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Do Less, Get More: How to Work Smart and Live Life Your Way

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When you stop trying to do so much, you get so much more done. Do you put yourself under too much pressure to succeed, which only makes it harder to achieve? Are you constantly playing catch-up and struggling to find time for the things, and people, you love? It doesn't have to be this way. Anything is possible when you stop trying to do everything at the same time. Often it' When you stop trying to do so much, you get so much more done. Do you put yourself under too much pressure to succeed, which only makes it harder to achieve? Are you constantly playing catch-up and struggling to find time for the things, and people, you love? It doesn't have to be this way. Anything is possible when you stop trying to do everything at the same time. Often it's fear that keeps us stuck in our patterns. If we're super busy then no one can say we're not working hard. But there's another way to live a life that's both more enjoyable and more productive, if only we can break those routines. In Do Less, Get More, entrepreneur and bestselling author Shaa Wasmund reveals that when we embrace a "less is more" attitude, we can appreciate all the good things we already have and find the courage to prune the nonessentials. And then we can find the space in which to pursue exciting new opportunities. Wasmund teaches us how to become experts in the things we're truly passionate about, rather than mediocre jacks-of-all-trades. Her tools include exercises like: * Escaping the "when, then" trap. Stop putting something off because you're waiting to be ready ("I'll start my own business when my kids are out of the house" or "I'll lose weight when this project is over"). Take one practical step toward what you want right now. * Nurturing your support network: Who are the people who truly support you? Prioritize those who are genuinely on your side and practice asking for help. Focus on quality over quantity in developing your network. * Scheduling for value: What gets put in our calendar gets done. And you shouldn't only plan for work projects: scheduling time for the people and activities you love and that give you purpose and energy is just as important. This life-changing book gives you the tools to ditch your to-do list and follow your dreams. It will be your essential guide to doing what you love--and letting go of the rest.


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When you stop trying to do so much, you get so much more done. Do you put yourself under too much pressure to succeed, which only makes it harder to achieve? Are you constantly playing catch-up and struggling to find time for the things, and people, you love? It doesn't have to be this way. Anything is possible when you stop trying to do everything at the same time. Often it' When you stop trying to do so much, you get so much more done. Do you put yourself under too much pressure to succeed, which only makes it harder to achieve? Are you constantly playing catch-up and struggling to find time for the things, and people, you love? It doesn't have to be this way. Anything is possible when you stop trying to do everything at the same time. Often it's fear that keeps us stuck in our patterns. If we're super busy then no one can say we're not working hard. But there's another way to live a life that's both more enjoyable and more productive, if only we can break those routines. In Do Less, Get More, entrepreneur and bestselling author Shaa Wasmund reveals that when we embrace a "less is more" attitude, we can appreciate all the good things we already have and find the courage to prune the nonessentials. And then we can find the space in which to pursue exciting new opportunities. Wasmund teaches us how to become experts in the things we're truly passionate about, rather than mediocre jacks-of-all-trades. Her tools include exercises like: * Escaping the "when, then" trap. Stop putting something off because you're waiting to be ready ("I'll start my own business when my kids are out of the house" or "I'll lose weight when this project is over"). Take one practical step toward what you want right now. * Nurturing your support network: Who are the people who truly support you? Prioritize those who are genuinely on your side and practice asking for help. Focus on quality over quantity in developing your network. * Scheduling for value: What gets put in our calendar gets done. And you shouldn't only plan for work projects: scheduling time for the people and activities you love and that give you purpose and energy is just as important. This life-changing book gives you the tools to ditch your to-do list and follow your dreams. It will be your essential guide to doing what you love--and letting go of the rest.

