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P.O.W.ER What would happen if women and girls joined their unique abilities together to change the world? In a world where access to the written word is reserved to men, Andra BetScrivener has been able to read and write ever since she was a little girl without anyone teaching her. She must keep her abilities a secret in the country of New North, or she could lose her hands P.O.W.ER What would happen if women and girls joined their unique abilities together to change the world? In a world where access to the written word is reserved to men, Andra BetScrivener has been able to read and write ever since she was a little girl without anyone teaching her. She must keep her abilities a secret in the country of New North, or she could lose her hands, her eyes or her life. In fact, the only paths offered to her–and all young women–are to either marry or enter the government-run Women’s Training Program, where she’ll be taught “feminine” arts like drawing, painting, and homemaking. On her seventeenth birthday, Andra discovers that her abilities extend beyond reading. She can write events to life. As she begins to explore her new ability, she must take care not to jeopardize her father’s job as head scrivener at the Ministry. Despite her efforts to keep her powers hidden, she comes to the attention of both the government and a rebel group, who each desire to use Andra for their own goals. At the same time, she begins to meet other gifted women who have never dared use their unique powers. With the help of her friends Brian and Lauren—who has the ability to read minds—Andra must find a way to unite the power of women to create change. When one side manipulates Andra’s words into killing someone, and the other threatens her father’s life and her own freedom, Andra decides to use her writing to empower others to stop governmental oppression. But in a society ruled by lies, cruelty, and inequality her journey will not be easy or safe. Short listed for the Sarton LIterary Award in Contemporary Fiction. For each book sold, a portion of the proceeds will be donated to causes that support women and children around the world. Cover Art by Jacqueline Haltom.


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P.O.W.ER What would happen if women and girls joined their unique abilities together to change the world? In a world where access to the written word is reserved to men, Andra BetScrivener has been able to read and write ever since she was a little girl without anyone teaching her. She must keep her abilities a secret in the country of New North, or she could lose her hands P.O.W.ER What would happen if women and girls joined their unique abilities together to change the world? In a world where access to the written word is reserved to men, Andra BetScrivener has been able to read and write ever since she was a little girl without anyone teaching her. She must keep her abilities a secret in the country of New North, or she could lose her hands, her eyes or her life. In fact, the only paths offered to her–and all young women–are to either marry or enter the government-run Women’s Training Program, where she’ll be taught “feminine” arts like drawing, painting, and homemaking. On her seventeenth birthday, Andra discovers that her abilities extend beyond reading. She can write events to life. As she begins to explore her new ability, she must take care not to jeopardize her father’s job as head scrivener at the Ministry. Despite her efforts to keep her powers hidden, she comes to the attention of both the government and a rebel group, who each desire to use Andra for their own goals. At the same time, she begins to meet other gifted women who have never dared use their unique powers. With the help of her friends Brian and Lauren—who has the ability to read minds—Andra must find a way to unite the power of women to create change. When one side manipulates Andra’s words into killing someone, and the other threatens her father’s life and her own freedom, Andra decides to use her writing to empower others to stop governmental oppression. But in a society ruled by lies, cruelty, and inequality her journey will not be easy or safe. Short listed for the Sarton LIterary Award in Contemporary Fiction. For each book sold, a portion of the proceeds will be donated to causes that support women and children around the world. Cover Art by Jacqueline Haltom.

30 review for P.O.W.ER

  1. 4 out of 5

    J. Schlenker

    Lisa A. Kramer's P.O. W. ER speaks volumes to young women, and hopefully old women, like myself. We all have superpowers we let get rusty. The main superpower is words. What I got as the main message from this book is the power of words. But will we use words to their greatest advantage? Quote from book: "You do it by writing to inspire," Dad said. "Use your words to bolster the abilities others already have,..." Vibration is creation. Vibration comes from words. Words create. Why did the ancient Lisa A. Kramer's P.O. W. ER speaks volumes to young women, and hopefully old women, like myself. We all have superpowers we let get rusty. The main superpower is words. What I got as the main message from this book is the power of words. But will we use words to their greatest advantage? Quote from book: "You do it by writing to inspire," Dad said. "Use your words to bolster the abilities others already have,..." Vibration is creation. Vibration comes from words. Words create. Why did the ancient yogis chant? In this day and age we toss around words too freely without thinking of their consequences. This is an excellent read for young girls, and also I would think for book club choices.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Becca Cornell

