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First Class Murder

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Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are taking a holiday on the famous Orient Express. From the moment the girls step aboard, it's clear that everyone in the first-class carriages has something to hide. Then there is a scream from one of the cabins, and a wealthy heiress is found dead, But the killer has vanished - as if into thin air ... Daisy and Hazel are faced with their first l Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are taking a holiday on the famous Orient Express. From the moment the girls step aboard, it's clear that everyone in the first-class carriages has something to hide. Then there is a scream from one of the cabins, and a wealthy heiress is found dead, But the killer has vanished - as if into thin air ... Daisy and Hazel are faced with their first locked-room mystery - and with competition from several other sleuths, who are just as determined to crack the case.


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Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are taking a holiday on the famous Orient Express. From the moment the girls step aboard, it's clear that everyone in the first-class carriages has something to hide. Then there is a scream from one of the cabins, and a wealthy heiress is found dead, But the killer has vanished - as if into thin air ... Daisy and Hazel are faced with their first l Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are taking a holiday on the famous Orient Express. From the moment the girls step aboard, it's clear that everyone in the first-class carriages has something to hide. Then there is a scream from one of the cabins, and a wealthy heiress is found dead, But the killer has vanished - as if into thin air ... Daisy and Hazel are faced with their first locked-room mystery - and with competition from several other sleuths, who are just as determined to crack the case.

30 review for First Class Murder

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

    Another great mystery solved by Daisy and Hazel! I absolutely loved all the homages to Murder on the Orient Express and the crazy cast of characters, all with a great critic of xenophobia! It's been so great to see the girls in different locations, but I'm really excited for them to get back to their boarding school in the next book. Another great mystery solved by Daisy and Hazel! I absolutely loved all the homages to Murder on the Orient Express and the crazy cast of characters, all with a great critic of xenophobia! It's been so great to see the girls in different locations, but I'm really excited for them to get back to their boarding school in the next book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    Another delightful tale featuring the plucky young amateur detectives from the 1930’s, this time Daisy and Hazel find themselves trying to solve a murder whilst taking a holiday on the famous Orient Express. With Daisy’s love for crime fiction soon makes her wonders if the catalyst for this crime was inspired by the famous Christie novel from the previous year. In fact this entry in the family friendly series is a real affectionate nod to that original Poirot classic. It’s great to see the girls in Another delightful tale featuring the plucky young amateur detectives from the 1930’s, this time Daisy and Hazel find themselves trying to solve a murder whilst taking a holiday on the famous Orient Express. With Daisy’s love for crime fiction soon makes her wonders if the catalyst for this crime was inspired by the famous Christie novel from the previous year. In fact this entry in the family friendly series is a real affectionate nod to that original Poirot classic. It’s great to see the girls in a different location as they try to solve the case against all the odds, especially as Hazel’s father expressly forbids them from getting involved in anymore dangerous adventures. These books are great introductions to the great crime fiction of the time period for kids, whilst there’s plenty for older readers to enjoy. One element that I practically liked is the political backdrop across Europe at this time is also a very important part in which Stevens cleverly captures the feel of the era.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    Definitely the best one yet! A beautiful homage to Agatha Christie, the third Murder Most Unladylike outing sees Daisy and Hazel solve a murder on the Orient Express. I loved the entire atmosphere and setting of this book - anything set on a train really and I'm happy! Another mystery where I wasn't expecting the outcome. Definitely the best one yet! A beautiful homage to Agatha Christie, the third Murder Most Unladylike outing sees Daisy and Hazel solve a murder on the Orient Express. I loved the entire atmosphere and setting of this book - anything set on a train really and I'm happy! Another mystery where I wasn't expecting the outcome.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jessica (Jess Hearts Books)

    My favourite of this series yet. I wish that I could hang out with Hazel and Daisy every day and become a member of their detective society. Jolly good show Robin Stevens!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daisy May Johnson

