many of these stories are also available as an audiobook from our sister company Word Of Mouth. Many samples are at our youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/PortableP...


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The short story is often viewed as an inferior relation to the Novel. But it is an art in itself. To take a story and distil its essence into fewer pages while keeping character and plot rounded and driven is not an easy task. Many try and many fail. In this series we look at short stories from many of our most accomplished writers. Miniature masterpieces with a lot to say The short story is often viewed as an inferior relation to the Novel. But it is an art in itself. To take a story and distil its essence into fewer pages while keeping character and plot rounded and driven is not an easy task. Many try and many fail. In this series we look at short stories from many of our most accomplished writers. Miniature masterpieces with a lot to say. In this volume we examine some of the short stories of GK Chesterton. Gilbert Keith Chesterton was born in Campden hill, Kensington on May 29th 1874. Originally after attending St Pauls School he went to Slade to learn the illustrators art and literature. In 1896 he joined a small London publisher and began his journalistic career as a freelance art and literary critic. In 1901 he married Frances Blogg, to whom he remained married for the rest of his life. Thereafter he obtained weekly columns in the Daily News and The Illustrated London News. For many he is known as a very fine novelist and the creator of the Father Brown Detective stories which were much influenced by his own beliefs. A large man – 6’ 42 and 21st in weight he was apt to be forgetful in that delightful way that the British sometimes are – a telegram home to his wife saying he was in one place but where should he actually be. But he was prolific in many other areas; he wrote plays, essays, loved to debate and wrote hundreds of poems. But in this volume we concentrate on his short stories especially those concerning a certain Father Brown. Chesterton died of congestive heart failure on 14th June 1936 and is buried in Beaconsfield just outside of London. Many of these stories are also available as an audiobook from our sister company Word Of Mouth. Many samples are at our youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/PortableP...

30 review for The Flying Stars and Other Stories: "I am not absentminded. It is the presence of mind that makes me unaware of everything else." 

  1. 4 out of 5

    J.Aleksandr Wootton

    Chesterton's essays are brimming with mini-parables and illustrative anecdotes, peopled by persons both historical and imagined. This story feels much as if he set out to write an essay, but the anecdotes took over: the characters broadened and clambered right out of the mini-parables and seized upon lives of their own. The result is The Flying Inn, a string of episodes into which mini-essays (and dozens of uproarious songs and poems) keep on breaking. The tale is told with exuberance and does, Chesterton's essays are brimming with mini-parables and illustrative anecdotes, peopled by persons both historical and imagined. This story feels much as if he set out to write an essay, but the anecdotes took over: the characters broadened and clambered right out of the mini-parables and seized upon lives of their own. The result is The Flying Inn, a string of episodes into which mini-essays (and dozens of uproarious songs and poems) keep on breaking. The tale is told with exuberance and does, finally, resolve into something like a novel. But you've got to keep with it, and resign yourself from the outset to a story rather thickly yet entertainingly mediated by a storyteller who wishes to make a number of observations and points; indeed, he has spun his yarn for no other purpose. Once you've got to the end, and learned what the story you've been reading is, you'll be prepared to fully enjoy the book. But not before.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave/Maggie Bean

    Yep. Chesterton again. Manic-depressive bastard that I am, I love his work and Joseph Conrad’s equally. Chesterton’s thinking is very similar to mine when I’m hypomanic, while Conrad’s is similar to mine when I endure depressive and "mixed" episodes. This book is a thoroughly enjoyable, manic romp across Chesterton’s rich, ever-optimistic mental landscape. A more mature work than The Napoleon of Notting Hill, The Flying Inn is an examination (and indictment) of authoritarianism and progressivism, Yep. Chesterton again. Manic-depressive bastard that I am, I love his work and Joseph Conrad’s equally. Chesterton’s thinking is very similar to mine when I’m hypomanic, while Conrad’s is similar to mine when I endure depressive and "mixed" episodes. This book is a thoroughly enjoyable, manic romp across Chesterton’s rich, ever-optimistic mental landscape. A more mature work than The Napoleon of Notting Hill, The Flying Inn is an examination (and indictment) of authoritarianism and progressivism, and an expression of distrust for power in and of itself. Written on the eve of World War I (when the European empires’ chickens first came home to roost), …TFI proved even more prophetic than the former. Set in a UK besieged by theosophists, vegetarians, rabid xenophiles and other turn-of-the-century fruitcakes, TFI accurately presaged the modern, NuLab-dominated, post-British Britain we modern Americans have ironically (and hypocritically) come to pity. An allegory, romance, and expression of populist defiance all at once, TFI chronicles the adventures of one Humphrey Pump (an English pub owner) and his friend, Captain Patrick Dalroy -- a truculent, red-bearded Irish giant in the service of a decaying, increasingly ridiculous and dwarfish Britain. Opposing them is a cast of silly (but sinister) villains -- villains rendered all the more sinister by their inability to perceive their own silliness. The novel begins with one of the protagonists, Captain Patrick Dalroy (an Irishman serving in the British navy) resigning his commission at the conclusion of a ridiculous, one-sided treaty with the Turks, courtesy of his nemesis, Lord Ivywood. Dalroy then returns to England and renews his acquaintance with his friend, Humphrey Pump. When the Ivywood-dominated government, under the influence of a Turkish mystic and pseudo-scholar (my bone of contention, incidentally: no son of the grey or red wolf –however strident -- ever influenced the UK as profoundly as even the most transparently fraudulent cow-worshipper of the Subcontinent) prohibits the sale of alcohol, Pump and Dalroy load an immense hoop of cheese and a keg of rum into a donkey cart and hit the road, dispensing good cheer (and populist defiance) the length and breadth of the country. I won’t ruin the story, but I’ll add that Ivywood is perhaps the most sinister of Chesterton’s villains – all the more so because he’s ridiculous without being funny. Embodying the almost mechanistic irrationality of the ideological fanatic, Ivywood is Hoffer’s "true believer" – but at the opposite end of the social "food chain."

  3. 5 out of 5

    F.R.