30 review for Do Less, Get More: How to Work Smart and Live Life Your Way

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ally

    I have read the whole thing, properly, literally from cover to cover. I'll prefix my review by saying that this is clearly a very successful woman who has obviously done extremely well. Having an MBE in her professional field and clients including Sir James Dyson and Sir Bob Geldof are not to be sneezed at. So, I actually feel hugely disappointed and wonder whether I have spectacularly missed the point of this book! My first impressions on receiving the book were favourable - I loved the covers. M I have read the whole thing, properly, literally from cover to cover. I'll prefix my review by saying that this is clearly a very successful woman who has obviously done extremely well. Having an MBE in her professional field and clients including Sir James Dyson and Sir Bob Geldof are not to be sneezed at. So, I actually feel hugely disappointed and wonder whether I have spectacularly missed the point of this book! My first impressions on receiving the book were favourable - I loved the covers. Minimalistic, clean and to the point, in keeping with the theme. The testimonials on the back made some bold claims "A potential life changer", "devastatingly effective" and "my guide book on how to live a life filled with meaning". Unfortunately I cannot agree with any of these sentiments. The tone of the book is irritatingly chatty. I felt as though I was being talked at at 100 miles per hour, not being engaged with, even the 'exercises' didn't help draw me in. The same points were made over and over and the relentless use of rhetorical questions was infuriating and felt patronising. There is nothing new here. This is a very shallow drawing together of common sense notions, presented as though they are groundbreaking ideas. Using post-it notes. Drawing a 'mind map' / brainstorm. Delegate the things you do not love doing (hardly realistic advice when it comes to the daily grind of parenthood). What was unforgivable in my opinion, was the complete lack of references. Throughout the book the author makes many references to scientific studies from various respectable academic institutions and seems to expect us to take her on her word. The inclusion of Abraham Maslow's 'Hierarchy of Needs' is casually dropped into page 76 without credit or explanation. A credible non fiction book would use a formal referencing system. The 'Inspiring words' resource list is not a substitute. I did like the layout however; the many subtitles help to break up the sections and make it (thankfully) very easy to put down and pick up in short bursts. The vast majority of the illustrations were superfluous and seemed to be 'space fillers'. The inclusion of little stars and love hearts scattered throughout were ridiculous and reminded me of a teenager's secret diary. I loathed this book and felt obligated to read it as part of an online giveaway. Ordinarily I would not have read past the first five pages.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Berlinska

    I wanted to give the book three stars, but three stars stands for 'I liked it' while what I really want to say is that ... it was ok. But not much more than that. At least for me, who have read a few books on self-development and self-management. I picked this one before a longish train journey and I read it quickly. I think that is what it is - an easy, travel book. I picked it up intrigued by the cover reviews, such as this one 'Simple yet devastatingly effective. Packed with tools and tricks I wanted to give the book three stars, but three stars stands for 'I liked it' while what I really want to say is that ... it was ok. But not much more than that. At least for me, who have read a few books on self-development and self-management. I picked this one before a longish train journey and I read it quickly. I think that is what it is - an easy, travel book. I picked it up intrigued by the cover reviews, such as this one 'Simple yet devastatingly effective. Packed with tools and tricks to help you reignite your schedule, your days and your life' or 'My guide on how to live a life filled with meaning'. It promised a lot! Unfortunately there were hardly any new ideas for me in the book. What there was was sleekly put together from various sources + some common sense - at least for a person capable of pausing, self-analysing and reflecting what doesn't work and coming up with ideas for change (e.g. switching off your phone, scheduling and prioritising, saying No, de-cluttering, open space, concentration and connection...). The book is like a good singer covering other artists - it's ok but there is very few original ideas. The book is also painfully repetitive - it almost felt through the first 50 pages like sitting in a plane circling on the runway without taking off for a long time. It finally did take off but even as the book progressed, very often it was coming back to the same ideas over and over again. I will take something away with me from the book though - next time I do wardrobe tidying-up I will apply the rule 'Would I buy it today? No? Get rid of'! :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cristian

