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Daredevil, Volume 17: Hell to Pay, Volume 2

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Things couldn't be going worse for Matt Murdock. Everything he thought he'd gotten back teeters on the edge of a precipice, ready to shatter all around him, as he fights a battle on both fronts of his life - in the courtroom and on the rooftops of Hell's Kitchen. Collecting: Daredevil 100-105, Annual Things couldn't be going worse for Matt Murdock. Everything he thought he'd gotten back teeters on the edge of a precipice, ready to shatter all around him, as he fights a battle on both fronts of his life - in the courtroom and on the rooftops of Hell's Kitchen. Collecting: Daredevil 100-105, Annual


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Things couldn't be going worse for Matt Murdock. Everything he thought he'd gotten back teeters on the edge of a precipice, ready to shatter all around him, as he fights a battle on both fronts of his life - in the courtroom and on the rooftops of Hell's Kitchen. Collecting: Daredevil 100-105, Annual Things couldn't be going worse for Matt Murdock. Everything he thought he'd gotten back teeters on the edge of a precipice, ready to shatter all around him, as he fights a battle on both fronts of his life - in the courtroom and on the rooftops of Hell's Kitchen. Collecting: Daredevil 100-105, Annual

30 review for Daredevil, Volume 17: Hell to Pay, Volume 2

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Daredevil: the Man Without Fear will feel… fear. From… Mr Fear! Hmm. Sounds like a load of old bollocks, I fear - and it is! Ed Brubaker’s an awesome writer but he’s perfectly capable of churning out instantly forgettable crap like any hack – case in point: this garbage book! It’s the same old Daredevil story recycled for the umpteenth time: push Matt Murdock until he snaps. So some D-list villains brainwash Matt’s wife Milla into doing terrible things, Matt gets worked up, kicks some butt, and Daredevil: the Man Without Fear will feel… fear. From… Mr Fear! Hmm. Sounds like a load of old bollocks, I fear - and it is! Ed Brubaker’s an awesome writer but he’s perfectly capable of churning out instantly forgettable crap like any hack – case in point: this garbage book! It’s the same old Daredevil story recycled for the umpteenth time: push Matt Murdock until he snaps. So some D-list villains brainwash Matt’s wife Milla into doing terrible things, Matt gets worked up, kicks some butt, and that’s it. I’m not sure what was accomplished but I know it sure wasn’t the least bit entertaining to read! Pitifully unimaginative with the most pointless, unengaging storyline, Daredevil, Volume 17: Hell to Pay, Part 2 is buh-buh-buh-boring!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Wow, this second volume of Hell to Pay is brutal, even for Brubaker. So Larry Cranston, AKA Mister Fear, was behind the strange behavior of both the previously gentle criminal Melvin Potter (Gladiator) and Matt's wife Milla Donovan. DD and Milla are tortured throughout this volume, driven insane. There's an early issue done by various artists to reflect the fear/hallucinations of Milla that sort of pulls out all the stops to get at this craziness. Yes, we find out how it happens by Dr Fear, the Wow, this second volume of Hell to Pay is brutal, even for Brubaker. So Larry Cranston, AKA Mister Fear, was behind the strange behavior of both the previously gentle criminal Melvin Potter (Gladiator) and Matt's wife Milla Donovan. DD and Milla are tortured throughout this volume, driven insane. There's an early issue done by various artists to reflect the fear/hallucinations of Milla that sort of pulls out all the stops to get at this craziness. Yes, we find out how it happens by Dr Fear, the sociopath, who it seems wants to start a Hell's Kitchen turf war. This is pretty dark stuff for Daredevil, I'll admit that. In the effort to deepen the character, did they go too far in taking the fun out of the comic? Do the depths of his psyche require the edge of madness? I dunno, but this is tough stuff. Maybe a 3.5 for me, maybe better. I'll need to take another look at it in terms of the volume to follow.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    Daredevil "Hell to Pay" is sort of a retelling. I know this because the volume I purchase had the orignal story as an addendum. The gist? Taking place post-Matt Murdock's "reveal"as DD, Mr. Fear has poisoned his wife Milla and now she is in deep trouble with the law. So is DD, as he too is affected by the gas, as he struggles to unravel the mystery of Mr. Fear and save his wife. The premise is ok, though I have a huge difficulty grasping how Murdock can stay alive since his exposure. You'd think Daredevil "Hell to Pay" is sort of a retelling. I know this because the volume I purchase had the orignal story as an addendum. The gist? Taking place post-Matt Murdock's "reveal"as DD, Mr. Fear has poisoned his wife Milla and now she is in deep trouble with the law. So is DD, as he too is affected by the gas, as he struggles to unravel the mystery of Mr. Fear and save his wife. The premise is ok, though I have a huge difficulty grasping how Murdock can stay alive since his exposure. You'd think every dime store robber would be gunning for him, Foggy, Milla, etc. But sense never enters into Comic stories, does it? So the story is ok, the artwork is ok and the overall story was really on the border between a two and three star story. Perhaps I was in a generous mood. At best this is a three star story and at worst it is a 2 star. I leave it up to you. For my part? I'm a DD fan and tend to like most his titles, but this one was at best average.

