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Quiet Power: The Secret Strengths of Introverts

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The monumental bestseller Quiet has been recast in a new edition that empowers introverted kids and teens  Susan Cain sparked a worldwide conversation when she published Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. With her inspiring book, she permanently changed the way we see introverts and the way introverts see themselves. The original book focuse The monumental bestseller Quiet has been recast in a new edition that empowers introverted kids and teens  Susan Cain sparked a worldwide conversation when she published Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. With her inspiring book, she permanently changed the way we see introverts and the way introverts see themselves. The original book focused on the workplace, and Susan realized that a version for and about kids was also badly needed. This book is all about kids' world—school, extracurriculars, family life, and friendship. You’ll read about actual kids who have tackled the challenges of not being extroverted and who have made a mark in their own quiet way. You’ll hear Susan Cain’s own story, and you’ll be able to make use of the tips at the end of each chapter. There’s even a guide at the end of the book for parents and teachers. This insightful, accessible, and empowering book, illustrated with amusing comic-style art, will be eye-opening to extroverts and introverts alike.


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The monumental bestseller Quiet has been recast in a new edition that empowers introverted kids and teens  Susan Cain sparked a worldwide conversation when she published Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. With her inspiring book, she permanently changed the way we see introverts and the way introverts see themselves. The original book focuse The monumental bestseller Quiet has been recast in a new edition that empowers introverted kids and teens  Susan Cain sparked a worldwide conversation when she published Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. With her inspiring book, she permanently changed the way we see introverts and the way introverts see themselves. The original book focused on the workplace, and Susan realized that a version for and about kids was also badly needed. This book is all about kids' world—school, extracurriculars, family life, and friendship. You’ll read about actual kids who have tackled the challenges of not being extroverted and who have made a mark in their own quiet way. You’ll hear Susan Cain’s own story, and you’ll be able to make use of the tips at the end of each chapter. There’s even a guide at the end of the book for parents and teachers. This insightful, accessible, and empowering book, illustrated with amusing comic-style art, will be eye-opening to extroverts and introverts alike.

30 review for Quiet Power: The Secret Strengths of Introverts

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lorilin

    Man oh man, I wish I had a book like this when I was younger. I grew up in a family that did not accept quiet people. I was always the odd one out, as I preferred a calm and soothing environment to read or think by myself. I hated that the TV was on all the time, that people seemed to be shouting and arguing instead of talking and listening, and, especially, that I was constantly criticized for being too sensitive, too shy, and too reclusive. I, of course, enjoyed reading Susan Cain's first book, Man oh man, I wish I had a book like this when I was younger. I grew up in a family that did not accept quiet people. I was always the odd one out, as I preferred a calm and soothing environment to read or think by myself. I hated that the TV was on all the time, that people seemed to be shouting and arguing instead of talking and listening, and, especially, that I was constantly criticized for being too sensitive, too shy, and too reclusive. I, of course, enjoyed reading Susan Cain's first book, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking, but I love that she decided to write another book aimed at a younger audience. I know my childhood experience of being shamed for being "too quiet" isn't unique. And the judgments you absorb as a child stay with you--sometimes for a lifetime, unfortunately. As a kid, I think I would have given anything to hear someone say that it was okay to, well, be me. And that is what this book gives: acceptance. There is no extrovert-bashing in here (quite the opposite, actually), but the book IS a gentle celebration of all people who prefer to approach life in a slightly more calm and deliberate way. Quiet Power is divided into four sections: School, Socializing, Hobbies, and Home. Each section has several chapters, all pertaining to the main subject of the section. Cain gives a lot of good, practical advice, but she's never pushy or judgmental. Some of my favorite insights from this book: (*) Introverts are good listeners, and they are very focused. This tends to make them good leaders. (*) Find tactics that help you reduce social anxiety: speak up first; speak up last; or sit up front so you don't have to see others watching you. (*) Pursue causes you are passionate about, since passion tends to override fear. (*) It's okay to build your alliances slowly and steadily. (*) You don't grow out of being shy, you grow into it. (*) Stretch yourself beyond your comfort zone, but only so far; on a scale of 1 - 10, your anxiety level should be around 5 - 6. (*) If your kid loves school, but tends to come home and immediately have a meltdown, it might be because she is exhausted by being "on" for the past several hours. Make sure your kid has time to unwind and recharge after big activities. (Um, this was life-changing for our household.) One of the best things about this book is that all this advice isn't delivered via a lecture; it's demonstrated through personal stories. Most of the stories come from introverted kids (in middle school through college), but there are some stories from famous adults, as well (e.g., Gandhi, Beyonce, Steve Wozniak, Bill Gates, Eleanor Roosevelt, etc.). All of these people experience different levels of introversion. Some are straight up loners; others become class president. There is a lot of variety, which means just about any introvert is going to be able to read this book and find something useful. Ultimately, Quiet Power is a practical and uplifting resource for introverted kids--and I think it's a helpful book for adults, too, whether you are introverted or not. It can be so hurtful to not be accepted as a kid, and I think it is worthwhile for adults to understand that quiet kids aren't weird or broken. They have their own unique way of experiencing the world and expressing themselves, but they add so much to the conversation. We just need to close our mouths, open our ears, and listen. ARC provided by Amazon Vine. See more of my book reviews at www.BugBugBooks.com.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Raoufa Ibrahim

