web site hit counter Humans Are Underrated: Proving Your Value in the Age of Brilliant Technology - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Humans Are Underrated: Proving Your Value in the Age of Brilliant Technology

Availability: Ready to download

From the bestselling author of Talent is Overrated, an extensive look at the essential human skills that can never be replaced by technology. In the economy of a few years from now, what will people do better than computers? Technology is rapidly invading fields that it once could not touch, driving cars better than humans do, predicting Supreme Court decisions better than From the bestselling author of Talent is Overrated, an extensive look at the essential human skills that can never be replaced by technology. In the economy of a few years from now, what will people do better than computers? Technology is rapidly invading fields that it once could not touch, driving cars better than humans do, predicting Supreme Court decisions better than legal experts, packing boxes, identifying faces, scurrying around hospitals delivering medications, all faster, more reliably, less expensively than people. In a world like that, how will we and our children achieve a rising standard of living? The real issue is what we humans are hardwired to do for and with one another, arising from our deepest, most essentially human abilities—empathy, social sensitivity, storytelling, humor, forming relationships, creativity. These are how we create value that all people hunger for, that is unique and not easily quantified. Individuals and companies are already discovering that these high-value abilities create tremendous competitive advantage—more devoted customers, stronger cultures, breakthrough ideas, more effective teams. They’re discovering also that while many of us regard these abilities as innate traits—“he’s a real people person,” “she’s naturally creative”—it turns out they can all be developed and are being developed in far-sighted organizations from software firms to the U.S. Army to the Cleveland Clinic. To a far greater degree than most of us ever imagined, we already have what it takes.


Compare

From the bestselling author of Talent is Overrated, an extensive look at the essential human skills that can never be replaced by technology. In the economy of a few years from now, what will people do better than computers? Technology is rapidly invading fields that it once could not touch, driving cars better than humans do, predicting Supreme Court decisions better than From the bestselling author of Talent is Overrated, an extensive look at the essential human skills that can never be replaced by technology. In the economy of a few years from now, what will people do better than computers? Technology is rapidly invading fields that it once could not touch, driving cars better than humans do, predicting Supreme Court decisions better than legal experts, packing boxes, identifying faces, scurrying around hospitals delivering medications, all faster, more reliably, less expensively than people. In a world like that, how will we and our children achieve a rising standard of living? The real issue is what we humans are hardwired to do for and with one another, arising from our deepest, most essentially human abilities—empathy, social sensitivity, storytelling, humor, forming relationships, creativity. These are how we create value that all people hunger for, that is unique and not easily quantified. Individuals and companies are already discovering that these high-value abilities create tremendous competitive advantage—more devoted customers, stronger cultures, breakthrough ideas, more effective teams. They’re discovering also that while many of us regard these abilities as innate traits—“he’s a real people person,” “she’s naturally creative”—it turns out they can all be developed and are being developed in far-sighted organizations from software firms to the U.S. Army to the Cleveland Clinic. To a far greater degree than most of us ever imagined, we already have what it takes.

30 review for Humans Are Underrated: Proving Your Value in the Age of Brilliant Technology

  1. 4 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣

    Seriously, if storytelling is such a large chunk of what humans can do, sign me up for robotification right now. I firmly believe that storytelling is an evil undertaking designed to waste shitloads of my time and highjack large pieces of projects just to tell some story every-fucking-one already heard is some version somewhere sometime. Humans should be better at other stuff: intuition, thinking, imagination, inventing, being the masterminds behind the data-crunching macnines... Not making shit Seriously, if storytelling is such a large chunk of what humans can do, sign me up for robotification right now. I firmly believe that storytelling is an evil undertaking designed to waste shitloads of my time and highjack large pieces of projects just to tell some story every-fucking-one already heard is some version somewhere sometime. Humans should be better at other stuff: intuition, thinking, imagination, inventing, being the masterminds behind the data-crunching macnines... Not making shit stories up.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Abhishek

    An insightful book full of great information from multiple observations and researches. Although the author makes great arguments, they are primarily based on assumptions that are just that - assumptions. Computers might not be able to truly replicate some of human's emotional capabilities but surely it is not in the realm of impossible by any means for them to mimic them to a close approximation. Some of the arguments such as the direct correlation between population density and innovation do n An insightful book full of great information from multiple observations and researches. Although the author makes great arguments, they are primarily based on assumptions that are just that - assumptions. Computers might not be able to truly replicate some of human's emotional capabilities but surely it is not in the realm of impossible by any means for them to mimic them to a close approximation. Some of the arguments such as the direct correlation between population density and innovation do not take into account the lack of innovation in heavily populated areas of the world. There are other factors at play here as well - access to resources, education, and others. Empathy and ability to lead effectively has always been an important factor in success. Though logical and systematic thinking has succeeded quite well also. Overall, though I was quite impressed with the first half of the book, I found myself wondering and my mind wandering in the second half, which seemed to meander a bit. Also, in the end a clear take away - other than the empathy will rule - was hard to grasp. I would still recommend the book since it's an interesting read, offers great research and stories, and does reflect on what we should be reflecting on as technology changes not just our world but also our selves. The brain that relied on empathy to survive this far may no longer have as much need for this skill as it spends more time with machines than with people. The bigger risk than making machines as smart as people is of people becoming dumb to a level that could be relatively easily reproduced via machines.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wynn Netherland

    A little slow to get started, Colvin spent so much time talking about how computers are putting us all out of work, I was expecting a pitch for basic income. The balance of the book does a good job of showing the power of empathy in the new economy, especially for large, dynamic organizations. The latter chapters are thought provoking, especially for anyone leading distributed teams.