    I received this book though a Goodreads Contest. CONTAINS SPOILERS If I didn't have to start classes I would have finished this book right after I received it. As soon as I started this book I knew it was going to be a good one. This is something this generation of women need to read. We might not have some of the powers listed in the book but each of us have the power to change something if we all work together. This author brought Andra to life right in front of me. I related to her, without wr I received this book though a Goodreads Contest. CONTAINS SPOILERS If I didn't have to start classes I would have finished this book right after I received it. As soon as I started this book I knew it was going to be a good one. This is something this generation of women need to read. We might not have some of the powers listed in the book but each of us have the power to change something if we all work together. This author brought Andra to life right in front of me. I related to her, without writing or reading I would be lost too. I loved how Lisa Kramer brought her story to life and the way it took off. There were some twists I wasn't expecting in there as well. I basically read this book in two sittings (I am an English major in my final year of college, I have lots of stuff to read.) I wanted to finish this book and I haven't had that in a while usually it's just required reading. I would recommend this to lots of women who are feeling powerless in what they are doing. You have the power to change the world and you should never feel alone. Lisa shows this throughout the book. I don't want to give away the novel, I just really enjoyed what it was trying to do. I hope this book reaches people I know I will recommend it to friends. Thanks for sending me a copy. I hope I can find my power like she wrote in my copy. Sorry it took me so long to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cameron Garriepy

    Welcome to New North, a near-future splinter-nation of a once-great democracy. A walled-off, totalitarian, patriarchal theocracy in which centralized wealth, rigid social castes, legislated segregation and discrimination, and technological reversion leave women powerless, denied the written word, kept as chattel by men: fathers, husbands, or the state. We meet Andra BetScrivener on her seventeenth birthday, a day on which she is welcomed to womanhood by the Ministry, reminded that she must choose Welcome to New North, a near-future splinter-nation of a once-great democracy. A walled-off, totalitarian, patriarchal theocracy in which centralized wealth, rigid social castes, legislated segregation and discrimination, and technological reversion leave women powerless, denied the written word, kept as chattel by men: fathers, husbands, or the state. We meet Andra BetScrivener on her seventeenth birthday, a day on which she is welcomed to womanhood by the Ministry, reminded that she must choose within the year: an appropriate marriage or entrance to a Women's Training Program, in which she will be taught to be a proper, subservient female so that her weak, inferior feminine brain can be put to use for the greater good (servitude or forced marriage). Andra, like her late mother before her, is a gifted artist, but Andra has talents heretofore unheard of in a generation of oppression and subjugation. When Andra discovers that her unusual talents have far-reaching implications, she must take hold of her destiny and examine the true meaning of power. A debut novel that is equal parts adventure story and call-to-peaceful-revolution, Lisa A. Kramer's P.O.W.ER reaches out to a broad audience. Echoes of Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale mingle with shades of The Hunger Games. Like Atwood's Offred, Andra is a first person narrator, a witness to the events of the tale, but she is a conflicted warrior, a Katniss Everdeen whose bow and arrow are pen and ink, wishing for a life of peace, potential, and freedom from oppression, but drawn into and brought to the front of a rebellion with far larger goals. Kramer's prose is accessible to YA readers without feeling reined-in, while the themes will give adult readers much to consider. The plot is tight, the conflict consistently present and immediate. This is a perfect book for young women, mothers, sons and fathers, brothers, and all those who both love a great story and believe in the power of community to bring about a better world.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Helena Hann-Basquiat

    I really loved this book. It's everything many modern dystopian novels try to be but end up falling short of because they get distracted by trying to pander to audiences who demand that there be a love triangle, a vampire, a werewolf, and a bland teenager. Instead, we have a powerful, brave protagonist in Andra BetScrivener -- a truly inspiring heroine who absolutely DOES NOT BEND in her conviction, even when the reader might have cut her some slack. Imagine the sense of power you would feel if I really loved this book. It's everything many modern dystopian novels try to be but end up falling short of because they get distracted by trying to pander to audiences who demand that there be a love triangle, a vampire, a werewolf, and a bland teenager. Instead, we have a powerful, brave protagonist in Andra BetScrivener -- a truly inspiring heroine who absolutely DOES NOT BEND in her conviction, even when the reader might have cut her some slack. Imagine the sense of power you would feel if you suddenly discovered that your own writing could alter reality -- what a terrifying prospect that would be. Such power comes, as they say, with great responsibility, and Andra lives up to the task, even though she finds herself in a world where she -- and all women -- have had terrible things done to them, and are treated as second-class citizens. Rather than use this power to enact revenge or mould the world to suit her design, she uses it instead to reach out and empower other women -- women with abilities of their own -- to rise up against the oppressive regime of New North. This was an exciting, fast moving book, whose narrative voice switched from first person (Andra) to third person to give a nice wide view of how the plot was moving along -- I think this was a good choice by the writer. I'd recommend this to fans of things like Hunger Games or Divergent, though to be honest, I enjoyed this more than either of those.