    It's strange, sometimes, how books can make you long to read them and then freeze a little when you have them finally in your hands. And this was one: I love the work of Robin Stevens. I have adored Murder Most Unladylike and Arsenic For Tea. The third in the series, First Class Murder, was something that I was viciously hungry to read - and yet, reluctant to do so. I think that's something that sometimes happens when books are this good, this continual level of good and wonderful writing and pl It's strange, sometimes, how books can make you long to read them and then freeze a little when you have them finally in your hands. And this was one: I love the work of Robin Stevens. I have adored Murder Most Unladylike and Arsenic For Tea. The third in the series, First Class Murder, was something that I was viciously hungry to read - and yet, reluctant to do so. I think that's something that sometimes happens when books are this good, this continual level of good and wonderful writing and plots which hit all of your sweet spots and just make everything right with the world. You get scared that it can't last. You get nervous. There aren't many contemporary writers I feel like this about. Susie Day is one as is Sita Brahmachari, and I suspect Aoife Walsh may become another. Robin Stevens is very much up there on this list; a collective of some of the smartest and most exciting author voices working in contemporary children's literature today. And because of all of that, I was nervous of First Class Murder. I was nervous that it just might not be that good. So. Let me tell you this before we go on. First Class Murder is just -well, it's perfect. I love what Stevens does with her characters. I love that the further on she gets in the series, the more confident her writing feels and the drama becomes more dramatic and the humour becomes more stylish and heartfelt (The 'Hermes' moment is one such perfect example). I love that this series is turning into a such a powerhouse that can have jokes about the amount of times somebody vomits, with discussion of some incredibly dark and relevant issues. I love how the female characters in this book are so intensely multi-faceted and rich and capable; and I love how the adult characters, in particular Hazel's father, are drawn with such sympathy and truth. I would give these books to the world if I could, because they're just a genuine joy all the way from the start through to the end, so instead I shall end with a small anecdote about a girl I met in the library once. I asked her what sort of books she liked. She told me that she liked Enid Blyton and Agatha Christie. "Well," I said, "Do I have the perfect recommendation for you," and then we beamed at each other as fellow bookish folk often do. This is the perfect book for that girl. It's also the perfect book for anyone who's wanting something that has strong and brave characters, a tightly choreographed and controlled dance of a plot, murder, trains, shenanigans and buns. Basically, it's the sort of book that I am and will continue to be slightly evangelical over. (Also, these books are begging to be bought together as a series. Just look at those covers! My book shelves long for the three of them to be back to back!)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Claire Fayers

    At last! I solved the murder before Daisy and Hazel. I now feel like a real detective and want my own badge. And a bunbreak. Bunbreaks on the Orient Express are in a class of their own, as are the murders - an extra-tricky "locked room" mystery with the added complication of a spy, a jewel thief and a bungling official investigator. The characters are a joy as always, especially Daisy and Hazel. Hazel has grown up a lot over the last two books and now she begins to realise it, leading to tension At last! I solved the murder before Daisy and Hazel. I now feel like a real detective and want my own badge. And a bunbreak. Bunbreaks on the Orient Express are in a class of their own, as are the murders - an extra-tricky "locked room" mystery with the added complication of a spy, a jewel thief and a bungling official investigator. The characters are a joy as always, especially Daisy and Hazel. Hazel has grown up a lot over the last two books and now she begins to realise it, leading to tension with Daisy, who can't quite allow Hazel to be an equal, and with Hazel's loving but over-protective father. Super fun. Can't wait for the next installment.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Veronique