  4. 4 out of 5

    RG

    This one was solid but nothing amazing. The issue of Fear seems to a big theme throughout this volume. Solid crime story just not Brubakers best work.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    Brubaker, I hate and also love you, you heartless bastard. SPOILERS AHEAD IF YOU HAVEN'T READ VOLUME 1!!! This is one of those dark, fucked up stories that I was still thinking about hours after I'd finished it. This second volume covers issues 100-105 and holy shit is it brutal. I mean, even with as little knowledge as I have of Daredevil's past, I probably should have expected it to not end well. But damn. At the end of the first volume, it was revealed that an old foe of Daredevil's, Larry Brubaker, I hate and also love you, you heartless bastard. SPOILERS AHEAD IF YOU HAVEN'T READ VOLUME 1!!! This is one of those dark, fucked up stories that I was still thinking about hours after I'd finished it. This second volume covers issues 100-105 and holy shit is it brutal. I mean, even with as little knowledge as I have of Daredevil's past, I probably should have expected it to not end well. But damn. At the end of the first volume, it was revealed that an old foe of Daredevil's, Larry Cranston, AKA Mister Fear, was behind the strange behavior of both the previously gentle criminal Melvin Potter and Matt's wife Milla Donovan. This Mister Fear is not some laughable asshat in a mask though. He's reborn as a sociopath totally without fear. Turns out that Mister Fear has been less than pleased with the fact that Matt was getting his life back together again. So he sets out to make sure that Matt learns the true meaning of fear by breaking Milla Donovan. Watching Matt struggle with what's been done to Milla and how to fix it was painful. And the ending...damn. It's Brubaker so you can't expect a happy ending but that was just seriously fucked up. The following spoiler is a MAJOR one so please don't click unless you've read it and/or would like the ending spoiled for you. (view spoiler)[ Mister Fear doesn't play around. After all the other seriously unhappy endings in his romantic life, to have his wife literally driven insane by a villain has to just be the cherry on top. Seriously, no one wants Matt to be happy ever. At least, not without there being a very long fall coming. (hide spoiler)] The artwork was all over the place in this one and not in a bad way. The first issue has a fear hallucination sequence that has different styles every few pages which made for an interesting break and was really well done. The rest is in Lark's standard dark, gritty style which pairs so well with Brubaker's writing. It should go without saying that Brubaker writes dark stories extremely well and this has to be one of Daredevil's darkest yet. Just an incredibly well written disaster for the Man Without Fear and yet another reason to love Brubaker.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    A relatively new and critically acclaimed Daredevil series by writer Ed Brubaker and artist Michael Lark which won the 2007 Harvey Award for Best Writer. In "Hell to Pay" volume 2 Daredevil gets out of his jam but deals with a bigger problem related to his wife. Once again his rage helps him but it also works against him. Dr. Fear makes an appearance and sets up a master plan to do Daredevil in but not in the manner you expect. During Daredevil's “visions” we get to go back in time to some of th A relatively new and critically acclaimed Daredevil series by writer Ed Brubaker and artist Michael Lark which won the 2007 Harvey Award for Best Writer. In "Hell to Pay" volume 2 Daredevil gets out of his jam but deals with a bigger problem related to his wife. Once again his rage helps him but it also works against him. Dr. Fear makes an appearance and sets up a master plan to do Daredevil in but not in the manner you expect. During Daredevil's “visions” we get to go back in time to some of the main character's personal conflicts and it's a nice touch that they use artwork from the old comics to show it off. As usual the artwork is dark and gritty to reflect the setting. ARTWORK: B; CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: B to B plus; STORY/PLOTTING: B to B plus; ACTION SCENES: B plus; WHEN READ: late February; OVERALL GRADE: B to B plus.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Hell to Pay (100-105). Here's a great idea for Daredevil #100: hit Matt with a hallucinatory fear drug, and then have him spend the issue fighting old foes and meeting old lovers and friends, as he trips his way across Hell's Kitchen. It lets you touch back on the continuity of the entire comic's run, and so honor the anniversary. Except, it turns out that this idea has never been interesting and isn't interesting here either. Instead, you get a dull and pointless issue. Worse, this particular u Hell to Pay (100-105). Here's a great idea for Daredevil #100: hit Matt with a hallucinatory fear drug, and then have him spend the issue fighting old foes and meeting old lovers and friends, as he trips his way across Hell's Kitchen. It lets you touch back on the continuity of the entire comic's run, and so honor the anniversary. Except, it turns out that this idea has never been interesting and isn't interesting here either. Instead, you get a dull and pointless issue. Worse, this particular usage makes you question why Matt's poisoning worked different from Melvin's poisoning. (Different drugs, I guess, but it's never clarified.) Fortunately, the rest of the volume is great. Brubaker reinvents Mr. Fear as a Killgrave-level manipulator and creates a compelling drama, particularly for the heart-breaking ways that it impacts Matt's life. I said of Brubaker's initial arc that I didn't want to see another repeat of the killing of Matt's friends, but what Brubaker does here is so much better (and worse!). It's also pretty great that Brubaker interweaves his plot with the Dark Reign plotline, but through the use of the Hood he makes it totally organic: a real part of the overall storyline. In the end, Brubaker offers up another excellent volume. Though he's still never matched the excellence of his prison arc, as a whole his second year's story is more consistently great than the first year's story was [8/10]. Devil May Care (Annual 1). Using Matt's prison stay as a way to give him a link to another villain is great, and Black Tarantula comes off as a very interesting character. This storyline definitely feels somewhat removed from Brubaker's other work, but it's nonetheless an intriguing character study, and a reflection of what even Matt won't do. [7+/10].