  5. 4 out of 5

    brickhousechick

    Lisa Kramer’s P.O.W.E.R. is a unique and imaginative story of a country where women are not allowed to express their individuality, intelligence or power, at the hands of the men who govern. Threatened by suspicions that women are gifted with intelligence and special powers, they forbid all women access to the written word and control their every move. Kramer takes us on a suspenseful and believable journey as Andra, the main character, risks her life as well as the life of her loved ones, in or Lisa Kramer’s P.O.W.E.R. is a unique and imaginative story of a country where women are not allowed to express their individuality, intelligence or power, at the hands of the men who govern. Threatened by suspicions that women are gifted with intelligence and special powers, they forbid all women access to the written word and control their every move. Kramer takes us on a suspenseful and believable journey as Andra, the main character, risks her life as well as the life of her loved ones, in order to organize and mobilize a movement that will free all women. I could relate to the different characters and their roles in working hard to create change. I also appreciated the fact that in no way was this a “man-bashing” story, although one might erroneously assume it to be so at first. Kramer portrays the opinions and actions of many “good” men who are eager for change and who support the women they love. I absolutely loved this brilliant story and recommend it to readers of all ages.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kristie Schmidt

    LIsa Kramer's P.O.W. ER is a welcome addition to the YA dystopia family. Featuring a smart, linguistically talented female protagonist, Kramer novelly introduces a non-violent approach to solving the problem of fascist overloads, one that instead emphasizes intelligence and cooperation over brute force. She dares to point her finger solidly at religious extremism, misogyny, and an undervaluing of creativity, the arts, and individualism as dire perils to democracy. One can't help but notice that LIsa Kramer's P.O.W. ER is a welcome addition to the YA dystopia family. Featuring a smart, linguistically talented female protagonist, Kramer novelly introduces a non-violent approach to solving the problem of fascist overloads, one that instead emphasizes intelligence and cooperation over brute force. She dares to point her finger solidly at religious extremism, misogyny, and an undervaluing of creativity, the arts, and individualism as dire perils to democracy. One can't help but notice that this novel needn't actually be set in the future--the roots of these threats have already taken hold and so P.O.W. ER sounds the warning siren for the world's notice. For teens, P.O.W. ER is more accessible than The Handmaid's Tale and especially sends the message that teen girls should be valued for their unique talents and abilities while men and women must work together to achieve equality in a democracy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Arlene Mullen

    Andra turns 17 and it basically means her life is over. She has to either marry by 18 or join the woman's school. In the new north woman are not allowed to read or do anything except car for their man. Andra though has a special talent. What she writes cones true. Brian tries to keep her safe but when the secret comes out, everyone wants her. I loved andra! She has such fire and passion. She has this amazing gift and is still so real. I loved Andra’s dad love for her. He wants to keep her safe but Andra turns 17 and it basically means her life is over. She has to either marry by 18 or join the woman's school. In the new north woman are not allowed to read or do anything except car for their man. Andra though has a special talent. What she writes cones true. Brian tries to keep her safe but when the secret comes out, everyone wants her. I loved andra! She has such fire and passion. She has this amazing gift and is still so real. I loved Andra’s dad love for her. He wants to keep her safe but let her live. The whole time reading this book I felt so many different things. I felt anger and sadness and love. I think every book should take you on an emotional rollercoaster that leaves you exhausted. This author captured everything amazingly! I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laurence King

    A captivating read and beautifully-written debut! P.O.W.E.R is about women embracing their own power and confronting a government determined to keep them oppressed and under the control of men. It’s about human connections and what happens when those are severed. A genre bender, the book celebrates friendship, loyalty, and women (and men) working together to achieve their dreams and make the world a better place. A highly enjoyable story that lingered with me long past the last page.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarahksnoopy

