web site hit counter The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and His Essay: The Gospel of Wealth - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and His Essay: The Gospel of Wealth

Availability: Ready to download

A native of Scotland, Andrew Carnegie emigrated to Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in his youth and through voracious reading and personal initiative became one of the richest men in American history. His autobiography recounts the real-life, rags-to-riches tale of an immigrant's rise from telegrapher's clerk to captain of industry and steel magnate. One of the earliest memoirs o A native of Scotland, Andrew Carnegie emigrated to Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in his youth and through voracious reading and personal initiative became one of the richest men in American history. His autobiography recounts the real-life, rags-to-riches tale of an immigrant's rise from telegrapher's clerk to captain of industry and steel magnate. One of the earliest memoirs of an American capitalist, The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie appeared shortly after the 84-year-old author's death in 1919. Industrialist, innovator, scholar, and philanthropist, Carnegie gave away more than 90 percent of his wealth for the establishment of libraries, schools, and hospitals. In addition to describing how he amassed his enormous fortune, his memoirs chronicle the deliberate and systematic distribution of his fortune for the enlightenment and betterment of humanity. This volume includes Carnegie's essay "The Gospel of Wealth," in which he outlines his philanthropic views, stating that "the millionaire will be but a trustee for the poor," bestowing charity on those willing to help themselves.


Compare

A native of Scotland, Andrew Carnegie emigrated to Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in his youth and through voracious reading and personal initiative became one of the richest men in American history. His autobiography recounts the real-life, rags-to-riches tale of an immigrant's rise from telegrapher's clerk to captain of industry and steel magnate. One of the earliest memoirs o A native of Scotland, Andrew Carnegie emigrated to Allegheny, Pennsylvania, in his youth and through voracious reading and personal initiative became one of the richest men in American history. His autobiography recounts the real-life, rags-to-riches tale of an immigrant's rise from telegrapher's clerk to captain of industry and steel magnate. One of the earliest memoirs of an American capitalist, The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie appeared shortly after the 84-year-old author's death in 1919. Industrialist, innovator, scholar, and philanthropist, Carnegie gave away more than 90 percent of his wealth for the establishment of libraries, schools, and hospitals. In addition to describing how he amassed his enormous fortune, his memoirs chronicle the deliberate and systematic distribution of his fortune for the enlightenment and betterment of humanity. This volume includes Carnegie's essay "The Gospel of Wealth," in which he outlines his philanthropic views, stating that "the millionaire will be but a trustee for the poor," bestowing charity on those willing to help themselves.

30 review for The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and His Essay: The Gospel of Wealth

  1. 5 out of 5

    A

    I love how his optimism in life really comes through in his writings. He never says anything bad about anyone and always has a positive outlook on things. I think he would have been an enjoyable person to be around. Before reading this book, I assumed he was a stuck-up rich guy (being incredibly wealthy in his lifetime) however, it amazed me how gracious he was and how much he really gave back to the world. This book was written in his spare time over several vacations and follows his life from I love how his optimism in life really comes through in his writings. He never says anything bad about anyone and always has a positive outlook on things. I think he would have been an enjoyable person to be around. Before reading this book, I assumed he was a stuck-up rich guy (being incredibly wealthy in his lifetime) however, it amazed me how gracious he was and how much he really gave back to the world. This book was written in his spare time over several vacations and follows his life from starting in a poor Scottish town to the end of his life. I always keep this book around when it is rainy or dreary out, and I feel a bit down because Carnegie's cheery temperament always gets rid of my blues.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    I enjoyed this autobiography of the second richest man in the world from a bit over a hundred years ago. Carnegie's book, while written around the turn of the century, feels much more modern. At times, I had the feel I got when reading Sloan's "My Years with General Motors", which was written 40 years later or so. Carnegie delves into his childhood quite extensively, as well as his early working life. Least covered was his middle years, while he grew his company. His stories of those times seeme I enjoyed this autobiography of the second richest man in the world from a bit over a hundred years ago. Carnegie's book, while written around the turn of the century, feels much more modern. At times, I had the feel I got when reading Sloan's "My Years with General Motors", which was written 40 years later or so. Carnegie delves into his childhood quite extensively, as well as his early working life. Least covered was his middle years, while he grew his company. His stories of those times seemed of two parts - dealing with technical issues in the steel making process, and working on finances and negotiation. You can tell Carnegie relished the technical aspects of steel-making and being involved on the cutting edge of technology. His negotiation and finance stories seemed there more to show he was a common-sense leader. By the last third of his book, Carnegie focuses on giving away his fortune and working with governments. He really enjoyed this phase of his life, and seems to be into name-dropping the leaders of the times. He really got around. I can easily picture him as the host of "The Apprentice" or a shark on "Shark Tank" had he been around today. He seems to have that personality, a bit star-struck, while also quite full of himself. Overall, I liked Carnegie's stories and how he explains his thoughts. He made being fabulously wealthy sound pretty good.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Meaningless