    Definite mixed emotions on picking up this one: eager to read, but trembling a tad at the prospect. Reading one hundred year old novels about the clash of cultures is something that will generally make your liberal leaning twenty-first century man (that’s me, by the way) quake with nerves. The world has moved so far in the last hundred years, what’s accepted in society is so different. So while reading a novel from 1914, there’s the good possibility that in amongst the plot, the characters and th Definite mixed emotions on picking up this one: eager to read, but trembling a tad at the prospect. Reading one hundred year old novels about the clash of cultures is something that will generally make your liberal leaning twenty-first century man (that’s me, by the way) quake with nerves. The world has moved so far in the last hundred years, what’s accepted in society is so different. So while reading a novel from 1914, there’s the good possibility that in amongst the plot, the characters and the themes, there will be a good bit of nose holding as offensiveness levels rise. Yet there was something so tantalising about a G.K. Chesterton novel where he examines Islam in Britain that I just couldn’t resist. Looking back on the news of 1914, it’s hard to believe that the threat of hard-line Muslims impinging on British society was something was high up in British people’s minds. In 2015 scarcely a week (or maybe two days; or this past terrible week, one day) goes by without a comment piece or two in the press. Yet a hundred years ago, given that a huge European war was about to ignite, it doesn’t feel like it’d have been that big an issue at all. But there you go, this book somehow exists. I found myself wondering: how much of it would be pertinent and relevant today? For all my worries of blatant intolerance just pouring off the page though, it seems like Chesterton didn’t do much research into what Islam actually meant. Basically he boils the faith down to just stopping people having a drink. Yes, it’s enforced abstinence which is the main thrust and driver of the book. Islam may be the face that’s given to it, but really it’s impossible to ignore that the Christian temperance movement was much more lively and healthy in 1914 (and would soon achieve success with prohibition in the USA). That’s the real target of this book: how wrong it is – whether the impulse comes from an Islamic preacher or a wrong-headed aristocrat – to stop an Englishman indulging his God given right to have a sip of rum or wine or beer. Rather than dealing seriously with Islam, Chesterton is just taking on puritanism and dressing it up in Arabic robes for fun. Yes there are nods towards not eating pork and polygamy at points later in the book, but it’s decoration with no willingness to engage beyond the narrowest viewpoint. The plot, such as it is, sees an English Lord fall under the influence of an Islamic preacher and start to shut down pubs, while making a law that no alcohol can be sold unless there is a pub sign present. If there are no pubs though, there can’t be any pub signs and so no alcohol can be sold. A couple of eccentric radicals rescue a sign, a cask of rum and a wheel of cheese and travel around the country flaunting the rules. It’s a picaresque tale, one with frequent deviations which become so overwhelming that by the end Chesterton has completely lost control of his book and it splutters to a halt. Novels are of course being written today about the relations between Islam and The West (Michel Houellebecq was on the front cover of Charlie Hedbo this week promoting his). And these books will be more challenging than ‘The Flying Inn’ as they’ll actually engage in the subject, rather than using the garb just for dressing up. Some of them, if we’re honest, will actually go out of their way to be far more offensive than this tome. As ‘The Flying Inn’ is merely an intermittently amusing book, one whose offensiveness comes from its Western imperialistic refusal to take other cultures remotely seriously. It doesn’t address, challenge or comment on anything beyond the most narrow concerns of 1914, and so has little to say for itself today. It’s a long, bawdy, drunken tale which has little of pertinence and is utterly innocuous and toothless. In short I'm not disappointed in it because there are meaningful points in between some truly offensive and jingoistic passages which don't sit well with a 2015 audience; instead I'm disappointed with it because it never rouses itself to engage with its subject and so offends in the most blase, careless and self-righteously casual way. There's no meat, only blather.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ero

    An odd book. Chesterton's an amazing proser, and his books are pretty much always delightful from a using-the-english-language point of view. And there's a lot to like about this book, which is sort of a love letter to alcohol and the Traditional English folk who drink it. There is much silliness and romping around with a keg of rum and a giant wheel of cheese. There are many rollicking songs to sing while rolling said keg of rum down the road. But there's also a darkness to the book, a deep anx An odd book. Chesterton's an amazing proser, and his books are pretty much always delightful from a using-the-english-language point of view. And there's a lot to like about this book, which is sort of a love letter to alcohol and the Traditional English folk who drink it. There is much silliness and romping around with a keg of rum and a giant wheel of cheese. There are many rollicking songs to sing while rolling said keg of rum down the road. But there's also a darkness to the book, a deep anxiety and shadow that seems very timely: the fear of arabs. In this semi-sci-fi alternate britain, 'oriental' influences have banned booze, promoted (gasp) vegetarianism, sought to replace christianity with idol-worship, and in general replaced dear old england's can-do spirit with a lurking islamic/hindu voodoo. The books reveals a bit too much xenophobia for my taste. In times less full of fear (I just got that anti-islam propaganda DVD in the mail yesterday) this would be fine and I could ignore it and enjoy the playful parts of the book. Reading it now though was fairly unpleasant, and will make it harder for me to enjoy Father Brown in the future.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cornelia

    I miss those kind of stories-do they make it still nowadays? A satirical, humorous story that makes you curl with a soft blanket next to the fire sipping a hot chocolate and indulging yourself with earthly delights. Making fun of legalism or prohibition-Chesterton paints a picture so real. From finding loopholes in keeping a pub open-a flying inn, to the atrocious speeches "important people" give, to the conformism of the masses, you will laugh, wonder, and laugh again. I miss those kind of stories-do they make it still nowadays? A satirical, humorous story that makes you curl with a soft blanket next to the fire sipping a hot chocolate and indulging yourself with earthly delights. Making fun of legalism or prohibition-Chesterton paints a picture so real. From finding loopholes in keeping a pub open-a flying inn, to the atrocious speeches "important people" give, to the conformism of the masses, you will laugh, wonder, and laugh again.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Orange

    Fine! Dedicated to fans of no alcohol law. In addition, Chesterton correctly indicates that the ruling "elite" of UK are traitors to Christianity. They directly or indirectly seek to Islamize the country. Fine! Dedicated to fans of no alcohol law. In addition, Chesterton correctly indicates that the ruling "elite" of UK are traitors to Christianity. They directly or indirectly seek to Islamize the country.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adam Marischuk