    It was amazing. It had so many details that I could picture every single thing. Also, I actually can see this as a movie in the future. I hope other tween/teens will read this. Yes it is YA but I think tween/teens can read this empowering book. We've got the P.O.W.ER!!!!!!!! P.O.W= Prisoner of War & Power of Women. It was amazing. It had so many details that I could picture every single thing. Also, I actually can see this as a movie in the future. I hope other tween/teens will read this. Yes it is YA but I think tween/teens can read this empowering book. We've got the P.O.W.ER!!!!!!!! P.O.W= Prisoner of War & Power of Women.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anna Nesbitt

    I wish I had been able to read this engaging, adventurous story as a young person trying (pretending?) to be an adult. I can remember many times when I needed to hear that being different, being a wordworm like Andra BetScrivener, can be a source of strength and power. I appreciated how this novel celebrates girls and women with all their differences, oddities, and unique, remarkable strengths. The writing is at times warm, at times playful and precise to create characters that rise off the page I wish I had been able to read this engaging, adventurous story as a young person trying (pretending?) to be an adult. I can remember many times when I needed to hear that being different, being a wordworm like Andra BetScrivener, can be a source of strength and power. I appreciated how this novel celebrates girls and women with all their differences, oddities, and unique, remarkable strengths. The writing is at times warm, at times playful and precise to create characters that rise off the page like the smell of warm cinnamon scones. While a few ignorant and fearful men are the ones held responsible for the oppression of (gifted) women in Kramer's dystopian New North, I appreciated how the girls and women learn to trust and cooperate with the men in their lives to affect change; this is not a man-bash, but rather a story of hope and possibility. This book will certainly stay on my shelf until my two girls are old enough to read it by themselves. Perhaps, like me, they will be inspired that being a young woman is a blessing, not an obstacle to be overcome.

  11. 5 out of 5

    A.M.

    Such empowering content!. You've got the oppression, the sexist vibe, the feminist counteract, and the those in favor of equality. This held so much controversial stuff, It was like having your favorite breakfast, lunch, and dinner. But your pig-headed older brother eat your portion, therefore leaving you hungry. Well, that's exactly how I felt. Hungry, For what? For some change. For the bad to end in good. Not to have corrupt ministers use religion to justify the means. To just put every bad thin Such empowering content!. You've got the oppression, the sexist vibe, the feminist counteract, and the those in favor of equality. This held so much controversial stuff, It was like having your favorite breakfast, lunch, and dinner. But your pig-headed older brother eat your portion, therefore leaving you hungry. Well, that's exactly how I felt. Hungry, For what? For some change. For the bad to end in good. Not to have corrupt ministers use religion to justify the means. To just put every bad thing done under the rug, because nobody likes to air out their dirty laundry. That shit stank. This was not just a piece of fiction, this held meaning, there was a cause. This had a bunch of everything, so this cannot be solely a book of feminism. The end game was equality, although it needed a feminist movement in order to get as far away as possible from the sexist, backward society the people lived in. Young Andra BetScrivener just turned seventeen. And in this society, where men held all power and knowledge and the women were forbidden to read and write, she has finally entered womanhood. Thus, allowing her to began finding a husband. Go figure. There are many things that happen once she discovers her own unique power, so pay very close attention because things get very interesting. Andra and her pacifist-like morals were so sweet and naive, but her sense of knowledge and reading and writing was very impressive, considering she learned but was never taught. At times I thought of here as a young pre-teen, or someone sheltered from the reality of life with the way she acts. Especially when she was around her father and Brian, it would show a flip side of her as well. In the end, things were very nicely polished and didn't leave any thing out. I would've died if there was a cliff hanger. Overall, this read was extremely riveting, and I highly recommend this to both men and women. This was seriously some good stuff.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Zaz