    It was interesting book to read, although most biographies and autobiographies are pack of lies but you learn the techniques of creating and selling the image. These kind of books are the fav of American self help industry. So this is an inspirational story of an poor Irish immigrant child who became one of the wealthiest person in America. It is the story of remarkable success through hardwork in a liberal, egalitarian and just society (Sound too good to be true!!). Well for me the most interes It was interesting book to read, although most biographies and autobiographies are pack of lies but you learn the techniques of creating and selling the image. These kind of books are the fav of American self help industry. So this is an inspirational story of an poor Irish immigrant child who became one of the wealthiest person in America. It is the story of remarkable success through hardwork in a liberal, egalitarian and just society (Sound too good to be true!!). Well for me the most interesting thing was his interest in books and libraries. He had built many libraries or funded many. This is the most inspirational aspect of some of the blood sucking capitalists . (Or its another promotional tool).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cyndy

    There's a lot of reasons to get to know Andrew Carnegie, not the least of which are the libraries he bequeathed to America. I think that is my favorite Carnegie legacy. But it turns out there are so many more. He devoted the last years of his life to divesting his fortune to mankind. The pensions he set up for less fortunate are too many to name. It's an intriguing read, although the latter half of the book dragged a bit for me There's a lot of reasons to get to know Andrew Carnegie, not the least of which are the libraries he bequeathed to America. I think that is my favorite Carnegie legacy. But it turns out there are so many more. He devoted the last years of his life to divesting his fortune to mankind. The pensions he set up for less fortunate are too many to name. It's an intriguing read, although the latter half of the book dragged a bit for me

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nex Juice

    I really enjoyed this book. I found it very encouraging as a business owner. My two major takeaways were: 1) Put all of your eggs in one basket - then watch that basket. He argues that YOUR business is the best one to invest in. Focus on your expertise - beware of diversification. 2) There is not much worse than a person who does not want to do what they are best at. Some people get sidetracked by power and don't realize their skills are best served as technicians rather than as managers or entrep I really enjoyed this book. I found it very encouraging as a business owner. My two major takeaways were: 1) Put all of your eggs in one basket - then watch that basket. He argues that YOUR business is the best one to invest in. Focus on your expertise - beware of diversification. 2) There is not much worse than a person who does not want to do what they are best at. Some people get sidetracked by power and don't realize their skills are best served as technicians rather than as managers or entrepreneurs (terminology borrowed from one of my other favorite books The E-Myth: Revisited by Michael Gerber) He also loved reading, which is something I can obviously identify with! If you don't know, I read a new book every week - and you can sign up to receive my reviews and summaries in your email free every 4 months (only 3 emails a year) at https://nexjuice.com Catch my live review and summary on Youtube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LX_X...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I enjoyed Andrew Carnegie’s lightly edited autobiography a lot more than I expected I would. He had a very interesting life and is truly an American Dream rags to riches success story. It’s a little bit over the top in showing how good he was and sometimes it rambled from one thing to another without any rhyme or reason. For the most part, though, even when it totally rambled, it was quite fascinating. I highly recommend The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth to older teen I enjoyed Andrew Carnegie’s lightly edited autobiography a lot more than I expected I would. He had a very interesting life and is truly an American Dream rags to riches success story. It’s a little bit over the top in showing how good he was and sometimes it rambled from one thing to another without any rhyme or reason. For the most part, though, even when it totally rambled, it was quite fascinating. I highly recommend The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth to older teens and adults interested in Carnegie.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Floris Wolswijk