    actual rating :4.5 when I was a little kid, one of my family member thought I had some kind of social disease .. some thing that prevents me from mingling with other kids. what they didn't know is that I was-and still-an Introvert. the problem was when the community tried so hard to make me an extrovert(the default in their opinion), I might have looked like an Extrovert but that wasn't my stable state, so when I entered the college, all the tension school brings to the students was gone and I f actual rating :4.5 when I was a little kid, one of my family member thought I had some kind of social disease .. some thing that prevents me from mingling with other kids. what they didn't know is that I was-and still-an Introvert. the problem was when the community tried so hard to make me an extrovert(the default in their opinion), I might have looked like an Extrovert but that wasn't my stable state, so when I entered the college, all the tension school brings to the students was gone and I finally got back to my stable state(Introvert) and I embraced it! The problem this book is trying to solve is to change the worlds perspective toward us the Introverts, at least not trying to push hard into making us an Extrovert. And to make sure the Introverts understand them selves well so they can know their weakness and try to change it and to know their strength to use it, like did you know that the best leaders are Introverts?! this information alone can change an Introvert life! the solution(book) comes in 4 chapters: 1-School I decided that I wasn't going to have the largest number of friendships, but I was going to have plenty of deep and excellent ones. And I've continued doing that all my life. 2-socializing Besides learning from one another, introverts and extroverts often find that they balance each other out. 3-hobbies Pay attention to what makes you curious, and let it lead you in a direction that might provide a life-changing experience. 4-Home So if you're reading quietly, someone else can come in and read quietly too, but they can't come in and turn on music and start to dance. what I liked the most is ending of every section, she ends it with tips on the problem discussed.. example: one chapter discussed friendship and parties, when one of your friends invites you to a party but you don't feel like coming because People! you have to tell him that the problem is not with him, you'd love to spend time with him but not in party and try to schedule a time to do what you like better, That's one of the tips. It's really helpful, and since most of the bookworms here are Introverts, I'm encouraging you to read it. -------- Introvert people: "I'm genuinely a shy, socially awkward, introverted person" "coming to realize that about myself was very empowring, because I had felt like, 'Oh my God, there must be something wrong with me because I don't want to go out and do what all my friends want to do' " -Emma Watson Elon Musk, J.k Rowling, Steve Jobs, Abraham Lincoln, Sir Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin, Steve Wozniak, and many more are Introverts

  3. 5 out of 5

    Clumsy Storyteller

    It wasn't bad, it was just Meh! I haven't learned anything new. Maybe because I read a lot of psychology papers that this book was not news to me. It wasn't bad, it was just Meh! I haven't learned anything new. Maybe because I read a lot of psychology papers that this book was not news to me.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kyla Harris

    Such a great fresh read to start off 2017! Nice break from all the high fantasies I'm constantly reading! Made me appreciate me as a person more as well as other introverts. I'd definatly be open to recommending Quiet Power to others <3 Such a great fresh read to start off 2017! Nice break from all the high fantasies I'm constantly reading! Made me appreciate me as a person more as well as other introverts. I'd definatly be open to recommending Quiet Power to others <3

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    This was a really well done example of a young reader edition -- rather than talking down to readers or only highlighting the "easy" stuff from the adult version of the book, Cain tailors her book toward teenagers. She explains what introversion is, doing a much better job in this version to differentiate introvert and extrovert while not putting one down over the other (this was an issue I took with the original, where extroverts seemed weirdly made to sound like a problem when really the probl This was a really well done example of a young reader edition -- rather than talking down to readers or only highlighting the "easy" stuff from the adult version of the book, Cain tailors her book toward teenagers. She explains what introversion is, doing a much better job in this version to differentiate introvert and extrovert while not putting one down over the other (this was an issue I took with the original, where extroverts seemed weirdly made to sound like a problem when really the problem is the world caters to extroversion). There are times when shy and introvert get conflated here, as they do in the original, and it's more a detriment here simply because it could get really confusing for younger readers to tease the two apart. The examples of introversion and the stories used are smart, and Cain does a great job of offering ways to work with one's introverted strengths, rather than hide from them. She uses a metaphor of a rubber band that works well: be flexible, work to push to your edge, but don't stretch until you break. There is a lot here for extroverts, too, and I could see this being a really fascinating classroom or book club read, for sure. I wonder about standing-on-the-shelf appeal, but readers who pick this one up will likely be drawn in immediately...especially introverts who feel their preferences aren't the ones they get to indulge or hear much about.

