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The Chronological Study Bible presents the text of the New International Version in chronological order - the order in which the events actually happened - with notes, articles, and full-color graphics that connect the reader to the history and culture of Bible times and gives the reader a dramatic, "you are there" experience. Features include full-color illustrations of p The Chronological Study Bible presents the text of the New International Version in chronological order - the order in which the events actually happened - with notes, articles, and full-color graphics that connect the reader to the history and culture of Bible times and gives the reader a dramatic, "you are there" experience. Features include full-color illustrations of places, artifacts, and cultural phenomena, contextual articles that connect Biblical times and world history and culture, daily life notes, time panels and charts that show the flow of Biblical history, and in-text and full-color maps. Part of the Signature Series line of Thomas Nelson Bibles Chronological Study Bibles sold to date: More than 400,000 Thomas Nelson Bibles is a proud supporter of World Vision in eradicating poverty and preventable deaths among children. Learn more and discover what you can do at www.seegodswordinaction.com.


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The Chronological Study Bible presents the text of the New International Version in chronological order - the order in which the events actually happened - with notes, articles, and full-color graphics that connect the reader to the history and culture of Bible times and gives the reader a dramatic, "you are there" experience. Features include full-color illustrations of p The Chronological Study Bible presents the text of the New International Version in chronological order - the order in which the events actually happened - with notes, articles, and full-color graphics that connect the reader to the history and culture of Bible times and gives the reader a dramatic, "you are there" experience. Features include full-color illustrations of places, artifacts, and cultural phenomena, contextual articles that connect Biblical times and world history and culture, daily life notes, time panels and charts that show the flow of Biblical history, and in-text and full-color maps. Part of the Signature Series line of Thomas Nelson Bibles Chronological Study Bibles sold to date: More than 400,000 Thomas Nelson Bibles is a proud supporter of World Vision in eradicating poverty and preventable deaths among children. Learn more and discover what you can do at www.seegodswordinaction.com.

51 review for NIV, The Chronological Study Bible, eBook

  1. 5 out of 5

    LeAnne

    The uniqueness of this version is arranging the material in chronological order. It jumps from Kings to Jeremiah (rearranged) to excerpts from Daniel and Ezekiel interspersed with cultural notes and summaries of events from secular history to give a greater understanding of the historical context of biblical passages. I have read a chronological version before, but it was just Scripture without the cultural and historical notes. That one also interspersed details from Chronicles and Kings while The uniqueness of this version is arranging the material in chronological order. It jumps from Kings to Jeremiah (rearranged) to excerpts from Daniel and Ezekiel interspersed with cultural notes and summaries of events from secular history to give a greater understanding of the historical context of biblical passages. I have read a chronological version before, but it was just Scripture without the cultural and historical notes. That one also interspersed details from Chronicles and Kings while this study Bible separates the prophetic account (Kings) and the priestly account (Chronicles) so readers can more easily see the differences. On one hand, the cultural notes sometimes make the Psalms or other stories seem no different from other ancient religions, but Truth doesn’t need to fear questions. I don’t find it surprising that God would use familiar cultural forms to communicate with his people in their time and place. It’s also not surprising that 21st c forms are not used in ancient writings even though they have application to today. Among the notes “Time Capsules” intersperse dates of biblical events with events of secular history of countries of the Mediterranean like “1786–1633 BC 13th Dynasty of Egypt establishes capital at Thebes” or “AD5 5 Ovid composes Metamorphoses.” It probably is because of book design issues, but I didn’t like that these Time Capsules were scattered with little or no reference to the timing of Bible events on the page. I would also like to have seen some reference to what was going on in the Americas, India, or China when Abraham was moving to Canaan or the magi traveling to Bethlehem.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Charles Kee

    A useful way of reading This is not my first reading of even my first time to read a chronological Bible. I chose this copy because of the notes that addressed chronological issues. I was not disappointed. For reading straight through as I did it is helpful that the notes are in line with the text rather than accessed via footnotes. The reader may occasionally view the placement as an awkward interruption of the text - something that does not happen in the print edition since the notes there are A useful way of reading This is not my first reading of even my first time to read a chronological Bible. I chose this copy because of the notes that addressed chronological issues. I was not disappointed. For reading straight through as I did it is helpful that the notes are in line with the text rather than accessed via footnotes. The reader may occasionally view the placement as an awkward interruption of the text - something that does not happen in the print edition since the notes there are placed elsewhere on the page. Navigational aids are abundant, but I didn't make much use of them. I already owned the print edition when I purchased the Kindle version. While each has its advantages, the electronic version is my personal preference. I read this on the Fire HE because of the color content but don't feel I would have missed anything by reading on my paperwhite. The chronology is broken up into historical epochs, each with a very good summary introduction. These would be very good to go back and read again as a historical overview.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Kessler