  8. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    Quite a bit better than Volume 1.I don't think I realized how brutal Daredevil can be. I though there were perhaps too many characters, though. I couldn't always keep them straight, but some were no doubt introduced earlier in the series and I'm coming in during the middle. Quite a bit better than Volume 1.I don't think I realized how brutal Daredevil can be. I though there were perhaps too many characters, though. I couldn't always keep them straight, but some were no doubt introduced earlier in the series and I'm coming in during the middle.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jedhua

    ABSOLUTE RATING: {3+/5 stars} STANDARDIZED RATING: <3/5 stars>

  10. 4 out of 5

    Aydin

    First thing's first: The art in this book is fantastic. Lark was a great choice for Daredevil, the tone of his work following Maleev's really well. Love the Djurdjevic colors and the artist choices for #100. As for the story, oh boy! Brubaker does great stuff with Matt's character, but god, can he be less weird about women? This arc is entirely about the ruination of Milla Donovan. Ruin a woman to make a man sad? Real original, Brubaker. Not surprised that that was one of his first moves upon inh First thing's first: The art in this book is fantastic. Lark was a great choice for Daredevil, the tone of his work following Maleev's really well. Love the Djurdjevic colors and the artist choices for #100. As for the story, oh boy! Brubaker does great stuff with Matt's character, but god, can he be less weird about women? This arc is entirely about the ruination of Milla Donovan. Ruin a woman to make a man sad? Real original, Brubaker. Not surprised that that was one of his first moves upon inheriting this series. We continue to see pheremone-powered Lily Lucca be manipulated to this end, and the arc ends with Mr. Fear raping a nameless woman. Great! I don't think he means to be misogynistic; he just happens to be, consistently, at least in everything he writes in the mid- to late-00s. It's not the 80's anymore, Ed! After a phenomenal run from Bendis/Maleev, I no longer have any patience for male writers destroying women to make male characters sad! Good Matt though.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Abu Syed sajib

    Too much emphasis on Matt's personal life.He's a superhero after all,there should be room for other things in his life rather than just protecting his loved ones.I think the writers just overdid it for Daredevil.... Too much emphasis on Matt's personal life.He's a superhero after all,there should be room for other things in his life rather than just protecting his loved ones.I think the writers just overdid it for Daredevil....