    An easy read, with an interesting insight on a controlled society where women are highly monitored. The story followed Andra, a 17 years old girl, brought up in a way against rules controlling women lives. She joined a rebel movement, a wise decision as she’s not the only one to try to change things. She’s surrounded by women and men eager of gender equality, which kept balance in the story. However, this was a smooth revolution, there were few real dangers and if there were threats, they never j An easy read, with an interesting insight on a controlled society where women are highly monitored. The story followed Andra, a 17 years old girl, brought up in a way against rules controlling women lives. She joined a rebel movement, a wise decision as she’s not the only one to try to change things. She’s surrounded by women and men eager of gender equality, which kept balance in the story. However, this was a smooth revolution, there were few real dangers and if there were threats, they never jeopardized really the actions of the characters. It felt a little childish but, maybe, we can put this on the over confidence of men in the governement who really thought women were weak and fragile creatures or in the low complexity of the protagonists. Another thing bothered me: even if I understand fear, the women regulations were pretty recent (like 20 years old) and it seemed older women were a little selfish and not brave enough to improve the lives of their children or to defend their own rights (I can understand this after 2-3 generations but it annoys me a lot for the 1st generation who grew up free and does nothing). The writing was pleasant and clearly aimed at teenagers. The switching between 1st (Andra) and 3rd person (events happening to other characters) was a little disturbing and broke at some points my pleasure while reading. I was very interested in the dystopian world, I think it gives a good insight on how "male ruled" societies work and how you start with small things and finish with monitoring and tyranny, under false reasons. Because of it, it could be an interesting family reading to show teenagers the importance of gender equality and defense of women rights.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    It's quite a shame. The premise of this book - a world where men are in power and women are forbidden to read or write - was intriguing, especially the idea that there are, of course, women who do those things and then find out they have special abilities that arguable elevates them above their male counterparts. The problem is that the writing is just too simplistic and amateur. I was in no means invested in the characters or the small inkling of romance that was hinted at. I was increasingly f It's quite a shame. The premise of this book - a world where men are in power and women are forbidden to read or write - was intriguing, especially the idea that there are, of course, women who do those things and then find out they have special abilities that arguable elevates them above their male counterparts. The problem is that the writing is just too simplistic and amateur. I was in no means invested in the characters or the small inkling of romance that was hinted at. I was increasingly frustrated because of the writing - it felt like something I would have written in my downtime in middle school. Lots of telling, lots of rushing through important scenes, lots of disjointed timelines. Lack of conflict to give the characters a simple way. Predictable conflict because the skill didn't exist to provide ways for the characters or story to proceed. And the dumbest thing ever - if you live in a world where you are forbidden to read or write and that's the one thing you dread about being married, then why refuse to marry the one guy your age who knows you can and would let you continue? Just because he's your best friend and there's no spark? Or you don't want to be forced into marriage? Dumb. If you have no interest in being forced into marriage, you want to continue reading and writing - then maybe marry somebody who will let you and it shouldn't matter that you don't love him because you don't want to be married anyway. Then bide your time, overthrow the patriarchy and get a divorce. Simple business arrangement. Rant over. Overall, would not recommend.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jannatha Coffin-Malia

    P.O.W.ER is a fascinating look into the not so distant future where women are not allowed to read and write. While I hope our society never comes to this, Lisa A. Kramer's debut novel shows how frightening the world would be for women living with such a reality. Andra BetScrivener is one of my favorite characters in recent fiction. She's spunky, determined, and learns how to use her formidable power to change her society. In our current world, where young women are bombarded by mixed messages an P.O.W.ER is a fascinating look into the not so distant future where women are not allowed to read and write. While I hope our society never comes to this, Lisa A. Kramer's debut novel shows how frightening the world would be for women living with such a reality. Andra BetScrivener is one of my favorite characters in recent fiction. She's spunky, determined, and learns how to use her formidable power to change her society. In our current world, where young women are bombarded by mixed messages and are increasingly unwilling to define themselves as feminists, Andra is a desperately needed role model. One of the things about P.O.W.ER that I enjoyed the most are the blurred lines that are so aptly depicted. No one character is all perfect or all evil. Kramer does a spectacular job fleshing out the inhabitants of New North and showing us how and why they act as they do. I also appreciate that so many of her male characters are allies for the women working to regain their place in society. While this novel has a powerful and important social commentary, it's also a joy to read (something that not all dystopian fantasy achieves). The story and characters are accessible and exciting as they put forth a strong message that everyone, especially today's young men and women, needs to hear. It was hard to put down this quick moving story, and I highly recommend it for all ages. It left me thinking and wondering long after I finished it what I can do with my own power.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mary Schroth

    Lisa Kramer's debut novel is an empowering and entertaining read, and though it has a YA feel to it, its themes are socially significant and include critical content that is mature enough for older audiences to enjoy as well. This piece of feminist fiction is a must-read for adolescent girls, as it inspires women to speak up and be unafraid in a male-dominated culture. Today's young women need to be taught the vital lesson that this book promotes-- that women are equally as capable as their male Lisa Kramer's debut novel is an empowering and entertaining read, and though it has a YA feel to it, its themes are socially significant and include critical content that is mature enough for older audiences to enjoy as well. This piece of feminist fiction is a must-read for adolescent girls, as it inspires women to speak up and be unafraid in a male-dominated culture. Today's young women need to be taught the vital lesson that this book promotes-- that women are equally as capable as their male counterparts, and have just as much to offer the world. I love that this novel focuses on intelligence, independence, and social justice rather than romance, which is a rarity in contemporary fiction. There is very minimal mention of romance, particularly on the part of the strong female protagonist, throughout the book. A romantic subplot would have taken away from the feminist messages Kramer is conveying to her audience, and for that I applaud her. The characters are lovable, memorable, and beautifully brought to life by Kramer's eloquent way with words. Additionally, for each book sold, a portion of the proceeds are donated to causes that support women and children around the world, which is reason enough to purchase the novel in and of itself. I definitely recommend this book, and Lisa has my complete support and admiration.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nathan010