  4. 5 out of 5

    John Park

    Three and half stars. Humans are Misunderstood might be a more accurate title, though "underrated" probably is more eye-catching. This is a piece of journalism, smoothly and brightly written, rather than an academic treatise; Colvin does list his sources, but few are primary, a lot are web pages and popular books, and his instances of "scientists believe" or "as X says" do leave room for suspicion that he is cherry-picking in the interests of making a case. But generally he makes his case well, p Three and half stars. Humans are Misunderstood might be a more accurate title, though "underrated" probably is more eye-catching. This is a piece of journalism, smoothly and brightly written, rather than an academic treatise; Colvin does list his sources, but few are primary, a lot are web pages and popular books, and his instances of "scientists believe" or "as X says" do leave room for suspicion that he is cherry-picking in the interests of making a case. But generally he makes his case well, providing several areas of support for his main points. On the way he pursues a slightly meandering path through a range of fascinating topics without losing track of his goal. Colvin starts by delineating the ways in which computers are out-competing us in areas we had felt secure (chess, Jeopardy, Go . . .), heading towards the inevitable question of whether they will ultimately leave any place for us at all. There's very little they can't do, it seems. (They can read emotions from micro-expressions which suggests that in some sense they might understand us better than we understand ourselves. This however is about as close as Colvin gets to addressing spiritual values. He also skips over the point that even not-very-bright machines could out-think us because they work so much faster.) Some ways of looking at and solving problems do still seem to be human preserves, especially when the goals are imprecise. Machines have not yet become good at identifying the real rather than the immediate goal and then thinking outside the box (instead of changing how a failing part is shaped, make it out of a different material). Nevertheless, our island of genuinely human attributes seems to be shrinking rapidly. Rather than try to hold back the tide, Colvin suggests, we should decide what is important to us about people and identify areas where we insist on participation by real humans. Such areas include those requiring tact, expressions of sympathy or empathic understanding, and those involving legal or moral responsibility: few of us would willingly hand over the adjudication of our criminal or civil law case to a machine. As a caveat here, there is evidence that some judicial sentences are strongly influenced by the time are given (with respect to meal times or the end of the day), and so might be made fairer by incorporating AI assistance. [This situation recalls the relatively recent use of computer technology in cricket, to review disputed umpire decisions. At present the human umpire makes the first decision and has priority if the ensuing computer analysis is borderline—but it is not hard to imagine that in a few years the roles will be reversed and the AI will make the initial call and human judgement will be invoked only to review questionable decisions.] One of the main things that make us human seems to be our ability (or even need) to share and co-operate; and since Colvin's main focus is on work in the modern world, this leads to a long investigation of what makes a successful team. He starts by noting that teamwork is growing common in many areas of society—even in science [as illustrated by some astronomy and high-energy physics papers with hundreds or thousands of authors, though mathematics journals still publish a fair percentage of single-author works. And of course there is little multi-author fiction—though writing support-groups are almost universal]. And he provides a lot of evidence that good teams are better than would be expected from the individuals that compose them. Throughout this book, a surprising number of Colvin's examples are drawn from the (U.S.) military, particularly in the area of training. He shows that realistic combat training made great improvements in performance (for example in air combat over Vietnam), enough to undermine the old assumption that fighter aces were born, not made. That impression originated from the truism that you can't learn from your mistake if it kills you; but experience showed that training could dramatically improve battlefield performance, particularly by developing effective teamwork among ground forces. So what makes an effective team? It turns out to depend mostly on how its members interact and communicate. And face-to-face contacts have a special power that text messaging, or any form of remote communications vitiates. Nonverbal links are vital to effective and satisfying communications. Eye-contact, pupil responses, and other nonverbal signalling modes (Colvin doesn't address possible pheromone effects) are a huge part of what make communications work and teams successful. The key elements seem to be "ostentatious listening" and equal time awarded to each person's contributions. A Yahoo CEO in desperate circumstances essentially banned telecommuting and required employees to work on site. Google and other firms have taken various measures to encourage workers to meet and talk to strangers within their organisations—choosing the location of the cafeteria, optimising the time spent in cafeteria queues, and adjusting the space between chairs or tables in meeting rooms to encourage workers to (almost literally) bump into strangers and talk. The core of a successful team seems to be empathy; and empathy is an intrinsically human quality that can be either developed or allowed to atrophy. Remote communications such as texting undermine empathy. But it can also be taught. There is evidence that reading character-based fiction can develop empathy. Women appear to have more of it naturally than men, though Colvin is careful to point out the implications of the bell-curve. The military is interested too: empathy includes understanding the enemy. What poisons a team? Competitiveness and testosterone (in addition to softer evidence, Colvin cites a biochemical experiment that found administration of testosterone lowered empathy in adults). "Takers" as opposed to "givers"; a "giving" culture is easily poisoned, so that the solitary IT nerd is toxic. [This is a fairly isolated hint of a dark side to the optimistic picture Colvin is gradually building; surely a dangerous inverse-puritanism is rearing its head here, ignoring the fact that some forms of work (not just in science or technology) can only be done in isolation.] On a different level, probably the element of communications that most powerfully engenders motivation and commitment is the story. Listening to and watching someone tell a story triggers parallel responses in our brains. We tend to bond with the story-teller and be motivated by the story. Even if the teller is not present in person, much of the power of the story remains. Colvin doesn't really define what he means by "story", but his main examples are nonfictional narratives involving individuals dealing with stressful situations. He does note that the way a story ends seems to be important, but he doesn't delve far into such matters or ask some obvious questions: why stories are so powerful, and could AIs produce them effectively? After pointing out that AIs have displayed creativity in such areas as musical composition and cookery, Colvin suggests that works of art produced by humans may still retain a unique value by association with their creator, particularly if we know the person. But the example he cites, of the conflicting responses to J. K. Rowling's initially pseudonymous detective novel, seems to cut both ways: behaviours that may be characteristically human also appear silly and even dangerously irrational. For there is a darker side to stories. The success of organisations like ISIS in recruiting followers can be seen as a result of effective story-telling. Building towards his conclusion Colvin identifies some trends in business policy. Five-year plans and the like may be outmoded—in the face of rapid changes caused by new technology, agility may be more useful than a long-term strategy. Firms are hiring for empathy: women and liberal arts graduates are becoming sought after. Colvin suggests that "networking, teamwork and leadership" will form the future skill-set. In the U.S, engineers, even when not potentially replaceable by AIs, are cheap because they are available internationally in huge numbers; so if the U.S. "wants to stay ahead . . . then the person who used to be an engineer will have to be a team leader." And much training can be done more effectively by interactive software than in a lecture—leaving classroom time for face-to-face work and exercises useful in team building and developing empathy. Colvin emphasised the importance importance of stories and of endings, but his story—and he has shaped this book as a story—for me ends weakly. His closing chapter makes more or less explicit the earlier hints that he was talking of the economic future of business graduates or those looking for careers in business, and it seems to leave the rest of us out in the cold. Yes, there may be new hope for liberal arts graduates and women in general, but how many team leaders and team-building managers will we need? Whom will they be managing and what will everyone else be doing in the world of the machine?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Raz Pirata