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gustavo hayasaki

    Cool,cool,cool,cool,cool

  13. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    Writer Ed Brubaker and artist Michael Lark continue to psychologically, emotionally, and physically brutalize the Man Without Fear in volume 2 of "Hell to Pay," the rather shocking conclusion of what would appear to be a turf war between Mr. Fear and The Hood. Readers will continue to delight in the manner in which Brubaker constructs the conflicts around Matt Murdock and his loved ones. In volume 1, it appeared that B-list villains were stepping things up and making life at least a little misera Writer Ed Brubaker and artist Michael Lark continue to psychologically, emotionally, and physically brutalize the Man Without Fear in volume 2 of "Hell to Pay," the rather shocking conclusion of what would appear to be a turf war between Mr. Fear and The Hood. Readers will continue to delight in the manner in which Brubaker constructs the conflicts around Matt Murdock and his loved ones. In volume 1, it appeared that B-list villains were stepping things up and making life at least a little miserable for Daredevil...and writers always delight, as the fans do, in proving that characters that you once believed were a necessary evil to the hero's mythology, are suddenly a bit more terrifying than ever before. The twists and turns that ramp up and lead to the stunning final pages of this volume are a worthwhile treat, proof that Daredevil's soul-searching and psychological foundation weren't entirely abandoned when Bendis left the book about two years prior. DAREDEVIL has been very concerned not only with action, detection, and crime, but also with the make-up of Daredevil himself. This is a tortured individual who, according to some theories doesn't really seem to catch a break too often. To others, and perhaps to Brubaker especially, it appears more and more that Murdock himself makes it impossible for him to discover his own happiness. Like a small handful of heroes in contemporary comic books today, Murdock surrounds himself with a circle of friends that are directly in danger, simply for having Murdock as a friend, and Brubaker continues to build upon that legacy, if in rather circuitous fashion. If it's a staple of Brubaker's writing that the path to a story's conclusion seems to almost veer out of control, the conclusion itself is the payoff. At times, though, whether controlled and manipulated perfectly by Brubaker or not, the road to those last pages of "Hell to Pay" tend to get a little long. Your interest is maintained for the majority of the tale, but some abbreviation of the plot could sometimes be in order. What does not seem to take forever, though, are Lark's pencils. His gritty artwork, a remarkable contrast to the work he did on Vertigo Comics' TERMINAL CITY, seem sometimes hurried. As with illustrators like Guy Davis and Eduardo Risso...both very accomplished and good at what they do...readers sometimes have to take care that they recognize who they're looking at. The artwork doesn't necessarily detract from the book in a tremendous way, but some more control of the "darkness" of Lark's pencils might be called for in the future. All in all, "Hell to Pay" is a fine addition to the DAREDEVIL saga, evidence that Brubaker/Lark do, in fact, have a notion of the dark places they intend to visit over the course of their run on the series, and previewing the very dark places that Matt Murdock is beginning to call "home".