  6. 5 out of 5

    royaevereads

    I really wish I had been able to read this as a child! I have been facing the extrovert ideal my entire life, constantly being told that I need to talk more or be louder and feeling like I never measure up. Well, not anymore. This book focuses on accepting yourself, playing to your strengths, minimising your weaknesses and stretching out of your comfort zone when required. I absolutely loved the layout. The cartoons are fantastic and the whole book is set out in a really clear and concise way. Bu I really wish I had been able to read this as a child! I have been facing the extrovert ideal my entire life, constantly being told that I need to talk more or be louder and feeling like I never measure up. Well, not anymore. This book focuses on accepting yourself, playing to your strengths, minimising your weaknesses and stretching out of your comfort zone when required. I absolutely loved the layout. The cartoons are fantastic and the whole book is set out in a really clear and concise way. But what I loved most about it was the content and the advice that it gives. The one thing I didn't like so much was the amount of real life stories and examples sprinkled throughout it. Just because they all linked back to the same overarching meanings. I highly recommend this book to all introverts or just to anyone who's remotely interested in introverts :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Abdel-Aziz Fathy

    I cannot forget the discomfort I had back in school for being a quiet student while outgoing talkative students were more praised and appreciated. Not only I needed to understand that different doesn't mean bad and quiet doesn't mean sad, I also needed to accept my nature as it is and stop trying to meet those standards of a "successful" student. I saw myself in those children's stories and struggles. I would have saved a lot of efforts and time as a kid if I had some guidance that bring me close I cannot forget the discomfort I had back in school for being a quiet student while outgoing talkative students were more praised and appreciated. Not only I needed to understand that different doesn't mean bad and quiet doesn't mean sad, I also needed to accept my nature as it is and stop trying to meet those standards of a "successful" student. I saw myself in those children's stories and struggles. I would have saved a lot of efforts and time as a kid if I had some guidance that bring me closer to my nature and help me grow to be me not someone else. A big thank you to Susan Cain for her efforts and devotion to help introverts understand themselves , their needs and most importantly their real powers.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kate Willis

    I’m an introvert. 86% on the MBTI scale, if anyone is asking. I struggle to want to go to social events, struggle to enjoy them long while I’m there, and am so bad at introductions I generally avoid them. I’m better at imaginary, practice conversations than real ones. I’ve grown to accept and (mostly) love this aspect of my personality, but I’ve been through times where I felt undervalued in this world and had the social skills of a baby alien. The arts and some of the lovely and admirable peopl I’m an introvert. 86% on the MBTI scale, if anyone is asking. I struggle to want to go to social events, struggle to enjoy them long while I’m there, and am so bad at introductions I generally avoid them. I’m better at imaginary, practice conversations than real ones. I’ve grown to accept and (mostly) love this aspect of my personality, but I’ve been through times where I felt undervalued in this world and had the social skills of a baby alien. The arts and some of the lovely and admirable people I’ve met through them have helped. The cutesy memes and entirely loveable, nerdy fictional characters have too. My parents’ support and my siblings eventually understanding that I don’t hate people just too many for too long have been a key. And the world’s most understanding and friendly extrovert and an inquisitive, thoughtful introvert adopted me as their friend for some inexplicable reason, and I’m so grateful. But I still needed every word of this book, and I’m so glad to have read it. It gave me tips for navigating this world built for extroverts, and it reminded me again of things I’ve learned by trial and error and about why they’re important. I’ve been feeling a little extra stressed/depressed lately and had a few lightbulb moments while reading, especially in sections about self-care. (I should probably get back into journaling…) But most importantly, this book is a scientifically-based (but not boring--there are comics and interesting stories ;) ) love letter to introverts everywhere. I cried. God made this world to be a two-sided coin personality-wise, and especially in the chapters on extrovert/introvert team-ups and introverted “powers”, I was reminded of my value. <3 I would love to time travel and hand this book to eleven-year-old Kate and tell her she’s not an alien, she is wonderful and loved, and she will learn to stretch and get to talk about the things she cares about without dying from fright. Instead, I passed it to my 14-year-old introverted sister and I’ll have it ready for my baby nephew when he’s a little older than four. It’s that good. (Notes: As an adult who has tried to read the scholarly masterpiece that is Quiet by Susan Cain and failed, this book was not too low of a reading level or cutesy. It was well thought out, respectful, and helpful. If you are concerned about the handling of extroversion, I found it minimal since this is a book for introverts but respectful. Read reviews by extroverts if you would like to see how they felt about it. There are a couple blasphemies.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Siepel