    “Infotech is doubling in power every two years. I am not - and I’ll guess you are not either.” I remember walking down Houston St, about a quarter mile from FDR drive, when a gentleman of questionable sobriety appeared. He was howling at the heavens, “the future is here, the FUTURE IS HERE!”. (God I love New York) I shuffled my step to give his prophecy space when a few knuckle heads on the corner started egging him on. “Where is it brother? I can’t see it. I must’ve gone blind, where is the futur “Infotech is doubling in power every two years. I am not - and I’ll guess you are not either.” I remember walking down Houston St, about a quarter mile from FDR drive, when a gentleman of questionable sobriety appeared. He was howling at the heavens, “the future is here, the FUTURE IS HERE!”. (God I love New York) I shuffled my step to give his prophecy space when a few knuckle heads on the corner started egging him on. “Where is it brother? I can’t see it. I must’ve gone blind, where is the future?” Well, knuckleheads, the future is here. It is big and bold and it is coming for your job. “We must force ourselves to envision larger, faster changes than the mind blowing ones we’ve seen so far.” Geoff Colvin, author of Humans Are Underrated, will play John Conner in this future. He will be the one who saves you, and your career, from the takeover of the machines. As he outlines for us, in stark detail, the world we know is changing faster than we can perceive. Humans are Underrated, will prepare us on how to survive this cataclysmic shift from what we have always known, to what we can’t imagine. “The new high value skills are instead part of our deepest nature, the abilities that literally define us as humans.” In Colvin’s version of the future, machines have taken on much more of the workforce than we previously predicted. But what they can’t do, and ‘What High Achievers Know That Brilliant Machines Never Will’, is how to be authentically human. It is this that he proposes will save us. Colvin postulates that the skills of value in this future will be the ones from our past. That our greatest advantage will be our most essential human abilities: creativity, empathy, sensitivity, humor, storytelling and relationship building. That the high value skills of the workforce will be the ability to “be a people person”. To survive the shift in the employment marketplace, we must recapture the skill that too many of us have lost. Humans Are Underrated is an important conversation. One you should pay attention to. Because the future comes whether or not you are ready and this book is your heads up. So don’t get caught slippin’, or the future will leave you behind. Overall Score: 3.6 / 5.0 In a Sentence: The only way to survive the labor market of the future is to reclaim the skills of your past.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Heep