  14. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    Mister Fear (aka Larry Cranston, a former law school classmate of Matt Murdock's) reveals himself as the new figure making Matt's life hell, having used his fear gas successfully on both Melvin Potter and Matt's wife, Milla Donovan. (view spoiler)[In a state of fear, Milla attempted to kill Lily Lucca at the end of the previous arc, but instead accidentally caused the death of a bystander. (hide spoiler)] Matt goes after Cranston as Milla's fate hangs in the balance. This volume functions as anot Mister Fear (aka Larry Cranston, a former law school classmate of Matt Murdock's) reveals himself as the new figure making Matt's life hell, having used his fear gas successfully on both Melvin Potter and Matt's wife, Milla Donovan. (view spoiler)[In a state of fear, Milla attempted to kill Lily Lucca at the end of the previous arc, but instead accidentally caused the death of a bystander. (hide spoiler)] Matt goes after Cranston as Milla's fate hangs in the balance. This volume functions as another pretty effective use of a supervillain knowing who the superhero really is. Instead of Cranston just crashing through Matt's window (which would be boring, easy, and probably wouldn't gain Cranston anything), he orchestrates a Kingpin-level infiltration of Matt's life that feels like a long time coming for a superhero who has been living in the public eye. Matt does eventually catch up to him though, and (view spoiler)[though Cranston is defeated and sent to jail in a Pyrrhic victory for DD, it's clear that Cranston wins the showdown. Cranston retains his fear powers to get anything he wants in prison, meanwhile Matt's life is effectively shattered as Milla is sent to a mental institution due to the lasting effects of the fear drug. Another function this arc has seems to be Brubaker moving Milla off the stage in order to get back to a status quo without her. I'm sure that didn't sit well with her fans, but it's hard to believe Milla lasted this long considering Matt's exposed identity. To some degree this is stuffing Milla into a fridge but it's more like she was put on a bus since she could someday be cured (hide spoiler)] . It feels like it's been a while since DD had a classic supervillain showdown and this one was effectively executed with some real consequences for the Man Without Fear.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This has all become very formulaic and predictable. Reading this volume elicited no gasps of excitement or wonder, and at no point did I find myself really caring how things would work themselves out. Brubaker's autopilot put himself on autopilot for this one, it's just stock bad guy manipulating Daredevil's wife/life for revenge purposes, while gang warfare rages on the streets and Daredevil goes all crazy-psycho again (though he even does that a bit halfheartedly). This one is also a reminder This has all become very formulaic and predictable. Reading this volume elicited no gasps of excitement or wonder, and at no point did I find myself really caring how things would work themselves out. Brubaker's autopilot put himself on autopilot for this one, it's just stock bad guy manipulating Daredevil's wife/life for revenge purposes, while gang warfare rages on the streets and Daredevil goes all crazy-psycho again (though he even does that a bit halfheartedly). This one is also a reminder that brubaker writes women pretty poorly - well, he doesn't really bother to write them, they're meek sex objects ... 3 stars because Bru's overall comic shaping skills are still on show and Michael Lark's artwork always knows what's needed when it's needed - the comic still looks and feels like a gorgeous piece of popular culture. Even then, though, there are pages where it felt like Brubaker had phoned in saying "sorry, busy with Captain America this week, so, this is what's gonna happen I won't bother giving you any script" It's a shame to see the slide into cliche, because this run started off so well.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mark Desrosiers

    Well, OK, here's my big problem with the Daredevil: he's blind, yet there's nothing he can't do. There's no evidence that he's a sloppy eater (like most visually impaired people), and he can even read a newspaper by letting his fingers analyze the ink-paper boundaries. So when an enemy named Mister Fear shows up to demolish the Man Without Fear, you can expect lots of excitement, and, well -- er -- the Mister Fear potion just really makes Daredevil mess around with phony illusions of the chicks Well, OK, here's my big problem with the Daredevil: he's blind, yet there's nothing he can't do. There's no evidence that he's a sloppy eater (like most visually impaired people), and he can even read a newspaper by letting his fingers analyze the ink-paper boundaries. So when an enemy named Mister Fear shows up to demolish the Man Without Fear, you can expect lots of excitement, and, well -- er -- the Mister Fear potion just really makes Daredevil mess around with phony illusions of the chicks he'd banged -- we see what he's "seeing" but -- hit the snooze button. The real action does commence eventually, in all sorts of creepy-angst ways with Mister Fear basically riffing on the Book of Job. Still, you can tell Brubaker's trying to unleash a cool, unrelenting plot while remaining cuffed to the canon.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Eric Mikols

    Four volumes into Ed Brubaker's run on Daredevil and I've come to a temporary conclusion. This is good Daredevil storytelling but it might not be the best. For one, it just doesn't seem to move the same way Bendis was able to get it to. Another problem is the lack of a direction. I'm not sure where this is all heading and I don't know if that's a good thing. The big issue this volume has is the villain. I'm not familiar with Mr. Fear and I can see his appeal, but the problem is I've seen this ch Four volumes into Ed Brubaker's run on Daredevil and I've come to a temporary conclusion. This is good Daredevil storytelling but it might not be the best. For one, it just doesn't seem to move the same way Bendis was able to get it to. Another problem is the lack of a direction. I'm not sure where this is all heading and I don't know if that's a good thing. The big issue this volume has is the villain. I'm not familiar with Mr. Fear and I can see his appeal, but the problem is I've seen this character type done better with the Scarecrow and Mr. Fear loses credibility doing the same thing. Daredevil is similar to Batman in enough ways, he doesn't need his villains doing the same thing. Even with some of those problems, this is still a great book and I'm not losing interest at all.

