web site hit counter An Absent Mind - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

An Absent Mind

Availability: Ready to download

An Absent Mind, a riveting new novel from Eric Rill, author of Pinnacle of Deceit and The Innocent Traitor, is about a race against time. The ticking time bomb is Saul Reimer's sanity. His Alzheimer's is going to be the catalyst that will either bring his family together or tear it apart. Although An Absent Mind depicts Saul's arduous struggle with Alzheimer's, it is equal An Absent Mind, a riveting new novel from Eric Rill, author of Pinnacle of Deceit and The Innocent Traitor, is about a race against time. The ticking time bomb is Saul Reimer's sanity. His Alzheimer's is going to be the catalyst that will either bring his family together or tear it apart. Although An Absent Mind depicts Saul's arduous struggle with Alzheimer's, it is equally a story about his relationship with his loved ones and their shared journey. Seventy-one, and a man used to controlling those around him, Saul finds himself helplessly slipping into the abyss in what he describes as his slow dance with death. As we listen in on his ramblings, humor, emotions, lucid moments, and confusion, we are also privy to the thoughts and feelings his family share with us-his wife, Monique, conflicted and depressed; caring, yet angry; his daughter, Florence, compassionate, worried about her father's health, yet proper and reserved; his son, Joey, self-centered and narcissistic, seemingly distant from his family's challenges. And Dr. Tremblay, Saul's Alzheimer's specialist, who provides the reader with facts and observations about this dreaded disease that imprisons more than 35 million people worldwide. We know from the beginning how it has to end for Saul, because no one has ever outsmarted Alzheimer's. But how will he navigate the meandering road that will eventually destroy his health and result in his death? And how will it affect those around him as they live with strain and guilt, while at the same time being forced to face their own demons? These questions are answered expertly by the author as he explores the conflicts that rise to the surface as the family deals with Saul's dementia. Eric Rill's novel is reminiscent of Lisa Genova's Still Alice, Nicholas Sparks The Notebook, and Alice Munro's Away From Her. Although a beautiful work of literary fiction, An Absent Mind will expose the reader to the reality of Alzheimer's.


Compare

An Absent Mind, a riveting new novel from Eric Rill, author of Pinnacle of Deceit and The Innocent Traitor, is about a race against time. The ticking time bomb is Saul Reimer's sanity. His Alzheimer's is going to be the catalyst that will either bring his family together or tear it apart. Although An Absent Mind depicts Saul's arduous struggle with Alzheimer's, it is equal An Absent Mind, a riveting new novel from Eric Rill, author of Pinnacle of Deceit and The Innocent Traitor, is about a race against time. The ticking time bomb is Saul Reimer's sanity. His Alzheimer's is going to be the catalyst that will either bring his family together or tear it apart. Although An Absent Mind depicts Saul's arduous struggle with Alzheimer's, it is equally a story about his relationship with his loved ones and their shared journey. Seventy-one, and a man used to controlling those around him, Saul finds himself helplessly slipping into the abyss in what he describes as his slow dance with death. As we listen in on his ramblings, humor, emotions, lucid moments, and confusion, we are also privy to the thoughts and feelings his family share with us-his wife, Monique, conflicted and depressed; caring, yet angry; his daughter, Florence, compassionate, worried about her father's health, yet proper and reserved; his son, Joey, self-centered and narcissistic, seemingly distant from his family's challenges. And Dr. Tremblay, Saul's Alzheimer's specialist, who provides the reader with facts and observations about this dreaded disease that imprisons more than 35 million people worldwide. We know from the beginning how it has to end for Saul, because no one has ever outsmarted Alzheimer's. But how will he navigate the meandering road that will eventually destroy his health and result in his death? And how will it affect those around him as they live with strain and guilt, while at the same time being forced to face their own demons? These questions are answered expertly by the author as he explores the conflicts that rise to the surface as the family deals with Saul's dementia. Eric Rill's novel is reminiscent of Lisa Genova's Still Alice, Nicholas Sparks The Notebook, and Alice Munro's Away From Her. Although a beautiful work of literary fiction, An Absent Mind will expose the reader to the reality of Alzheimer's.