    At times fascinating, but mostly the descriptions of what computers are able to do,or will be doing soon. I am a little doubtful that computers will be crowded out of "human" jobs - those emphasizing emotion and interaction. I suspect computers will be programmed for many of these activities too, and in some cases cost and accessibility may win out over our supposedly better bedside manner. Not all the time perhaps, but enough for there to be significant economic displacement And that is my grea At times fascinating, but mostly the descriptions of what computers are able to do,or will be doing soon. I am a little doubtful that computers will be crowded out of "human" jobs - those emphasizing emotion and interaction. I suspect computers will be programmed for many of these activities too, and in some cases cost and accessibility may win out over our supposedly better bedside manner. Not all the time perhaps, but enough for there to be significant economic displacement And that is my greatest critique of the book - it does not credibly discuss the scale and speed of all the dislocation and economic change. Whole segments of jobs will disappear, and in cascading waves as computer technology finds a way to do a task cheaper and better than humans. How will economies adapt? How will people be retrained and relocated? There is an underlying algorithm in the development of this technology and it is the profit motive combined with analytics that will make it hard for economic or political policy to keep up. The book does not give a credible explanation of how this might get sorted out, and essentially says that for the moment there will be enough empathy jobs to stem the tide. It is a hopeful message just not a particularly compelling one.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sasha Boersma

    If you read a lot on the topic, not a lot new. What I did like was what the author brought to the book for those who hadn't already read a lot on the topic. Right to the point - Humans are empathy machines who tell stories. Computers are logical and factual. Therefore the future jobs for humans are in empathy and storytelling. Before I returned the book to the library, I wish I made note of one thing that hit me, and that was he was't referring to the current economic era as the knowledge era - be If you read a lot on the topic, not a lot new. What I did like was what the author brought to the book for those who hadn't already read a lot on the topic. Right to the point - Humans are empathy machines who tell stories. Computers are logical and factual. Therefore the future jobs for humans are in empathy and storytelling. Before I returned the book to the library, I wish I made note of one thing that hit me, and that was he was't referring to the current economic era as the knowledge era - because knowledge is stored on the Internet. I will get my hands on the book again and make note of what he does call it. Because that was a fascinating concept to read and reflect on.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nigel Shenton

    I think it took me from September to November to read because I was in so many other books and order so many and put all of them currently reading instead of when I open it. It really only took me 4 to 3 days of an hour here and there of reading to finish. Was a quick read and thoroughly liked what the author was saying. Rise of Human services it a new era cause from the technology revolution. Ok that was a bit dramatic but not sappy like oh man,,,, more like where is man?!?!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Wendi Lau

    What?! A computer can do legal discovery, financial planning, and medical diagnoses?! Anything requiring drawing on a wealth of information to make an informed decision is now better done by computers. (I thought it was just McDonalds and WalMart cashiers). That friend who can organize and incentivize her co-workers to stick to a schedule and produce their best work – she’s the hot commodity now. Not you with your computer science and math degrees. Can you listen and predict how your teammates w What?! A computer can do legal discovery, financial planning, and medical diagnoses?! Anything requiring drawing on a wealth of information to make an informed decision is now better done by computers. (I thought it was just McDonalds and WalMart cashiers). That friend who can organize and incentivize her co-workers to stick to a schedule and produce their best work – she’s the hot commodity now. Not you with your computer science and math degrees. Can you listen and predict how your teammates will act, how the enemy will behave? If not, better learn, or risk becoming obsolete. This is the idea Geoff Colvin wants to get across. People skills matter a lot more than we thought. Two stories about teamwork blew my mind. (The book is full of interesting stories.) The first showed that women-dominated teams – more women than the other teams – always did better than other teams due to the way they cooperated and communicated. I have worked in workplaces with more women, both functioned well, but underlying girl-grumpiness was also present - moodiness that negatively affected the work environment. Women are notoriously moody, I wonder how teams with more females function better. The second teamwork story was about an elite golf team that competed on the world stage. The team organized by personality types and communication styles won. Teams organized by complementary skills or the best golfer for each position always lost. The team functioned differently and better when members worked as parts of a team than when the individuals considered their roles separately. This weird parts-of- a-whole concept is worth considering in light of how companies, communities, and countries normally function. If we need this big goal, this common thing that we swim toward, all in our own way supporting the whole, trying to achieve a goal, then everybody doing their own thing selfishly trying to maximize our own utility leads to an organism that disintegrates, dies. We can see this phenomenon in viral and bacterial communities; they function best, most healthfully, when they behave altruistically. Single-celled organisms do this! This was my big takeaway from this book. We have to behave differently for our group/company/country/free society to survive in the long run. This book would benefit anyone who plans to continue working for the next several decades. But it is of particular use to parents and educators incentivizing them to develop better ways to interact and socialize. These abilities would be the most meaningful things kids gain from an “education.” Alternatively, sports teach many of these soft skills.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Navneet Bhushan