    A good translation with OK notes, but what I particularly recommend to everyone is to read the Bible chronologically at least once in their life. This particular version arranges the Bible chronologically down to the resolution of the verse. Obviously there are some assumptions that need to be made in order to do that, and I appreciate how this version arranges the content. I did enjoy the notes in the older parts of the old testament where I found the extra historical context either helpful or i A good translation with OK notes, but what I particularly recommend to everyone is to read the Bible chronologically at least once in their life. This particular version arranges the Bible chronologically down to the resolution of the verse. Obviously there are some assumptions that need to be made in order to do that, and I appreciate how this version arranges the content. I did enjoy the notes in the older parts of the old testament where I found the extra historical context either helpful or interesting, but I used the notes less and less as I progressed through. Especially in the new testament where I think I completely ignored the notes. Also, I have the hard copy of this Bible, as that is my preferred experience.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    It was interesting to read the bible this way. I am kind of concrete in just wanting to start to read from Genesis to Revelation the way the Bible is "ordered" so this was a great way to shake things up so to speak in reading God's Word. It was interesting to read the bible this way. I am kind of concrete in just wanting to start to read from Genesis to Revelation the way the Bible is "ordered" so this was a great way to shake things up so to speak in reading God's Word.

  5. 5 out of 5

    crystal hatley

    Excellent resource! This Bible was so full of history and "behind the scenes" information that I feel I know the Bible so much deeper now. Excellent resource! This Bible was so full of history and "behind the scenes" information that I feel I know the Bible so much deeper now.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike Norman

    A brilliant way to read the bible. Full of extra information and knowledge.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Cochran

    Can't recommend reading the Bible in the order it was written strongly enough! What a perspective after a lifetime of Bible studies Can't recommend reading the Bible in the order it was written strongly enough! What a perspective after a lifetime of Bible studies