    Daisy and Hazel find themselves on the Orient Express, and what better setting for a mystery! Once more, Stevens plays with the tropes of the genre to great effect. Lots of potential suspects, all contained in a small space with no escape. Our girls are hot on the case, although continually stymied by grown-ups wanting to keep them away from danger... I’m not the targeted audience for these books, and yet, I do love them. I guess it is because of the continuing references to Christie’s work (and Daisy and Hazel find themselves on the Orient Express, and what better setting for a mystery! Once more, Stevens plays with the tropes of the genre to great effect. Lots of potential suspects, all contained in a small space with no escape. Our girls are hot on the case, although continually stymied by grown-ups wanting to keep them away from danger... I’m not the targeted audience for these books, and yet, I do love them. I guess it is because of the continuing references to Christie’s work (and other Golden Age of Crime Writing authors), the nostalgic world of the 1930s, and our two heroines. In this instance, I particularly enjoyed seeing Hazel with her father and witnessing their changing relationship. And yes, I would LOVE to travel once on the famous Orient Express :O)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Another rippingly good read from Robin Stevens, probably my favourite of Daisy and Hazel's adventures so far! I loved the Christie references and thought the mystery itself was brilliant. Another rippingly good read from Robin Stevens, probably my favourite of Daisy and Hazel's adventures so far! I loved the Christie references and thought the mystery itself was brilliant.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    At least the author admits (in the Afterword) that this is a rewrite of Murder on the Orient Express--if she hadn't done that I wouldn't be surprised if Christie's descendants slapped her with a lawsuit, since all of Agatha's books are still under copyright by the Christie conglomerate. But gosh I wish she could have come up with a better train mystery of her own! After all, Greenwood managed it in Murder on the Ballarat Train. Today's budding serial authors are a bit too lazy, and perhaps the y At least the author admits (in the Afterword) that this is a rewrite of Murder on the Orient Express--if she hadn't done that I wouldn't be surprised if Christie's descendants slapped her with a lawsuit, since all of Agatha's books are still under copyright by the Christie conglomerate. But gosh I wish she could have come up with a better train mystery of her own! After all, Greenwood managed it in Murder on the Ballarat Train. Today's budding serial authors are a bit too lazy, and perhaps the younger ones don't realise that cut and paste and tweak is not originality. A good enough lite read to pass the time on a stressful day, but we are back to the notes in Wong's handwriting--which when you're reading on an ebook reader, strains the eyes a bit, even trying to enlarge the font. That is saved by the ending, which I found much better than Christie's original. Then we have young Alexander, in 1935, using the protestation, "No way!", only about 60 years before that slang phrase became current. And this is the kid who went to an English public school? I think not. Too much California, not enough Oxford. Get some ideas of your own, though, Stevens--do you really want to be famous for being a copycat with nothing original to bring to the table? Three and a half stars.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ivy

    I got this book from Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. This book took me back to when I was a kid reading Nancy Drew mystery books. It is set on the Orient Express and although there is a murder it is not anything like the book by Agitha Christie. Hazel and Daisy are very likeable characters. They clash just enough to make the story interesting. And they get into some fixes that are for sure going to help solve the mystery but at the same time get them in trouble with Hazel's I got this book from Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. This book took me back to when I was a kid reading Nancy Drew mystery books. It is set on the Orient Express and although there is a murder it is not anything like the book by Agitha Christie. Hazel and Daisy are very likeable characters. They clash just enough to make the story interesting. And they get into some fixes that are for sure going to help solve the mystery but at the same time get them in trouble with Hazel's father, who has made Hazel promise not to do any detective work on this holiday. Daisy is very much the leader of the pack because she reads mysteries she thinks that she knows all about murders and spies. She tryes to solve it on her own but knows that she needs to have Hazel along to help her out. By the end of the book, Hazel isn't so much dependant on Daisy to figure out parts of what is going on. Having not read the other books in the seris I still liked it alot. It kept me incaged and wanting to keep on reading even when I had to put it down to go to bed or my lunch break at work ended. It is written for middle aged children but I think that even an adult would enjoy reading it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    'Naturally, murder is always rather dreadful...' I just cannot get enough of Wells and Wong and The Detective Society. From the first delightful sentence I was hooked. Robin Stevens has such a wonderful way with words, she has managed to capture perfectly 1930's England and magic of Golden Age crime mysteries. With a host of wonderful characters – a Russian Countess, a medium, a magician, a writer and an undercover detective – and an absolutely perfect setting – the Orient Express, I knew I was g 'Naturally, murder is always rather dreadful...' I just cannot get enough of Wells and Wong and The Detective Society. From the first delightful sentence I was hooked. Robin Stevens has such a wonderful way with words, she has managed to capture perfectly 1930's England and magic of Golden Age crime mysteries. With a host of wonderful characters – a Russian Countess, a medium, a magician, a writer and an undercover detective – and an absolutely perfect setting – the Orient Express, I knew I was going to love the latest Wells and Wong outing. And I did! I could blather on about how much I love these books all day long, Hazel and Daisy feel like my best friends and I'd like to think I would be allowed to join The Detective Society, well once I pass Daisy's scrutiny of course! Brilliant, brilliant, brilliant or in the words of Hazel Wong and Daisy Wells – wizard!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    This is such a great series. In previous books we have seen Hazel and Daisy in Detection mode at school and then at Daisy's home. This book takes them on the Orient Express and it takes place a year after the publication of Agatha Christie's novel set onboard that train so you know from the start that there will be an exciting mystery to solve. The book is narrated by Hazel Wong as usual and again her experiences and commentary challenge our assumptions about the background, social standing and c This is such a great series. In previous books we have seen Hazel and Daisy in Detection mode at school and then at Daisy's home. This book takes them on the Orient Express and it takes place a year after the publication of Agatha Christie's novel set onboard that train so you know from the start that there will be an exciting mystery to solve. The book is narrated by Hazel Wong as usual and again her experiences and commentary challenge our assumptions about the background, social standing and class of the characters in the story. Before I read the book I listened to an episode of the podcast Shedunnit where Caroline Crampton interviewed Robin Stevens about her research for the book which was fascinating.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Listen to this as an audio book, it was well read and kept me entertained as I was cleaning my house! A great continuation of the series. Hazel and Daisy are great characters and the murder was full of mystery. I did guess who the murder was before the end, (which I didn’t with the other two books) but it didn’t stop my enjoyment. Also I did enjoy hearing that Daisy had read Murder on the Orient Express! Nice nod to Agatha Christie.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    A perfect homage to Christie's Murder on the Orient Express! The locked room mystery was solid, and I really loved how Hazel is growing as a character. I can't wait for the next book in the series to be published in the States! A perfect homage to Christie's Murder on the Orient Express! The locked room mystery was solid, and I really loved how Hazel is growing as a character. I can't wait for the next book in the series to be published in the States!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mathew

