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Myth, Allegory, and Gospel: An Interpretation of J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, G.K. Chesterton, Charles Williams

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48 review for Myth, Allegory, and Gospel: An Interpretation of J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, G.K. Chesterton, Charles Williams

  1. 5 out of 5

    Skrivena stranica

    Ako dobro shvaćam, ovo su članci nastali u vrijeme kad su ovi autori stvarali i oni za mene nose posebnu težinu jer su u istom duhu vremena. Drugi je problem što su prvi pa često ne idu u preduboke analize i oklijevaju s davanjem nekih procjena.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    More discussion-based, and a little scattered. But of course, that's not surprising with an anthology. This originated as a series of lectures given 1969-1970 at DePaul University. With authors like Dr. Montgomery and Chad Walsh, it's exciting to hear from men who knew Lewis and Tolkien directly, writing only shortly after Lewis's death (1963) or before Tolkien's death (1973). There's nothing ground-breaking here, but these men clearly understand Lewis, Tolkien, and Williams well, and I pulled o More discussion-based, and a little scattered. But of course, that's not surprising with an anthology. This originated as a series of lectures given 1969-1970 at DePaul University. With authors like Dr. Montgomery and Chad Walsh, it's exciting to hear from men who knew Lewis and Tolkien directly, writing only shortly after Lewis's death (1963) or before Tolkien's death (1973). There's nothing ground-breaking here, but these men clearly understand Lewis, Tolkien, and Williams well, and I pulled out some good quotes. A note on typesetting: Unrelated to the content of the book itself, I have to note down some peculiarities of this book's printing. There are no verso and recto pages (all page numbers are on the left side). Extra spaces lie between each paragraph (though I suppose that's not so uncommon in older books). Plus all titles that would normally be in italics are placed in boldface. Did the printing press they used in 1974 not have italic typeface? In a few places I noticed typos ("Goesham" instead of "Gresham" or the missing s after "Williams's"). There are cool little tidbits like a photocopy of Lewis's letter to Montgomery at the back, but also a random essay by Montgomery in French, left untranslated. Table of Contents Introduction: The Apologists of Eucatastrophe by John Warwick Montgomery Chesterton, Madmen, and Madhouses by Russel Kirk Charles Williams' Novels and the Contemporary Mutation of Consciousness by Chad Walsh After the Moon Landings: A Further Report on the Christian Spaceman C. S. Lewis by Edmund Fuller The Chronicles of Narnia and the Adolescent Reader by John Warwick Montgomery Mythic and Christina Elements in Tolkien by Clyde S. Kilby Appendices Unpublished Letter from C. S. Lewis to the Editor on His Narnian Article Revue Critique. The Christian World of C. S. Lewis, par Clyde S. Kilby, by John Warwick Montgomery The Contributors Index Older Lewis works in the context of this book: A Well of Wonder: C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and The Inklings C. S. Lewis: apostle to the skeptics Light on C. S. Lewis The Christian World of C.S. Lewis, Shadows of Imagination: The Fantasies of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien and Charles Williams C. S. Lewis, Speaker And Teacher Some favorite quotes from this book: "The demythologizers have peeled away at the onion of objective Christian truth, claiming that if one can just get rid of the layers of miraculous symbolism created by a prescientific age, the 'self-authenticating,' existential heart of the Christian faith will be revealed in its purity to modern man. But secular man observes the process with little more than amusement, since as the 'layers' of Incarnation, Virgin Birth, and Resurrection are discarded, nothing whatever of the Christian basis seems to be left, and the secularist has every reason to wonder if 'existential self-authentication' is not the product of theological self0hypnosis -- Wish fulfillment writ large, in which one thinks he can have the cake of Christian hope while at the same time masticating it with the teeth of rationalistic biblical criticism." ("Introduction: The Apologists of Eucatastrophe" by Montgomery, pg 18-19.) “…the messages and morals in his fictions… are more effectively communicated eve than in his admirable didactic books. I think that long after such an excellent book as Mere Christianity is forgotten… that the Silent Planet trilogy, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, and his many other fantastic fictions…. Will be read and will continue to expound classical, orthodox Christian doctrine to minds that would never approach it, or open themselves to it, or understand it, in more formally didactic terms.” (“After the Moon Landings: A Further Report on the Christian Spaceman C. S. Lewis” by Fuller, pg 90-91) “The call of conscience toward perfect goodness is a mythic call lying beyond the best possible set of rules and regulations. Systematic philosophy and systematic theology are no more than statemental pointers, dry bran, beside the reality toward which they point.” (“Mythic and Christian Elements in Tolkien” by Clyde S. Kilby, pg 123) “Myth is the dull name of a way of seeing, a way of knowing in depth, a way of experiencing – a way that in being disinterested contains the freedom of unending and vital interest…. Lewis points out that enchanted trees give all ordinary trees a measure of enchantment. Myth is vision.” (“Mythic and Christian Elements in Tolkien” by Clyde S. Kilby, pg 122)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bob Wolniak

    Essays on Lewis' Space Trilogy and Narnia Chronicles, Tolkein's Lord of the Rings, Chesterton's madmen and Charles Williams--th.e author's of eucatastrophe Essays on Lewis' Space Trilogy and Narnia Chronicles, Tolkein's Lord of the Rings, Chesterton's madmen and Charles Williams--th.e author's of eucatastrophe

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Moelker

    Thought provoking analysis of these four others (All of whom I love) and an explication of the Christianity central to their work.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chad

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  7. 5 out of 5

    Argonath

  8. 5 out of 5

    Donald

  9. 4 out of 5

    David

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Haslam

  11. 5 out of 5

    Judy

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Choat

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tonytheprof

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Brooks

  15. 4 out of 5

    dennis

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bart

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lyf

    a fantastic collection of recorded lectures on 4 of my favorite authors.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Provost

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Luke Thorne

  21. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Hall

  22. 5 out of 5

    Len

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gregory

  25. 4 out of 5

    Diana Glyer

  26. 5 out of 5

    Philip Johnson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris Mondello

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ancient Weaver

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jean Rossner

  31. 5 out of 5

    Barbara (Barb)

  32. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  33. 4 out of 5

    Warren E.

  34. 4 out of 5

    Derrick

  35. 5 out of 5

    Nan Clegg

  36. 4 out of 5

    Karey

  37. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  38. 4 out of 5

    Adam Ross

  39. 4 out of 5

    Claire Doyle

  40. 5 out of 5

    Tim Goebel

  41. 4 out of 5

    Wes

  42. 4 out of 5

    Frank O'brien

  43. 4 out of 5

    Cathia

  44. 4 out of 5

    Anne Gazzolo

  45. 5 out of 5

    Jorike Langerman

  46. 4 out of 5

    Rese Smith

  47. 4 out of 5

    Stacey Douglas

  48. 4 out of 5

    Richard

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