  18. 4 out of 5

    John Wiswell

    I love how Ed Brubaker has taken campy villains, recast them in a dimmer light and made them engaging, multi-dimensional characters under his reign on this book. Watching Cranston interact with the world, abusing his power over fear to refine himself, abuse fighting trainers, and build himself a little empire is morbidly engaging. Brubaker's Daredevil is fallible - he loses fights, he's not smarter than his villains, his willpower can't overcome everything, earning disappointment without being m I love how Ed Brubaker has taken campy villains, recast them in a dimmer light and made them engaging, multi-dimensional characters under his reign on this book. Watching Cranston interact with the world, abusing his power over fear to refine himself, abuse fighting trainers, and build himself a little empire is morbidly engaging. Brubaker's Daredevil is fallible - he loses fights, he's not smarter than his villains, his willpower can't overcome everything, earning disappointment without being masturbatorially bleak. Actions have the gravest consequences here, and failure has a real sense of meaning that I don't get in most sequential art.

  19. 4 out of 5

    logankstewart

    Really probably closer to a 3.5 star rating, but whatever. This is basically the conclusion to the story that began back with the previous arcs, at least wrapping up some of the smaller arcs, anyway. Mister Fear and the Hood and a few other villains I'd never heard of before make Matt's life miserable again for a motive that is laughable. I'm not saying that I didn't enjoy these issues, but quality is dropping. Issue #100 was rather cool, but over all this arc felt both too rushed and too slow. Ad Really probably closer to a 3.5 star rating, but whatever. This is basically the conclusion to the story that began back with the previous arcs, at least wrapping up some of the smaller arcs, anyway. Mister Fear and the Hood and a few other villains I'd never heard of before make Matt's life miserable again for a motive that is laughable. I'm not saying that I didn't enjoy these issues, but quality is dropping. Issue #100 was rather cool, but over all this arc felt both too rushed and too slow. Additionally a lot of this material seems re-hashed and I'm thinking that perhaps I'm getting numb to the turmoils Daredevil faces.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    In superhero books, you expect a happy ending--such a formula grows tired, but then becomes reliable, and later comfortable. In crime books, a happy ending is never assured. With this and Volume 1, Brubaker has written a pitch-dark crime noir drama disguised as a superhero book. The effect is disconcerting and powerful. All the familiar elements--rampaging supervillains, a hero on the prowl, a mastermind bent for revenge--are there, but they refuse to cohere into a familiar or expected form. The In superhero books, you expect a happy ending--such a formula grows tired, but then becomes reliable, and later comfortable. In crime books, a happy ending is never assured. With this and Volume 1, Brubaker has written a pitch-dark crime noir drama disguised as a superhero book. The effect is disconcerting and powerful. All the familiar elements--rampaging supervillains, a hero on the prowl, a mastermind bent for revenge--are there, but they refuse to cohere into a familiar or expected form. The effect is unsettling in the best possible way.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    So Milla Donovan sinks further into her role as utterly dependent on Matt's acceptance and approval until Brubaker metaphorically stuffs her in a refrigerator, finding room in there for Melvin Potter as well. Mr. Fear, the villain behind it all is attempting to use the distribution of a new drug to take over the Kingpin's territory in his absentia. (Please not that Bendis had The Owl do the exact same thing) but he's challenged by rival, The Hood. The Hood's roll in this was shaping up to be the So Milla Donovan sinks further into her role as utterly dependent on Matt's acceptance and approval until Brubaker metaphorically stuffs her in a refrigerator, finding room in there for Melvin Potter as well. Mr. Fear, the villain behind it all is attempting to use the distribution of a new drug to take over the Kingpin's territory in his absentia. (Please not that Bendis had The Owl do the exact same thing) but he's challenged by rival, The Hood. The Hood's roll in this was shaping up to be the most interesting thing about it, until it ended up going absolutely nowhere. Blah.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Daredevil goes off the deep end after Mr.Fear (look up scarecrow for basic idea) goes too far. The story and art are really good. Brubaker brings Daredevil down to Earth like so many of his other realistic crime stories. There are many thoughts that Daredevil has concerning the superpowered folks as well as on his own life and friends. The only thing missing was a better developed story for the villain.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Hodson

