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An intimate memoir of a friendship with the greatest artist in rock and roll history, taking you from late-night parties at Graceland to the bright lights of Hollywood sets and glittering stages of Vegas On a lazy Sunday in 1954, twelve-year-old Jerry Schilling wandered into a Memphis touch football game, only to discover that his team was quarterbacked by a nineteen-year An intimate memoir of a friendship with the greatest artist in rock and roll history, taking you from late-night parties at Graceland to the bright lights of Hollywood sets and glittering stages of Vegas On a lazy Sunday in 1954, twelve-year-old Jerry Schilling wandered into a Memphis touch football game, only to discover that his team was quarterbacked by a nineteen-year-old Elvis Presley, the local teenager whose first record, “That’s All Right,” had just debuted on Memphis radio. The two became fast friends, even as Elvis turned into the world’s biggest star. In 1964, Elvis invited Jerry to work for him as part of his “Memphis Mafia,” and Jerry soon found himself living with Elvis full-time in a Bel Air mansion and, later, in his own room at Graceland. Over the next thirteen years Jerry would work for Elvis in various capacities—from bodyguard to photo double to co-executive producer on a karate film. But more than anything else he was Elvis’s close friend and confidant: Elvis trusted Jerry with protecting his life when he received death threats, he asked Jerry to drive him and Priscilla to the hospital the day Lisa Marie was born and to accompany him during the famous “lost weekend” when he traveled to meet President Nixon at the White House. Me and a Guy Named Elvis looks at Presley from a friend’s perspective, offering readers the man rather than the icon—including insights into the creative frustrations that lead to Elvis’s abuse of prescription medicine and his tragic death. Jerry offers never-before-told stories about life inside Elvis’s inner circle and an emotional recounting of the great times, hard times, and unique times he and Elvis shared. These vivid memories will be priceless to Elvis’s millions of fans, and the compelling story will fascinate an even wider audience. BACKCOVER: Advance Praise for Me and a Guy Named Elvis “This book kept me up late into the night as I turned the pages, reliving every situation and every story as if I were there all over again, until I finished. Jerry Schilling’s words brought tears to my eyes, making me smile and nod as it filled my head with things I had forgotten but thankfully he remembered. Jerry tells his story with the freshness and purity of a man who truly loved his friend. Me and a Guy Named Elvis is not only authentic, honest, and truly moving—it is a marvel.” —Priscilla Presley “Jerry had the keys to the kingdom, the keys to the King’s houses, to the King’s cars, to the heart of what made Elvis a King in the first place. Here he unlocks every door and his own heart to boot. In this book, Jerry Schilling brings grace to Graceland.” —Bono “Jerry Schilling has captured the beauty of my father’s spirit in a way that has never been done before. I will admit that I was nervous to read another book on this subject, especially by a friend (there are not many who remain in my life from this time period, as Jerry does), but this book is by far my favorite. It is a captivating, well-written, and un-crucifying account of many historic moments that shows the real birth and evolution of Rock and Roll and how it bridged the racial divide. Jerry tells his story of a young boy growing up poor with no real family before fate changed his life during one Sunday afternoon game of football—and he tells it with humility, honesty, and dignity.” —Lisa Marie Presley “What Jerry Schilling has written in Me and a Guy Named Elvis is an account of one man’s experience, a personal memoir that, while it places its narrator squarely in the midst of historic events, never claims credit for those events in the way that so many self-serving memoirs are inclined to do. It is a balanced treatment of a complex subject . . . What I think distinguishes the book most of all, though, is its emotional honesty, the generosity of spirit with which Jerry seeks to emulate his friend and mentor.” —Peter Guralnick, author of Last Train to Memphis and Careless Love