30 review for An Absent Mind

  1. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    I know I am very fortunate not to know anyone personally stricken with Alzheimer disease. This author though definitely knows what he is talking about as he watched his fathers downward spiral for eight years. This is narrated by Saul, seventy, who is diagnosed with the disease, his wife of many years who wants to keep him home as long as possible. His grown son, who is not able to forget what he considers his cold upbringing and his sister, Florence who he thought was always the favorite. Also b I know I am very fortunate not to know anyone personally stricken with Alzheimer disease. This author though definitely knows what he is talking about as he watched his fathers downward spiral for eight years. This is narrated by Saul, seventy, who is diagnosed with the disease, his wife of many years who wants to keep him home as long as possible. His grown son, who is not able to forget what he considers his cold upbringing and his sister, Florence who he thought was always the favorite. Also by the doctor who explains how he makes his diagnosis and exactly what is happening to Saul at various stages. A good hard look at how this disease affects the whole family, told in entries almost like a diary or journal. Parts were funny, Saul does and thinks some amusing things. Poignant, as his wife, Monique is his main caregiver and one sees the extreme stress this causes her. I felt it was told in a distant, somewhat unemotional way but I preferred this. What the characters are going through is heartbreaking enough, I think the distance lets us fill in our own emotions. Well done, I thought providing a clear understanding of just how hard this disease is on families and the patient themselves.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    I want to scream to the world..."YOU HAVE TO READ THIS BOOK"! I dare people to take longer than two sittings to finish. You can't put it down!!! I believe this is one of those books that is best not to say 'too much'. It takes a BRAVE person to read it though!! Its impossible to exaggerate the importance of this novel. Its wonderfully written --vividly descriptive --deeply emotionally felt. For those who've read "Still Alice", by Lisa Genova ... (another phenomenal book ), "An Absent Mind" goes I want to scream to the world..."YOU HAVE TO READ THIS BOOK"! I dare people to take longer than two sittings to finish. You can't put it down!!! I believe this is one of those books that is best not to say 'too much'. It takes a BRAVE person to read it though!! Its impossible to exaggerate the importance of this novel. Its wonderfully written --vividly descriptive --deeply emotionally felt. For those who've read "Still Alice", by Lisa Genova ... (another phenomenal book ), "An Absent Mind" goes deeper. Each family member is so honest with their feelings and thoughts --its painful to hear the truth. With resentments, anger, and fears, while facing the reality of Saul's decline--- family love shines through: Alzheimer within a Jewish Family -- in Quebec -- WHAT a MIX!!! Its hard to believe the author was able to write this novel without ongoing shivering. What he did with this story is beyond brilliant. Page-turning gripping --Sometimes hilarious --always sad! Thank You, Netgalley for this huge opportunity to read this!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Esil

    I received a free copy of this book from the publisher through Netgalley. I didn't know anything about An Absent Mind before requesting it, but it sounded interesting and has recently won an Indie book prize. And I am so glad I took a chance on this book. Rill's book is about a man with Altziemer's, and how he and his family cope with the evolution of the disease. It is sad, at times funny, and feels very real. It is told from the perspective of each family member, including the main character w I received a free copy of this book from the publisher through Netgalley. I didn't know anything about An Absent Mind before requesting it, but it sounded interesting and has recently won an Indie book prize. And I am so glad I took a chance on this book. Rill's book is about a man with Altziemer's, and how he and his family cope with the evolution of the disease. It is sad, at times funny, and feels very real. It is told from the perspective of each family member, including the main character whose mind is deteriorating. Besides dealing really well with the illness and how it affects the family, Rill portrays a very recognizable family. These characters and their relationships felt very real with all their flaws and complicated love for each other. The book seems very personal and I suspect it is somewhat autobiographical. But it is not self indulgent, as some autobiographical novels can be. And An Absent Mind had the added bonus of being set in Montreal -- in a cultural and geographic context that is very familiar to me and that was really well portrayed. Well worth the read. A great little book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    George

    ENLIGHTENING, INSIGHTFUL, AND WELL WRITTEN. "It's all unravelling."—page 117 Just why a septuagenarian might choose to read a book about Alzheimer's still eludes me. Could the choice, itself, be a symptom? Or, perhaps—putting a brighter face on it—just a celebration of capacity, curiosity, compassion and wonder? To lose one's mind—your source of identity—has to be among the very scariest of things to contemplate, ever. One of just many, though, that vouchsafe that great title of Art Linkletter's ex ENLIGHTENING, INSIGHTFUL, AND WELL WRITTEN. "It's all unravelling."—page 117 Just why a septuagenarian might choose to read a book about Alzheimer's still eludes me. Could the choice, itself, be a symptom? Or, perhaps—putting a brighter face on it—just a celebration of capacity, curiosity, compassion and wonder? To lose one's mind—your source of identity—has to be among the very scariest of things to contemplate, ever. One of just many, though, that vouchsafe that great title of Art Linkletter's excellent book: OLD AGE IS NOT FOR SISSIES. In this enlightening and insightful book, AN ABSENT MIND: A Novel, author Eric Rill compassionately paints what feels like a very real and complete picture of what Alzheimer's might be like, from various perspectives. But it is not a restful read. It is about as sad as life can get. Recommendation: Assuming knowledge trumps curiosity, and that knowing 'might' help mitigate worry—this is a book that should be read by any and all in anyway involved and/or concerned with this dreadful subject. Eric Rill has achieved his goal. "I [...] penned 'An Absent Mind'—a novel I knew I had to write, having been through eight years with my father's Alzheimer's. My goal was not only to write good fiction, but also to provide readers with a true picture of this dreaded disease that afflicts more than 35 million people worldwide. I truly hope I was able to achieve that."—from About the Author, page 261 Kindle edition, 263 pages