    Being more and more human is the skill, ironically, will be what is needed more and more as our economic world shifts to more and more intelligent machines. This is the basic premise of the book. To be human and to leverage human skills of empathy, deeper understanding of the complex ways in which other humans work, respond and operate in a world where not only most mechanical jobs are going to increasingly intelligent machines, the ability to collaborate with other humans and empathise with the Being more and more human is the skill, ironically, will be what is needed more and more as our economic world shifts to more and more intelligent machines. This is the basic premise of the book. To be human and to leverage human skills of empathy, deeper understanding of the complex ways in which other humans work, respond and operate in a world where not only most mechanical jobs are going to increasingly intelligent machines, the ability to collaborate with other humans and empathise with them to create team work, to generate end value will be the demand. The aloof technology non social nerds or middle managers of the previous economic system will start getting booted out of the jobs that big corporates are gravitating towards. I would however like to point out this being one side of the story. Despite the so called improving intelligent machines, making them work together and with humans will require skills that may lead to disruptions of the big companies. The young unique newer type of technologies and their systems may be emerging in the next decade or so that may actually be radically different than what we have seen in the fifth wave of innovation 1990 to 2020. The 30 years have given us algorithms as economic vehicles of creating value - Google ebay amazon Facebook are all algorithms ! Contrast it to companies of the previous waves say GE PHILIPS Shell Toyota etc. How different are these two sets of companies. Perhaps the skill needed will be more to do with creating new organization's that leverage the next wave of innovation..the sixth wave that will driven by algorithmic intelligence and later quantum computing to give us nee ability to synthesise energy biology and in fact reality. Nevertheless a skill set based on human social interaction and the ability tow work with people is needed. Machined human social interaction skills will be more like it . Sort of human machine socio techno interaction system !

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nitin

    Awesome, insightful and thought-provoking with a highly readable style of writing. It definitely got me to re-appraise how I had been thinking of my own skills and competencies.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Edward

    This book puts us in a different perspective amidst the talk about technologies, computers and AI taking over our jobs. Technology is getting better every day and it is growing exponentially. A lot of things that we knew were not possibly performed by computers and machines are now becoming a reality. We should expect the trend to continue. However, instead of chasing to race against the machine, which for most tasks they will do better than humans, if not now but eventually, the author argues t This book puts us in a different perspective amidst the talk about technologies, computers and AI taking over our jobs. Technology is getting better every day and it is growing exponentially. A lot of things that we knew were not possibly performed by computers and machines are now becoming a reality. We should expect the trend to continue. However, instead of chasing to race against the machine, which for most tasks they will do better than humans, if not now but eventually, the author argues that we should look at things that human would do best, regardless of how well a computer would do. A number of true human abilities are listed in the book, including social sensibility for human-to-human interaction, the ultimate problem solving that involves finding the right problem to solve in the first place, story-telling and creativity and innovation. We can use technology to our advantage so that we can focus on doing what we human can do best. We are entering an era where focusing on true human qualities is ever more important than simply equipping ourselves to race against the machines. As technology becomes more and more powerful every year, the most valuable skill that people, corporations, educational systems, governments should harness are skills of empathy, collaboration, creation and leadership.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Haur Bin Chua

    Book on man vs machine and how man continue to have the upper hand in the challenge. This book explores how as technology advances, there are limits to which technology can replace human ingenuity. Ultimately humanity problems require human solutions which artificial intelligence are unable to come out with. And human solutions require creativity, empathy, trust & relationship at personal level, all of which cannot (or at least have yet to) be coded. Also highlighted as skills require to succeed Book on man vs machine and how man continue to have the upper hand in the challenge. This book explores how as technology advances, there are limits to which technology can replace human ingenuity. Ultimately humanity problems require human solutions which artificial intelligence are unable to come out with. And human solutions require creativity, empathy, trust & relationship at personal level, all of which cannot (or at least have yet to) be coded. Also highlighted as skills require to succeed are soft skills vs technical skills, women will have genetic advantage over men in the future world where team work, empathy, collaboration are traits more highly sought after than STEM related skills. While skills like coding might be commoditized in the future, this basically means a higher bar set for future generation as basic math and science does not cut it anymore. Hence disagree with author on the point where STEM takes a backseat vs humanities. It's like saying it's more important for a basketball player to communicate with his team mates than actually able to dribble, block or shoot. In summary, a combination of nuggets of information on why humanity needs humans rather than robots. At the end of day, we write the codes.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Eikenberry