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An intimate memoir of a friendship with the greatest artist in rock and roll history, taking you from late-night parties at Graceland to the bright lights of Hollywood sets and glittering stages of Vegas On a lazy Sunday in 1954, twelve-year-old Jerry Schilling wandered into a Memphis touch football game, only to discover that his team was quarterbacked by a nineteen-year An intimate memoir of a friendship with the greatest artist in rock and roll history, taking you from late-night parties at Graceland to the bright lights of Hollywood sets and glittering stages of Vegas On a lazy Sunday in 1954, twelve-year-old Jerry Schilling wandered into a Memphis touch football game, only to discover that his team was quarterbacked by a nineteen-year-old Elvis Presley, the local teenager whose first record, “That’s All Right,” had just debuted on Memphis radio. The two became fast friends, even as Elvis turned into the world’s biggest star. In 1964, Elvis invited Jerry to work for him as part of his “Memphis Mafia,” and Jerry soon found himself living with Elvis full-time in a Bel Air mansion and, later, in his own room at Graceland. Over the next thirteen years Jerry would work for Elvis in various capacities—from bodyguard to photo double to co-executive producer on a karate film. But more than anything else he was Elvis’s close friend and confidant: Elvis trusted Jerry with protecting his life when he received death threats, he asked Jerry to drive him and Priscilla to the hospital the day Lisa Marie was born and to accompany him during the famous “lost weekend” when he traveled to meet President Nixon at the White House. Me and a Guy Named Elvis looks at Presley from a friend’s perspective, offering readers the man rather than the icon—including insights into the creative frustrations that lead to Elvis’s abuse of prescription medicine and his tragic death. Jerry offers never-before-told stories about life inside Elvis’s inner circle and an emotional recounting of the great times, hard times, and unique times he and Elvis shared. These vivid memories will be priceless to Elvis’s millions of fans, and the compelling story will fascinate an even wider audience. BACKCOVER: Advance Praise for Me and a Guy Named Elvis “This book kept me up late into the night as I turned the pages, reliving every situation and every story as if I were there all over again, until I finished. Jerry Schilling’s words brought tears to my eyes, making me smile and nod as it filled my head with things I had forgotten but thankfully he remembered. Jerry tells his story with the freshness and purity of a man who truly loved his friend. Me and a Guy Named Elvis is not only authentic, honest, and truly moving—it is a marvel.” —Priscilla Presley “Jerry had the keys to the kingdom, the keys to the King’s houses, to the King’s cars, to the heart of what made Elvis a King in the first place. Here he unlocks every door and his own heart to boot. In this book, Jerry Schilling brings grace to Graceland.” —Bono “Jerry Schilling has captured the beauty of my father’s spirit in a way that has never been done before. I will admit that I was nervous to read another book on this subject, especially by a friend (there are not many who remain in my life from this time period, as Jerry does), but this book is by far my favorite. It is a captivating, well-written, and un-crucifying account of many historic moments that shows the real birth and evolution of Rock and Roll and how it bridged the racial divide. Jerry tells his story of a young boy growing up poor with no real family before fate changed his life during one Sunday afternoon game of football—and he tells it with humility, honesty, and dignity.” —Lisa Marie Presley “What Jerry Schilling has written in Me and a Guy Named Elvis is an account of one man’s experience, a personal memoir that, while it places its narrator squarely in the midst of historic events, never claims credit for those events in the way that so many self-serving memoirs are inclined to do. It is a balanced treatment of a complex subject . . . What I think distinguishes the book most of all, though, is its emotional honesty, the generosity of spirit with which Jerry seeks to emulate his friend and mentor.” —Peter Guralnick, author of Last Train to Memphis and Careless Love

30 review for Me and a Guy Named Elvis: My Lifelong Friendship with Elvis Presley