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    Many reviewers have compared this to Lisa Genova's book "Still Alice" but I don't think they are even in the same ballpark! Genova's story is much better. I think I remember that there was a little hype about this book but it just wasn't that good at all! This book is told from multiple viewpoints, Saul, his wife Monique, his daughter Francine, his son Joey, and every now and then a chapter by Saul's doctor for some clinical explanations of Alzheimer's. It reads very fast. I didn't connect with Many reviewers have compared this to Lisa Genova's book "Still Alice" but I don't think they are even in the same ballpark! Genova's story is much better. I think I remember that there was a little hype about this book but it just wasn't that good at all! This book is told from multiple viewpoints, Saul, his wife Monique, his daughter Francine, his son Joey, and every now and then a chapter by Saul's doctor for some clinical explanations of Alzheimer's. It reads very fast. I didn't connect with any of the characters and therefore wasn't emotionally invested in the story to feel anything when reading about Saul's decline. It was all so strange and clinical for me. It didn't seem like there was any attempt by the author to engage the reader's emotions at all. I could have read/listened to this book in one sitting but frankly, I got bored. I just don't see where people are getting these 4 and 5 star ratings when there are so many better books out there. Sorry this is only getting 2 stars from me. Read Lisa Genova's book instead.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    Book blurb: The ticking time bomb is Saul Reimer's sanity. His Alzheimer's is going to be the catalyst that will either bring his family together or tear it apart. Although An Absent Mind depicts Saul's arduous struggle with Alzheimer's, it is equally a story about his relationship with his loved ones and their shared journey. This novella is less than 200 pages, and is a really quick read, but knowing the subject matter, you know that there is no happily-ever-after at the end. I'm conflicted abo Book blurb: The ticking time bomb is Saul Reimer's sanity. His Alzheimer's is going to be the catalyst that will either bring his family together or tear it apart. Although An Absent Mind depicts Saul's arduous struggle with Alzheimer's, it is equally a story about his relationship with his loved ones and their shared journey. This novella is less than 200 pages, and is a really quick read, but knowing the subject matter, you know that there is no happily-ever-after at the end. I'm conflicted about how to rate this one, so will try to work it out in this review. Reading this story was almost like reading a play with stage scenery and actors. The story is told from multiple points of view: Saul, his family, and a doctor. I quite liked that we get Saul's point of view as the disease progresses, and the fact that we also hear about key events from his wife and kids, means that the reader gets a more complete sense of the scene. The story cycles through the various narrators at a pretty fast clip, and each section is really short, sometimes only a paragraph or a single sentence in length. The writing is very straightforward with no flourishes of any kind, and my largest complaint is that the various voices sound exactly the same. If the sections had not been labeled I would have been hard pressed to tell them apart. The author's father also had Alzheimer's, and I'm not sure how much of this novel is based on his personal experience, but it is clear that he wanted to help others understand more about the destruction left in the wake of this disease. I think he did a good job with that, but I felt at somewhat of an emotional remove as the story unfolded, and I think a large part of that was due to the writing itself. If you have never read a book on this disease, this would be a good introduction, and if you have not yet read it, I would highly recommend Still Alice by Lisa Genova.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Truly exceptional! I would highly recommend this book to all my reader and non-reader friends. Eric Rill did a phenomenal job capturing four distinct voices through his writing! Alzheimer’s is such a sad disease for not only the person diagnosed but all who surround them. An Absent Mind really captured the emotions and stages of a family who is losing the head of the household to this dreadful disease. I listened to some of An Absent Mind on audio and it was really wonderful, this is only the se Truly exceptional! I would highly recommend this book to all my reader and non-reader friends. Eric Rill did a phenomenal job capturing four distinct voices through his writing! Alzheimer’s is such a sad disease for not only the person diagnosed but all who surround them. An Absent Mind really captured the emotions and stages of a family who is losing the head of the household to this dreadful disease. I listened to some of An Absent Mind on audio and it was really wonderful, this is only the second book that I have tried to listen to and I quite enjoyed the narration and felt it added to the story. There wasn’t a time I felt my mind wandering. Excellent book...going to see what else Eric Rill has to offer me.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    I have a dear friend who was just diagnosed with Alzheimer's. Eric Rill does a wonderful job of bringing this up close and personal. The book is narrated by five people, Monique, the wife, Saul, the Alzheimer's patient, Florence, the daughter, Joey the son, and Dr. Trembley. I have gained a much greater understanding of the disease and how it effects the family and friends. It's as if each narrator is a friend and drops by for a cup of coffee and a visit, sharing how they feel and what they feel I have a dear friend who was just diagnosed with Alzheimer's. Eric Rill does a wonderful job of bringing this up close and personal. The book is narrated by five people, Monique, the wife, Saul, the Alzheimer's patient, Florence, the daughter, Joey the son, and Dr. Trembley. I have gained a much greater understanding of the disease and how it effects the family and friends. It's as if each narrator is a friend and drops by for a cup of coffee and a visit, sharing how they feel and what they feel in their individual roles. This book made me weep, for my friend.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Judy D Collins