    Fun and prescient In a world gone mad, two drunk friends decide to save the world with a keg and a barsign. The best way to fight the tyrrany is with a cultural revolution, or at least a drunken spin. The reason it is so prescient is that Chesterton foresaw the queer alliance between the political left and what he calls 'the orient' but what we would understand to be Islam and Buddhism. Written before prohibition, it is eerily prophetic. Chesterton foresaw the bizarre alliance between feminism, l Fun and prescient In a world gone mad, two drunk friends decide to save the world with a keg and a barsign. The best way to fight the tyrrany is with a cultural revolution, or at least a drunken spin. The reason it is so prescient is that Chesterton foresaw the queer alliance between the political left and what he calls 'the orient' but what we would understand to be Islam and Buddhism. Written before prohibition, it is eerily prophetic. Chesterton foresaw the bizarre alliance between feminism, low-Church evangelicalism, Germanic utilitarianism and the quasi-mysticism of the orient, along with a political class too far removed from the hopes, dreams and desires of the general population. The book is full of Chesterton's folksy wisdom and belief in common-sense. And while this is generally to be expected in any Chesterton novel, in this one it sometimes becomes too dense and exaggerated. The characters are caricatures and vehicles for Chesterton's philosophical and cultural opinions. Either you like it or you don't. "The sun was sinking: but the river of human nonsense flowed on for ever." (p.17) "feeding on fanatical pleasure: the pleasure his strange, cold, courageous nature could not get from food or wine or women." (p.51) "Lord Ivywood shared the mental weakness of most men who have fed on books; he ignored, not the value but the very existence of other forms of information." (p.52) "Country folk will forget you if you speak to them, but talk about you all day if you don't." (p.53) "There was a faint renewal of that laughter that has slept since the Middle Ages." (p.62) "I have long been increasingly convinced that underneath a certain mask of stiffness which the Mohammedan religion has worn through certain centuries, as a somewhat similar mask has been worn by the religion of the Jews, Islam has in it the potentialities of being the most progressive of all religions" (p.78) "He chopped and changed his original article in such a way that it was something quite beyond the most bewildering article he had written in the past; and is still prized by those highly cultured persons who collect the worst literature of the world." (p.101) "Then there was a weak plea for Eugenics; and a warm plea against Conscription, which was not true eugenics." (p. 102) "All that was natural in her was still alive under all that was artificial." (p.111) "The next best thing to really loving a fellow creature is really hating him...the desire to murder him is at least an acknowledgement that he is alive." (p.192) "There are crowds who do not care to revolt; but there are no crowds who do not like someone else to do it for them." (p.234) "Not seeing any rational explanation of this custom of dying, so prevalent among his fellow-citizens, he concluded that it was merely tradition." (p.235) Feast on wine or fast on water, And your honour shall stand sure; God Almighty's son and daughter, He the valiant, she the pure. If an angel out of heaven Brings you other things to drink, Thank him for his kind intentions, Go and pour them down the sink. Tea is like the East he grows in, A great yellow Mandarin, With urbanity of manner, And unconsciousness of sin; All the women, like a harem, At his pig-tail troop along, And, like all the East he grows in, He is Poison when he's strong. Tea, although an Oriental, Is a gentleman at least; Cocoa is a cad and coward, Cocoa is a vulgar beast; Cocoa is a dull, disloyal, Lying, crawling cad and clown, And may very well be grateful To the fool that takes him down. As for all the windy waters, They were rained like trumpets down, When good drink had been dishonoured By the tipplers of the town. When red wine had brought red ruin, And the death-dance of our times, Heaven sent us Soda Water As a torment for our crimes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    CJ Bowen

    Chesterton's writing is too big for his books as he maintains an extra storyline or two and suffuses the narrative with poems, but he remains Chesterton, and such trivial flaws are quickly forgiven. This story was particularly amusing, as inns and pubs, really any place that serves alcohol, are closed down as the Muslim religion conquests ideologically through England. A wildly Chestertonian character and a common Britisher band together to exploit a loophole in the law, bringing Christian rum a Chesterton's writing is too big for his books as he maintains an extra storyline or two and suffuses the narrative with poems, but he remains Chesterton, and such trivial flaws are quickly forgiven. This story was particularly amusing, as inns and pubs, really any place that serves alcohol, are closed down as the Muslim religion conquests ideologically through England. A wildly Chestertonian character and a common Britisher band together to exploit a loophole in the law, bringing Christian rum across the country by means of the Flying Inn. Chesterton is unafraid to view the conflict of religions through the lens of apparently trivial liberties, and rompingly makes his case by means of a silly novel. He would, of course, consider silly novels to be the most potent kind, and I for one wouldn't mind many more such efforts replacing earnest Amish fiction everywhere.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melaszka

    Didn't really know how to rate this. There's some fantastic Chestertonian wit (the satirical account of Hibbs However's journalistic style is hilarious and still pertinent today), some lusty, loveable, eccentric characters and, whatever I think about other ideological elements in the books, it's hard not to admire, in a general sense, Chesterton's championing of individual liberties. But...this is probably one of the most racist books I have ever read. I know Chesterton was of another age and is Didn't really know how to rate this. There's some fantastic Chestertonian wit (the satirical account of Hibbs However's journalistic style is hilarious and still pertinent today), some lusty, loveable, eccentric characters and, whatever I think about other ideological elements in the books, it's hard not to admire, in a general sense, Chesterton's championing of individual liberties. But...this is probably one of the most racist books I have ever read. I know Chesterton was of another age and is hardly known for his political correctness, but, while in other of his books I can gloss over the occasional racist remark, here the entire basis of the book is Islamophobic and anti-oriental. It also meanders on aimlessly for a bit too long. I rarely get bored reading Chesterton, but with this one I did. There's also FAR too much poetry padding it out.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Manuel Alfonseca

    This is Chesterton at his best. In this book, one century ahead of his time, he foresees the current garrulousness about "an open and inter-religious education, rather than an exclusivist and intolerant religious indoctrination." He also foresees correctly the attempt to introduce Islam in Europe, if not as a full-fledged religious option, at least as a weapon to attack Christianity. But the people revolution that saves England from the post-modernist politically-correct stunt is little credible. This is Chesterton at his best. In this book, one century ahead of his time, he foresees the current garrulousness about "an open and inter-religious education, rather than an exclusivist and intolerant religious indoctrination." He also foresees correctly the attempt to introduce Islam in Europe, if not as a full-fledged religious option, at least as a weapon to attack Christianity. But the people revolution that saves England from the post-modernist politically-correct stunt is little credible. I'm afraid I'm far less optimist than Chesterton.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rox

    The main summary of this book fails to mention its chief feature ! It takes place in a Britain which has become part of the Ottoman Empire. As this makes it a Muslim country, it has a certain relevance today, presumably never dreamed of by the author (who was trying to make various other points through this unlikely situation).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Fighting an evil regime with beer! Only Chesterton could do it, and so well.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laurel Hicks

    This is one that I’ll have to read another time or two to digest fully. That worked for me with GKC’s amazing The Man who was Thursday.