    Whilst reflecting on his life, Andrew Carnegie (in his autobiography) inspires his readers with an abundance of life-lessons. He describes how his family moved to the United States. He plainly describes how he took on responsibility early on in life. He isn't boastful of the steel corporations he helps build. And in the end he shows gratitude and ends up giving away almost his whole fortune. In his autobiography Andrew Carnegie never gets too personal, but we can still learn a lot from his life. Whilst reflecting on his life, Andrew Carnegie (in his autobiography) inspires his readers with an abundance of life-lessons. He describes how his family moved to the United States. He plainly describes how he took on responsibility early on in life. He isn't boastful of the steel corporations he helps build. And in the end he shows gratitude and ends up giving away almost his whole fortune. In his autobiography Andrew Carnegie never gets too personal, but we can still learn a lot from his life. Youth: Always learning, always working As a kid Carnegie already understood two big life lessons (lessons that many people never seem to grasp). The first was that you should work hard to start earning. As a deliverer of messages he made it his job to learn everybodies name. When moving up the (corporate) ladder he learned on the job, wasn't afraid to ask for advice and grew to become one of the richest men in history. The second lesson is that he knew to learn when he was not working, reading books in the evening and keeping in good company. In his own words "There was scarcely a minute in which I couldn't learn something or find out how much there was to learn and how little I knew." When speaking about his upbringing I believe we get the best insight into the person who Carnegie was. Always a sunny disposition to life, he describes how he has benefited from having poor parents. His parents fulfilled all the roles a kid looks up to (nurse, cook, teacher, saint, exemplar, guide, friend). He shows great gratitude for their support and start contributing to the family at a very young age. In later chapters they are rarely mentioned, but it's hard to imagine that they weren't taken good care of. Business: Keep your focus and listen to people When Carnegie proved himself very resourceful and capable in his first few jobs he soon rose to high positions. First he moved up the ladder in the railroad business, and then switched to become a business owner in production (most famously steel). For me he portraits that even in those early days a honest and kind person can always win from the cheating and deceiving kinds. When he speaks of his workers he is apt to name names and attribute positive traits to them. Even when in conflict with others he knows that first listening is more important than being heard. One thing Carnegie is quoted for a lot is the following "Put all your eggs in one basket, and then watch that basket!" In the following sentences he argues that this doesn't mean you can't pursue multiple goals, nor to miss opportunities because you weren't looking beyond your own reach. He states that you should be fully committed and have single minded focus on your core business to make it a success. Looking at what he did you can see that this is true, he became big by focussing on steel. In his free time however he was very busy distributing his wealth, shortly engaged in politics and more generally used his power for the good. Charity: Give it all away His autobiography almost never mentions how much Carnegie has given away. In his lifetime Carnegie gave away more than 350 million dollars (giving away the remaining 30 million in his will). He used this money to build over 2,000 libraries, fund universities and promote world peace. One thing that is genius in the way he distributed his money is that he made sure the institutions he erected would stand for centuries to come. Municipalities were asked to maintain the libraries and each fund had very qualified boards. In the essay The Gospel of Wealth Carnegie writes more about his giving philosophy. He states that it's a disgrace for rich people to die rich. He argues that the capitalist system can work because smart rich people can best distribute that wealth back to the people. He uses the example of a library as something that can better a society, but if that money would be evenly distributed would be lost to trifling matters (i.e. booze or other excesses). Carnegie states "In bestowing charity, the main consideration should be to help those who will help themselves." "People who are unable to motivate themselves must be content with mediocrity, no matter how impressive their other talents." - Andrew Carnegie The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie is one of the best biographies that I have read to date. It reflects on a great career, has a human touch and is packed with timeless lessons. It may forget to go into depth about his personal feelings or fail to expose flaws in his character. These miscomings are however forgiven when you consider the amazing legacy Carnegie has left behind. Please take your time to read this book when convenient.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matt McCormick