    A special thank you to Lake Union Publishing and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Eric Rill’s AN ABSENT MIND, is a riveting account of one man’s struggle with Alzheimer’s and the emotional journey of his family and those around him. Saul is a man in his early seventies when this terrible illness strikes. We also hear from the other family member’s perspective and how this horrific disease has touched each life. His wife, Monique; Florence-daughter; and Joey, the son. With sh A special thank you to Lake Union Publishing and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Eric Rill’s AN ABSENT MIND, is a riveting account of one man’s struggle with Alzheimer’s and the emotional journey of his family and those around him. Saul is a man in his early seventies when this terrible illness strikes. We also hear from the other family member’s perspective and how this horrific disease has touched each life. His wife, Monique; Florence-daughter; and Joey, the son. With short chapters we hear from the controlling Saul as he feels he is losing his control and slipping away. At times of course your heart goes out to him with the confusion and other times he can be humorous. As we hear from each family member, his wife is depressed and feels obligated, the daughter is reserved, yet compassionate and worried; and then of course we have the son who is more self-centered and removed. If you have been around anyone with Alzheimer’s, it is rather scary, as you can only image what is going on in their confused mind. If they could only tell you. My sister cares for a woman with Alzheimer’s, ninety years old and she can be a real hoot; however, as the day progresses she seems more confused and disoriented. This was my first book by Eric Rill and his personal journey with his father definitely brought insights to the novel. However, I would not compare this book to Lisa Genova's novels, as have read all her books; and one of my favorite authors -she brings much more emotion and feelings from her characters to her stories. If you enjoyed this book, would highly recommend Genova’s new upcoming novel Inside the O’Briens , a family’s struggle with HD (Huntington’s Disease)—was fortunate to have read an ARC. With Genova’s books you feel each person’s emotion deeply; whereas with Rill’s did not have the same impact. However, I would recommend AN ABSENT MIND, as a realistic portrait of a family and how each person is affected by the illness. Rill also includes chapters from a doctor’s perspective with nice research. Look forward to reading more from this author. Judith D. Collins Must Read Books

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sbr Martin

    Monsters, vampires, werewolves, clown-clad serial killers, and demons—there’s a lot to be afraid of in life, especially as portrayed in fiction. But, if you want to read a tale about the most relentless of villains, don’t turn to the works of King, Bradbury, Lovecraft, or Koontz, but, rather, to Eric Rill’s latest novel. According to recent statistics, at least thirty-six-million people across the globe are currently suffering with Alzheimer’s. In the United States alone, the disease claims more Monsters, vampires, werewolves, clown-clad serial killers, and demons—there’s a lot to be afraid of in life, especially as portrayed in fiction. But, if you want to read a tale about the most relentless of villains, don’t turn to the works of King, Bradbury, Lovecraft, or Koontz, but, rather, to Eric Rill’s latest novel. According to recent statistics, at least thirty-six-million people across the globe are currently suffering with Alzheimer’s. In the United States alone, the disease claims more than 500,000 lives a year, and, with a new case being diagnosed approximately every sixty-seven seconds, it’s anticipated that many, many more folks will eventually fall victim. “An Absent Mind” by Eric Rill follows one man’s journey down the downward spiral of this disease, as delivered from his perspective and the perspectives of his wife, daughter, son, and doctor. Heartfelt, heartwarming, and heartbreaking all at the same time, it finds Canadian married father Saul on the brink of his slow, dark descent and chronicles the changes he endures over the next several years, as well as those endured by his family. Whether you’re new to information on Alzheimer’s or are unfortunately familiar, this story is sure to affect and alarm you, and make you think more about your own future and how you would handle such a sickness, as patient, caregiver, friend, or family member. As apt as the story is, so, too, is the way it is written. Rill uses short first-person narrative chapters, in alternating voices, to record the goings-on, thoughts, and feelings experienced by Saul and his family, from before Saul’s initial diagnosis to his final lucid moments and beyond. Saul’s voice, in particular, changes drastically, as is expected—starting out with cohesive, eloquent memories; turning to scatterbrained, distracted entries that are full of suspicion and are unquestionably impulsive; and, near the end, simply spitting out a word or two, misspelled and misplaced in what barely passes for a sentence. Dovetailing Saul’s transformation are those of his wife and children, which won’t be mentioned here, for the sake of preserving many of the book’s tribulations and treasures. “An Absent Mind” by Eric Rill was, indeed, a very difficult novel to read, inasmuch as it explicitly depicts something most of us would like to avoid confronting unless we have to. But ignoring this disease won’t make it go away—and, until medical science can effectively do so, we must confront the disease and, dare say, embrace it, so that we can prepare ourselves for what will inevitably affect us, either directly or indirectly, in our future and find further impetus to feed, fuel, and fund the research necessary to combat this relentless villain… and, that’s exactly what this book will help you do. Kudos to Rill for his loving handling of the topic, for his compassion and sensitivity, and for his dedication to increasing public awareness.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tamsen