  1. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali

    “I’m a fan of anyone who’s the best at what they do.” - Elvis Presley on why he introduced Wilt Chamberlain at a concert. ============== I didn't list enough quotes to give His Majesty enough justice, but WOW. Had no idea Elvis was such a voracious reader -- or had a photographic memory -- or was an incorrigible lothario -- or a Self-Realization Fellowship devotee -- or so generous with money -- or a karate fanatic -- and especially that he had endured violence singing black music in the white So “I’m a fan of anyone who’s the best at what they do.” - Elvis Presley on why he introduced Wilt Chamberlain at a concert. ============== I didn't list enough quotes to give His Majesty enough justice, but WOW. Had no idea Elvis was such a voracious reader -- or had a photographic memory -- or was an incorrigible lothario -- or a Self-Realization Fellowship devotee -- or so generous with money -- or a karate fanatic -- and especially that he had endured violence singing black music in the white South. But just glimpse how a teenage Elvis turns one ambush around : “Hit me from the left side.” “Why?” “I got a few bones over there that aren’t broken yet,” said Elvis. The big guy started laughing. He was laughing hard enough that he didn’t have the strength to steam-roll Elvis. Now the big guy was all smiles. “Sure did enjoy the game. Hope there aren’t any hard feelings.” “Elvis just shrugged. “No hard feelings.” As Elvis signed autographs for their wives, it all came together for me… He would have ended up with some more enemies. Instead, he took a little punishment and ended up with four new fans, something I witnessed over and over again. A lot of people thought they had something against Elvis, but I never saw anybody who spent any time with him walk away not liking him.” More quotes : ----------- “Memphis was also home to WDIA, the first station in the whole country to have a black on-air staff, even though the station itself was white-owned... jockeyed by the likes of a very young guitar player named B.B. King.” “… To a lot of people Elvis Presley was nothing more than white trash playing black music… The general feeling of of conservative old school Memphis was that the city should be more embarrassed by Elvis than proud of him.” “Those were the early days of what would soon be called the ‘youth culture.' For all the kids who first got excited about the sound of rock and roll, there were twice as many who thought it sounded just horrible.” “It was when Elvis took the stage that the place just about exploded… As soon as Elvis started moving, the energy that came off that stage was even bigger than anything the crowd was throwing back at him… He handled the show like a real pro, working the crowd masterfully.” “… A couple of guys had blind-sighted Elvis, pretending to come to him for an autograph… swing at him when they got close enough… throwing a punch and then driving away.” “His reliance on medication was getting out of control again.” “Elvis was buying me a house! My hands started shaking so badly that I dropped the check. ‘Elvis, this is… this is too much.’ He leaned forward with a smile, picked up the check, and put it back in my hands. How many friends buy you a house?… ‘Jerry, your mother died when you were a year old. You never had a home. I wanted to be the one to give it to you.’ ” “Elvis was the first Monty Python fanatic I knew.” “One of the saddest truths of Elvis’s career was crystal clear to me. The pills he took were only Band Aids. What was sucking the life out of Elvis Presley was creative disappointment.” “There were nights on the road when Elvis was still every bit the master entertainer. But there were other times when you could sense just how tired he’d become of night after night of one-night stands, and when you could see what a toll it had taken on him. His stage jumpsuits had originally been designed to accommodate his intensely physical performances. The way he moved on stage, he’d rip regular clothing to shreds.” “… He bought an out-of-service Convair 880 jet… He immediately rechristened it the Lisa Marie… the interior was refurbished to his very specific design requirements. He bought another plane to make those trips, a smaller Lockheed jet star. Elvis wanted a seating area, a conference room, and a private bedroom on the plane, with space for an in-flight reading library. He picked fabrics, decided on color schemes, chose the on-board audiovisual system, and even okayed the gold fixtures in the bathrooms… The same design team working on the Lisa Marie also customized Air Force One.” “Myrna hadn’t seen (the film), and so Elvis acted it out for her. I don’t mean he told her the story and quoted a few lines of dialogue. He began to act out the whole movie. Setting up each scene and then presenting just about every line of dialogue in the script. He brought each character to life with walks, vocal mannerisms, and the subtleness of gestures. It was bravura performance, and Elvis drew upon that photographic memory of his…” “Off the slopes, Elvis spent a lot of time with … Denver policemen he had met on past trips to the city. They had always been supportive of Elvis, even welcoming him into their own inner circle of police officers. And during this trip, Elvis bought them all Cadillacs as thank you gifts.” “ ‘Elvis is dead.’, she said. I hung up the phone. Started to cry. I went back out on the balcony. It started to rain.” “Thousands and thousands of people lined both sides of the street, standing in solemn respectful silence as the procession passed by. I saw children crying, grandparents crying, cops standing at attention with their hats over their hearts…” .