    Imagine where our world will be in 20 yrs. It's hard to grasp with the news media sensational portrayal of our current world and the political climate of the United States. The future world in P.O.W.ER could come from this. Each and everyone of us can take a message to the necessity of: being good, learning, and working with our fellow person. There are well developed characters that interact in this future country of New North. Other reviews have comparison to the recent dystopia YA literature Imagine where our world will be in 20 yrs. It's hard to grasp with the news media sensational portrayal of our current world and the political climate of the United States. The future world in P.O.W.ER could come from this. Each and everyone of us can take a message to the necessity of: being good, learning, and working with our fellow person. There are well developed characters that interact in this future country of New North. Other reviews have comparison to the recent dystopia YA literature such as Hunger Games, but this novel is closer to City of Ember in the characters and arc of the story.There is action and adventure that will appeal to all readers. I loved how the teen characters expressed the realistic feelings: "I tried to avoid awkwardness as I slid into the booth. I didn't know where to look, or what to do with my hands I focused on the view; the glow of the mysterious city in the distance fascinated me. The sky began to fill with bright stars. I wasn't often out at night so took a moment to appreciate the beauty." Lisa Kramer created a well written story that has not only has wonderful characters but a great meaning. **Spoiler** Unlike the the current trend in dystopian youth literature killing is used sparingly.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steve Kramer

    I had the privelege of seeing the transformation of this book from a basic idea to an eye opening novel. Despite several readings at different stages, the final product was still filled with entertainment, both for the simple joy of well written words ... and the lessons that those words manage to convey while entertaining. This is a must read just for the concepts that it brings out into the open. The story is a very strong possible future for a society that is quickly losing its way. It brings I had the privelege of seeing the transformation of this book from a basic idea to an eye opening novel. Despite several readings at different stages, the final product was still filled with entertainment, both for the simple joy of well written words ... and the lessons that those words manage to convey while entertaining. This is a must read just for the concepts that it brings out into the open. The story is a very strong possible future for a society that is quickly losing its way. It brings out many relevant ailments we deal with today in such a way that one might actually want to take action to prevent such realities from being created. We learn of the danger of blind faith, lack of education, and dehuminization based on the silliest of criteria. While it focuses on the battle to lessen woman, it really applies to all persecutions, whatever they may be based on. Only by learning to work together, and choosing non-combative modes for change do we really have hope for a better future. And who knows what the human brain is cacpable of when it has the need? Read this!! You will NOT be disappointed!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maria Rose

    Bravo to Lisa Kramer for her brilliant debut Novel! The intriguing story of ‘P.O.W.ER’, pulled me into an adventure of suspense, revelation and revolution! From the moment I turned the first page I was hooked! Powerful characters, a just cause and a powerful message = a great combination! The premise of the story is strangely reminiscent of some extreme views being witnessed in current politics, which makes P.O.W.ER a very interesting tale. Although the protagonist, Andra is a strong young woman Bravo to Lisa Kramer for her brilliant debut Novel! The intriguing story of ‘P.O.W.ER’, pulled me into an adventure of suspense, revelation and revolution! From the moment I turned the first page I was hooked! Powerful characters, a just cause and a powerful message = a great combination! The premise of the story is strangely reminiscent of some extreme views being witnessed in current politics, which makes P.O.W.ER a very interesting tale. Although the protagonist, Andra is a strong young woman, she finds her true strength in sisterhood with other women. That alone is refreshing and such a positive message for all readers. For we, the people are powerful in numbers and can change things when we work together. A MUST READ! I’ll be the first in line to see it on the big screen! Great Story!!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nivi Engineer