    Really god-awful. I am sure, after writing this review, I will go the GR review section and read glowing reviews, but someone has to speak the truth... even if it makes you a shitty person. I know that Rill's own father was diagnosed with Alzheimer's, and this piece of fiction is probably not fiction at all. This is what makes me a shitty person - that I will admit that this is still terribly written. Just because it really happened to you does not make it good reading for everyone else. The writ Really god-awful. I am sure, after writing this review, I will go the GR review section and read glowing reviews, but someone has to speak the truth... even if it makes you a shitty person. I know that Rill's own father was diagnosed with Alzheimer's, and this piece of fiction is probably not fiction at all. This is what makes me a shitty person - that I will admit that this is still terribly written. Just because it really happened to you does not make it good reading for everyone else. The writing is very juvenile. The publisher doesn't make it any more mature with the oddly large print. All the characters sound exactly alike. I didn't get a sense that Saul was really slipping into later stages of Alzheimer's - it's just written so poorly that it makes him seem like a child all of the sudden. Monique is a bit hard to sympathize with. At one point, at the Alzheimer's center, she calls the patients (and forgive the paraphrasing, I don't have the book with me) something like drooling idiots. I don't know that I would have lost empathy for adults suffering with Alzheimer's, ESPECIALLY if my own husband was going to become of those 'drooling idiots' one day. I finished this, and I'm struggling with this need of mine to finish every book on my path of reading. Maybe I should start abandoning books, but it feels a disservice to the author to quit half-way through. Who knows if the ending will redeem itself? This one won't.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Baker

    An absent mind is definitely not absent emotion. This is a beautiful story of a family struggling with a loved one with Alzheimers. Having a mother in early stages of Alheimers myself, this book especially struck home. It seems most books on this subject are written either for or from the perspective of the caregiver. The book "Still Alice" was excellent because it was from the patient's point of view and I thought it spoke volumes. An Absent Mind combines all aspects when the journey is shared An absent mind is definitely not absent emotion. This is a beautiful story of a family struggling with a loved one with Alzheimers. Having a mother in early stages of Alheimers myself, this book especially struck home. It seems most books on this subject are written either for or from the perspective of the caregiver. The book "Still Alice" was excellent because it was from the patient's point of view and I thought it spoke volumes. An Absent Mind combines all aspects when the journey is shared with the thoughts and feelings of the patient, spouse, children and doctor. If there is a redeeming factor in having Alheimers it would be that there is little, if any, physical pain involved for the inflicted. The amount of emotional and pyschological pain is an different story entirely. This story is a short, quick read but a powerful one. I highly recommend it to anyone of any age. Woven in the story of Saul's plight, is also the reminder of how powerful our connections are to family -- even as we grow up and sometimes apart. Like a slight shake of sprinkles on a cupcake, the story is topped with the added flavor of how much a word or touch can make to someone's feeling of selfworth. It reiterates how important it is that we not only show our loved ones how much they mean to us, but tell them. A great discussion book or just one to enjoy and ponder, "An Absent Mind" does not miss the mark. I received this book free of charge for an objective and honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    I received a copy of this book from the publishers, through NetGalley. If I could give this book more than 5 stars, I would. One of my biggest fears in life is to lose my mental faculties. The idea seriously terrifies me, as I'm sure it does most people. "An Absent Mind" is an honest and raw account of how Alzheimers affects not only the person with the disease, but everyone who cares about the person as well. "An Absent Mind" is a quick paced story that draws you in from the first paragraph and t I received a copy of this book from the publishers, through NetGalley. If I could give this book more than 5 stars, I would. One of my biggest fears in life is to lose my mental faculties. The idea seriously terrifies me, as I'm sure it does most people. "An Absent Mind" is an honest and raw account of how Alzheimers affects not only the person with the disease, but everyone who cares about the person as well. "An Absent Mind" is a quick paced story that draws you in from the first paragraph and that leaves you in tears (several times, I'll admit it) and feeling nothing but compassion and empathy for the characters involved. It's almost like an intimate inside look at the slow dance with death that is Alzheimers Disease. The story is told from multiple perspectives: Saul, the main character, is a 71 year old man who recieves the Alzheimers diagnosis. Through the story we witness his decline and it honestly feels like we're right there beside him in his confusion. Saul's wife, Monique, becomes Sual's caretaker and we are privy to the thoughts and feelings she experiences through the years of the disease. Also narrating the story are Saul's two adult children: Florence and Joey. The alternating narration keeps the story fresh and flowing, and it's one that I couldn't put down. This book is due to be released in two days. Everyone should read it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Blankfein