  2. 5 out of 5

    Craig Nixon

    I have a teacher friend who has the uncanny ability to make me feel better about myself than I ever should. He is a born diplomat, cheerleader, sage. Every single time I have lunch with him, go see a movie or a football game, I realize how lucky I am to have him as a friend. If I were to die, he would probably give a praiseworthy eulogy at my funeral, maybe even write my uneventful biography. And I'm no Elvis. Far from it. I am just an average teacher in a modest suburb in Virginia, but somehow I have a teacher friend who has the uncanny ability to make me feel better about myself than I ever should. He is a born diplomat, cheerleader, sage. Every single time I have lunch with him, go see a movie or a football game, I realize how lucky I am to have him as a friend. If I were to die, he would probably give a praiseworthy eulogy at my funeral, maybe even write my uneventful biography. And I'm no Elvis. Far from it. I am just an average teacher in a modest suburb in Virginia, but somehow I managed to find this gem of a guy and try to appreciate him each and every day. This is exactly how I pictured Jerry Schilling after finishing his book "Me and a Guy Named Elvis: My Lifelong Friendship with Elvis Presley". It is a slow start, to be sure, and at times the reader starts to wonder if this is a book about Jerry Schilling or Elvis Presley. The answer, of course, is that it is both. It is an account of two good-ole-boys from Memphis who begin their journey orchestrating touch football games, but end up touching each other's lives meaningfully even beyond the tragic death of the man known as the King. And sure, some of the details Jerry depicts -- from Elvis' generosity to his drug addiction -- are common knowledge, but it is his simple prosaic style and ability to make those around him shine that makes this account a gem. By the time I read the epilogue, detailing Jerry's undying devotion for the King's legacy, I got teary-eyed. His loyalty and devotion to Elvis and his family are virtues all of us should aspire to. Something else: So many rock biographies read the same. So and so had a horrible childhood, fell in with the wrong crowd, found music (and drugs), made it big, fell to abysmal depths, then (hopefully), cleaned up and discovered life in a more meaningful way. Elvis, however, veered from this script in that he had a loving, caring upbringing (though poor), and maintained religion and spirituality on his journey through stardom. And man was the guy generous, to a fault. Yes, the pills took their toll on him, but sometimes the reader got the feeling that disappointment was Elvis' depressive, his cross to bear, his anchor. Jerry Schilling highlighted Elvis as an entertainer and a man. His late night bull sessions, his generous gifts, his family loyalty. They complimented each other and sometimes conflicted. But as Jerry gave as his reason for leaving Elvis a few years before his death: I did not want to be a yes man or an asshole. He valued his friendship that much, and Elvis knew it. One of the hardest scenes to read follows Jerry's discovery that Elvis has died. He boards Elvis's plane, finds no one on board, and holds one of the King's nightshirts to his chest as a mother to an infant. He says he does not know what life will be like without his best friend, and even breaks his hand trying to come to grips with the passing of that good-looking quarterback from 20 years ago who was nice enough to invite him to a game of touch football. Thank you, Jerry Schilling, for being so loyal to a man who may have lost his way by the end of his life. You, like my friend, have the uncanny ability to make people look better than they really are. In this case, the man who would die way too young and change the course of your life forever.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Belcher

    I am 42 and have been an Elvis fan for over 35 years. During that time I have read quite a few Elvis biographies; however, this one stands out at the top of the list due to Jerry Schilling’s sincerity and close tie to Elvis Presley -the man- as well as the entertainer. As a close insider, Jerry Schilling is able to give some very detailed accounts of his years as one of Elvis' best friends and most trusted Memphis Mafia members. Jerry does a very admirable job of giving fans a chance to really s I am 42 and have been an Elvis fan for over 35 years. During that time I have read quite a few Elvis biographies; however, this one stands out at the top of the list due to Jerry Schilling’s sincerity and close tie to Elvis Presley -the man- as well as the entertainer. As a close insider, Jerry Schilling is able to give some very detailed accounts of his years as one of Elvis' best friends and most trusted Memphis Mafia members. Jerry does a very admirable job of giving fans a chance to really see Elvis not as just a superstar entertainer but also as a man who had personal dreams, vulnerabilities, doubts, and challenges as a human being. There is a common theme of how Elvis was a very generous and spiritual person who throughout his trials and tribulations remained loyal to his family, friends and fans. I highly recommend this book to Elvis fans and non-Elvis fans alike. The book keeps you entertained throughout the journey from first page to last giving you as a reader the uncanny feeling of being a fly on the wall during Elvis' astounding career. -Eddie

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I wanted to read a biography about Elvis before I went to Graceland, and chose this book. I learned a lot about Elvis the person. I thought the author did a great job of describing the kind of person Elvis was, not just all of his accomplishments.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Anderson

    Great read on the life on Elvis Presley from the perspective of one his closest friends. It's a little longer than it needs to be, and there are definitely parts that are biased towards making Elvis out as positive as possible, but still an enjoyable and informative bio. Great read on the life on Elvis Presley from the perspective of one his closest friends. It's a little longer than it needs to be, and there are definitely parts that are biased towards making Elvis out as positive as possible, but still an enjoyable and informative bio.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    There were some interesting points about this book. I found the insight to Elvis never really socializing outside of his inner circle, the first hand personal side of Elvis, and the Beatles meeting very interesting. I thought Schilling himself going to UCLA while working for Elvis was interesting, especially since I grew up in the area and could picture him walking up and down the hill along Sunset. But there was some off putting stuff in the book as well. Schilling is very full of himself and tr There were some interesting points about this book. I found the insight to Elvis never really socializing outside of his inner circle, the first hand personal side of Elvis, and the Beatles meeting very interesting. I thought Schilling himself going to UCLA while working for Elvis was interesting, especially since I grew up in the area and could picture him walking up and down the hill along Sunset. But there was some off putting stuff in the book as well. Schilling is very full of himself and tries to paint himself in the best picture possible. He is a narcissist. It comes through in the book. He talks about cheating on his wife once. Once? Really? I don't think so. Try the time he got caught. He holds back the real seediness of his life. I felt he never really laid it on the line about Priscilla. I understand the latter. He is still friends with her and wants to stay connected to Elvis through her. I don't blame him for this, but I hope he has the real book in a safety deposit box to be released upon his death, but I won't hold my breath. This life is looked through with rose covered glasses. But if you are an Elvis fan (as I am) then this is still worth a read for some more insight that will bring you closer to the King.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Diane Heath