    Geoff Colvin, the senior editor-at-large at Fortune wrote one of my favorite books of 2008 – Talent is Overrated. Now he’s written what will clearly be one of my favorites of 2015. This book took me on more of an emotional roller coaster ride than any great novel or whodunit. The first two chapters were informative and scary – telling just how fast computers (and technology-cousins robots of all sorts) are improving – and what they can already do that you may not be aware of. Then the book takes a Geoff Colvin, the senior editor-at-large at Fortune wrote one of my favorite books of 2008 – Talent is Overrated. Now he’s written what will clearly be one of my favorites of 2015. This book took me on more of an emotional roller coaster ride than any great novel or whodunit. The first two chapters were informative and scary – telling just how fast computers (and technology-cousins robots of all sorts) are improving – and what they can already do that you may not be aware of. Then the book takes a turn looking at us as humans and what our world, businesses and lives need that computers can’t provide: relationships. Colvin makes a compelling case that we aren’t really knowledge workers but need to become relationship workers. After another scary chapter about how our current technology is eating away at the skills we will most need in the future, the rest of the book explores what we can do, what we need to do, and how we as individuals and as teams can become even more effective. - See more at: http://blog.kevineikenberry.com/commu...

  15. 5 out of 5

    John Orr

    I got very little out of this book. For me, it read too much like a middle school term paper. The author seems to think that providing a quote or clever anecdote provides sufficient evidence to prove his broad, sweeping economic predictions. Much of the book consists of the author making fairly mundane observations before leaping to conclusions that are either blindingly obvious or complete speculation. The idea that emotional intelligence is becoming more and more important in the modern world I got very little out of this book. For me, it read too much like a middle school term paper. The author seems to think that providing a quote or clever anecdote provides sufficient evidence to prove his broad, sweeping economic predictions. Much of the book consists of the author making fairly mundane observations before leaping to conclusions that are either blindingly obvious or complete speculation. The idea that emotional intelligence is becoming more and more important in the modern world is nothing new, and yet this is the author's primary observation. I was hoping for a well researched book founded in economic principles and technological fact. Instead, I got a rambling jumble of speculation that would have been better off as an opinion piece for a national periodical.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bill Pritchard

    Geoff Colvin has written an easy to read book that reads more like an essay - a call to the skills that this and future generations will need to refine and improve in order to better utilize the impacts of the improving technology around us. I found each chapter as a stand alone essay very thought provoking - it is the interactions and interpersonal skills between people and teams that will make for the greatest successes and improvements. It is an area that I don't excel in - and I consider it Geoff Colvin has written an easy to read book that reads more like an essay - a call to the skills that this and future generations will need to refine and improve in order to better utilize the impacts of the improving technology around us. I found each chapter as a stand alone essay very thought provoking - it is the interactions and interpersonal skills between people and teams that will make for the greatest successes and improvements. It is an area that I don't excel in - and I consider it a wake up call that I work to improve in these areas. If you are in the workplace of anykind - especially in a corporate organization - I would consider this an essential read. Highly recommended.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    This is a book that I got from the library and now will be buying a copy of to foist on everyone I know. It is a great review of critical human skills that make our world better and will continue to, even as we increase our reliance on machines. Anyone wondering how they can improve themselves to be relevant in that not-so-distant future should read this. Has great commentary and examples of humans working in teams, for instance, and adding value through pure human social connection.

  18. 4 out of 5

    David R.

    Colvin lays down some depressing news about the future of humanity vis a vis technology. Technology will commoditize almost all jobs now done by humans and only a narrow set of "relational" occupations will remain truly human. As to how all this will come about when technology is also disrupting human interrelationships is anyone's guess. Colvin lays down some depressing news about the future of humanity vis a vis technology. Technology will commoditize almost all jobs now done by humans and only a narrow set of "relational" occupations will remain truly human. As to how all this will come about when technology is also disrupting human interrelationships is anyone's guess.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marco Morales

    It has good insights about our future coexisting with machines smarter than us. I consider interesting how the author argues our brain evolved at this high cognitive level mainly because we needed to interact socially. I don't really think it is completely accurate but it makes you think. Although it is kind of redundant at the end, it is worth reading. It has good insights about our future coexisting with machines smarter than us. I consider interesting how the author argues our brain evolved at this high cognitive level mainly because we needed to interact socially. I don't really think it is completely accurate but it makes you think. Although it is kind of redundant at the end, it is worth reading.

  20. 5 out of 5

    JP

    A lovely book, There was common saying the technology going to outs the human employment.. In real the new invention eliminate the old one and not humans Author explains why better technology required and how it helps the human evolution.. an interesting write to read. Overall can Check it out..

  21. 4 out of 5

    Zivile

    Well, to be short, this book ensures that humans cannot be 100% replaced by machines, especially, where team work is essential. And to my surprise: the best teams are only where there are women included but not the smartest men, because apparently empathy is EVERYTHING.