    I got prety sad about or sick of the treatment of milla so i didn't find it enjoyable. It was probably more emotionally wrenching than some of the other losses of loves for matt because it has been so consistently harsh and matt hasn't really been able to step away and just quit being daredevil and actually love this woman. Kinda makes hell's kitchen love ring a bit hollow, but i guess that's how it is. Not that it's not well done, but i probably wished i hadn't read it. I got prety sad about or sick of the treatment of milla so i didn't find it enjoyable. It was probably more emotionally wrenching than some of the other losses of loves for matt because it has been so consistently harsh and matt hasn't really been able to step away and just quit being daredevil and actually love this woman. Kinda makes hell's kitchen love ring a bit hollow, but i guess that's how it is. Not that it's not well done, but i probably wished i hadn't read it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    Hell to Pay, Volume 2 is the Empire Strikes Back of Daredevil. It's very well written, gritty and the bad guy, in this case Mr. Fear, seems to come out better off than he went in. It is the conclusion to a very good story by Brubaker with interesting art. Brubaker uses the side characters of Hells Kitchen like Dakota North really well here without making cheesy call backs. This collection and Volume 1 are every bit as good as Brubacker's work on Gotham Central. Hell to Pay, Volume 2 is the Empire Strikes Back of Daredevil. It's very well written, gritty and the bad guy, in this case Mr. Fear, seems to come out better off than he went in. It is the conclusion to a very good story by Brubaker with interesting art. Brubaker uses the side characters of Hells Kitchen like Dakota North really well here without making cheesy call backs. This collection and Volume 1 are every bit as good as Brubacker's work on Gotham Central.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Mister Fear turns out to be a decent villain. Brubaker does a great job amping up his horribleness, though he seems to make an awfully easy link between inducing fear and mind control. Daredevil, and his wife Milla, gets put through the ringer again, and the lack of resolution at the end is anguishing, in a good way.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Another one I wish I could award half stars, because I'm not sure I really want to give this a three. A two and a half would be a bit more accurate. Just not a story I was into, and I'm tired of female characters being victimized in new and creative ways just to make the male heroes suffer. I love DD, but damn, this book suffers from a lot of that. Another one I wish I could award half stars, because I'm not sure I really want to give this a three. A two and a half would be a bit more accurate. Just not a story I was into, and I'm tired of female characters being victimized in new and creative ways just to make the male heroes suffer. I love DD, but damn, this book suffers from a lot of that.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kurt

    Some terrible things happen to people in Matt Murdock's life, but when one of them is Milla, I don't really mind. Brubaker presents his story well, even in the potentially chaotic issue 100 with about a thousand artists, and I like his update of Mr. Fear. Some terrible things happen to people in Matt Murdock's life, but when one of them is Milla, I don't really mind. Brubaker presents his story well, even in the potentially chaotic issue 100 with about a thousand artists, and I like his update of Mr. Fear.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Μιχάλης

    I really want to like Brubacker's DD, but it just feels a lot like Frank Miller's Daredevil amped to eleven. The writing is good and so is the art, but the melodrama and the stretches are as thick as you've expected in a comic from the silver age. I really want to like Brubacker's DD, but it just feels a lot like Frank Miller's Daredevil amped to eleven. The writing is good and so is the art, but the melodrama and the stretches are as thick as you've expected in a comic from the silver age.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    This one was emotional. PRECIOUS MATT BEING HURT EMOTIONALLY IS SO PAINFUL. IT HURTS. SO BAD. I'm not the hugest fan of Milla but Matt being so hurt over her, just, oh gosh feels. Also, Elektra made a super brief appearance and that gives me life okay. This one was emotional. PRECIOUS MATT BEING HURT EMOTIONALLY IS SO PAINFUL. IT HURTS. SO BAD. I'm not the hugest fan of Milla but Matt being so hurt over her, just, oh gosh feels. Also, Elektra made a super brief appearance and that gives me life okay.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    (See review of DAREDEVIL Volume 16.)

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