    I could only make it 1/3 of the way through this book before giving up. I really like reading about business and biographies, but this is an example of how an autobiography should not be written. People are quite bad at analysing themselves and their own life and that came off in the part of the book I read. Carnegie doesn't do a good job of identifying key points in his life and writing in an entertaining manner. In parts of the book he goes off on tangents that really don't have anything to do I could only make it 1/3 of the way through this book before giving up. I really like reading about business and biographies, but this is an example of how an autobiography should not be written. People are quite bad at analysing themselves and their own life and that came off in the part of the book I read. Carnegie doesn't do a good job of identifying key points in his life and writing in an entertaining manner. In parts of the book he goes off on tangents that really don't have anything to do with his life leaving the reader confused and wondering what the point is. He seems to advance in his career without giving much thought as to why that happened. What made him different than others? One day he is working as a courier and the next day he is in charge of managing the railroad. He does try to identify some points (like loyalty and taking risks) but, in my view, there is probably a lot he left out. It would have been better to write his autobiography with a biographer, similar to Malcolm X, who could have probed more into these situations and discovered the real reasons behind his rise to fortune. Recently I read the autobiography of Henry Ford which I really enjoyed. It wasn't so much an autobiography as a collection of his business values and principles. While I didn't agree with them and found him hypocritical in places, it was valuable to see Ford's thinking process and where he was coming from. I would have preferred more like that for Carnegie's book. There were some lessons and thought process but they were spaced too few between the long, drawn out stories to make it worthwhile continuing to read the book. Despite not liking this book, I would still be interested in reading a good biography about the man if anyone has suggestions.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Faraday

    The book is written in a very simple but boring manner. He just describes his encounters with important people in his life and talks a little bit about how to manage employees. Other than that, he doesn't touch on any important topics like what were the major factors in his life which made him successful or anything like what are his principles when dealing with life problems. The book was a bit disappointing and boring. The book is written in a very simple but boring manner. He just describes his encounters with important people in his life and talks a little bit about how to manage employees. Other than that, he doesn't touch on any important topics like what were the major factors in his life which made him successful or anything like what are his principles when dealing with life problems. The book was a bit disappointing and boring.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Botty Dimanov

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Amazing to step into the shoes of the richest man in the world! I wished he had shared a little bit more on how he suddenly transitioned from an exceptionally hard-working clerk to an outstanding businessman! A few thoughts which I had along: Andrew Carnegie Gospel of Wealth Child is primed by environment - Carnegie patriotic - Power to memorise - Organised people to take care of pets for the privilege of having one named after them!! Faculty of knowing and choosing other who had know better!!! Notice Amazing to step into the shoes of the richest man in the world! I wished he had shared a little bit more on how he suddenly transitioned from an exceptionally hard-working clerk to an outstanding businessman! A few thoughts which I had along: Andrew Carnegie Gospel of Wealth Child is primed by environment - Carnegie patriotic - Power to memorise - Organised people to take care of pets for the privilege of having one named after them!! Faculty of knowing and choosing other who had know better!!! Notice it starts with KNOWING!! ->>> strive to understand MAN! $300 per household He felt like a real disciple of Wallace and Bruce Among trifles the best gifts of the gods hang The best gifts of God are where most people see mundane things. Notice that ever Saturday you wear your best cloths to feel good about yourself!!!! Memorise firms in street At night practice!!! It is not the rich man’s son that the young advancements has to fear, but the boy who beggins by sweeping 🧹 Wise man are always looking out for clever boys A boy only needs to attract attention Work until 11 one day and then 6 Read a book in the hours that can be snatched from duty!!!!!!! Taste of Shakespeare Taste of literature Founder of free libraries! No better thing anybody can do for boys than the creation of a public library!! If only 1 boy gets half value of a whole library, the library was worth it!! As the tree is bend, the twigs incline Library gives nothing for nothing??? Acquire knowledge yourself Memorise Shakespeare without effort! Rhythm and melody! Vagner Confucius: To perform the duties of one lives well, troubling not with the lives of other is the prime wisdom Two weeks of holiday in summer!!!! United family with transparency Disgrace the family - something higher than just him!! Gave the $11 kept the two New chance - constantly look fo opportunity Apply knowledge ASAP Learn to receive message by ear 17 years -> telegraph for $25/month Guessing work- not to interrupt sender! Also knowing will always come useful! Created a literary club and stuck together!! Reading is concentrated towards debate! Gives purpose and clarity and focus Scot is reserved - feels most, says the least 18y -$35 Friends with eminent people gradually into politics until he reached Lincoln and General Grant Andrew Carnegie worked for a big company, which meant that many people went to talk to him! For opportunities That means I can go and talk to such people for opportunities Before it is over lay hand on someone and make him personally accountable when one party gets excited the other should keep cool He was doing a lot of other deals while operating the iron business Because he had two good partners when one party gets excited the other should keep cool Put all eggs in one basket Invest every dollar in The ONE business you operate!!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Regina