    This was quite reminiscent of Margaret Atwood's 'Handmaid's Tale' and sadly, relative to that, it falls short. (That is an absolute must-read as far as dystopian novels exploring a world where women have been marginalized) However, on its own merit, it was a decent story, and different enough from 'Handmaid's Tale' that it doesn't seem to merely copy it. The book obviously has a message, and at times, through the voices of the character, it is obvious that the author is passionate about the mess This was quite reminiscent of Margaret Atwood's 'Handmaid's Tale' and sadly, relative to that, it falls short. (That is an absolute must-read as far as dystopian novels exploring a world where women have been marginalized) However, on its own merit, it was a decent story, and different enough from 'Handmaid's Tale' that it doesn't seem to merely copy it. The book obviously has a message, and at times, through the voices of the character, it is obvious that the author is passionate about the message and its cause (during the Freedom Readers meetings, mostly) and thus comes across as a bit heavy handed and pedantic. But the story still satisfies, the characters distinct, the plot understandable. The characters change and grow, the world of the story seems real, and the dialog is usually pretty authentic. All in all, it's a worthy read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Theroux

    Let me give you an exact recipe of how this book was written: 1 cup stereotypical feminist ideology 1/2 cup recycled dialogue 2 tsp unintentional innuendos 8 tbsp plot tropes 1/2 tbsp inconsistent POVs Throw haphazardly into a notebook or Word document. Scribble lines or pound keyboard until words begin to appear. Make sure all characters fit no unique characteristics and fit at least one YA stereotype or trope. Half-bake at 150 degrees, then chill, crack open, heat up, and plate sludge. Serves 0.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    While reading this book, it allowed me to realize that women have each other as support. We support each other. It also made me think about my choices and words I say to everyday people like interacting and having conversations with other human beings. To stand up for what I believe is right. If we want to make this world a better place, we need to start by having respect for one another and help each other accomplish greater things we never thought could happen.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Barb

    The story drew me in from the start much as The Handmaid's Tale does. The author has created a scarily plausible future state in which women who think, read or write are feared and oppressed. The main character is well drawn and believable. I read it in one sitting, and now want to go back to it after it has sat with me for a while. The story drew me in from the start much as The Handmaid's Tale does. The author has created a scarily plausible future state in which women who think, read or write are feared and oppressed. The main character is well drawn and believable. I read it in one sitting, and now want to go back to it after it has sat with me for a while.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    This book is unique. I like unique.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mina De Caro (Mina's Bookshelf)

    This and other reviews available on MINA'S BOOKSHELF http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2015/0... This and other reviews available on MINA'S BOOKSHELF http://minadecaro.blogspot.com/2015/0...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Bouse

    Every girl should read this and I want to read more!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Kelly

    Intriguing concept, poor execution. This felt like a superficial exploration of a story with the potential for a lot more depth and intrigue. The prose itself was also lacking.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Desiree

    Just realized why the punctuation in title This YA distopia was a page turner. I liked that this takes place in a future society that has moved backwards in technology, unlike most dystopian novels. I didn't really find the likelihood of it believable though, especially with women being so oppressed. The special abilities the women possess represent our own abilities and the power we have and are responsible for using wisely, both men and women. Just realized why the punctuation in title This YA distopia was a page turner. I liked that this takes place in a future society that has moved backwards in technology, unlike most dystopian novels. I didn't really find the likelihood of it believable though, especially with women being so oppressed. The special abilities the women possess represent our own abilities and the power we have and are responsible for using wisely, both men and women.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ally