    Even better than the previous two. Stevens is going from strength to strength and I hope she continues to subtly touch upon the themes and history which is so cleverly running beneath the main storyline. Also, I wouldn't mind a little trip to the Pinkertons too! Even better than the previous two. Stevens is going from strength to strength and I hope she continues to subtly touch upon the themes and history which is so cleverly running beneath the main storyline. Also, I wouldn't mind a little trip to the Pinkertons too!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

    Robin Stevens pays homage to Agatha Christie in her 'First Class Murder' as her two teenage protagonists, and amateur sleuths,Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong, embark on a journey on the Orient Express along with Hazel's father and a variety of disparate characters. The girls are settled in a sleeping car alongside Hazel's father, Mr Wong, and a cast of fellow travellers all of whom seem to have something to hide. Introductions taken care of the train sets off and the interplay between the characters b Robin Stevens pays homage to Agatha Christie in her 'First Class Murder' as her two teenage protagonists, and amateur sleuths,Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong, embark on a journey on the Orient Express along with Hazel's father and a variety of disparate characters. The girls are settled in a sleeping car alongside Hazel's father, Mr Wong, and a cast of fellow travellers all of whom seem to have something to hide. Introductions taken care of the train sets off and the interplay between the characters begins. Daisy and Hazel, often involved in solving mysteries wherever they happen to be, begin to think that something strange is going to happen on the journey. And sure enough they are not wrong, for a sudden scream alerts them to a sinister happening, which turns out to be the murder of one of the passengers, a Mrs Georgiana Daunt. What is more, the dastardly deed has taken place in a locked sleeping car with no obvious entry or egress. Despite the strictures from Hazel's father, who instructs the pair to have nothing to do with any investigation, the youngsters set about trying to solve the crime, which is further complicated when they discover that there is also an unknown spy on board the train. Daisy and Hazel surreptitiously interview their fellow passengers and come up with a number of possible scenarios. Which, if any, is the correct one? With no police on board because the incident has taken place in Jugoslavia, the couple have almost free rein to carry out their investigations - with the exception of a certain young man named Alexander Arcady, who regards himself as a junior Pinkerton agent and who occasionally gets in Daisy and Hazel's way. But in the end the girls triumph after a variety of strange happenings help lead them to the final solution.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Luna

    The Wells & Wong Mysteries are some of my favourite books and I read the last instalment the minute I got home. I’m not exaggerating! The only thing I did first was make a cup of tea and get some cookies because you can’t read about Hazel and Daisy without bunbreak supplies. It’s essential. Murder on the Orient Express, again. Only this time it’s Daisy and Hazel who are investigating. Discreetly mind you because Hazel’s father it quite adamant that Hazel is supposed to be a good influence on Dais The Wells & Wong Mysteries are some of my favourite books and I read the last instalment the minute I got home. I’m not exaggerating! The only thing I did first was make a cup of tea and get some cookies because you can’t read about Hazel and Daisy without bunbreak supplies. It’s essential. Murder on the Orient Express, again. Only this time it’s Daisy and Hazel who are investigating. Discreetly mind you because Hazel’s father it quite adamant that Hazel is supposed to be a good influence on Daisy and all this dangerous detecting as no business on their holiday. It’s a bit difficult to ignore the dead body, the mystery surrounding the murder and all the intriguing passengers though. First Class Murder is my favourite book in the series so far (not that I didn’t love the other two books because they are brilliant). Hazel grows which each story and in this book I felt she really shone. Hazel has an inner strength and we see a lot of the accepted racism of that time, not just how people treat Hazel and her father but also in the fact that this it set in the run up to WW2. Can’t wait for the next book. The Wells & Wong Detective Society can continue indefinitely. I adore Robin Stevens books.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Claire Rousseau