    I am an extrovert with three (out of 4) introverted children. If you find yourself in this situation, I highly recommend this book. My eldest child probably suffered because I truly did not understand how he functioned as an introvert. Quiet Power gives insight into what it means to be an introvert and practical steps how to function in our world. I very much appreciated the fact that this book does not ask an introvert to change, but rather meet the challenges of life within the framework of th I am an extrovert with three (out of 4) introverted children. If you find yourself in this situation, I highly recommend this book. My eldest child probably suffered because I truly did not understand how he functioned as an introvert. Quiet Power gives insight into what it means to be an introvert and practical steps how to function in our world. I very much appreciated the fact that this book does not ask an introvert to change, but rather meet the challenges of life within the framework of their personality. There are times when the author encourages kids to embrace the strength of introversion and other cases where she encourages them to step outside their comfort zone. I am giving this book 4 out of 5 stars because it is suppose to be written to kids and teens ages 10 and up. Having passed this book around to my teenage children (who are avid fiction and non-fiction readers) I can tell you that the layout and length of the book did not encourage them to read it through. I ended up reading portions over our dinner table, which kicked off some great discussions. One evening I witnessed the light go on in my youngest and most introverted child as he saw that the way he was created could actually be of benefit to him. The topics covered in this book include what it means to be an introvert at school, in social settings, in outside interests, and at home. Each topic covers what situations are most likely going to feel like to an introvert and how to function well within those environments. I particularly liked times when the author gives introverts ways to succeed in areas that are more difficult for them, like giving a presentation, small talk and leadership. I see myself either using this book as a parenting resource or putting it by my kid's bedside with pertinent pages marked for them to read at their leisure.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    This is a beginners level book. I cannot read past the first chapter. I find this one too bossy. Hey dear beginners, don't bother too. This is a beginners level book. I cannot read past the first chapter. I find this one too bossy. Hey dear beginners, don't bother too.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bookphile

    A nice adaptation of the original, which I think is well suited to the tween and teen set. More complete review to come. Full review: If you're an introvert (or an extrovert who wants to better understand the introverts in your life), and you're unfamiliar with Susan Cain, I recommend reading Quiet as soon as you can. Even though I've always known I had introverted tendencies, reading her book helped me understand a lot about myself, and make peace with what I've always seen as some of my negative A nice adaptation of the original, which I think is well suited to the tween and teen set. More complete review to come. Full review: If you're an introvert (or an extrovert who wants to better understand the introverts in your life), and you're unfamiliar with Susan Cain, I recommend reading Quiet as soon as you can. Even though I've always known I had introverted tendencies, reading her book helped me understand a lot about myself, and make peace with what I've always seen as some of my negative quirks. Now, as a parent, I've entered a whole new realm of introvert confusion. My kids are introverted too, but I still find parenting demanding at times because I do get to a point where I'm fried. Cain's books have helped me to find ways to explain to them when I need some me time, while also figuring out ways to meet their needs, and I'm glad for this adapted version as I think it'll help my twelve-year-old in particular understand her own needs a little better. The cover states that the book is for kids and teens, but by kids I'd say around 10 and up. I'm not sure younger kids (like my almost seven-year-old) would get as much out of it, but if they read it with a parent, it could be a good vehicle for discussion. Even if your introverted kids are too young for the book, it's a great read for parents, particularly if you're an extrovert who has trouble understanding why your child is quiet, has so few friends, and is seemingly shy. Though introverts can, of course, be shy, the two are often mistakenly conflated, particularly in a school setting, so this book may also be helpful for educators and anyone who works with children. Back when I was in school, the structure already leaned toward the extroverted kids, but in today's world of group work, grouped desks, and schools designed with pods to bring large groups of students together, I think it's even more important for parents, educators, and administrators to develop a better understanding of why such structures don't always bring out the best in introverted students. I've lost count of the number of times teachers have told me that my daughter is a good student and a nice kid, but that she should talk more in class, and I've come to see that as a big, red flag that maybe they don't get my introverted girl. What I think kids will get out of this book is twofold: assurance that they're not alone, which is very important, and concrete ideas for how to work with their personality type instead of trying to fight against it and, therefore, exhausting themselves and making themselves unhappy. The book has very good advice for topics ranging from how to participate in school in a way that makes introverted kids comfortable (and how to talk to teachers to help them understand how their needs can be best served) to