  22. 5 out of 5

    sadiq

    Human to human relationships will never be mimicked by computers well enough for people to prefer them. Okay time will tell Mr Colvin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Don Putnam

    About a year after this book came out, I listened to a number of key note speakers from our IT management which left me feeling depressed (my job is in the IT sector). I've long suspected this and these speakers confirmed it. Automation, robotics and outsourcing IT work to India and other low-cost countries is the prevailing strategy of in-house IT. Other technology companies that actually produce software are probably in the same boat. If you are a manufacturer laborer or in the IT or engineerin About a year after this book came out, I listened to a number of key note speakers from our IT management which left me feeling depressed (my job is in the IT sector). I've long suspected this and these speakers confirmed it. Automation, robotics and outsourcing IT work to India and other low-cost countries is the prevailing strategy of in-house IT. Other technology companies that actually produce software are probably in the same boat. If you are a manufacturer laborer or in the IT or engineering industries, your job will become a commodity in the next decade or so. And in this context, I agree with many who are considering Universal Basic Income (UBI). What will we do, as a planet, when millions of people are out of jobs due to automation? And if that wave comes more quickly than society can adjust, it will disrupt life as we've known it for the last 80 years. I've not seen too many dissenting opinion out job outlooks for the big middle part of the curve. And I stick to my opinion that having a job, and a fulfilling one at that, is and will be a luxury. Living on UBI is just a way tell 'the masses' to leave the massively wealthy alone. Colvin does a pretty good job of spreading the gloom. And he does offer some hope. In sum, if you are a woman, you have a leg up. Lean in on your femininity, social strengths and ability to empathize. And if you want to really change the world, get on an all-women team and stay there. And if you are a man, continue to pursue your preferred skills, but learn how to be a highly social being; learn to work well with women ... or just go find an all-male company and eek out an existence. Jobs of the future - for the big middle of the curve, it'll probably be a combination of UBI and some low-earning, enjoyable, life-skill or hobby that pays. Kids today will need to know and understand technology. But those who's strengths are in creativity, innovation, and empathy / working well in a team, will be the ones who "win" in the future - they will be the ones who have the luxury of having a traditional career as we know it today. In sum, jobs are becoming less of a means to survive and put food on the table, and more about a life experience. At some point, we all need to get comfortable with the idea that governments want to pay people to simply not wreck havoc on society, so that those who have luxury jobs can feel good about themselves.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Staci

    For some reason, I didn't care for this book as much as I thought I would, given how connected I feel to the topic (having a liberal arts degree and being quite concerned about my ability to get a job, both now and in the future). I think it may be the tone of the book; it's not harsh, or cold, or unfeeling, or anything I can put a definitive negative term on, it just felt somewhat...offputting. Like, even though I can't point to anything Colvin wrote that sounded sketchy, at times I questioned For some reason, I didn't care for this book as much as I thought I would, given how connected I feel to the topic (having a liberal arts degree and being quite concerned about my ability to get a job, both now and in the future). I think it may be the tone of the book; it's not harsh, or cold, or unfeeling, or anything I can put a definitive negative term on, it just felt somewhat...offputting. Like, even though I can't point to anything Colvin wrote that sounded sketchy, at times I questioned claims he was making and where he was getting his info. Although maybe that just has to do with how the book is formatted. Colvin does quote several research studies and various individuals but there are no superscript or footnotes. There are notes at the back of the book for each chapter and the things referred to in them but to make use of them, you'll have to remember or look back to catch the exact wording used (and you'll have to have realized that that particular sentence or phrase was something that might have a note to it to begin with). I don't know, there are several books on this subject (about liberals arts and humanities people and how they will fare in our ever-more-technologically-based future world) -- I imagine that at least one of them has to portray the information better so I'll try to check those out.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Wally Bock

    One of the five best books I read in 2015 The key insight of this book is that human brains evolved for social interaction. What Colvin does is spin out the implications of that insight, with excellent real life examples. This book is a wonderful counterpoint to the books which attempt to predict the future and also to the ones who claim that computers will never be able to do what humans do. The strength of the analysis is that you will get an idea of how you might adapt effectively to a rapidly One of the five best books I read in 2015 The key insight of this book is that human brains evolved for social interaction. What Colvin does is spin out the implications of that insight, with excellent real life examples. This book is a wonderful counterpoint to the books which attempt to predict the future and also to the ones who claim that computers will never be able to do what humans do. The strength of the analysis is that you will get an idea of how you might adapt effectively to a rapidly changing business/technology landscape. This is an insightful and helpful book that will help you live the rest of your life more productively. Instead of specific predictions, either about what will happen and how you should react, Colvin has given us a framework within which we can adapt to whatever happens next. That’s not giving you a fish, it’s teaching you how to fish and it’s the reason to read Humans Are Underrated: What High Achievers Know That Brilliant Machines Never Will. Read my complete review at http://www.threestarleadership.com/bo...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    The world is changing fast. Computers are expanding their capacity to handle cognitive processes faster than humans have a chance of doing, and we can't keep up. Geoff Colvin asks the question, "Why should we?" Were humans made to work that mimics and rivals computational power and processes, or is there some other kind of work that computers will never imitate? This book focuses on the skills that computers are not able to recreate, and which not only will remain valuable in the changing economy The world is changing fast. Computers are expanding their capacity to handle cognitive processes faster than humans have a chance of doing, and we can't keep up. Geoff Colvin asks the question, "Why should we?" Were humans made to work that mimics and rivals computational power and processes, or is there some other kind of work that computers will never imitate? This book focuses on the skills that computers are not able to recreate, and which not only will remain valuable in the changing economy but will actually become more valuable than ever for those in leadership positions: Social skills, empathy, and creativity. Not only are these skills in higher demand than ever, but they lead to a happy fulfilled life because they're the kind of tasks the people are uniquely created to do at their best! I'm not into economics, but this book really helped me understand why some sorts of tasks lead to more personal fulfillment than others, and how to continue to grow personally and professionally in a way that doesn't keep me looking over my shoulder constantly, waiting for a computer to catch up. Strong recommendation!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rohit Tandekar