    The next installment in the Murder Most Unladylike series, this one follows Hazel & Daisy onto the Orient Express!! I'm not a huge Agatha Christie fan, or a huge fan of mysteries in general, so maybe I missed some references to Murder on the Orient Express, but I really loved this nonetheless. Hazel & Daisy continue to be great protagonists, growing from one book to the next and dealing with their previous experiences. They’re learning to manage their fears and their feelings as they are once mo The next installment in the Murder Most Unladylike series, this one follows Hazel & Daisy onto the Orient Express!! I'm not a huge Agatha Christie fan, or a huge fan of mysteries in general, so maybe I missed some references to Murder on the Orient Express, but I really loved this nonetheless. Hazel & Daisy continue to be great protagonists, growing from one book to the next and dealing with their previous experiences. They’re learning to manage their fears and their feelings as they are once more confronted with death, violence and danger. Hazel is also forced to reassess her own moral compass when she had to lie to her father in order to continue her investigation. And Hazel's Dad, he was just wonderful! From the quiet dignity with which he bears the era's casual racism to his obvious care for his daughter and his respect for her intellect and character. It was great to see on the page, and he is now up there with Keith Mars as one of my favourite fictional Dads.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brandy Painter

    This delightful series continues to make me smile. Hazel is coming in to her own so nicely and I can't wait to see how that affects her relationship with Daisy. I can already see more strain starting to develop. I hope that it eventually leads to more growth on Daisy's part. Meanwhile, I love the callbacks to classic mysteries and was delighted to see my two favorites from book two make cameos. Alexander was a great secondary character addition in this as well. I can not wait for the US to catch This delightful series continues to make me smile. Hazel is coming in to her own so nicely and I can't wait to see how that affects her relationship with Daisy. I can already see more strain starting to develop. I hope that it eventually leads to more growth on Daisy's part. Meanwhile, I love the callbacks to classic mysteries and was delighted to see my two favorites from book two make cameos. Alexander was a great secondary character addition in this as well. I can not wait for the US to catch up to where the series is in the UK! If you haven't experienced these wonderful MG books and are a fan of old fashioned mystery stories, start with Murder Is Bad Manners.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    I really enjoy this mystery series, but be warned, Daisy Wells can be a self-important little ass. I also got annoyed with her because she viewed solving the murder mystery as a competition against other characters in the book, rather than cooperating with others for the sake of justice for the victim. Fortunately, the narrator, Hazel Wong (Daisy's "Watson") has her feet more firmly planted on Terra Firma and is not so self-aggrandizing. One of the good things about this series is that as it is I really enjoy this mystery series, but be warned, Daisy Wells can be a self-important little ass. I also got annoyed with her because she viewed solving the murder mystery as a competition against other characters in the book, rather than cooperating with others for the sake of justice for the victim. Fortunately, the narrator, Hazel Wong (Daisy's "Watson") has her feet more firmly planted on Terra Firma and is not so self-aggrandizing. One of the good things about this series is that as it is set in the 1930's, the girls were much more restricted by the adults around them, for their "safety and protection," and the two girls had to jump through all kinds of hoops in order to carry out their investigation. But it was realistic as girls, especially 14 year old girls, didn't have as much freedom back then as they have now.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Maggie (Magsisreadingagain)

    The third installment in the Wells and Wong Mystery series sees Hazel and Daisy on holidays with Hazel’s dad, traveling across Europe on the Orient Express. In a wonderful tribute to Agatha Christie, Stevens has written a clever locked-room mystery, complete with jewel theft, murder, espionage and international spy rings. With help from a few of the other passengers, Hazel and Daisy solve the crime, before the adults and authorities can fit all the pieces together. Love this series, looking forw The third installment in the Wells and Wong Mystery series sees Hazel and Daisy on holidays with Hazel’s dad, traveling across Europe on the Orient Express. In a wonderful tribute to Agatha Christie, Stevens has written a clever locked-room mystery, complete with jewel theft, murder, espionage and international spy rings. With help from a few of the other passengers, Hazel and Daisy solve the crime, before the adults and authorities can fit all the pieces together. Love this series, looking forward to the next adventure back at Deepdean School.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marina