    This was an insider's look at the life of Elvis Presley. Reviews from Priscilla Presley and Lisa Marie both support Jery Schilling's book. He met Elvis when he was 12 and Elvis was 19. The book does not deny the drug problems that Elvis had but does not make them the center of the books. It is a well balanced look at Elvis and you know that Jerry truly was a friend to Elvis. As he states in his forward "I wouldn't want to speak for Elvis Presley and tell you that I was his best friend. But I can This was an insider's look at the life of Elvis Presley. Reviews from Priscilla Presley and Lisa Marie both support Jery Schilling's book. He met Elvis when he was 12 and Elvis was 19. The book does not deny the drug problems that Elvis had but does not make them the center of the books. It is a well balanced look at Elvis and you know that Jerry truly was a friend to Elvis. As he states in his forward "I wouldn't want to speak for Elvis Presley and tell you that I was his best friend. But I can tell you this: He was MY best friend"

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rhys

    I love Elvis...and I like to hear what went on between him and his friends. However...Jerry Schilling is such a sap...it's hard to believe they were just "friends." (I'm just sayin') I love Elvis...and I like to hear what went on between him and his friends. However...Jerry Schilling is such a sap...it's hard to believe they were just "friends." (I'm just sayin')

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dlittle

    ok book told by a friend of Elvis'. He seemed like a real nice guy in this story, which is a little different than the book written by his ex-wife. Got it at Graceland when I went with Maria. ok book told by a friend of Elvis'. He seemed like a real nice guy in this story, which is a little different than the book written by his ex-wife. Got it at Graceland when I went with Maria.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Greetje-greta

    It was an ok book,found it a little boring at times.Read a lot about Elvis and this was not the best.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I'm a huge Elvis fan and have read a few books written about him through the years. I especially wanted to read this from one of the guys who was part of the inner circle and who continues to be so involved with the legacy to see how he might spin it and if he would have anything new to tell us. I think one of the things I really appreciated about the way Schilling tells the story is that he - like most - was a fan, was enamored with Elvis from the beginning and genuinely loved him. And while he I'm a huge Elvis fan and have read a few books written about him through the years. I especially wanted to read this from one of the guys who was part of the inner circle and who continues to be so involved with the legacy to see how he might spin it and if he would have anything new to tell us. I think one of the things I really appreciated about the way Schilling tells the story is that he - like most - was a fan, was enamored with Elvis from the beginning and genuinely loved him. And while he became a friend and confidant, it doesn't appear that the luster ever really wore off. Even at times when Elvis was unreasonable or selfish, there was a lot of grace extended because of his admiration and love for Elvis. I think I still search for an understanding of why those closest to him refused to confront what now can be seen as obvious red flags. Had they been addressed, had they been more proactive, perhaps this would have had a different ending. But in Jerry's book you can also see how careful everyone was with Elvis. I used to think it was because they simply didn't want to lose their job or their place in the inner circle - and maybe that's true for some - but you can also see in this book how perhaps their lack of confrontation or telling hard truths might also have had to do with an unwillingness to hurt someone they loved, someone who was a fragile soul in so many ways. Their entire world, upbringing almost - because they were all kids when they started hanging out - was about protecting Elvis. So confronting him would have been seen as hurtful or even cruel and that kept them from doing so. I loved hearing a lot of new stories and insider information. Schilling stays away from much of the lascivious details that might malign Elvis but explains how life on the road and the environment did not make for a good home life - for Elvis and Priscilla or any of the guys. I don't think the intent was to chronicle every single detail of his day-to-day with E but to give a sense for the real man and the friendship. I think he does this admirably and well. If you're a fan, I highly recommend. One of my bucket list requests would be to one day get to spend a day - or two - just hearing all the stories from those who knew him best. I feel like I got a little of that from this book. Thanks Jerry!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sammy Ochoa