  14. 5 out of 5

    William Titshaw

    A great story, entertaining in itself, that is at the same time also a comical and brutal satire on what I would call the "progressive spirit," and all the same is packed with bits of profound philosophy. That is my review. What comes next is less a review and more a summary of some of the ideas in the book, which I am still trying to work out in more precision. If you do not want any of this book to be spoiled, then I would not recommend reading this. 1. Progressivism wants progress for its own A great story, entertaining in itself, that is at the same time also a comical and brutal satire on what I would call the "progressive spirit," and all the same is packed with bits of profound philosophy. That is my review. What comes next is less a review and more a summary of some of the ideas in the book, which I am still trying to work out in more precision. If you do not want any of this book to be spoiled, then I would not recommend reading this. 1. Progressivism wants progress for its own sake One theme that stands out in Chesterton -- and not only in this work -- is the criticism of what could be called the idolization of progress. Progress, whatever that means, is considered to be some noble goal which is aspired to. But why it is so noble, and the point of aspiring to it, is not exactly clear. The following takes place in the midst of an "art" gallery displaying modern "art." A discussion begins on the point of art where there is no intelligible picture. Lord Ivywood: "Everything lives by turning into something else. Exaggeration is growth." "But exaggeration of what?" demanded Dorian. "I cannot see a trace of exaggeration in these pictures; because I cannot find a hint of what it is they want to exaggerate. You can't exaggerate the feathers of a cow or the legs of a whale. You can draw a cow with feathers or a whale with legs for a joke...But don't you see, my good Philip [Ivywood], that even then the joke depends on its looking like a cow and not only like a thing with feathers. Even then the joke depends on the whale as well as the legs. You can combine up to a certain point; you can distort up to a certain point; after that you lose the identity, and with that you lose everything. A Centaur is so much of a man with so much of a horse. The Centaur must not be hastily identified with the Horsy Man. And the Mermaid must be maidenly; even if there is something fishy about her social conduct..." "No," said Lord Ivywood, in the same quiet way, "I understand what you mean, and I don't agree. I should like the Centaur to turn into something else, that is neither man nor horse." "But not something that has nothing of either?" asked the poet [Dorian]. "Yes," answered Ivywood, with the same queer, quiet gleam in his colourless eyes, "something that has nothing of either." "But what's the good?" argued Dorian. "A thing that has changed entirely has not changed at all. It has no bridge of crisis. It can remember no change. If you wake up tomorrow and you simply are Mrs. Dope, an old woman who lets lodgings at Broadstairs -- well, I don't doubt Mrs. Dope is a saner and happier person than you are. But in what have *you* progressed. What part of *you* is better? Don't you see this prime fact of identity is the limit set on all living things?" "No," said Philip, with suppressed but sudden violence, "I deny that any limit is set upon living things." ...[And later:] Dorian: "I think my complaint is that he [Ivywood] has no pathos. That is, he does not feel human limitations..." ... Ivywood did not remove his gaze from the picture of "Enthusiasm," [the modern art] but simply said "No; I have no sense of human limitations...I would walk where no man has walked; and find something beyond tears and laughter. My toad shall be my road indeed; for I will make it, like the Romans. And my adventures shall not be in the hedges and the gutters, but in the borders of the ever advancing brain. I will think the unthinkable until I thought it; I will love what never lived until I loved it -- I will be as lonely as the First Man." "They say," she [Joan] said after a silence, "that the first man fell." "You mean the priests?" he [Ivywood] answered. "Yes, but even they admit he discovered good and evil. So are these [modern] artists trying to discover some distinction that is still dark to us." "Oh," said Joan, looking at him with a real and unusual interest, "then you don't see anything in these pictures yourself?" "I see the breaking of the barriers," he answered, "beyond that I see nothing." ... "But perhaps the breaking of barriers might be the breaking of everything." End First, the discussion between Ivywood and Dorian begins on what is more or less a debate between Thomistic essentialism and nominalism. Ivywood wants the evolution of things, constantly transcending the barriers. But what makes a thing what it is, as opposed to some other thing -- that which defines its essence -- is in some sense its 'barriers.' It is its essence and nature. And if you destroy these you do not evolve the thing: you destroy it. Ivywood see's what a thing is as arbitrary. It is an imposition of the will in some sense. It is nominalism: a painting is art because it is called art. Dorian takes the saner, Thomistic view of essentialism. A painting is art because it possesses all the features of art, and it does not matter if someone calls it art or not. And if you "evolve" art, if you "break the barriers" of it past a certain point, it is no longer art. You have not evolved art. You have destroyed it. This applies to all the social evolution desired by progressivism as well. If you evolve the family into something which is no longer geared toward procreation, which no longer consists of husband, wife, and children, if you break its barriers and make it into a mere partnership for pleasure, or if you dissolve its proper end of procreation, you have not evolved the family. You have not progressed it. You have destroyed it. 2. Progressivism as pride The same excerpt above soon moves from a philosophizing about the essence of art to philosophizing about the essence of man. A definition is a barrier. It is a limitation. A definition is, quite simply, definite. It means something is one thing, and not some other thing. Likewise there is an essence of man. Man is a composite of body and soul. He is not a mere body, a mere animal; nor is he only a soul, an angel. But Ivywood, in Nietzschean fashion, has no "sense of human limitations." He has no humility. These two are quite connected. For example, the fall of Lucifer was that he would not accept the limitations of an angelic being, but wanted to be something greater: he wanted to be like God. And Ivywood, like "the First Man," wants to "walk where no man has walked." He does not want to be a composite of body and soul: he wants to be God, he wants to create, he wants to impose his will on reality and to change reality. He does not understand that he is a man, and that his good therefore consists in tending toward God as a composite of body and soul, with the soul leading the body, the two in harmony. He does not see the end of the intellect in truth, and the end of the will in loving the good. He wants to be something else instead. He wants to make his own 'truth' and to make his own 'good'. Progressives do not accept human limitations, and this is, paradoxically, their limitation. "They say that the first man fell." By human limitations, Chesterton means accepting the reality of man. A sense of human limitations is a sense that one is a human; a sense that one is a creature and not the Creator. He also means a sense of what those human limitations are: a sense of the true nature of man. Chesterton attributes a lack of this sense to the Progressives. And in this he is dead-on (as usual). Progressivism is the pride of wanting to evolve beyond human limitations. It is the pride of wanting to break the barriers of human limitations. "But perhaps the breaking of barriers might be the breaking of everything." By trying to evolve human limitations one does not make a better man. One destroys man. 3. The industrious elite are obeyed, not respected. Here Chesterton delves less into metaphysics, and more into politics. In the midst of police enforcing a ban on inns, Dalroy avoids an arrest by a loophole in the law: the law says you cannot sell alcohol. It does not say you cannot give it out for free. But to this Mr. Hugby, a businessman who is also trying to get in on the business of the inn, objects. Mr. Hugby represents the corporate empire for Chesterton. Dalroy says to him: "It's brewers like you that have made the inns stink with poison, till even good men asked for no inns at all. And you are worse than the teetotallers, for you prevented what they never knew." Here Chesterton is reflecting on the fact that by being driven solely by industry and money, the man ruined all that made the inns good. J.R.R. Tolkien called such people "servants of the Machines." By this he meant that they are servants of efficiency for efficiency's sake. A good word for it is utilitic reductionism. The reduction of things to efficiency and utility. It mirrors the Cartesian reductionism of Descartes, which reduces all things to mathematics and banishes "qualia" and the soul. The issue is that it is a false reductionism. By reducing things to mere utility and profit, you leave out much of what makes the things good and desirable in the first place. Then, turning to the industrious satirized-health guru, who in his absurd idealism has joined in the campaign against inns, Dalroy says: "You are not respected. You are obeyed. Why should I or anyone respect you particularly? You say you built this town and get up at daybreak to watch this town. You built it for money and you watch it for more money...Read the Bible, if you like...I remember some words...and I leave them with you: "unless God build the city, their labor is but lost that build it; unless God keep the city, the watchman watcheth in vain. It is lost labor that you rise up early in the morning and eat the bread of carefulness; while He giveth his beloved sleep." End. The psalm is Nisi Dominus: Psalm 126 in the Douay-Rheims. The Haydock commentary reads here: "That is, your early rising, your labour and worldly solicitude, will be vain, that is, will avail you nothing, without the light, grace, and blessing of God." Workaholism is not a virtue, it is a vice. The absurd idealism which leads the "elite" to campaign against alcohol (and today, tobacco) is not respected. It is obeyed. And how long will it be obeyed? I will simply remark that Chesterton's book ends in a revolt. 4. Progressivism as anti-human. Will finish later. Touches on the thought that things such as alcohol are hated because they remind people they are men.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Talkinhorse