    I really liked Alexander and that HE wasn't evil :))) {Steven, was it? I believe so... :((((} I love how Mrs. Vitillious (sorry, probably not spelled right) came back, as well as Hetty. I really loved this book! I'm hoping the next is as good, if not better. Of course, the characters have grown tremendously since the first book (I keep remembering when Hazel broke down in tears in the first book because of all the deaths, and now they've seen, what, 3 or four dead bodies? nice!). I can't wait to I really liked Alexander and that HE wasn't evil :))) {Steven, was it? I believe so... :((((} I love how Mrs. Vitillious (sorry, probably not spelled right) came back, as well as Hetty. I really loved this book! I'm hoping the next is as good, if not better. Of course, the characters have grown tremendously since the first book (I keep remembering when Hazel broke down in tears in the first book because of all the deaths, and now they've seen, what, 3 or four dead bodies? nice!). I can't wait to start the fourth book!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Klassen

    Man, this series is serious fun. Even after having to put it down for school reading and studying for an ASTONISHINGLY LONG PERIOD OF TIME (2 MONTHS) I was absorbed right back into the mystery and intrigue upon resumption. Well crafted mystery that had me guessing until the very end. I didn't realize the truth until the characters told me 😂 thanks to Robin Stevens for keeping this naive reader on her toes. Man, this series is serious fun. Even after having to put it down for school reading and studying for an ASTONISHINGLY LONG PERIOD OF TIME (2 MONTHS) I was absorbed right back into the mystery and intrigue upon resumption. Well crafted mystery that had me guessing until the very end. I didn't realize the truth until the characters told me 😂 thanks to Robin Stevens for keeping this naive reader on her toes.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tara Gold

    Such a cute book for middle grades fans of classic Agatha Christie! I first read The Murder on the Orient Express in eighth grade and instantly loved it, and I know I would have eaten this book up, too. This is the third in a series, but could be enjoyed without reading the rest. Though I will be going back to read the others because it was such a delightful story!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    A fantastically fun middle-grade murder mystery set on the Orient Express. As always with Robin's mysteries, she had me guessing how it was done until almost the end. A welcome third outing for Daisy and Hazel. I look forward to reading more of their stories. A fantastically fun middle-grade murder mystery set on the Orient Express. As always with Robin's mysteries, she had me guessing how it was done until almost the end. A welcome third outing for Daisy and Hazel. I look forward to reading more of their stories.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    This was a stunningly enjoyable read and I loved all the little twists and the final reveal. Even though I have read this book before, I had forgotten the identity of the murderer(s) and nothing in the book gave away who it was; even with my extra knowledge of the storyline so well done Robin!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Caolainn

    I- wow

  28. 5 out of 5

    Evie

    5 stars: Very Good This series keeps getting better. How was the world building? Very Good ✅ Good Ok Meh Bad Explain: Train mysteries are my favourite. How were the characters? Very Good ✅ Good Ok Meh Bad Explain: I’m liking Daisy a lot more. Hoping the Hazel and Alexander tension goes somewhere... How was the plot? Very Good✅ Good Ok Meh Bad Explain: You would of thought after reading so many mystery books I would have been able to guess who did it but nope. I didn’t.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alyce Hunt