how to develop and sustain friendships when all you may want to do at times is hide in your room alone with a book. This isn't what I'd call a "hard" science book in that, while Cain does reference studies, she doesn't lay them out the way she does in the version targeted to adults. Instead, she provides lots of personal anecdotes from kids from a variety of ages in which they address a particular episode or problematic area and how they went about solving it in a way that satisfied their need for privacy, quiet, and solitude. The framing of the book is very positive, showing kids that though it can be a struggle to be an introvert in a world that leans toward the more extroverted, introverts also possess some deep strengths. By learning how to harness these strengths rather than seeing them as weaknesses (i.e. "I wish your daughter would talk more in class" when, really, she's too busy listening and working through her own thoughts to be able to articulate on the spot), this book can really empower kids to speak up for themselves and to be sure their own needs are met while also strengthening their bonds with others, whether family, friends, or teachers. The last two sections of the book are targeted at educators and parents. They're only a few pages long, so they don't have a great deal of depth, but they do have some good suggestions for how to work with introverted kids. For example, the book suggests that teachers build thinking time into their lessons, giving all kids a chance to consider information they've gained and to synthesize it rather than immediately shouting out answers. For parents, she offers some tips for helping their kids navigate their social lives while monitoring their kids' anxiety levels. The topic of introverts versus extroverts is one that I don't think gets enough attention, but I understand the reasoning behind it. It makes sense to me that extroverts don't get why introverts want to sometimes retreat into their caves, and that introverts don't understand why extroverts are constantly nagging them to go to parties. However, it is possible to reach a happy medium when introverts and extroverts learn how to pool their strengths in order to get the best out of both personality types. I'm heartened by the thought that views may be shifting, sparing my introverted kids from some of the well-meaning but negative consequences I suffered as an introverted child. Had I known how to adopt some of the techniques this book describes, I would likely have been happier both at school and in my social life, because I would have had the tools to express to my friends, teachers, and family members what my needs were.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    This is the kids and teens version of "Quiet" and I have to say I think it should be required reading in classrooms and homes across the country. Not only does it help introverts how to cope with school and friends and life, but it lets them know that it's ok. They don't have to be like everybody else. It's ok if you need to hide away from people in order to recharge your batteries. It's ok if you can't answer questions right away because you like to think about the issue and contemplate it. And This is the kids and teens version of "Quiet" and I have to say I think it should be required reading in classrooms and homes across the country. Not only does it help introverts how to cope with school and friends and life, but it lets them know that it's ok. They don't have to be like everybody else. It's ok if you need to hide away from people in order to recharge your batteries. It's ok if you can't answer questions right away because you like to think about the issue and contemplate it. And it's ok if you don't have a hundred friends. You only need one or two good ones. This is also a great guide for extroverts and ambiverts on understanding your introvert friends, colleagues and family. Although the book is geared towards kids and teens, there's a section in the back for teachers and one for parents. It's spectacular! It's another great resource on how to live with one another and our differences. (And I haven't read "Quiet" but now I think I should.) The illustrations are awesome, too!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emmanuelle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Good book on introverts, extroverts and ambiverts because you can't categorize a person 100/100 but you discover through many topics, many experiences even among the most illustrious (politics, leaders, actors, many in the creative field and especially writing). The advantage of this book is to find ways by being parents or coach to give means to introverts, to dare to undertake, to speak in public, to work in groups without fear. This is illustrated by a behavioural and psychological approach t Good book on introverts, extroverts and ambiverts because you can't categorize a person 100/100 but you discover through many topics, many experiences even among the most illustrious (politics, leaders, actors, many in the creative field and especially writing). The advantage of this book is to find ways by being parents or coach to give means to introverts, to dare to undertake, to speak in public, to work in groups without fear. This is illustrated by a behavioural and psychological approach to discover that we can be, for example, ambivalent with a strong inclination for introversion and that it can make us smile to read ourselves and discover where our strengths (which we considered as weaknesses) lie, how to use them step by step in a rather elitist world. On the other hand, it is important to note that the greatest number of leaders is found among introverts, that the author's popularized presentation has a scientific basis in cognition or epigenetics and that she does not talk about it but uses it in substance. So this book is not blah blah, but well-founded. I recommend it in spite of the redundant ending.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heidi McQuay