    Author Eric Rill paints an accurate overview of Alzheimer's disease and how the patient and family members are affected. My father is around the same age as Saul, the main character, and he too has dementia and suffers from many of the same things mentioned in the book. Because the book was short it did not delve into the constant day to day emotional struggle or the medicines or the specific small changes that take the patient from independence to wheelchair bound, but the narrative does touch Author Eric Rill paints an accurate overview of Alzheimer's disease and how the patient and family members are affected. My father is around the same age as Saul, the main character, and he too has dementia and suffers from many of the same things mentioned in the book. Because the book was short it did not delve into the constant day to day emotional struggle or the medicines or the specific small changes that take the patient from independence to wheelchair bound, but the narrative does touch upon major events and each characters feelings enough to give readers a taste of this sad, scary and devastating disease for everyone.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    This is a story about one person with Alzheimer's and how it affects him and his family. Told from the POV of Saul, the 71 year old with Alzheimer's, his wife of many years, Monique, who wants to keep him at home for as long as possible, his daughter, Florence, the favored child, and Joey, the self-centered son who never did anything right. Dr. Trambley rounds out the chapters with information about the disease, what to expect and what will happen. The story was nicely done but I prefer Just Ali This is a story about one person with Alzheimer's and how it affects him and his family. Told from the POV of Saul, the 71 year old with Alzheimer's, his wife of many years, Monique, who wants to keep him at home for as long as possible, his daughter, Florence, the favored child, and Joey, the self-centered son who never did anything right. Dr. Trambley rounds out the chapters with information about the disease, what to expect and what will happen. The story was nicely done but I prefer Just Alice

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ryshia Kennie

    Alzheimer’s is a difficult journey for any individual or family to take and there is no opt out. In An Absent Mind, Eric Rill takes on a family’s journey as their patriarch is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. The story is told in a unique fashion, first person that swings from one family member to another, including occasionally, Saul’s doctor. I liked the easy back and forth of switching from one person’s story to another. As Saul’s Alzheimer’s progresses, his point of view becomes shorter and short Alzheimer’s is a difficult journey for any individual or family to take and there is no opt out. In An Absent Mind, Eric Rill takes on a family’s journey as their patriarch is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. The story is told in a unique fashion, first person that swings from one family member to another, including occasionally, Saul’s doctor. I liked the easy back and forth of switching from one person’s story to another. As Saul’s Alzheimer’s progresses, his point of view becomes shorter and shorter until it is only one sentence and garbled. And as the story evolves, we see the effect Saul’s condition has on each member of the family, how they cope and grow or how they don’t cope. Nothing is a given, nothing is for sure, as this family struggles to survive. Rill tells a story that captures you and keeps you turning pages to the end – it is a journey through Alzheimer’s and while it can’t be called everyone’s journey, it opens the door on the effect, both good and bad, the disease can have on the family and on the patient. And despite all the pain and the inevitable end, this story has heart and gets to the pulse of what family is all about.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Blanca M. Harrison

    Masterful storytelling, wrenching story This is a page turner. So relatable because most all of us readers have family and all of us experience the same events, either joyous or grievous, differently within that family. This book gives voice to each member of a family going thru the slow goodbye to the father, who is stricken with Alzheimer's. Whilst turning pages my mind reeled at the turn of events that would have death be welcomed. This family struggled with everything but financial devastation, Masterful storytelling, wrenching story This is a page turner. So relatable because most all of us readers have family and all of us experience the same events, either joyous or grievous, differently within that family. This book gives voice to each member of a family going thru the slow goodbye to the father, who is stricken with Alzheimer's. Whilst turning pages my mind reeled at the turn of events that would have death be welcomed. This family struggled with everything but financial devastation, as the story takes place in Canada where there are no copays, deductibles or exclusions in medical care. American readers who become aware there's a genetic link to the disease may want to get their affairs in order. This book is as real as it gets. I know this because I too lived it. Call me Florence.

  18. 4 out of 5

    george agle

    It Was An Honor It was a privilege to be allowed into this family's experiences as they managed Saul's Alzheimers journey. It was tough and touching to read their private thoughts. I am glad I did. I recommend it to everyone who has a father and a mother and even to those who do not. I think we are or will be touched by this terrible disease. May it soon be conquered. Thank you author Eric Roll. K Agle 2-28-2015 It Was An Honor It was a privilege to be allowed into this family's experiences as they managed Saul's Alzheimers journey. It was tough and touching to read their private thoughts. I am glad I did. I recommend it to everyone who has a father and a mother and even to those who do not. I think we are or will be touched by this terrible disease. May it soon be conquered. Thank you author Eric Roll. K Agle 2-28-2015