    I have not read a lot of books on productivity, personal improvement or time management. The one I remember is Eat That Frog!: 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time that one had only one powerful advice Do less, Get More by Shaa Wasmund goes to the same shortlist of best books I have read on self-management. Loved her writing, advices and overall feel and look of the book. I read it in one go and start applying its advices on one very specific area of my life I'm I have not read a lot of books on productivity, personal improvement or time management. The one I remember is Eat That Frog!: 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done in Less Time that one had only one powerful advice Do less, Get More by Shaa Wasmund goes to the same shortlist of best books I have read on self-management. Loved her writing, advices and overall feel and look of the book. I read it in one go and start applying its advices on one very specific area of my life I'm stuck with. This is what a good book is all about. Encouraging permanent change. PS: I did not give it 5 starts only because I wished the book was longer. Other than that, really liked it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Margot

    This book does have some interesting points and I really like how it’s presented, the graphics etc. however it is repetitive - a good book on doing less to get more really shouldn’t waste reader’s time... and yes it’s nothing groundbreaking for sb who is into self-development. It could be potentially a very useful read for sb new to the field and hence I was considering giving it 3 stars but couldn’t really because of lack of references- the author is just too casual about the sources and some t This book does have some interesting points and I really like how it’s presented, the graphics etc. however it is repetitive - a good book on doing less to get more really shouldn’t waste reader’s time... and yes it’s nothing groundbreaking for sb who is into self-development. It could be potentially a very useful read for sb new to the field and hence I was considering giving it 3 stars but couldn’t really because of lack of references- the author is just too casual about the sources and some things don’t get credit at all (as mentioned by sb before - Marlow’s pyramid of needs is a stark example).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Lynn Thomas

    If you've ready any similar books, you probably won't find much new here, but I appreciated the way the text was broken down into handy "cheat-sheet" graphics. I also started using Evernote again thanks to this book--it can do so much more than it used to, and it's awesome. If you've ready any similar books, you probably won't find much new here, but I appreciated the way the text was broken down into handy "cheat-sheet" graphics. I also started using Evernote again thanks to this book--it can do so much more than it used to, and it's awesome.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nopadol Rompho

    I like this book. I think that if you don't focus, you cannot accomplish them all. This book told you just that. It also shows you how to do it. I like this book. I think that if you don't focus, you cannot accomplish them all. This book told you just that. It also shows you how to do it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Bennett

    Not what I was looking for. Lots of theory with no science. Lots of generic quotes with not much practical advice.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Niko Vermeer

    Meh-ish motivational writing. Not bad but not really good either. Many open doors, but still refreshing enough not to be terrible.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Renuka Prasad Yarasu