  8. 4 out of 5

    James

    On the making of books there is no end and much study wearies the body (Ecclesiaties 12:12). When Qoheleth penned these words, he could not have imagined how many times his own prose would be copied, translated, edited and bound. On the publishing of Bibles there is no end, and Study Bibles weary the Body. There is an ever-growing number of translations to choose from (i.e. CEB, ESV, NASB, NAB, GNB, The Message, KJV, NKJV, NIV, TNIV( now deceased), NIrV, Amplified Bible, Living Bible, NLV, ISV, N On the making of books there is no end and much study wearies the body (Ecclesiaties 12:12). When Qoheleth penned these words, he could not have imagined how many times his own prose would be copied, translated, edited and bound. On the publishing of Bibles there is no end, and Study Bibles weary the Body. There is an ever-growing number of translations to choose from (i.e. CEB, ESV, NASB, NAB, GNB, The Message, KJV, NKJV, NIV, TNIV( now deceased), NIrV, Amplified Bible, Living Bible, NLV, ISV, NKOTB, Jerusalem Bible, New Jerusalem Bible, God’s Word Translation, RSV, NRSV, and more). There are also devotional Bibles marketed to ever niche from teenage girls to used car salesman (I’m exaggerating, slightly). Study Bible’s are no better. There is a constant deluge of new study Bibles, each boasting a unique lens, approach, or aimed at a particularly age group, denomination or theological camp. The Bible is inspired but the notes seldom are. Still there are some great resources for those seeking to go deeper into the Biblical text. Here is a Bible I think will be a beneficial for those wanting to go deeper into biblical history. The NIV Integrated Study Bible (NIVISB) presents the entire Bible in chronological order. When events are described by more than one biblical author, they appear in parallel columns (2-4). Geneologies are paralleled by then repeated later in their actual context. For example, Genesis 5, shows parallels in 1 Chronicles 1:1-4, and Luke 3:36b-38. But these also appear later in 1 Chronicles 1, and Luke 3, respectively. The effect is that the reader can see at a glance how events and people in biblical history relate to one another. This is particularly helpful in relating the history books and the prophets, or in illuminating gospel parallels. It is also helpful for navigating how some of Paul’s letters fit within Acts. The NIVISB is edited by John R. Kohlenberger III and organized under six chronological categories: (1) Creation through the Patriarchs, (2) Conquest Through United Kingdom, (3) Divided Kingdom & Exile; (4) Return to the Land, (5) The Life of Jesus and (6) The Early Church. Additionally there are other helpful aids, like a timeline on the bottom of each page which locates the passages in the broad sweep of Biblical history, brief commentary linking transition between each era, and charts which illuminate each era. An index at the back of the Bible, aids in finding passages quickly. Resources like this are helpful, because they do at a glance what cross references and commentaries do for us: they remind you of a passage’s place within the larger biblical story and show how different books relate together. I find this helpful. Nevertheless there are drawbacks to this format. First, it examines the Bible through a historical lens, but breaks up literary units. It is important to also read these passages in their own habitat. Second, this is the work of a New Testament scholar, giving his best guess on the chronology and timeline. Not every commentator would agree with all of Kohlenberger’s choices, though I think in the main, his timeline is quite reasonable. Third, on a practical level, those most at home in the traditional canon will have some difficulty in navigating to particular passages. But Kohlenberger doesn’t intend for this Bible to replace all others. His proposal is more modest. This is an aid for studying one aspect of scripture and helping readers grasp historical connections. He also suggests several other resources for digging into the text (conveniently all published by Zondervan).I give it four stars. ★★★★ Notice of material connection: I received this book for free from Book Look Bloggers in exchange for my honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I have followed some chronological Bible reading plans before, but have never used a Chronological Bible, so this is my first one and I am delighted with it. It has several timelines and also a timeline across the bottom of every page indicating what year, or approximate year, you are in at whatever point you are at in your reading. As example of how this type of Bible arrangement works: when you reach the book of Acts and are reading at the time the letter to Galatians was probably written, the I have followed some chronological Bible reading plans before, but have never used a Chronological Bible, so this is my first one and I am delighted with it. It has several timelines and also a timeline across the bottom of every page indicating what year, or approximate year, you are in at whatever point you are at in your reading. As example of how this type of Bible arrangement works: when you reach the book of Acts and are reading at the time the letter to Galatians was probably written, the book of Galatians is inserted 'into', as it were, the book of Acts and you read it as a part of the account instead of as a separate book. It is so nice not to have to keep turning back and forth every few minutes in order to read chronologically, instead you can just read right through, simply turning one page after another. When you are done, you can just place a bookmark where you stopped instead of having to mark the spot on a reading chart when you are done. So convenient! Not only is this chronological, it also uses a parallel column format at times. For instance, since the four Gospels recount some of the same events, instead of placing them one right after another, these chronologically 'parallel' accounts are placed side by side in two, three, or even four columns. Oh, and be sure to read the introduction to this Bible first. I did not do this at first and thus had a misconception for a while that the people who arranged this Bible were fudging the chronological aspect by placing the repetition of the law that was given when Israel is finally about to enter the promised land, parallel to the first giving of the law about forty years earlier. Later on I examined their arrangement again, and found that they actually repeated this recounting of the law when it is reached at the correct time. If I had read the introduction first I would have found that they use 'conceptual parallels' and not just chronological parallels: "Conceptual parallels occur primarily in the books of Moses when similar commands and instructions are repeated in different historical settings...In order to keep genealogies and conceptual parallels in their historical setting, they are repeated whenever they appear in the chronological presentation..." Conceptual parallels are indicated by a light grey title instead of the normal solid black title. The text of the NIV 2011 seems fine so far, though I know there has been some concern over the rendering of some verses, such as changing New Testament epistles addressed to 'brothers' as 'brothers and sisters'. I don't really like and would prefer a more literal translation, but can overlook it. Daniel Wallace(professor of New Testament Studies at Dallas Theological Seminary) has some articles on his blog critiquing the new NIV that you may find interesting. I do LOVE that they still have the footnotes that the old NIV had, regarding different renderings of verses in the Septuagint, the Dead Sea Scrolls and other manuscripts in the Old Testament and New Testament as well. All in all, I like the format of this Bible, very convenient and interesting. Thanks to BookSneeze® and Zondervan for sending me a free review copy of this book!(My review did not have to be favorable)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Deena Shoemaker