    Lust for Life, Political Incorrectness, and God G. K. Chesterton is a hugely powerful voice, both intellectually and spiritually. I resonate to him as I do to few others (a few examples of my personal favorites, going in different directions, would be Leo Tolstoy, Ayn Rand, Robert Heinlein, James Branch Cabell). "The Flying Inn", published in England in 1914, is a tale of a man who is confronted by modern cultural trends -- and, oddly enough, this focus on all things "modern" (in 1914) is no less Lust for Life, Political Incorrectness, and God G. K. Chesterton is a hugely powerful voice, both intellectually and spiritually. I resonate to him as I do to few others (a few examples of my personal favorites, going in different directions, would be Leo Tolstoy, Ayn Rand, Robert Heinlein, James Branch Cabell). "The Flying Inn", published in England in 1914, is a tale of a man who is confronted by modern cultural trends -- and, oddly enough, this focus on all things "modern" (in 1914) is no less relevant today than it was a hundred years ago. Chesterton saw England as being a culture in transition and in conflict with itself, and the struggles he saw play out dramatically in this novel: The individual versus the collective; common sense versus political correctness; right and wrong versus legal and illegal; a healthy soul versus a healthy body. But to state these themes makes the book sound like a lecture, and it's not that (although it does freely meander into occasional philosophical discourses, some of which didn't hold my interest); this story is, more than anything else, an adventure and an odyssey, which begins when Mr. Humphrey Pump wants to visit the local pub in pursuit of a pleasant hour, but he finds it is being shut down by lawmakers who have decreed the neighborhood bar to be an unhealthy anachronism. Thus begins a tale of flight and civil disobedience (hence the title, "The Flying Inn"). We meet a curious collection of characters that are driving, hindering, observing, and contemplating this safe, regulated, soulless, terrifying world of the near future. The descriptions of multicultural mandates are prescient. For example, one of the major characters, an English lawmaker, is enamored with Islam, and he becomes an agent of social progress, having decided it's necessary to make England less offensive to its Muslim friends -- thus England is to be purged of pubs, not to mention, for example, ending the offensive Christian habit of marking ballots with a cross (they should be marked instead with a crescent). A lot of the details of this enlightened "tolerance" ring disturbingly true when juxtaposed against the excesses of the present day. Like Gulliver's Travels, "The Flying Inn" is both a serious social comment and a lot of fun. There's a reason it's still in print after all these years.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    G.K. Chesterton is one of the greatest Catholic authors, not just of the 20th century, but possibly ever. He wrote drama, poetry, mysteries, and theological works. Some of his most famous works include Orthodoxy, The Everlasting Man, and my personal favorite the Father Brown series. I was recently introduced to a work of his that I had never heard of before called The Flying Inn. It was originally published in 1914 and was reprinted by Ignatius Press. The story takes place in England, but not the G.K. Chesterton is one of the greatest Catholic authors, not just of the 20th century, but possibly ever. He wrote drama, poetry, mysteries, and theological works. Some of his most famous works include Orthodoxy, The Everlasting Man, and my personal favorite the Father Brown series. I was recently introduced to a work of his that I had never heard of before called The Flying Inn. It was originally published in 1914 and was reprinted by Ignatius Press. The story takes place in England, but not the England you or I know. It takes place in future England, and is a political satire. In this future England, the Temperance Movement has allowed Progressive Islam to dominate England's political, cultural, and social landscape. Two laws were passed which effectively killed local bars and pubs. The first law made pub signs illegal, and the second made it illegal to serve alcohol in a place without a sign. You see the problem for local bar owners? Pub Owner, Humphrey Pump, and Captain Patrick Dalroy aim to right this wrong and travel the countryside with a cart, a cask of rum, a wheel of cheese, and of course the sign. They wheel the cart around, setting up makeshift bars long enough to serve a round of drinks and then hightail it before they are caught by Lord Ivywood. Each chapter is a mini and zany episode that eventually will lead to a final confrontation. The book is hilarious in nature, especially the drinking songs/poems which are scattered throughout the book. However, behind this outlandish nature of the story is some political foreshadowing that could almost be described as prophetic. Prohibition did occur in the U.S. about six years after this book was published and like in the story the rich were able to skirt the law by buying their alcohol in the pharmacy. What's even more scary is how accurate Chesterton was about Islam's pervasiveness in Europe. At the time this book was written, the Ottoman Empire (with Islam as its religion) was on the brink of extinction. Now, all of Europe has been taken over by Islam with them going so far as to claim that they are the religion of Europe. Overall, I found this to be a fun and interesting read and one that I am glad I was exposed to. This book was provided to me for free by Ignatius Press in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    The Flying Inn may well count as Britain’s first modern Islamophobic book. Of course there has been historical hostility to Muslims before G K Chesterton wrote this book, but this was of a very different nature. Chesterton’s Islamophobia contains the seeds of today’s Islamophobia. Previous dislike of Muslim was based on a sense of otherness, and often held by people who had never met a Muslim in their life. Muslims were the hordes of barbarians over-running the holy city of Jerusalem, but this ha The Flying Inn may well count as Britain’s first modern Islamophobic book. Of course there has been historical hostility to Muslims before G K Chesterton wrote this book, but this was of a very different nature. Chesterton’s Islamophobia contains the seeds of today’s Islamophobia. Previous dislike of Muslim was based on a sense of otherness, and often held by people who had never met a Muslim in their life. Muslims were the hordes of barbarians over-running the holy city of Jerusalem, but this hatred of them was an abstract one since few of the writers who spoke about Muslims had ever been on a crusade. Later on the British Empire put Britons in charge of countries containing Muslims. However while colonialist writings may have been prejudiced, the authors felt no worse about Muslims than any other religion or race. They were merely members of a lower order of people who could hopefully be civilised by Christian Europeans. What marks a change in The Flying Inn is that Chesterton’s fears are no longer about Muslims over there, but Islam over here. In common with the English National League and other bigots, Chesterton is concerned with a threat on his own doorstep. It is no longer a matter of worrying about uncivilised foreigners in the east. It is about having those barbarians over here threatening our way of life. There are subtle differences between Chesterton’s views and those of the modern Islamophobe. Nowadays the fear is as much about the people. In Chesterton’s day, there had been very little immigration from Muslim countries, so his fear is more about Islamic ideas taking root in England. Indeed he imagines the upper classes of Britain becoming so fascinated with Orientalism that they begin to impose their ideas on the decent ordinary people of the nation. This is not to say that there is no racism in The Flying Inn. Chesterton frequently mocks the little Islamic prophet who mispronounces words, and who draws up all kinds of absurd ideas suggesting that the origins of most of English life lie in Islam. The prophet is from Turkey, so perhaps Chesterton did not feel confident giving an Asian character a prominent role in the book. While the prophet’s ideas are daft, they are probably no sillier than the beliefs that Chesterton adhered to. Indeed some of Chesterton’s mockery falls flat. We are supposed to derive much mirth from the fact that the prophet thinks it makes more sense to take our feet off when entering a house than to take our hat off. Yet on this point the prophet’s arguments make sense, and Chesterton seems to think that the prophet’s views are laughable for no other reason than because we do it differently. The real threat is not the foolish prophet, but the aristocrat, Lord Ivywood, an appropriate name for someone seeking to choke the life out of his country. Enthused with Oriental ideas, Ivywood introduces legislation to ban alcohol, and begins to move towards Islamification of the country – its police force, and perhaps eventually a shift in the direction of polygamy. This move is opposed by the book’s heroes, tavern owner Humphrey Pump, and Irish adventurer, Captain Dalroy. Taking advantage of a loophole in the law, they carry the sign from Pump’s tavern with them and dispense alcohol to a grateful populace, while having occasional clashes with Ivywood’s men. Dalroy and Pump are clearly intended to defend a certain idea of Britishness. I say Britishness, not Englishness, since Dalroy is Irish (he meets all the stereotypes, being fiery and romantic). This is another respect in which Chesterton differs from the average bigot of today. To ask someone today why they oppose Islam is to hear that they feel it threatens the British way of life, but they would be hard pressed to say what that meant if you asked them. They only know what it is not. It is not burkhas and Sharia law and halal meat and mosques. By contrast Chesterton does have a genuine concept of Britishness. It is an absurd one, as any attempt to impose a monocultural view of a country has to be, but he does have one. It is based around Christianity, drinking rum, rolling English roads, eating beef and robust masculinity. There is only one prominent female character in the book, but Lady Joan’s role is only to wait patiently for Captain Dalroy to come for her. By contrast the enemies of British freedom are opposed to all these things. They wish to ban drink and promote vegetarianism and make the world miserable. Never mind that these are not necessarily Muslim ideas. Chesterton merrily puts all his enemies together under one umbrella. As far as he is concerned, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism and even atheism are all under one umbrella working together to undermine traditional Christianity. This joining together of entirely separate ideas shows the dishonesty of Chesterton’s stance. While there are some pseudo-liberals who condone the illiberal aspects of Islam (I am not a great fan of the religion either), there is really no question of angry atheists delivering lectures on the beach or promoting temperance. Indeed when has there ever been an Islamic temperance movement in this country, for that matter? It is actually Chesterton’s fellow Christians who have most firmly banged this drum in the past. Chesterton has no real wish to understand the motives of his enemies either. As far as he is concerned, the upper class hate alcohol and meat because the lower class love them. While it is certainly true that there is often an elitism in society that seeks to debase pleasures available to poor people, I think that Chesterton chooses to wilfully misunderstand the motives of his opponents. To consider the temperance movement, I believe that its members were not trying to deny people pleasure. They were concerned with the damaging effects of alcohol – the violence, and the problems caused by addiction. This side does not feature in Chesterton’s work at all. Alcohol is merely a pleasurable activity and a British right. I do not support banning alcohol either, but cannot help feeling that Chesterton would benefit from showing both sides of the argument. In any case, banning alcohol does not mean forcing everyone to drink milk. Similarly nobody is trying to impose vegetarianism on everyone, and frankly a vegetarian diet need not be as dreary as Chesterton would wish us to believe it. The Catholic church has discussed making Chesterton into a saint, and citing his tolerant views as a reason. Frankly this surprises me, as Chesterton was anything but tolerant towards those who did share his views, as any reading of his works will show. The Flying Inn is racist, anti-semitic, Islamophobic and narrow-minded in many respects. There is much fun to be had in reading The Flying Inn however. The antics of Pump and Dalroy are amusing, and their songs are a delight to read, actually rather better than the novel itself. The story does often drown in purple prose, and has its tedious moments. However while I deplore many of Chesterton’s view, I find the book very diverting.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    "We must not ask them to make a cross on their ballot papers; for though it seems a small thing, it may offend them. So I brought in a little bill to make it optional between the old-fashioned cross and an upward curved mark that might stand for a crescent -- and as it's rather easier to make, I believe it will be generally adopted." And so go the various projects in this rollicking and fantastical tale of Dalroy and Pump and their "flying inn," which flies against newly-legislated temperance law "We must not ask them to make a cross on their ballot papers; for though it seems a small thing, it may offend them. So I brought in a little bill to make it optional between the old-fashioned cross and an upward curved mark that might stand for a crescent -- and as it's rather easier to make, I believe it will be generally adopted." And so go the various projects in this rollicking and fantastical tale of Dalroy and Pump and their "flying inn," which flies against newly-legislated temperance laws and a newly-legislated merger of Islam with hitherto Christian England. Chesterton satirizes political correctness and wages war against the calm resignation which allows good things to slip and change and disappear without a fight. Moreover, in a story of victory, he includes a grim prophecy of the destiny of Empire: "Victory over barbarians. Employment of barbarians. Alliance with barbarians. Conquest by barbarians."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    The first half dragged rather, but once they had dealt with the man who watered the milk then the book caught fire and felt typical Chesterton. And what can be better than that? There are plenty of his wonderful descriptions of skies - no-one can make you see a sunset like him. The hero Dalroy is excellently realised, the women are more differentiated than usual, and the issues raised in the fantastical plot are as relevant today. But, I regret to say, the charges against Chesterton of anti-Semit The first half dragged rather, but once they had dealt with the man who watered the milk then the book caught fire and felt typical Chesterton. And what can be better than that? There are plenty of his wonderful descriptions of skies - no-one can make you see a sunset like him. The hero Dalroy is excellently realised, the women are more differentiated than usual, and the issues raised in the fantastical plot are as relevant today. But, I regret to say, the charges against Chesterton of anti-Semitism are given plenty of evidence here. I'm not saying they are the views of the man himself, who apparently was tolerance personified, but I still don't like the way he writes about Jews. Which is what knocks off the last star.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Griliopoulos