    Ever since I was little I remember going to my grandmas house and watching Elvis's movies and hearing his songs. It wasn't until now that I wanted to learn more about the king and I am so glad I did. It's a fantastic biography, I really enjoyed how it was written from a friends point of view rather than a writer of my biographies or someone who worked with Elvis only seeing his business side. It felt for special and personal to read it from Mr. Schilling, I feel like I have way better understand Ever since I was little I remember going to my grandmas house and watching Elvis's movies and hearing his songs. It wasn't until now that I wanted to learn more about the king and I am so glad I did. It's a fantastic biography, I really enjoyed how it was written from a friends point of view rather than a writer of my biographies or someone who worked with Elvis only seeing his business side. It felt for special and personal to read it from Mr. Schilling, I feel like I have way better understanding of who Elvis was as a human being and a singer and actor. He sounds like someone who is so generous because he wants to be not because it would have looked good in the papers. He also had beliefs that worked for him and that really made him who he was. Through the words of this book I grasped that Elvis began to loose his humanness because people talked to him like he was this super hero but he was just a guy that had major talent. Much like the singers of today. I have a new found respect for this man not as a celebrity but as a person. He would be a great soul to still have on this earth. I really recommend this book to anyone just looking to learn more about the king or a major fan!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bongo Starkey

    Its clear that Jerry Schilling was an Elvis insider and witness to so much day-to-day history and hysteria from being around the world's most famous man. Jerry chronicles his own personal story of how he met Elvis in a Memphis school as a pre-teen. There's a lot of humanity in the stories of Elvis, including his personal thoughts, his sheer generosity, his remarkable insecurity and his relationships with those closest to him. Mr. Schilling goes to great lengths to sanitize Elvis's flaws and his o Its clear that Jerry Schilling was an Elvis insider and witness to so much day-to-day history and hysteria from being around the world's most famous man. Jerry chronicles his own personal story of how he met Elvis in a Memphis school as a pre-teen. There's a lot of humanity in the stories of Elvis, including his personal thoughts, his sheer generosity, his remarkable insecurity and his relationships with those closest to him. Mr. Schilling goes to great lengths to sanitize Elvis's flaws and his own by glossing over many of the details about Elvis's infidelities, his immorality and his well-documented drug abuse. He also downplays so many critical moments in his relationship with Elvis, such as the various times when he made the decision to leave Elvis's inner circle (as though this were just matter-of-fact). But Schilling's insider roll made him a firsthand witness to many of Elvis's most notorious moments, such as his surprise visit to meet President Nixon at the White House and the birth of Lisa-Marie, Elvis's only child. His accounts of these and many other events make this books invaluable to any fan or history buff of the King of Rock and Roll.

  14. 5 out of 5

    RuthyMB

    I’ve spent probably the last 20 years reading around and exploring the life of Elvis, as a lifelong fan. I purposely put off reading this book for such a long time, because I knew it would be the best one. I’ve read pretty much every book written by those in Elvis’s inner circle and this was the most respectful, touching memoir of Jerry Schilling’s life with Elvis from aged 12 right up until his death. It showed a different side of Elvis that books by ex girlfriends and even Priscilla couldn’t q I’ve spent probably the last 20 years reading around and exploring the life of Elvis, as a lifelong fan. I purposely put off reading this book for such a long time, because I knew it would be the best one. I’ve read pretty much every book written by those in Elvis’s inner circle and this was the most respectful, touching memoir of Jerry Schilling’s life with Elvis from aged 12 right up until his death. It showed a different side of Elvis that books by ex girlfriends and even Priscilla couldn’t quite touch, their stories were always from a romantic perspective (understandably) but this was a different edge, from growing up together until his last day. Amazing, recommend to anyone and I’ll definitely read it again one day.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Beth Baier

    I thoroughly enjoyed the book. I have always been a fan of Elvis' music... and still enjoy listening to my Elvis cd's. this book takes you behind the scenes and gives you an in depth picture of Elvis the person.... and how many people it took to help run his 'business'. There was no doubt of the love and friendship that jerry and Elvis shared! My only complaint... The chapters were long... and all the pictures were at the very end! I thoroughly enjoyed the book. I have always been a fan of Elvis' music... and still enjoy listening to my Elvis cd's. this book takes you behind the scenes and gives you an in depth picture of Elvis the person.... and how many people it took to help run his 'business'. There was no doubt of the love and friendship that jerry and Elvis shared! My only complaint... The chapters were long... and all the pictures were at the very end!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ingibjorg Bjorgvinsdottir