    It is written for tweens/teens. But I felt like the whole book was just one example after another a d gets old really fast. It's written from the point of view of an introvert and gives some tips and whatnot to "make the most" out of being an introvert. What I didnt like about this book was that it equated introvertedness to shyness. Even though in the book it specifically says they are not the same thing, I think nearly every example (and there were a million) made it like they were. This was an It is written for tweens/teens. But I felt like the whole book was just one example after another a d gets old really fast. It's written from the point of view of an introvert and gives some tips and whatnot to "make the most" out of being an introvert. What I didnt like about this book was that it equated introvertedness to shyness. Even though in the book it specifically says they are not the same thing, I think nearly every example (and there were a million) made it like they were. This was annoying to me because I am an introvert, but I'm not particularly shy and I am also a strong leader. I felt it only painted one example of an introvert in all of it's millions of examples. Not a fan, though I can see how it might be helpful to a small, very select group of young introverts.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Madman Reads & Rocks

    Pretty good and succinct. I wish such a book existed when I was a kid.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Cunningham

    Susan Cain’s QUIET POWER is a retelling of her phenomenally popular QUIET, this time aimed at kids. Both books explore the hidden talents of introverts in a world that seems to venerate extroverts (Cain calls this “the Extrovert Ideal”). But where QUIET focused mainly on the workplace and adult interactions, QUIET POWER focuses on the world of teenagers – school, competitive sports, the Internet, and forming friendships. As an introvert myself, I would have loved a book like this when I was in h Susan Cain’s QUIET POWER is a retelling of her phenomenally popular QUIET, this time aimed at kids. Both books explore the hidden talents of introverts in a world that seems to venerate extroverts (Cain calls this “the Extrovert Ideal”). But where QUIET focused mainly on the workplace and adult interactions, QUIET POWER focuses on the world of teenagers – school, competitive sports, the Internet, and forming friendships. As an introvert myself, I would have loved a book like this when I was in high school. It would have meant so much to me to read that I wasn’t alone in feeling like an outsider. It’s very difficult being an introverted teen when everyone around you is urging you to “come out of your shell” and join the party! Cain recognizes that introverts have powers of their own (she calls them “superpowers”), if only they can recognize them. QUIET POWER is divided into four sections, covering school, socialization, hobbies, and home. Cain clearly explains what introvert and extrovert mean, and how many of us are actually “ambiverts,” with personality traits that are both introverted and extroverted; but the book is primarily directed at introverts. She provides many examples of famous introverted people who did great things with their lives – people like Albert Einstein, Beyoncé, Eleanor Roosevelt, Steve Wozniak, and Emma Warner. She also uses the stories of real teenagers who describe their own experiences navigating school and friends. All of it is very affirming, and I have no doubt introverted teens will relate to what Cain is presenting here. At the same time, I do have a few issues with QUIET POWER (just as I did with QUIET). Cain seems to link introversion and shyness in a way that confounds me. While she does mention at one point that not all introverts are shy, so many of the examples she uses in this book seem to apply more to shy teens (or those suffering from social anxiety) than they do introverted teens. I am definitely an introvert – I’ve taken the full scale Myers-Briggs personality test, and my introvert score was extremely high – but I’ve never been shy. I’ve also never been particularly “quiet,” which Cain suggests is a natural trait of introverts. I do prefer quiet locations to loud and raucous ones, but I’m also outspoken, opinionated, and eager to express my opinion. No one would ever have called me “quiet,” not even in high school. As I’ve always understood it, the clearest determinant of whether people are introverted or extroverted is how they recharge their batteries. An extrovert is energized by large groups, social interaction, and lots of activity; the longer an extrovert stays at a party, for example, the more energy he or she has. Introverts, on the other hand, lose energy during a large gathering (it exhausts them); they need to break away to a “restorative niche” (as Cain calls it) to recharge themselves. This doesn’t mean introverts are shy or socially awkward, but only that socialization can be draining in ways it isn’t for extroverts. It’s not the same thing as being shy. That said, there’s a lot in this book to help teens (and their parents) understand themselves better. Cain affirms the choices introverts make (smaller groups rather than larger ones, fewer close friends rather than a crowd of acquaintances, feeling comfortable with solitude rather than a need for socialization), and this can make kids feel less alien among their peers. Cain also encourages introverts to stretch beyond their comfort zone and take more risks, which is excellent advice for all of us. There’s also a helpful guide for teachers and parents at the end of the book which offers suggestions for how best to help introverted students and children thrive in an extroverted world. Bottom line, this is a helpful book for teens, teachers, and parents. It’s probably best read in sections, with readers picking out the parts that best apply to them. There’s a lot here that will undoubtedly help introverts better understand themselves, and that’s very important. [Please note: I was provided a copy of this book for review; the opinions expressed here are my own.]

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alice (Married To Books)

    This book is targeted more for a kids and teen audience. I'm 21, yet I do consider myself mainly to be a strong introvert and quite passive. Quiet Power is a popular self-help collection written by Susan Cain (who also feels introverted) and has given lectures of TED reaching millions of views. There are lots of teen and kid experiences from real-life school students on the social struggles they have faced and the steps taken to try and overcome them. I can see younger readers connecting with th This book is targeted more for a kids and teen audience. I'm 21, yet I do consider myself mainly to be a strong introvert and quite passive. Quiet Power is a popular self-help collection written by Susan Cain (who also feels introverted) and has given lectures of TED reaching millions of views. There are lots of teen and kid experiences from real-life school students on the social struggles they have faced and the steps taken to try and overcome them. I can see younger readers connecting with the content. I look forward to reading Susan's other books and hopefully watching one of her TED Talks!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mariel Maga

    just read the other quiet one book. (i really like it hence, i thought i'll like this too) but this took me 6 long month to finish, i just don't give a fuck about the stories. i don't understand at all why is this even published just read the other quiet one book. (i really like it hence, i thought i'll like this too) but this took me 6 long month to finish, i just don't give a fuck about the stories. i don't understand at all why is this even published

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Jane Brown

    I must admit, I’m disappointed with this book. Having been recommended this hundreds of times since it arrived on the scene, I had high expectations. I think the experience and take away from this book varies depending on who you are, hold old you are and how knowledgable you are on the subject. The book seems to talk to the reader as if they are an introvert. If it were written with a general point of view, a less precise address then I suppose this could be a good guide for extroverts. As for the I must admit, I’m disappointed with this book. Having been recommended this hundreds of times since it arrived on the scene, I had high expectations. I think the experience and take away from this book varies depending on who you are, hold old you are and how knowledgable you are on the subject. The book seems to talk to the reader as if they are an introvert. If it were written with a general point of view, a less precise address then I suppose this could be a good guide for extroverts. As for the audience itself though, I was confused as to who she was writing to. One moment, it felt like the book was for young people (15-20) and the next, tweens. The book itself seemed to be physically designed for an older audience. I know we shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but when you see he book - it doesn’t screen ‘children’ to me. Perhaps parents would benefit from this (who have little knowledge). Unfortunately, within 30 pages, it was apparent that I wasn’t going to be learning much from this. I quick flick through to the end seemed to answer my prediction. Obviously I need to read this thoroughly, but the impression I’ve gotten is - it’s basic. There’s some psychology talk thrown in, which is great but again - I know this already. As I said, I am disappointed. Perhaps my expectations were too high and his isn’t the book for me at present. I guess it’s worth a read if you feel alone or your ‘quietness’/introversion isn’t welcomed by your friends and parents. I wouldn’t recommend to adult introverts who feel they know themselves by now. I don’t feel I can rate this, especially as I haven’t read it properly, but, I thought I’d share my thoughts. *Written on a mobile. Will correct any problems later on. X