    Like Atlas Shrugged, this is a polemical piece intended to show the rightness of Chestertons's philosophy, through a parodic, dystopian view of his beloved country. Unlike Rand though, Chesterton makes his antagonist initially believable and clever and his protagonist preternaturally witty and wise - and suffuses the entire book with his delicacy of language and humour. For that reason, the sections that are great - his poetry and songs about England, the romps across Southern England, the short Like Atlas Shrugged, this is a polemical piece intended to show the rightness of Chestertons's philosophy, through a parodic, dystopian view of his beloved country. Unlike Rand though, Chesterton makes his antagonist initially believable and clever and his protagonist preternaturally witty and wise - and suffuses the entire book with his delicacy of language and humour. For that reason, the sections that are great - his poetry and songs about England, the romps across Southern England, the short dystopian end section - are only undermined slightly by his stereotyping (which sometimes bounds into racism) and petty nationalism. These regrettable latter elements make the book more like a Tom Sharpe farce than any of his other, clever and dark, fiction.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    For some moments Joan appeared to be in a blacker state of brooding than usual; then she said, in a candid and friendly tone, which somehow contrasted with her knit and swarthy brows— "No, really. At least I think I've only found out two things; and they are only things about myself. I've discovered that I do like heroism, but I don't like hero worship." "Surely," said Miss Browning, in the Girton manner, "the one always flows from the other." "I hope not," said Joan. "But what else can you do with For some moments Joan appeared to be in a blacker state of brooding than usual; then she said, in a candid and friendly tone, which somehow contrasted with her knit and swarthy brows— "No, really. At least I think I've only found out two things; and they are only things about myself. I've discovered that I do like heroism, but I don't like hero worship." "Surely," said Miss Browning, in the Girton manner, "the one always flows from the other." "I hope not," said Joan. "But what else can you do with the hero?" asked Mrs. Mackintosh, still without looking up from her writing, "except worship him?" "You might crucify him," said Joan, with a sudden return of savage restlessness, as she rose from her chair. "Things seem to happen then."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alfred Simon