  19. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Vigil

    The bitter road of Alzheimer's disease I was a little afraid to start this book as I and my family are experiencing the ravages of this disease; however the book is gently and beautifully written and handles the subject well. Every family has their own unique problems but this book gave me a feeling of peace. The bitter road of Alzheimer's disease I was a little afraid to start this book as I and my family are experiencing the ravages of this disease; however the book is gently and beautifully written and handles the subject well. Every family has their own unique problems but this book gave me a feeling of peace.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nancy P Sharlin

    Tears what a sad and heart wrenching way to bring attention to the suffering both the Alzheimer's patient and family goes through. Well done Tears what a sad and heart wrenching way to bring attention to the suffering both the Alzheimer's patient and family goes through. Well done

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karen Ng

    Comparable to, or even surpassed, Still Alice.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    An Absent Mind is a tale of a sometimes charismatic, sometimes overbearing patriarch as he slowly (or rapidly, depending on your perspective) degenerates from the cruel disease of Alzheimer's. The alternating perspectives are from Saul himself, his wife Monique, and their two adult children, the nurturing Florence and the self-centered Joey. It's a sad story, of course. But I think it gives great insight into the emotional toll Alzheimer's takes on everyone involved. Guilt, anger, sadness, nostal An Absent Mind is a tale of a sometimes charismatic, sometimes overbearing patriarch as he slowly (or rapidly, depending on your perspective) degenerates from the cruel disease of Alzheimer's. The alternating perspectives are from Saul himself, his wife Monique, and their two adult children, the nurturing Florence and the self-centered Joey. It's a sad story, of course. But I think it gives great insight into the emotional toll Alzheimer's takes on everyone involved. Guilt, anger, sadness, nostalgia, regret, relief. It's all there and beautifully expressed. 3.5 stars

  23. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Almost at times hits too close to home. This novel explores the emotional rollercoaster associated with an Alzheimer's diagnosis for all members of the family. Inadvertently revealing , how important it is to express the things that so often remain unsaid in a family. Almost at times hits too close to home. This novel explores the emotional rollercoaster associated with an Alzheimer's diagnosis for all members of the family. Inadvertently revealing , how important it is to express the things that so often remain unsaid in a family.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kylee O'Dea

    If you want a book to understand the Alzheimer’s process, this is a must read. As a caregiver, this book tore my heart open. Watching the process, understanding it, in the thoughts of the person is so heart wrenching. But helps you to understand why they behave the way they do as the disease progresses.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joel

    This wasn't a "bad" book—it was just extremely frustrating. An Absent Mind follows what happens when Saul Reimer is diagnosed with Alzheimer's, not only to him, but to his family. Having known families who struggled with similar situations, I feel like the author did a very good job of showing symptoms and progression of the disease (unsurprising since he wrote this novel based on experiences with his own father). I just didn't care. Or, rather, I didn't care enough. I cared in the sense that it's t This wasn't a "bad" book—it was just extremely frustrating. An Absent Mind follows what happens when Saul Reimer is diagnosed with Alzheimer's, not only to him, but to his family. Having known families who struggled with similar situations, I feel like the author did a very good job of showing symptoms and progression of the disease (unsurprising since he wrote this novel based on experiences with his own father). I just didn't care. Or, rather, I didn't care enough. I cared in the sense that it's tough to watch a fellow human suffer something that you can't do anything to improve. That part was relatable. But, frankly, Saul was an asshole. I could tell within 20 pages that I wasn't going to mourn his death. And the rest of the family were almost one-note stereotypes that were difficult to root for or identify with. The storytelling style was odd, switching perspectives between Saul, his wife, his son, his daughter, and his doctor. Most chapters were short, but all were written in first person, and sometimes there were multiple successive chapters by the same character, so i found myself (at least the first few times it happened) flipping back to the chapter header to see whose viewpoint I was following. There was also missed opportunity with the grandsons. It would have been a deeper emotional experience had Saul not been a jerk, and at least one of the kids had been written old enough to understand (or at least react) to what was going on. At times, the description of Alzheimer's veered toward the clinical. While I thought it was interesting, I think more than a few people will find their eyes glazing over while reading it. Not something I would recommend without serious reservations. While I hate to crap all over a writer's personal experience, I'm sure there are better books in existence that deal with this subject.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dolly Anderson