    I won a copy from Goodreads First Reads. So. P.O.W.ER is a really annoying name. There are way too much periods and all those things, so I'm just going to simply call it "POWER." Because that is so much easier. And less periods. Less typing. (Okay, I have to stop babbling). POWER is a really interesting book. It reminds me of another book I'd read a long, long time ago. Umm... For the life of me, I can't recall the name, but it is similar to this book. Very similar. The world of POWER has oppress I won a copy from Goodreads First Reads. So. P.O.W.ER is a really annoying name. There are way too much periods and all those things, so I'm just going to simply call it "POWER." Because that is so much easier. And less periods. Less typing. (Okay, I have to stop babbling). POWER is a really interesting book. It reminds me of another book I'd read a long, long time ago. Umm... For the life of me, I can't recall the name, but it is similar to this book. Very similar. The world of POWER has oppression. There is a conflict. Women are oppressed and hand off like mules. They aren't allowed to read or write. Honestly, this is almost Medieval. And it is all in the name of God (so POWER is sort of religious but not enough to be placed into that genre). There is a really fascinating notion to the book. The concept placed in the book by Kramer is both horrifying and crazy. Honestly, it reminds me of many Third World countries. But there is a difference (of course). Think of X-Men. But instead of X-Men, it is X-Women. All of the special people are woman and solely woman. There is this strange thing about equality. I have a lot of mixed feelings about POWER and the concept of that power. Let me say that the power part is a bit weird, but I'm going to let that go before I ramble off the next fifty pages about equal rights. (Yes, yes, yes. I'm insane). Andra has a special power. She can write things out and make them come true (but with limits). Obviously, the Law of Conservation applies to her power, because she can't make food come out of nowhere. Andra is definitely empowering, and she is inspirational in her own right. Let's talk about POWER's plot. Now, just looking at the plot, I will tell you that this book isn't ready. There are some awkward landings here and there. Some parts doesn't flow very well, and other parts are a bit jarring. Think of a shattered mirror. It is the only mirror you have, so you put it back together very nicely. The only problem is that there are pieces missing and that there are cracks in the mirror. That is exactly what the plot is like. Missing events (or at least, a disconnection between one event to another) and bumpy roads. The delivery is off at some points. And the villain of the story is definitely a very large bump. I can't reveal his/her name, because that is a spoiler. Overall, POWER needs more editing. There are some well-written characters, but the villain is bloody awful. The special powers... Well, I'm not going to get into that. But POWER remains interesting and entertaining, so... Rating: Two Point Five out of Five (Rounded To Three)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    What if you loved words? What if you loved words and were told you could not use them? No reading. No writing. No words. If you were told you had to give up words completely, would you stop? Could you? Andra BetScrivener has a secret power. But her life – and the lives of those she loves – may be in grave danger if it is discovered. Andra is faced with the challenge of finding a way to utilize her gifts without jeopardizing her own safety or anyone else’s. Her position is less than enviable. Step What if you loved words? What if you loved words and were told you could not use them? No reading. No writing. No words. If you were told you had to give up words completely, would you stop? Could you? Andra BetScrivener has a secret power. But her life – and the lives of those she loves – may be in grave danger if it is discovered. Andra is faced with the challenge of finding a way to utilize her gifts without jeopardizing her own safety or anyone else’s. Her position is less than enviable. Step into Lisa A. Kramer’s P.O.W.E.R. and join Andra as she learns about herself, her powers, and the dark secrets of New North. If you’ve read some of my other reviews, you know that I am not a big reader of YA literature. But every now and then a book comes along that makes me reconsider my stance. P.O.W.E.R. is one of those books. Kramer’s tale is immediately engaging and the characters are believable, likable, and real. Andra is intelligent and creative, passionate and brave. Her doting father is town between wanting his daughter to celebrate and develop her gifts and wanting to keep her safe. Family friend Brian loves them both and helps them find their way. The atmosphere of P.O.W.E.R. reminds me much of one of my favorites, Orwell’s 1984, but with an absorbing modern adventure story that had me rooting for the characters every step of the way as they fought against injustices suggestive of the evils our world faces today. P.O.W.E.R. has strong messages for girls and young women today- messages for everyone, really. P.O.W.E.R. beautifully portrays themes of love, of family and friendship, or loyalty. It encourages creativity, determination, and courage. It celebrates the strength of the individual and the strength of community. It gives the reader a clear vision of what can happen when women – or any of us – stand united and support one another. Kramer’s P.O.W.E.R. is now on my list of must-read suggestions for any teen or young adult girls – or anyone, for that matter. The story is accessible across age and gender lines and would be a smart addition to high school reading lists for the future adult members of our society. We need more books like this to inspire them to work together toward a better world. It is my understanding that for each copy of this book sold, a portion of the proceeds will be donated to causes that support women and children around the world. An investment in the future is high on my list of things worth supporting. If you haven’t read Lisa Kramer’s P.O.W.E.R., what are you waiting for? Grab a copy today and get ready to be drawn into a world that while seemingly desolate is filled with possibility and hope.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    3.5 Stars. This started off great and very interesting. The concept was different enough to keep me intrigued it it wasn't long before it turned predictable. Brian, Andra and Lauren were all like able enough though.....as well as some of the others. I took to Andras father immediately. Overall a good YA read.....this is actually a great book for ages 10 and older. 3.5 Stars. This started off great and very interesting. The concept was different enough to keep me intrigued it it wasn't long before it turned predictable. Brian, Andra and Lauren were all like able enough though.....as well as some of the others. I took to Andras father immediately. Overall a good YA read.....this is actually a great book for ages 10 and older.

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