    Light story, not as good as some of Chesterton's others, but a fun read nonetheless. Light story, not as good as some of Chesterton's others, but a fun read nonetheless.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tirzah Eleora

    Not my favorite Chesterton novel, it was somewhat tedious at parts, but it's still packed with all the philosophical riot that we know and love. Not my favorite Chesterton novel, it was somewhat tedious at parts, but it's still packed with all the philosophical riot that we know and love.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Chesterton's story (another parable, I'm convinced) of a fictional England in which the lord of the land makes the rule of the people (using legal means), and his only goal is to go where no (English) man has gone before; prohibition, vegetarianism, Islam, and Eastern philosophy, everything from the far corners of the Empire, all imposed (apparently legally) on the everyday hard-working Joe. Conflict first raises its head when he (Ivywood) imposes the first law severely limiting the number of pu Chesterton's story (another parable, I'm convinced) of a fictional England in which the lord of the land makes the rule of the people (using legal means), and his only goal is to go where no (English) man has gone before; prohibition, vegetarianism, Islam, and Eastern philosophy, everything from the far corners of the Empire, all imposed (apparently legally) on the everyday hard-working Joe. Conflict first raises its head when he (Ivywood) imposes the first law severely limiting the number of pubs (each must prominently display a pub sign so everyone understands their intent) - thus slowly strangling the working-class man's access to alcohol (grog and meat/flesh will take on an almost-holy-English significance in the story). Along comes red-headed Irish Captain Dalroy (who's just returned from his own mythical experience in Turkey) to challenge this insult of all that is truly representative English (yes, the Irishman saves the day). With his friend Henry Pump (English bar owner) Dalroy adventures through the English countryside as a thorn in Ivywood's side; his most valuable and dangerous possessions - a keg of rum, a wheel of cheese, and the Sign of The Old Ship (from Pump's former bar), which legally allows him to serve and consume alcohol anywhere where the sign can be plopped, in a brilliant subversion of the "letter of the law" - a Robin Hood tactic that causes Ivywood no end of headaches. I don't really know if Chesterton's story is on its surface Islamophobic; his wariness of Eastern influences on Western culture (especially among its ruling class) - and inevitable clashing of cultures - almost seems scarily prophetic in this day and age, but maybe it was just an ideal example at the time of the fads (temperance, vegetarianism, eastern philosophy and religions whose foundations lie upon it, etc) to that he believes the oligarchy susceptable, at the expense of the everyday English holding down the fort of true English tradition, fellowship, and character. Like many parables, the finer plot details of The Flying Inn are rather sketchy. It seems that Ivywood, Lady Joan, Dalroy, and Pump have known each other before the action of these circumstances, but I missed the particulars (if they're there) on that one- what would logically bring together an english Lady, an English pubkeeper, and an Irish sailor to form the basis of true friendship? There's a romance between Dalroy and Lady Joan, but that seems rather shoehorned in and lacking detail, particularly at the end of the story, as does the answer to the mystery of "who lives next door to Ivywood". All the action of the characters basically moving in circles rather wore me out. I have to comment on Chesterton's use of "that" word mostly in the beginning of the story - was it a common descriptive word for the race, in England at the time? It was a tad jarring to see it so often used so casually, especially as I don't remember it at all from the other Chesterton story I've read - The Man Who Was Thursday. I also have a feeling that I'm reading the work of a very clever man, whose allusions and semantic games and comedy are way over MY head. The story does make me wish I was English, in order to better understand what he was trying to convey.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cyr