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Notes: Books ------- Shawn Achor, The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology that Fuel Success and Performance at Work (Virgin Books, 2011) James and Claudia Altucher, The Power of No: Because One Little Word Can Bring Health, Abundance and Happiness (Hay House UK, 2014) Paul Arden, Whatever You Think, Think the Opposite (Penguin, 2006) Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Happiness (Rider, 2002) Bill Davidow, ‘Exploiting the Neuroscience of Internet Addiction’, At Notes: Books ------- Shawn Achor, The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology that Fuel Success and Performance at Work (Virgin Books, 2011) James and Claudia Altucher, The Power of No: Because One Little Word Can Bring Health, Abundance and Happiness (Hay House UK, 2014) Paul Arden, Whatever You Think, Think the Opposite (Penguin, 2006) Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Happiness (Rider, 2002) Bill Davidow, ‘Exploiting the Neuroscience of Internet Addiction’, Atlantic, 18 July 2012, www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/20... Timothy Ferriss, The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9–5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich, expanded and updated edn (Harmony, 2009) Tim Gill, No Fear: Growing Up in a Risk Averse Society (Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, 2007); www.gulbenkian.org.uk/pdffiles/--item... Boris Groysberg and Robin Abrahams, ‘Manage Your Work, Manage Your Life’, Harvard Business Review 92(3) (2014), pp. 58–66 George Halkos and Dimitrios Bousinakis, ‘The Effect of Stress and Satisfaction on Productivity’, International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management 59(5) (2010), pp. 415–31; www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.110... Chip and Dan Heath, Switch: How to Change When Change Is Hard (Random House, 2010) Sheena S. Iyengar and Mark R. Lepper, ‘When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing?’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 79(6) (2000), pp. 995–1006 Chalene Johnson, PUSH: 30 Days to Turbocharged Habits, a Bangin’ Body, and the Life You Deserve! (Rodale, 2011) Gabrielle Kratsas, ‘Cellphone Use Causes Over 1 In 4 Car Accidents’, USA Today, 28 March 2014, www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/201... Jonathan P. Little, Adeel S. Safdar, Geoffrey P. Wilkin, Mark A. Tarnopolsky and Martin J. Gibala, ‘A Practical Model of Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Training Induces Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Human Skeletal Muscle: Potential Mechanisms’, Journal of Physiology 3 (2010), pp. 202–10 Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less (Virgin Books, 2014) Stephen Moss, ‘Natural Childhood’, report for the National Trust; www.nationaltrust.org.uk/document-135... Dan Pallotta, ‘The Way We Think About Charity Is Dead Wrong’, TED Talk, March 2013; www.ted.com/talks/dan_pallotta_the_wa... Leads to a happier you in five minutes. I love this app because it’s a simple and effective way to reflect on my day and all the things I’m grateful for. And as you know, gratitude always leads to better things. If you keep a short journal each day then you can monitor your progress, which motivates you to continue. You can also acknowledge setbacks and learn from them immediately, which then allows you to move on, rather than get stuck as doubts are allowed to creep back in. Inspiring words Shawn Achor, The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology that Fuel Success and Performance at Work (Virgin Books, 2011) James and Claudia Altucher, The Power of No: Because One Little Word Can Bring Health, Abundance and Happiness (Hay House UK, 2014) Paul Arden, Whatever You Think, Think the Opposite (Penguin, 2006) Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Flow: The Psychology of Happiness (Rider, 2002) Bill Davidow, ‘Exploiting the Neuroscience of Internet Addiction’, Atlantic, 18 July 2012, www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/20... Timothy Ferriss, The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9–5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich, expanded and updated edn (Harmony, 2009) Tim Gill, No Fear: Growing Up in a Risk Averse Society (Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, 2007); www.gulbenkian.org.uk/pdffiles/--item... Boris Groysberg and Robin Abrahams, ‘Manage Your Work, Manage Your Life’, Harvard Business Review 92(3) (2014), pp. 58–66 George Halkos and Dimitrios Bousinakis, ‘The Effect of Stress and Satisfaction on Productivity’, International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management 59(5) (2010), pp. 415–31; www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.110... Chip and Dan Heath, Switch: How to Change When Change Is Hard (Random House, 2010) Sheena S. Iyengar and Mark R. Lepper, ‘When Choice is Demotivating: Can One Desire Too Much of a Good Thing?’, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 79(6) (2000), pp. 995–1006 Chalene Johnson, PUSH: 30 Days to Turbocharged Habits, a Bangin’ Body, and the Life You Deserve! (Rodale, 2011) Gabrielle Kratsas, ‘Cellphone Use Causes Over 1 In 4 Car Accidents’, USA Today, 28 March 2014, www.usatoday.com/story/money/cars/201... Jonathan P. Little, Adeel S. Safdar, Geoffrey P. Wilkin, Mark A. Tarnopolsky and Martin J. Gibala, ‘A Practical Model of Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Training Induces Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Human Skeletal Muscle: Potential Mechanisms’, Journal of Physiology 3 (2010), pp. 202–10 Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less (Virgin Books, 2014) Stephen Moss, ‘Natural Childhood’, report for the National Trust; www.nationaltrust.org.uk/document-135... Dan Pallotta, ‘The Way We Think About Charity Is Dead Wrong’, TED Talk, March 2013; www.ted.com/talks/dan_pallotta_the_wa... Kim John Payne, Simplicity Parenting: Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer, Happier, and More Secure Kids (Ballantine Books, 2009) Steven Pressfield, Do the Work: Overcome Resistance and Get Out of Your Own Way (Amazon Publishing, 2011) Barry Schwartz, The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less (Harper Perennial, 2005) Dan Siegel, ‘The Healthy Mind Platter’, www.drdansiegel.com/resources/healthy... David Strayer, ‘Driver Distraction and Cell Phones’, www.gocognitive.net/video/david-stray... Bob Sullivan and Hugh Thompson, ‘Brain, Interrupted’, The New York Times, 3 May 2013, www.nytimes.com/2013/05/05/opinion/su... University of California at Irvine, ‘Email “Vacations” Decrease Stress, Increase Concentration’, news release, 3 May 2012, http://news.uci.edu/features/email-va... Visit http://bit.ly/1IBDBzu for a larger version of this image. (American Society for Training and Development; www.astd.org) "If you chase two rabbits, both will escape" "If you keep on doing what you’ve always done, you’ll keep on getting what you’ve always got."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria

    When I jot down tons of notes from a book, it's an indication of a great book. Shaa Wasmund points out the exact reason why people are doing too much: they have their priorities on the wrong things. Once that's sorted out, everything changes for the better. If you're looking forward to straightening out your productivity methods, read this book! When I jot down tons of notes from a book, it's an indication of a great book. Shaa Wasmund points out the exact reason why people are doing too much: they have their priorities on the wrong things. Once that's sorted out, everything changes for the better. If you're looking forward to straightening out your productivity methods, read this book!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patrice Miller

    One of the best motivational best I've ever read. I will be reading this again and completing the activities. I feel inspired and motivated and have already made some changes. I've also invested in some of the resources. Absolutely loved it! One of the best motivational best I've ever read. I will be reading this again and completing the activities. I feel inspired and motivated and have already made some changes. I've also invested in some of the resources. Absolutely loved it!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Roe

    There wasn't anything new here. And Maslow's hierarchy of needs included "WiFi" at the bottom. I'm at a loss for words. There wasn't anything new here. And Maslow's hierarchy of needs included "WiFi" at the bottom. I'm at a loss for words.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Garo

    A book to keep handy at all times.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Toto Masini

    TAKE AWAY 1. Getting the best from life is about digging down to the core of who you are, what makes you truly happy, that make you smile, your heart sing, the dreams that linger unfulfilled, the adventures that have yet set off, then make the change necessary to focus on THOSE THINGS. Just stop doing what's not important and start prioritising what is. 2. Identify the ONE thing you can do today that will make the biggest difference. Filling every moment of the day with tasks and activities is not TAKE AWAY 1. Getting the best from life is about digging down to the core of who you are, what makes you truly happy, that make you smile, your heart sing, the dreams that linger unfulfilled, the adventures that have yet set off, then make the change necessary to focus on THOSE THINGS. Just stop doing what's not important and start prioritising what is. 2. Identify the ONE thing you can do today that will make the biggest difference. Filling every moment of the day with tasks and activities is not the same as being productive. Truly value your time, then will have the space to identify exciting new opportunities, rather than being weighed down by all those commitments you've agreed to take on. 3. FITLER: Identify what and who is important PRUNE: Let go of what isn't important PRIORITIZE: Bring what matters in your life to the front of the queue FOCUS: Do waht you love and do it really well 4. The things we want the most have more risks associated with them, because we care more about the outcome, our mind will come up with every excuse to avoid us from focusing on it right now. The justification we make are just our fears in disguise. To beat the voice telling you that you are not ready, you need to listen to the instinctive voice that says, this is the right thing to do. Start DOING it and take small step anyways. 5. Fixed Mindset vs Grow Mindset: Praise a kid for their effort of trying instead of getting the answer or thing right! The former will develop a growth mindset that the possible failure will not be immediate trigger to abandon ship, it's just an indicator you need to learn from the situation or try a new approach, one would enjoy the process of finding out how to make something work as much as the end result. While for the latter, they will start back out on themselves as we approach a challenge, things get tough, and get to a all or nothing mentality and give up immediately then do something else. 6. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. As with all matters of the heart, you'll know when you find it. 7. List out the things you enjoy doing and other list of your favourite peoples, which of those things do they like to do? Now pick up the phone and get scheduling!! 8. Act as if you already are. Want a promotion at work? Step up to the responsibility right now, show that you have what it takes. Starting acting as if you were already doing the job. 9. Life hardly ever goes exactly according to the plan: The point of plan is really to get us started, to move us from thinking or talking into active doing mode, to turn our big, vague dream into specific tasks that we can achieve by fixed deadline. Don't wait for perfect condition to start, start now! 10. We tend to believe that we must be highly motivated before we can do or start anything, But psychologically we actually become motivated by the doing, rather than the other way around. Just by going through the motions, the brain starts to kick in, catches up and things start to flow.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Madigan Mirza