  20. 5 out of 5

    Noninuna

    This book discuss how an introvert teenager / student is different from 'normal' extrovert. It also gives a lot of example of successful teenager/student and how they navigate the world without changing to be someone else (extrovert). Except for known public figures that used as example, there's a lot of unknown cases that the author found in the process of writing this book. I'd love if the author put some kind of pictures of them at the end (of course with their approval) so that I know the ex This book discuss how an introvert teenager / student is different from 'normal' extrovert. It also gives a lot of example of successful teenager/student and how they navigate the world without changing to be someone else (extrovert). Except for known public figures that used as example, there's a lot of unknown cases that the author found in the process of writing this book. I'd love if the author put some kind of pictures of them at the end (of course with their approval) so that I know the examples are not made up/fiction. That's my only problem with this book (and also the adult version of this). I recommend it for students & teenagers both introvert & extrovert because we could function better with some understanding. Adult could read it for some insight, especially if you're a parent or teacher and there are special chapters for both at the end of the book.My teenage years are not full of sunshine, most of the time were full of questions. There's no end of 'why'. My college years are me battling myself. But life went on until I was about 26 that I read Quiet: The Power of Introverts in A World That Can’t Stop Talking that something kinda lifted off my shoulder. My years of questions finally got an answer. Finally, I found peace with myself."If only I had this kind of books back then. If only I knew what I am back then." I could wish & there's no end to it but all in regrets. Life is better live looking forward & few glance to the back and no more. We just need to learn & to make use of what we've learned. Don't stop learning to be better.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dini

    This is Quiet adapted for younger readers, which I wish existed when I was a kid/teen. Younger me once entertained the ludicrous idea that I might have some sort of multiple personality disorder because at home I can be loud and playful, throwing punch lines like a stand-up comedian in front of my immediate family, but at school or other places I'm quieter and more reserved unless I'm with close friends. I didn't know then that personality exists in a spectrum, and while I'm mainly an introvert This is Quiet adapted for younger readers, which I wish existed when I was a kid/teen. Younger me once entertained the ludicrous idea that I might have some sort of multiple personality disorder because at home I can be loud and playful, throwing punch lines like a stand-up comedian in front of my immediate family, but at school or other places I'm quieter and more reserved unless I'm with close friends. I didn't know then that personality exists in a spectrum, and while I'm mainly an introvert my extroverted side can appear when I'm relaxed or with people I'm comfortable with. I wish a book like this had also been available to me when I was a teacher in the past (a misguided choice of career, by the way; I was able to go outside my comfort zone in order to put myself out there in front of a classroom, but after a few years I realized I simply did not have enough passion for the job to sustain the constant effort of doing so on a daily basis). I hope that as a teacher back then I didn't succumb too much to what the author calls the Extrovert Ideal in judging my students' participation in class. This book describes how teachers can help their quieter students be heard in a classroom, and also provides other tips and real-life stories of young introverts overcoming challenges in various environments. Recommended reading for all children, teenagers, parents and teachers. "Being introverted is not something to outgrow; it is something to accept and grow into—and even to cherish."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vinayak

    "When I was young, I had never heard of the terms introvert and extrovert. But I wish I'd known about the science and psychology of my personality, so that I could have understood that what I was experiencing was normal." This excerpt taken from the conclusion of the book perfectly describes what I feel about it. This book is a great way of addressing the aforementioned issue for the teenagers who are its intended audience. Also, this could well be a recommended read for any educators or parents "When I was young, I had never heard of the terms introvert and extrovert. But I wish I'd known about the science and psychology of my personality, so that I could have understood that what I was experiencing was normal." This excerpt taken from the conclusion of the book perfectly describes what I feel about it. This book is a great way of addressing the aforementioned issue for the teenagers who are its intended audience. Also, this could well be a recommended read for any educators or parents who are struggling to understand the quiet kids they have tasked with (some of whom might be hiding under the garb of forced loudness) Even though it's intended for a younger audience it is not skimpy on research, drawing upon prior published works (research papers, books) as well as personal interviews. Recommended gifting for the teenage readers in one's family. I certainly wish I had something of this sort growing up.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emeline Ring