    ** Review of Audio Format ** Raised Himself Up by the Bootstraps Andrew Carnegie was a poor Scottish boy who scrimped and saved and earned and worked hard and honestly to become the great man he was. He took care of his mother until the end of her days and built first an iron and then a steel empire not rivaled by many. Where he couldn’t beat someone, he would join with them to make his company stronger. He dealt with his workers honestly and fairly. He never bought anything he couldn’t pay cash f ** Review of Audio Format ** Raised Himself Up by the Bootstraps Andrew Carnegie was a poor Scottish boy who scrimped and saved and earned and worked hard and honestly to become the great man he was. He took care of his mother until the end of her days and built first an iron and then a steel empire not rivaled by many. Where he couldn’t beat someone, he would join with them to make his company stronger. He dealt with his workers honestly and fairly. He never bought anything he couldn’t pay cash for and he never invested where he couldn’t cover the loss. I think there is a little bit of self promotion and more than a tinge of preaching to Carnegie’s autobiography. Especially in the case of the 1896 riots, he absolves himself of all responsibility for how the negotiations went and the bloodshed that followed. He congratulates himself quite a lot throughout on various financial catastrophes he avoided as well. But he published it when he was still alive so he has to present himself in the best possible light. Carnegie grew up in a time when children were expected to work at a very young again and only schooled as a luxury. He really did bring himself up from the very bottom of society to the pinnacle. It was very, very interesting to read about the Civil War and his perspective of the personalities of Abraham Lincoln and General Grant. I did not know the part he himself played in the war so it was eye opening to hear this history through his eyes. The narration was just OK for me. The material was fairly dry so that may be an unfair assessment. Kevin Theis’ voice is great for the material but the delivery was a little dull for me. I would listen to other things he has narrated before saying I don’t like his style of narration. I received this audiobook for free through Audiobook Boom! in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Juan Chavez

    This was a good read. Mostly because I was familiar with Andrew Carnegie's life story previously. get lessons on having character and integrity in business and allowing that to drive your passion. Started off humble as a apprentice to Mr. Scott of the Pennsylvania railroad company and slowly moved to bridge building and eventually to steel where he made his real money. It was a little biased especially when talking about the strike and Mr. Frick. I felt that he made it seem as though he was clea This was a good read. Mostly because I was familiar with Andrew Carnegie's life story previously. get lessons on having character and integrity in business and allowing that to drive your passion. Started off humble as a apprentice to Mr. Scott of the Pennsylvania railroad company and slowly moved to bridge building and eventually to steel where he made his real money. It was a little biased especially when talking about the strike and Mr. Frick. I felt that he made it seem as though he was clear of any wrong doing but I know he and Mr. Frick had alot of friction. I also felt in his gospel of wealth that he seemed to say that the rich should keep the money since they know how to dispose of it for the betterment of the community. Better to concentrate the wealth with those that will do good with it than to disperse it among the many. Dont think I would agree with that. Still I have alot of admiration for Andrew Carnegie. 1- “People who are unable to motivate themselves must be content with mediocrity, no matter how impressive their other talents.” 2-“If you want to be happy, set a goal that commands your thoughts, liberates your energy, and inspires your hopes.” 3- “Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision. The ability to direct individual accomplishments toward organizational objectives. It is the fuel that allows common people to attain uncommon results.” 4-“It marks a big step in your development when you come to realize that other people can help you do a better job than you could do alone.” 5-“Perhaps the most tragic thing about mankind is that we are all dreaming about some magical garden over the horizon, instead of enjoying the roses that are right outside today.” 6-“Put all your eggs in one basket and then watch that basket.” 7-“All human beings can alter their lives by altering their attitudes.” 8-“He that cannot reason is a fool. He that will not is a bigot. He that dare not is a slave.”