    Here's a standard airport bookstore business book - short, easy to read, filled with ugly line illustrations and varying type faces, this is a book that could easily be finished by the end of a transcontinental flight. Wasmund's main advice seems to be for anyone contemplating an independent business venture: Don't worry about bills! Just go for it! Delegate and outsource all that you can and live your dreams! Follow your passion! This seems heartbreakingly deluded and naive to me. Either the a Here's a standard airport bookstore business book - short, easy to read, filled with ugly line illustrations and varying type faces, this is a book that could easily be finished by the end of a transcontinental flight. Wasmund's main advice seems to be for anyone contemplating an independent business venture: Don't worry about bills! Just go for it! Delegate and outsource all that you can and live your dreams! Follow your passion! This seems heartbreakingly deluded and naive to me. Either the author is a trust fund baby or has a financially comfortable spouse supporting her as her advice seems reckless for most.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elena Cofaru

    As someone who has read several books on personal development, I cannot say that I learnt a great deal of new things. However, the very concise and simple writing style of the book helped a lot to design a structure of how I want to better invest my time to get more. I recommend this book to those who are just starting to approach the topic of 'Do less, get more' as it might save your time from reading more books. What I definitely disliked about this book though was the almost complete lack of As someone who has read several books on personal development, I cannot say that I learnt a great deal of new things. However, the very concise and simple writing style of the book helped a lot to design a structure of how I want to better invest my time to get more. I recommend this book to those who are just starting to approach the topic of 'Do less, get more' as it might save your time from reading more books. What I definitely disliked about this book though was the almost complete lack of source referencing by the author. She pointed to many studies, articles, and so forth without adequate quotation marks, footnotes or reference numbers....That was pretty disappointing.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    So I admit it, this hits my buttons. It's a way of life forced upon me by a chronic illness, but one that also makes sense to me. Living in the countryside on a farm, I have the environment to embrace this approach (if we ignore the huge house, the enormous garden, the never-ending demands of farming). I liked this book because it wasn't too repetitive and had a couple of things actually made me pause and think. A lot was the usual self-help mush, but that's OK. Sometimes it's nice to read somet So I admit it, this hits my buttons. It's a way of life forced upon me by a chronic illness, but one that also makes sense to me. Living in the countryside on a farm, I have the environment to embrace this approach (if we ignore the huge house, the enormous garden, the never-ending demands of farming). I liked this book because it wasn't too repetitive and had a couple of things actually made me pause and think. A lot was the usual self-help mush, but that's OK. Sometimes it's nice to read something that chimes with your world view.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    3.5 stars. There is a lot of good information/advice here, but the author contradicts herself at times and is a tad repetitive. Also, I thought it was completely unnecessary and irrelevant for her to throw in the statement: "Nothing in life is black or white, completely right or completely wrong". Really? I beg to differ. I guess she just wanted to say that so we know how she feels? Odd. She also mentions several other books which go into more detail on some of the topics she mentions, for furth 3.5 stars. There is a lot of good information/advice here, but the author contradicts herself at times and is a tad repetitive. Also, I thought it was completely unnecessary and irrelevant for her to throw in the statement: "Nothing in life is black or white, completely right or completely wrong". Really? I beg to differ. I guess she just wanted to say that so we know how she feels? Odd. She also mentions several other books which go into more detail on some of the topics she mentions, for further reading. Which is nice, because I don't have enough books to read already. :-/