    Wonderful biography emotional and haertwarming. A book first and foremost about fraindship and how that survives but also the darker parts of how addiction takes a toll. I would have liked Schiller to have been more honest about how Elvis's doctors played an important role in his death, why does he not bear any grudge. Maybe some honesty about codependency would have given this book more dept. Wonderful biography emotional and haertwarming. A book first and foremost about fraindship and how that survives but also the darker parts of how addiction takes a toll. I would have liked Schiller to have been more honest about how Elvis's doctors played an important role in his death, why does he not bear any grudge. Maybe some honesty about codependency would have given this book more dept.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    First audio book I’ve listened to all the way through - the narrator makes all the difference, clearly. This guy was ok but not great. The book content was ok, very sanitised story of Elvis, his death came out of nowhere in this book as no reference was made whatsoever to his dangerous lifestyle. But Jerry Schilling’s story was interesting so all in all not bad.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I was so deeply touched by this volume. Jerry Schilling had the pleasure of knowing Elvis Presley before fame found him and remained his friend right to the end. Jerry worked for and alongside Elvis from the beginning. His heart is a tender one and his memories leave no room for spinning tales. Thank you Jerry for showing us not Elvis, the performer , but Elvis, the man.

  19. 4 out of 5

    KathiTheBookNerd

    I liked this book a lot. There's a whole new side to Elvis that you get to know. A very personal story written by a man who's been close to Elvis for most of his life. If you're interested in Elvis, the man behind the fame, I recommend this book! I liked this book a lot. There's a whole new side to Elvis that you get to know. A very personal story written by a man who's been close to Elvis for most of his life. If you're interested in Elvis, the man behind the fame, I recommend this book!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Harry John

    Perfect insight I wanted. Fun and exciting good read. Talented writer. Extraordinary life.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Russell Samuelson

    Great read Of all the books on Elvis I have read I felt a real connection to the subject and the author

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tracey Barry

    An honest account of true friendship. Other then Elvis and me by Priscilla its my favourite book ever written. Thanks Jerry....

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nick Van

    A good and thorough account of the King by one of his best friends — and a faithful account, in the fullest sense of the word. Necessary reading for any Elvis fan.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    Excellent! The best Elvis book I’ve read to date. Thank you Jerry for sharing your relationship with Elvis with the world!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marion Wilson

    It took me a long time to read it it's an amazing book I have now read a few books on Elvis this one is my best It took me a long time to read it it's an amazing book I have now read a few books on Elvis this one is my best

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Klobe

    Fantastic read - Jerry Schilling is the type of person we all should have as a friend - loyal, supportive, trustworthy, honest, dependable. This is the first book I have read about Elvis & I was so happy to have read. I learned a lot about Elvis but mostly, I learned about true friendship - a great story told! Thank you Jerry!!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Carey

    I liked about 3/4 of the book... telling us how charitable and generous Elvis was. I would have liked to see more of how he slipped into drug abuse... it seemed to be very sudden that he was addicted, then he died... boom.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Msmeemee