    A book that deals with the hot topic of technology disrupting organizations and AI taking over jobs. I recommend this book to everyone who's currently trying to understand what he or she is going to face in the future and how one can navigate through the uncertainties lying ahead. The author tries his best to anticipate the reader's apprehensions about the facts and stories he states and successfully manages to douse every tiny flame of doubt or apprehension he might have and thus weaves a well A book that deals with the hot topic of technology disrupting organizations and AI taking over jobs. I recommend this book to everyone who's currently trying to understand what he or she is going to face in the future and how one can navigate through the uncertainties lying ahead. The author tries his best to anticipate the reader's apprehensions about the facts and stories he states and successfully manages to douse every tiny flame of doubt or apprehension he might have and thus weaves a well rounded defense that sides with humans staying relevant in organizations (and in the world) whilst facing technological advancement. My biggest takeaway from the book was how computers and technology is getting better at even the most "creative" of tasks - writing poems, producing movies or cooking. And that there will come a time when they will get as good as humans or even better. But we can take solace in the fact that humans like to consume products that are produced by other humans, when they can attach a name and face to the otherwise ordinary commodity.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Weltengeist

    By and large, I enjoyed reading this book. It's typical journalist-style (i.e., it usually relies more on anecdotes to "prove" its points than on empirical science), but it is entertaining and contains many an interesting observation. In my opinion not so much about the relationship between humans and AI but more about how we think, learn and cooperate. Only the last chapter I found rather disappointing. Here, the author tries to make predictions for the future, which is always treacherous terra By and large, I enjoyed reading this book. It's typical journalist-style (i.e., it usually relies more on anecdotes to "prove" its points than on empirical science), but it is entertaining and contains many an interesting observation. In my opinion not so much about the relationship between humans and AI but more about how we think, learn and cooperate. Only the last chapter I found rather disappointing. Here, the author tries to make predictions for the future, which is always treacherous terrain. For example, he claims that the increasing need for empathic employees will provide ample job opportunities for people who have majored in the humanities. I strongly doubt this - my own prediction would be more in the vein of "we will need more people who do both people AND tech", which would not make the situation for humanities as they are currently taught any better than it currently is. But ignoring the fashionable "what will we do when the computers have taken over all they can" hook, there's a lot you can learn about humans from this book. I rate it four out of five stars.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Interesting view on what will be the valuable skills in the upcoming age of technology doing everything. Hardest things for Technology will be centered around people. Dealing with data and things will soon surpass humans in all jobs. Empathy is the core valuable skill for this next age. This is something that men are intrinsically bad at, and likely will be worse at empathy than machines themselves. (That's not saying much). Skill in working in collaborative teams which understand each others stre Interesting view on what will be the valuable skills in the upcoming age of technology doing everything. Hardest things for Technology will be centered around people. Dealing with data and things will soon surpass humans in all jobs. Empathy is the core valuable skill for this next age. This is something that men are intrinsically bad at, and likely will be worse at empathy than machines themselves. (That's not saying much). Skill in working in collaborative teams which understand each others strengths and weaknesses, likely alongside technology, will be the key critical skill. Creativity will still have value, but it too is likely to soon be matched by technology. In the future working world, women have a natural personality bent which likely will make them much more valuable than men... economic woe be to the uneducated male.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ami

    This was the first book I had come across on this topic - eye opening. A quick read as well - would recommend it to friends and colleagues. I liked that the book went into the recent advancements in technology, notably IBM's Watson, and how these advancements had exceeded what people thought would ever be possible from a machine. The author provided a number of innate human strengths and clear examples of how humans used them to their advantage (he had a number of military examples). I thought t This was the first book I had come across on this topic - eye opening. A quick read as well - would recommend it to friends and colleagues. I liked that the book went into the recent advancements in technology, notably IBM's Watson, and how these advancements had exceeded what people thought would ever be possible from a machine. The author provided a number of innate human strengths and clear examples of how humans used them to their advantage (he had a number of military examples). I thought the last third of the book was not as strong as the first two-thirds - he could have gone into more detail on his chapter on women, and the conclusion that humans will prevail seemed a nice but fluffy way to end a book on such a big topic.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.