    ~*~*~*~ Features include: -The entire text of the NIV translation with the order of events arranged chronologically -General and sectional (e.g., Pentateuch, History, Prophets, Gospels) introductions on chronology and dating, including comparative charts of major systems and schemes -Brief commentary in the form of transitions to help navigate the chronology ~*~*~*~ So I got an email a few weeks ago saying that a new NIV Chronological Study Bible was coming out soon and they needed reviews for it. I m ~*~*~*~ Features include: -The entire text of the NIV translation with the order of events arranged chronologically -General and sectional (e.g., Pentateuch, History, Prophets, Gospels) introductions on chronology and dating, including comparative charts of major systems and schemes -Brief commentary in the form of transitions to help navigate the chronology ~*~*~*~ So I got an email a few weeks ago saying that a new NIV Chronological Study Bible was coming out soon and they needed reviews for it. I may or may not have stayed up until midnight on the review-release date JUST so I could be 10,000% sure I got a copy to review. I wasn't really sure what to expect, honestly. I've never seen a Chronological Bible before, though I am a total geek about the timeline of Biblical events. Got the Book. I AM FANGIRLING OVER THIS BIBLE LIKE A 13-YEAR-OLD GIRL OVER JUSTIN BIEBER. OK so firstly. This Bible has a timeline running along the bottom of each page through the entire book. Coolest. thing. ever. The Bible also has a chronological chart in the beginning that tells you which dynasties, periods, and kingdoms were at which point in Biblical history (insert more fangirling here). This is quite possibly the coolest Bible I've ever had (and I am a Bible-collecting enthusiast) (no. really. I am). I wouldn't recommend using it in church during sermons. Mostly because it's all out of traditional order. You'll be flipping forever to find where everyone's at. I do strongly recommend it for personal study though. (seriously, COOLEST BIBLE EVER). It's easy to use and it has a chart in the back to tell you which books and chapters are on what page (because you will get lost). And there is this awesome little arrow that runs along the timeline on the bottom of the pages to show you where you are in time at every book of the Bible (more fangirl squeals from me). The parts of the Bible that overlap are laid out in side-by-side columns on each page. There are also charts spread through the pages. The Bible is hardback so it's extremely durable. It's kinda heavy because of the whole hardback thing, but that doesn't bother me at all. The font is the standard print size for Bibles so it's completely readable. All in all this is an incredible study tool for teachers, ministers, or seminary students. Or if you are just an enthusiastic admirer of Chronology (which is super important when studying, but that's a story for another time). I give it two thumbs way up and a 5 out of 5 stars. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through BookSneeze.com®. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  11. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    "NIV Integrated Study Bible" is a NIV Bible (newest translation) presented chronologically with some timelines and section introductions. Different records of the same event or genealogy are shown side-by-side so that you can easily compare the accounts to get a fuller understanding. Similar events are also often put in with the same-event accounts, which can be confusing. Similar events are indicated with a gray rather than black column heading, but the difference in headings is not noticeable "NIV Integrated Study Bible" is a NIV Bible (newest translation) presented chronologically with some timelines and section introductions. Different records of the same event or genealogy are shown side-by-side so that you can easily compare the accounts to get a fuller understanding. Similar events are also often put in with the same-event accounts, which can be confusing. Similar events are indicated with a gray rather than black column heading, but the difference in headings is not noticeable unless you are paying close attention. This Bible presents some events as the same event which are, in my opinion, different events, but they did a much better job with this than I expected. (People have a tendency to assume similar sermons must actually be the same sermon, but traveling speakers frequently use similar stories and sermons since they have a "fresh" audience who hasn't heard them before. And it's not surprising that some similar events happened.) Since it is a chronological Bible, this Bible isn't useful for "everyone turn to Luke chapter..." circumstances, but it is great for straight-through daily reading. If you need to look up the location of a specific verse, you can use an index in the back. For those who care: In the New Testament, John is used as the "backbone" that events in the other gospels are aligned with. As in, it's the gospel that has the most verses in the order we're used to. Mark is the second "most in order" book. The timeline that gave dates for various events was sometimes fairly vague, and no dates were given for events before Abraham. I appreciated that the author acknowledged that there is debate about various dates as most Bibles (and ancient history textbooks) will give you a date like it's undisputed fact. (Ancients didn't date things the same way we do, which opens things up to debate.) This Bible used more conservative dates and mainly compared its dates with liberal ones. Overall, I'd recommend this book to those who want a daily reading Bible that makes it easy to compare similar passages and align events chronologically. I received a review copy of this book from the publisher through BookLook Bloggers.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    I received a copy of this Bible from Book Sneeze in exchange for an honest review. From most of the reviews I've read of this Bible, most of the reviewers have 20+ Bibles in their home. I have two, one of them is this one. The other is a beat up paperback, written-on copy of the New Standard Revised Version (NSRV) that I picked up out of guilt at a used book store. I will admit that its been opened about 3 times. I thought that this would be a good way for me delve deeper into the Bible, becaus I received a copy of this Bible from Book Sneeze in exchange for an honest review. From most of the reviews I've read of this Bible, most of the reviewers have 20+ Bibles in their home. I have two, one of them is this one. The other is a beat up paperback, written-on copy of the New Standard Revised Version (NSRV) that I picked up out of guilt at a used book store. I will admit that its been opened about 3 times. I thought that this would be a good way for me delve deeper into the Bible, because frankly, the Bible is without a doubt the most difficult book I have ever attempted to read. The way that I've been shown in how to read a Bible is to read a passage, and then read verses before and after it to really get a feel for what the author(s) meant by it. At one point in this study Bible, on page 410, there are two columns: 2 Samuel 8: 15-18 in the upper left hand corner, 1 Chronicles 18:14-17 directly next to it. Right under the 2 Samuel 8:15-18 is 2 Samuel 22:1-12 and right next to that is Psalm 18. and at the very bottom of each page of this study Bible is a small timeline, with an arrow, showing where exactly in history this was happening in. If you look in the index for the the verses directly after 2 Samuel 8: 15-18, it is found 23 pages later. The ones directly before it are found a mere 3 pages before. The verses from 1 Chronicles isn't much better. For a new student like me, this Bible is not very helpful. However, I did check out another type of study Bible from the library as a comparison, the New Interpreter's Study Bible NSRV, and read Ruth side by side with the NIV Integrated. The language is easier to read than the NSRV, but the New Interpreter's Study Bible had better explanations.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ibjoy1953