    A story dealing with the subject of Alzheimer's is no easy task, and Eric Rill dealt with it in a smart and humanly fashion. There was wit, compassion, told in a very open frank way. Each character although seemingly flawed still held their own sense of dignity. There were moments of laugh out loud laughter and of tears while reading this novel. Many moments of which I related to from my own experiences when dealing with loved ones during the final phases of their lives. Although this may be the A story dealing with the subject of Alzheimer's is no easy task, and Eric Rill dealt with it in a smart and humanly fashion. There was wit, compassion, told in a very open frank way. Each character although seemingly flawed still held their own sense of dignity. There were moments of laugh out loud laughter and of tears while reading this novel. Many moments of which I related to from my own experiences when dealing with loved ones during the final phases of their lives. Although this may be the story of Saul's demise it speaks loudly of the love of Monique. "Why do I stay with this man? A man who doesn't trust me. A man who feels he has to control me." "You may be thinking to yourself. If she wanted to have a life, why didn't she just go out and do it? It wasn't that easy. He was domineering and overbearing and could make me feel so small ~ so wrong, even when I knew I was right. Nothing I did ever seemed to please him. Now though, he needs me. So what am I going to do? Leave him? No, I've made my lot in life. And for better or worse, I'm Saul's wife." This book would make for great discussion at a book club, and I plan on recommending it to the ones I am in for consideration. I want to say thanks to the author for writing this book, I thoroughly enjoyed it. It surely epitomized a lot of my emotions when we see those dear slowly deteriorating away in such a honest way. I received the novel through the Goodreads First Reads Giveaways.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tina Price

    At the end of this novel Eric Rill comments that he hoped to give us a true picture of a dread disease. He certainly does this, I feel that I have learned so much about the progress of an Alzheimer's patient and the impact this has upon them and their family. Told in the form of diary style entries from Saul, Monique and their children, with a generally calm and factual tone, this is an intensely moving story. The confusion and fear that builds for Saul, only to die away as his disease develops, At the end of this novel Eric Rill comments that he hoped to give us a true picture of a dread disease. He certainly does this, I feel that I have learned so much about the progress of an Alzheimer's patient and the impact this has upon them and their family. Told in the form of diary style entries from Saul, Monique and their children, with a generally calm and factual tone, this is an intensely moving story. The confusion and fear that builds for Saul, only to die away as his disease develops, is contrasted wonderfully with the quiet desperation experienced by Monique. Gradually their world contracts as we follow their final holiday, their final meal out, as Monique begins the long slow process of letting go, saying goodbye to her husband one step at a time. Meanwhile their children observe, support and despair as they follow their parents progress. This is not the story of an amazing love, Saul and Monique' s marriage is' good enough', nothing spectacular, with ordinary difficulties. Their response to disease is exceptional, a triumph of everyday courage and endurance over adversity. Well worth reading.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I have to say, I really loved this book. I work in geriatrics with people of various stages of dementia, and I cannot say how accurate this portrayal is of a family dealing with the course of Alzheimer's. I have seen every person represented in this book...the person tragically suffering the disease, the devoted spouse going through the disease along side of their partner as well as the detached child that rarely comes in to the devoted child doing what little bit they can to make their parent's I have to say, I really loved this book. I work in geriatrics with people of various stages of dementia, and I cannot say how accurate this portrayal is of a family dealing with the course of Alzheimer's. I have seen every person represented in this book...the person tragically suffering the disease, the devoted spouse going through the disease along side of their partner as well as the detached child that rarely comes in to the devoted child doing what little bit they can to make their parent's life more bearable. What was especially good about this book was the narration by the 'doctor' explaining biologically what is happening to the Alzheimer's patient. What a great novel for anyone going through this, about to go through this, working with people who go through this, or just the curious.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    "First they tell you you're sick because you can't remember anything then they give you hell for not remembering." Alzheimer's is robbing Saul of his memory in his 70's and eventually will claim his life. Saul, his wife and two grown children alternate chapters (written in first person) about the progression of Alzheimer's detailing the physical and emotional toll it takes on each of their lives. Saul's doctor also is given a few chapters to educate about Alzheimer's. Although the author states "First they tell you you're sick because you can't remember anything then they give you hell for not remembering." Alzheimer's is robbing Saul of his memory in his 70's and eventually will claim his life. Saul, his wife and two grown children alternate chapters (written in first person) about the progression of Alzheimer's detailing the physical and emotional toll it takes on each of their lives. Saul's doctor also is given a few chapters to educate about Alzheimer's. Although the author states this is a book of fiction, he has had firsthand experience as he lost his father to Alzheimer's. The author states he wanted to give readers a true picture of Alzheimer's. He truly has accomplished his goal. If you liked Still Alice, you will like this book too.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Eric Rill allows the reader to enter into the suffering and confusion of a fictional Alzheimers patient and his family as he tells the story from their various perspectives. He also includes the doctors perspective which is quite helpful. Very well done and I imagine realistic even though fiction. Not an easy read as the reader feels their pain, confusion, sorrow. Yet he writes with such compassion, having lived through it himself. And somehow he includes enough humor and hope to leave you glad Eric Rill allows the reader to enter into the suffering and confusion of a fictional Alzheimers patient and his family as he tells the story from their various perspectives. He also includes the doctors perspective which is quite helpful. Very well done and I imagine realistic even though fiction. Not an easy read as the reader feels their pain, confusion, sorrow. Yet he writes with such compassion, having lived through it himself. And somehow he includes enough humor and hope to leave you glad you've walked this oh-so-hard road with Saul and his family. The book certainly gives a lot of insight into what families go through.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.