    Not his best fiction, although it still succeeds in being very Chestertonian. The Flying Inn has some trouble staying aloft, and never soars to the heights of The Man who was Thursday or The Ball and the Cross. Still probably worth a read. A lot of satire, sometimes of ideas or classes of people who adhere to them, vegetarians for instance, but more often simply of certain ways of thinking, habits of mind. Among other things, the book dares to pit Christianity against Islam and to suggest that o Not his best fiction, although it still succeeds in being very Chestertonian. The Flying Inn has some trouble staying aloft, and never soars to the heights of The Man who was Thursday or The Ball and the Cross. Still probably worth a read. A lot of satire, sometimes of ideas or classes of people who adhere to them, vegetarians for instance, but more often simply of certain ways of thinking, habits of mind. Among other things, the book dares to pit Christianity against Islam and to suggest that one of them may be "right." It's a book of conflicts: poetry vs. progressivism, humanity against humanism. By the end there is something of the feeling you find in That Hideous Strength, with the coldly calculating, inhuman intellect trying to sanitize away all the common things that are plain but good in their own simple and flawed way....and that way of mind proving contagious among some people, which it debases, and needing to be combatted by something older and wilder and much more exuberant. I suspect Lewis read this book and it influenced his.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rex Libris

    Written in 1914, this story is more apt today than it was then. In the story progressive politicians legislate social policy to conform to aspects of sharia law. The main one being the ban on the sale of alcohol. The ban is not an outright ban on alcohol, but achieves it by limiting the conditions under which it can be sold, conditions which can never be met. In response to the ban, the two protagonists take the inn sign and the keg of rum and go on the road, setting up the sign and selling the Written in 1914, this story is more apt today than it was then. In the story progressive politicians legislate social policy to conform to aspects of sharia law. The main one being the ban on the sale of alcohol. The ban is not an outright ban on alcohol, but achieves it by limiting the conditions under which it can be sold, conditions which can never be met. In response to the ban, the two protagonists take the inn sign and the keg of rum and go on the road, setting up the sign and selling the rum until what time they have to hightail it away and set up shop somewhere else. When the working class discover the wealthy class have been given access to alcohol through a loophole meant for the wealth only, they march on the wealthy progs and upset their Islamist appeasements.

  27. 5 out of 5

    A

    Ok- i didn't finish it.. .but i was reading 5 other books at the same time and i just lost the thread. What i did read was in a beautiful old (old!) library binding book with that wonderful old feeling paper. This is a book about a subtle takeover of England by Turkish (light Muslim) ways. Alcohol is forbidden save at public inn's. they are all shut down, save one that travels stealthily by night with a sign and a heroic swashbuckling figure about the english country side evading the officials. Ok- i didn't finish it.. .but i was reading 5 other books at the same time and i just lost the thread. What i did read was in a beautiful old (old!) library binding book with that wonderful old feeling paper. This is a book about a subtle takeover of England by Turkish (light Muslim) ways. Alcohol is forbidden save at public inn's. they are all shut down, save one that travels stealthily by night with a sign and a heroic swashbuckling figure about the english country side evading the officials. Sounds great, right? yes- indeed- great! but also a little long on the one note motif. Still...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    I saw this book on a friend's GoodReads list and decided that since I like Chesterton I'd give it a try. As a bonus, since Chesterton's works are in the public domain, I was able to get the book free of charge (and you can too!). So there really is no excuse for not cozying up with a little G. K. Chesterton. To add to my bonus, I scored an audiobook from LibriVox. If you are ... Please finish reading this review on my website: http://www.wetalkofholythings.com/201... I saw this book on a friend's GoodReads list and decided that since I like Chesterton I'd give it a try. As a bonus, since Chesterton's works are in the public domain, I was able to get the book free of charge (and you can too!). So there really is no excuse for not cozying up with a little G. K. Chesterton. To add to my bonus, I scored an audiobook from LibriVox. If you are ... Please finish reading this review on my website: http://www.wetalkofholythings.com/201...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andy Zach

    The Flying Inn' is a wonderful piece of humorous satire, set at the turn of the 20th century England, before WW I. In it author GK Chesterton lampoon prohibition and British politicians, philosophers, and diplomats. I am by no means super-familiar with the time and cultural milieu of England, but I knew enough to laugh aloud at the pointed descriptions of politicians. There also was unintentional humor in it. The Flying Inn' is a wonderful piece of humorous satire, set at the turn of the 20th century England, before WW I. In it author GK Chesterton lampoon prohibition and British politicians, philosophers, and diplomats. I am by no means super-familiar with the time and cultural milieu of England, but I knew enough to laugh aloud at the pointed descriptions of politicians. There also was unintentional humor in it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris Amies

    Could be timely in this time of plague with pubs closed and a barrel of brandy our only man (not beer of course, you couldn't go on the road with that). The Flying Inn nicely skewers the woke tendencies of politicians jumping conveniently on bandwagons. When we get there we know if the pubs are all closed with some brandy you can get what you came for. Could be timely in this time of plague with pubs closed and a barrel of brandy our only man (not beer of course, you couldn't go on the road with that). The Flying Inn nicely skewers the woke tendencies of politicians jumping conveniently on bandwagons. When we get there we know if the pubs are all closed with some brandy you can get what you came for.

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