    The Chronological Study Bible is the well know NIV version. This Bible has many neat features that I really like. There are full color illustrations which are neat because they are on the actual pages and the images fade into the writing. Making the images and pages beautiful. Some of the other features are Daily Life Notes, Transition Comments, Time Panels and Charts, Background Notes, and more. This Chronological version of the Bible means that the events are written in the order that they hap The Chronological Study Bible is the well know NIV version. This Bible has many neat features that I really like. There are full color illustrations which are neat because they are on the actual pages and the images fade into the writing. Making the images and pages beautiful. Some of the other features are Daily Life Notes, Transition Comments, Time Panels and Charts, Background Notes, and more. This Chronological version of the Bible means that the events are written in the order that they happened in history. And I found one feature really interesting and helpful and that is the Epoch Introductions and Historical Overviews, explaining the chronological context. This Bible is a lot different that any I’ve ever seen, but I am really liking it! I enjoy it being the NIV, and the inside pages are beautiful with the colors, and the way it is formatted. Everything in this Bible is beautiful, inside and out. I love reading different Bibles, and this one is no different, and I appreciate the different study tools throughout. For me, this gives me a new and interesting way to study God’s Word. I encourage you to pick up a copy of The Chronological Study Bible for your own Bible study. I received this book from BookLookBloggers to read and review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 55

  14. 4 out of 5

    Yonasan Aryeh

    Taking a look through the Study Bible, I like the format a lot. It is simplified for easy reading. There is no commentary on the pages, but the top of the page gives a brief statement on where we are in the timeline of the Bible, and the bottom of the page shows the approximate year we are in, as well as main characters in play during that timeframe. While reading through passages, I can see some parts where other books are included due to them being the same chronological time. This, in its own Taking a look through the Study Bible, I like the format a lot. It is simplified for easy reading. There is no commentary on the pages, but the top of the page gives a brief statement on where we are in the timeline of the Bible, and the bottom of the page shows the approximate year we are in, as well as main characters in play during that timeframe. While reading through passages, I can see some parts where other books are included due to them being the same chronological time. This, in its own regard, gives a suggestion for debate on the authorship of Chronicles. Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy are all side-by-side when covering the same topic, so it's easy to see the differences for comparison. There is no pre-article on the books or authors, however. Overall, I would have liked to see commentary provided with more detailed information with the side-by-side scripture, but this book is designed to be more of a "read" than a study. In this regard, I believe it accomplished the goal it sought out to meet. I even appreciate the throwback design on the cover. Very simplistic and appreciative. Disclosure: I was contracted to write an honest review in exchange for a reviewer copy of the product. The opinions stated in this review are solely my own.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Create With Joy