    I loved this. Full review coming either tomorrow or Wednesday: it's a gushing one! EDIT 28/02/2018: It's the summer hols, so Mr Wong is taking Hazel and Daisy on a trip across Europe on the Orient Express. He's hoping he'll be able to keep them out of trouble: good girls don't do detective work, and he didn't send Hazel to a boarding school in England for her to keep getting herself in trouble. Unfortunately for Mr Wong, a passenger on the Orient Express has other ideas, and it isn't long before We I loved this. Full review coming either tomorrow or Wednesday: it's a gushing one! EDIT 28/02/2018: It's the summer hols, so Mr Wong is taking Hazel and Daisy on a trip across Europe on the Orient Express. He's hoping he'll be able to keep them out of trouble: good girls don't do detective work, and he didn't send Hazel to a boarding school in England for her to keep getting herself in trouble. Unfortunately for Mr Wong, a passenger on the Orient Express has other ideas, and it isn't long before Wells and Wong find themselves at the scene of ANOTHER murder. The body of Mrs Daunt is found in a locked room with her throat slit, her brother's knife on the floor beside her. It looks like an open-and-shut case, but Hazel and Daisy aren't convinced. There are too many passengers on the Orient Express who have motive for murder, and they're all acting remarkably shifty. The Detective Society are on the case! I absolutely loved Arsenic For Tea, but I assumed that its perfection meant that the series had peaked early. I'd prepared myself to be disappointed by this release, but First Class Murder is miles better than the first two books in the Murder Most Unladylike series. That shouldn't be achievable, but somehow Robin Stevens' writing just keeps getting better. In First Class Murder the mystery is more compelling, the characters are multi-dimensional and well-developed within moments of their introductions, and the setting of the confined train carriage causes the characters to suffer from ceaseless stress. I was only planning on reading a couple of chapters of First Class Murder, but before I knew it I was halfway through with no intention of stopping. These books are impossible to put down, and it makes it difficult to resist starting the next book in the series as soon as you finish one of them. You can't resist knowing what happens next, and Stevens makes the cases impossible to solve (although I did guess one of the culprits in this novel, which I'm proud of!). The best thing about First Class Murder is the combination of two cases. A familiar face returns, investigating a spy who's leaking British secrets to the Germans. Not only do Wells and Wong have a murder on their hands, but they need to try to seek out the spy and save their country, too! It makes you even more suspicious of every character you come across: this isn't a relaxing read, and you shouldn't try and pick it up before bed or you'll be up all night. I honestly cannot recommend the Murder Most Unladylike mysteries enough. This review was originally posted on The Bumbling Blogger.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Gargoyle

    Ten Second Synopsis: Hazel and Daisy find themselves on the Orient Express to "get away from it all" while the trial relating to the "unpleasantness" of the previous book is sorted out. When detectives are on a trans-European train however, murder cannot be far behind and so indeed it turns out to be. Another ripping adventure! First Class Murder is a tribute to Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express, not a retelling for juniors, so while there will be familiar aspects – the unexpected sto Ten Second Synopsis: Hazel and Daisy find themselves on the Orient Express to "get away from it all" while the trial relating to the "unpleasantness" of the previous book is sorted out. When detectives are on a trans-European train however, murder cannot be far behind and so indeed it turns out to be. Another ripping adventure! First Class Murder is a tribute to Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express, not a retelling for juniors, so while there will be familiar aspects – the unexpected stoppage, for example – don’t expect the story to unfold in exactly the same fashion. The girls find themselves on the train and under the ever-watchful eye of Hazel’s father; the grown-ups seem to think that the girls have got themselves into enough mischief and danger to be going on with and a change of scenery and civilised society should do them a world of good. Even before the murder happens, Daisy is determined to scent adventure, and after the incident Daisy and Hazel must employ all of their wits and cunning to continue detecting under the nose of a variety of meddling adults. The detecting aspect of the case has an added element of fun in this book because the girls have been expressly forbidden to engage in any detection by not one, but two, authoritative figures after the murder takes place. This means that a lot of listening at doors and hiding under tables is required in order to get the juicy clues. The prospect of competition is raised too, as the bumbling Doctor Sandwich and his much cleverer sidekick Alexander, are officially “on the case”. There are some red herrings left lying about in plain sight as well as a few hints that clever clogs should pick up on fairly early on, but the entire puzzle should remain a mystery until the reveal. First Class Murder felt like the most fun of the three books I have read of this series. There’s the light-hearted feeling of adventure from going on an unexpected holiday, the vaguely amusing collection of characters on the train and the lengths to which Daisy and Hazel must go to ferret out the murderer/s. I particularly enjoyed the introduction of Alexander and the mention of the Junior Pinkertons, as I think the girls can handle a little competition and this sets things up nicely for later books in the series. It was also a wonderful twist that the book doesn’t just become a retelling of Murder on the Orient Express, because it means that the reveal isn’t a given for anyone who has read that other classic story first. Overall, this was an excellent, slightly quirky addition to the series and I can’t wait to back up with book four, Jolly Foul Play.

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