  19. 5 out of 5

    Francesca Ricci Phillips

    The title is great and you want to like the book. But I couldn’t get past the bad writing, vague terms, and odd analogies. The author seems like a nice person with great experience but it was really hard to connect with what she was saying. It felt like one of those books written by someone who thinks they can write with no research or real experience in what they’re writing. The last page is the best where it talks about batching and delegating tasks.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cherry To

    I picked up this book because I want to learn how to work efficiently and productively. Not only did this book touch on that, but it also taught my valuable life lessons that I will remember for the rest of my life. This book talks about several aspects of life such as taking initiative, getting out of your comfort zone, confidence, stress, time management, and other topics. The skills I’ve learnt will definitely be useful in tackling daily life situations.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kitty Meeks

    Lovely, positive book full of encouraging ways to simplify life and still feel successful. I worked through the entire book making notes to write up into my bullet journal! It is also nicely designed, with the pages set out in a way that is easy to read and little pictures to break it up again. Some things were repeated a bit but this helps to drum it into your brain! I recommend if you feel overwhelmed by all your 'to-do' lists, whether in work or at home or both! Thank you, Shaa! Lovely, positive book full of encouraging ways to simplify life and still feel successful. I worked through the entire book making notes to write up into my bullet journal! It is also nicely designed, with the pages set out in a way that is easy to read and little pictures to break it up again. Some things were repeated a bit but this helps to drum it into your brain! I recommend if you feel overwhelmed by all your 'to-do' lists, whether in work or at home or both! Thank you, Shaa!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia Wilson

    This was recommended to me and sadly didn't live up to the recommendation. Lots of filler, the book could have been half the size if you take out the motivational quotes and weird spacing. I also hate how things aren't referenced properly. I wanted to love this but I just don't. Glad it's done with. This was recommended to me and sadly didn't live up to the recommendation. Lots of filler, the book could have been half the size if you take out the motivational quotes and weird spacing. I also hate how things aren't referenced properly. I wanted to love this but I just don't. Glad it's done with.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Monika

    A nice bit of motivation/kick up the backside (and my first foray into “self help”) books. But this was just a lot of repetition/restating of techniques that I either already employ, or kinda could have guessed.

  24. 4 out of 5

    David Wang-Faulkner

    Normally I’m very “meh” about self-help books — I read to be informed. But I picked this up at a friend’s house, read it for about 15 minutes, and immediately resolved to buy my one copy and ultimately devoured it. Lots of high quality content, no BS.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    Decent quick read. The format was short narratives with related illustrations and bold typography to emphasize various points. Not exactly ground breaking with recycled quotes and mantras but a good reminder non the less on prioritization and how to live life well.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nurili

    Simple to read and understand. The book has exercises which I thought were great. It “forces” you to ask deep, important questions about your goals, how you managing your time etc. Overall a great book to read and remind yourself of your focus.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sally Daffarn

    Interesting book which is well laid out and easy to read. It does tend to point out the obvious but for those stuck in a time trap it may be just what's needed. Interesting book which is well laid out and easy to read. It does tend to point out the obvious but for those stuck in a time trap it may be just what's needed.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elisa

    Would give zero stars if possible. This book has no substance at all.

  29. 5 out of 5

    JP

    Title and ideas of the book are nothing new The presentation of the book was good but disappoint!!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Free Thinking Mom

    Good book; help you rediscover priorities and practical ways to 'declutter' your life. Good book; help you rediscover priorities and practical ways to 'declutter' your life.

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