    If you are looking for a Bible whose strength lies in its ability to help you understand the Bible in the historical and cultural context in which the books were written, then the newly released The Chronological Study Bible, NIV from Thomas Nelson should be high on your wish list! The full-featured Chronological Study Bible is visually stunning. This Bible is divided into 9 epochs (or periods of time) with the books placed in rough chronological order based on historical events occurring in our If you are looking for a Bible whose strength lies in its ability to help you understand the Bible in the historical and cultural context in which the books were written, then the newly released The Chronological Study Bible, NIV from Thomas Nelson should be high on your wish list! The full-featured Chronological Study Bible is visually stunning. This Bible is divided into 9 epochs (or periods of time) with the books placed in rough chronological order based on historical events occurring in our world’s history. The Chronological Study Bible makes a wonderful study resource for those wanting to learn more about the history, background and culture of the Bible, and for those looking for a unique devotional and study Bible. Because of its unique features and narrow niche focus, however, I would not recommend it as your primary Bible. For more information about The Chronological Study Bible, and to read my review in its entirety, please visit Create With Joy. Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review purposes. However, the opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Bush

    I will admit, initially it was VERY confusing because I was studying on marriage and the role of wives (something I tend to do, because I have a weakness on the topic). Literally I had much of the Gospel side by side because (of course) the books occur concurrently. But then when I got to books like Ephesians & Colossians, it got really confusing because not only were similar text on the same page, you would see it occur several times as it happens with each book. So overall, I now enjoy the Bi I will admit, initially it was VERY confusing because I was studying on marriage and the role of wives (something I tend to do, because I have a weakness on the topic). Literally I had much of the Gospel side by side because (of course) the books occur concurrently. But then when I got to books like Ephesians & Colossians, it got really confusing because not only were similar text on the same page, you would see it occur several times as it happens with each book. So overall, I now enjoy the Bible because it does indeed make studying a lot easier (as far as wanting Scripture on the same or similar topic). I will say, have patience to actually look for things especially if you don't know the exact chronological order of the Old Testament (like myself, lol). Initially I asked myself what an Integrated Bible would be like and I can now say that its quite awesome. I use it for all of my studying. Believe it or not, I actually use it more than my Life Applications Study Bible.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    This is the second time I’ve read a Chrono Bible. The first was a couple of years ago.. The Chronological Life Application Study Bible (only comes in KJV and NLT). While it is certainly possible to just follow a Chrono reading guide to read the Bible through chronologically, all the helps in a Chrono Bible add a lot. The helps (graphs, charts, timelines, maps, archaeological and historical info) in this Chrono Bible were, in my opinion, significantly inferior to those but the Chronological Life This is the second time I’ve read a Chrono Bible. The first was a couple of years ago.. The Chronological Life Application Study Bible (only comes in KJV and NLT). While it is certainly possible to just follow a Chrono reading guide to read the Bible through chronologically, all the helps in a Chrono Bible add a lot. The helps (graphs, charts, timelines, maps, archaeological and historical info) in this Chrono Bible were, in my opinion, significantly inferior to those but the Chronological Life Application Study Bible. I’m glad I’ve read them both, but if you are only going to choose one, choose the Chronological Life Application Study Bible...all the helps- especially the timelines, maps, and charts - are terrific!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I loved reading the Bible chronologically, but I didn’t agree with some of the notes that were added for information.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Megan Smith

  20. 5 out of 5

    Annette Dimond

  21. 4 out of 5

    S

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karin Gillett

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jan Jonaitis

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jana Smith

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn D. Walters

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Rutkowski

  29. 4 out of 5

    Harold Vance III

  30. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

  31. 5 out of 5

    Phil Rice

  32. 5 out of 5

    Dagmar

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Bobin

  34. 4 out of 5

    Milton Thompson

  35. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

  36. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Sibley

  37. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

  38. 4 out of 5

    Charles Roberts

  39. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Ballor

  40. 5 out of 5

    Starla Gooch

  41. 4 out of 5

    Lynnelblessing

  42. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Misner

  43. 4 out of 5

    Haley

  44. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  45. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  46. 5 out of 5

    Charity Andrews

  47. 4 out of 5

    Audrey Annette

  48. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

  49. 4 out of 5

    Beth Smith

  50. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

  51. 4 out of 5

    Susan Gould

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