    This book was so insightful, well-written, and reassuring - I very much wish I had had this I was younger and in grade school! It perfectly sheds light on what it's like to be introverted growing up in a world that puts extraversion on the highest pedestal. If I could, I would make all of my friends and family (both introverts and extroverts alike) read this. It has plenty of too-relatable situations that introverts, like me, will empathize with, but also shows how to thrive in all aspects of li This book was so insightful, well-written, and reassuring - I very much wish I had had this I was younger and in grade school! It perfectly sheds light on what it's like to be introverted growing up in a world that puts extraversion on the highest pedestal. If I could, I would make all of my friends and family (both introverts and extroverts alike) read this. It has plenty of too-relatable situations that introverts, like me, will empathize with, but also shows how to thrive in all aspects of life not in spite of your introversion, but because of it! It also gives extroverts a look into how introverts' minds work and how we thrive through completely different outlets. Regardless of your age or personality type, this is a must-read that I cannot recommend enough!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I could've used something like this when I was a child and/or teenager, who are the target audience of this book. I struggled with being an introvert growing up, feeling as if I had to make myself as extroverted as possible, so something like this would've been lovely to have. Some of the examples were a bit repetitive -- and by the end of the book I was kind of tuning it out (it was in audiobook form) because I'd heard it before. Though I may be quite a bit older than its intended audience, I d I could've used something like this when I was a child and/or teenager, who are the target audience of this book. I struggled with being an introvert growing up, feeling as if I had to make myself as extroverted as possible, so something like this would've been lovely to have. Some of the examples were a bit repetitive -- and by the end of the book I was kind of tuning it out (it was in audiobook form) because I'd heard it before. Though I may be quite a bit older than its intended audience, I did pick up some tips that will help me learn how to use my "introvert powers" when I can't retreat into my own world.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amandajustamanda

    The one thing I didn't like about Quiet was that, now that Cain had validated me, what was I supposed to do about it? This book, "A Guide for Kids and Teens," is exactly what Quiet needed. Though it is for kids, anyone can find use in it, I did. My primary purpose in reading this version of Cain's book was as a teacher with my introverted students in mind. I wanted to find better ways to help them succeed (Cain addresses that) and I wanted to be able to recommend it as individual reading materia The one thing I didn't like about Quiet was that, now that Cain had validated me, what was I supposed to do about it? This book, "A Guide for Kids and Teens," is exactly what Quiet needed. Though it is for kids, anyone can find use in it, I did. My primary purpose in reading this version of Cain's book was as a teacher with my introverted students in mind. I wanted to find better ways to help them succeed (Cain addresses that) and I wanted to be able to recommend it as individual reading material for those students (I did so, wholeheartedly, and many looked interested). I'm glad I heard about version of Quiet for kids and teens!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Queen Cronut

    This was such an interesting book- it breaks all common misinterpretations of introverts and extroverts and explored the silent strengths introverts possess despite a quiet demeanor. Also, the cartoons were pretty cute and hilarious. Even though I am in the target audience for this book (as it's aimed towards children and teens), I felt like this version was very dumbed down and kind of repetitive on its content that there wasn't much room for a more in-depth discussion on several of the topics. This was such an interesting book- it breaks all common misinterpretations of introverts and extroverts and explored the silent strengths introverts possess despite a quiet demeanor. Also, the cartoons were pretty cute and hilarious. Even though I am in the target audience for this book (as it's aimed towards children and teens), I felt like this version was very dumbed down and kind of repetitive on its content that there wasn't much room for a more in-depth discussion on several of the topics.

  27. 5 out of 5

    ~Liz~

    Interesting and insightful read. Definitely learnt a few things about introversion and how to use it's strengths in school, social, sporting etc. Cain gave practical tips and advice on how to use introvert strengths like creativity and empathy to succeed in a rather extroverted world. Full of examples about introverted teens using their introversion to their advantage inspired me to do the same. Recommend to introverts and extroverts alike! Interesting and insightful read. Definitely learnt a few things about introversion and how to use it's strengths in school, social, sporting etc. Cain gave practical tips and advice on how to use introvert strengths like creativity and empathy to succeed in a rather extroverted world. Full of examples about introverted teens using their introversion to their advantage inspired me to do the same. Recommend to introverts and extroverts alike!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rachel León

    (3.5 stars, rounded up because it's so empowering) I wish I had this book when I was younger, but I'm glad I got to share it with my extremely introverted son. Like Susan Cain's Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking, this book for younger readers is very empowering for introverts. At times it's very self-help in a way that nudges towards preachy, but it's such an essential guide for young readers about how to be a quiet person in a loud world. (3.5 stars, rounded up because it's so empowering) I wish I had this book when I was younger, but I'm glad I got to share it with my extremely introverted son. Like Susan Cain's Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking, this book for younger readers is very empowering for introverts. At times it's very self-help in a way that nudges towards preachy, but it's such an essential guide for young readers about how to be a quiet person in a loud world.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    Quiet Power is a must read for young people! For introverts, it will allow you to see the strengths introversion brings, and for extroverts, your eyes will be opened to see and appreciate the qualities of your introverted friends and family. The true stories shared in this book were wonderfully inspiring and oh-my-gosh-no-way surprising. A millions thanks for this book to Susan Cain!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    As an introvert who doesn't seem like an introvert to people that don't know me well, this book is a breath of fresh air. It's good to know that nothing is wrong with me for liking to be away from people to recharge. I love the stories and ideas. This is a great book that I wish I had found years ago! This is a book I cannot wait to booktalk!!! As an introvert who doesn't seem like an introvert to people that don't know me well, this book is a breath of fresh air. It's good to know that nothing is wrong with me for liking to be away from people to recharge. I love the stories and ideas. This is a great book that I wish I had found years ago! This is a book I cannot wait to booktalk!!!

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