    let me start off by saying that my review of this book is totally biased for two reasons. first, look at the cover. the boy was fine as fuck. i'm a fan for his fuckableness if not for his musical genius. second, i've already crowned him the king of rock n' roll despite what others may have said contrary to that. anyone who can dress up like a blinged-out adult karate kid and have performers after him (ie., michael jackson, prince) follow suit has GOT to be the king (if not a queen) in my eyes. but let me start off by saying that my review of this book is totally biased for two reasons. first, look at the cover. the boy was fine as fuck. i'm a fan for his fuckableness if not for his musical genius. second, i've already crowned him the king of rock n' roll despite what others may have said contrary to that. anyone who can dress up like a blinged-out adult karate kid and have performers after him (ie., michael jackson, prince) follow suit has GOT to be the king (if not a queen) in my eyes. but i digress. i'm an avid reader and can read almost anything in a couple days or less so long as i have nothing else to do. however, i have come across books that have left me snoring in disappointment. this book was NOT one of them. "me and a guy named elvis"... the title says it all. author jerry schilling reminisces about his first-hand experiences with the king of rock n' roll. they had become football pals when schilling was but a young tween of 12, and elvis was 19 and already making musical waves with his first number one single, "that's all right." i'd have to say that the blossomings of their childhood friendship intrigued me the most. i was transported to the 50's when elvis' music was new and raw, a time when gyrating hips were probably perceived to be the dance of the devil. the image was clear-cut: elvis was danger. the girls loved him. the guys wanted to be him. and the adults wanted to lock up their kids for all eternity. then it just got depressing. without delving into too much detail, one can see the price elvis paid for being famous. if you have to read the book in segments (unlike myself who likes to read the entire book at once), don't allow too much time in between each sitting. i finished the book in 2 days, eager to read about what crazy shit elvis and the memphis mafia got themselves into next. i think the fact that i remained so engrossed in the story was what made me cry bitter tears at the end. and i've been a fan for all of a week by that time (thanks to an american idol special that featured celine dion "singing" with the late king). but i warn you all to remain close to the book for another reason. schilling also talks about his own career development as a film editor while trying to be friends with elvis. and while he might've been fabulously skilled at his trade, there is something lacking in his writing. i think the fact that i was reading about elvis himself and the fact that i was already curious to read about his life is what made me give the book 4 stars instead of 5. unfortunately, it felt more like a chronology of events with a smattering of emotions thrown in for good measure. i would've liked to have read a more vivid description of emotions in schilling's stories. it almost felt as though he was holding back for some reason. even when he described the fights between himself and elvis, it sometimes didn't read more than a line as simple as, "i was furious with him." i'm like, okay, schilling, HOW furious were you with him? were you cursing him out in your head? were you about to explode with rage? did you hate him in that very moment? perhaps when you're that close to a living legend it's hard to be objective, or even honest about him for fear of tainting a running legacy. one of the few times i felt something tug at my heart strings was when schilling described how devastated he was over the schoking news that elvis had died. there was the numbness and the shock. then the outpouring of anguish when he finally came to terms with his best friend's death. and i wept with him. i've gazed upon his beautiful face (on youtube) and basked in the molasses of his voice. but now i'm even more sorry that i never had a chance to see or experience elvis as close as schilling did. now i have to read more books on elvis. let the fetish continue...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dustin Henson

    The first time I read this book was nearly ten years ago as of this writing, I believe early summer 2010, so i thought it was a great time to revisit and get a second read. 2010 was also the year I visited Graceland. I’ve read a handful of books on Elvis, and there is many more that I have yet to read, but if anyone were to ask which book to read about Elvis, Jerry Schilling’s “Me and a Guy Named Elvis” would be the hands down book i would recommend. We all know what a talent and Legend Elvis wa The first time I read this book was nearly ten years ago as of this writing, I believe early summer 2010, so i thought it was a great time to revisit and get a second read. 2010 was also the year I visited Graceland. I’ve read a handful of books on Elvis, and there is many more that I have yet to read, but if anyone were to ask which book to read about Elvis, Jerry Schilling’s “Me and a Guy Named Elvis” would be the hands down book i would recommend. We all know what a talent and Legend Elvis was and is, but Jerry’s book takes you into his relationship with Elvis Presley from the time he met him at 12 years old until his death. So many great memories Jerry shares, and you also get an idea of just how beautiful of a soul Elvis Presley was. Over 30 Hollywood films, countless singles and records, I personally believe there will never be another in the business to ever touch the world as Presley did. I gave this book an easy five stars. From here I would recommend Joe Moscheo’s book, “The Gospel Side Of Elvis” and “My Best Man” by George Klein. All of these guys were a part of Elvis’s “Memphis Maphia.” Lastly, Jerry Schilling’s book has on the back cover book review quotes by Bono, Muhammad Ali, Priscilla Presley, and Lisa Marie Presley.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shahrun

    If you are looking for a sensational behind the scenes tale of dirt on Elvis, look away now. This is a story of friendship, albeit under the most extraordinary and unique circumstances. I felt this book was honestly written and genuine. Jerry Schilling has certainly led a fascinating life. He is so lucky to have been blessed not only with a good friend, but a wealth of different opertunities as a bonus to the friendship. He also gained my respect when I read that he was able to go off and persue If you are looking for a sensational behind the scenes tale of dirt on Elvis, look away now. This is a story of friendship, albeit under the most extraordinary and unique circumstances. I felt this book was honestly written and genuine. Jerry Schilling has certainly led a fascinating life. He is so lucky to have been blessed not only with a good friend, but a wealth of different opertunities as a bonus to the friendship. He also gained my respect when I read that he was able to go off and persue a life away from Elvis. Very few people would walk away from a lifestyle like that. And that he didn't take or take Elvis and/or his money for granted.

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