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary Keen

    Learned a lot about him --how he started i a poor family in Scotland, moved w them to Pittsburgh, and eventually made a success of himself and helped his parents. Not very modest in this story about himself --or maybe he's just truthful about his life. He credits his honesty and kindness to others, which often was paid back to him in favors and assistance. then he helped the US and England --felt reading was so important that he started libraries that would benefit people regardless of their finan Learned a lot about him --how he started i a poor family in Scotland, moved w them to Pittsburgh, and eventually made a success of himself and helped his parents. Not very modest in this story about himself --or maybe he's just truthful about his life. He credits his honesty and kindness to others, which often was paid back to him in favors and assistance. then he helped the US and England --felt reading was so important that he started libraries that would benefit people regardless of their financial status. It seems that part of his success was from Scottish contacts he kept running into in PA. Last section seemed to be just a bunch of letters people had written nominating worthy people for Carnegie awards. I personally liked this because i'm familiar with most of the locations where he lived and worked --and can picture them, altho' more recently than in his lifetime. [email protected] normal speed except speeded thru final section.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Charles Mathison Jr.

    The book, written in another era, was surprisingly relatable. Carnegie, a man from Scotland, who from very humble beginnings became one of the leading industrialists of the 19th and early 20th centuries, provides a template of how the rich should help society with their riches. He saw himself as a humble man, however, many of his professional actions lends one to think otherwise. He shunned speculation of any sort. I found his stance on not speculating in business to be the lead take away one co The book, written in another era, was surprisingly relatable. Carnegie, a man from Scotland, who from very humble beginnings became one of the leading industrialists of the 19th and early 20th centuries, provides a template of how the rich should help society with their riches. He saw himself as a humble man, however, many of his professional actions lends one to think otherwise. He shunned speculation of any sort. I found his stance on not speculating in business to be the lead take away one could get from the book. I think his total disavowing of speculating helped him to become the success that he was. It's a bit long, yet a good historical read. If you're into history, it's a great book to get insight into how one of the era's leading industrialists got his start and stayed on top and became extremely charitable in his final days.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mario

    The story of one of the USA’s first philanthropists in which he describes himself some of the values that led him to become rich and then decide to give his money away. The most important aspect of this book is how it has helped shape self-help in the 20th century. When Napoleon Hill wrote his seminal book ”Think and Grow Rich,” he was inspired by Andrew Carnegie’s life. The most critical points in the book are around how an impoverished childhood gave Mr. Carnegie the boost to work harder than a The story of one of the USA’s first philanthropists in which he describes himself some of the values that led him to become rich and then decide to give his money away. The most important aspect of this book is how it has helped shape self-help in the 20th century. When Napoleon Hill wrote his seminal book ”Think and Grow Rich,” he was inspired by Andrew Carnegie’s life. The most critical points in the book are around how an impoverished childhood gave Mr. Carnegie the boost to work harder than anyone and how his learning of how to deal with capital and wealth and NOT money gave helped him amass the fortune he built. As a closing point, I was impressed by how his ideas were shaped by the classics with mentions of Roman, Greeks, and Chinese philosophers - a testimony that the core of learning, growth, and development has been ”hiding in plain sight” for thousands of years.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    I thought Andrew Carnegie‘s autobiography showed a side of the entrepreneur that I have never known before. I didn’t realize so much about Andrew Carnegie‘s life. He led an extraordinary life, and I love the fact that he decided from a young age to give away at least 90% of his fortune before he died realizing that he couldn’t take his fortune with him. And the better thing, is that he actually followed through with it. Just look at all the different things with his name on it such as Carnegie H I thought Andrew Carnegie‘s autobiography showed a side of the entrepreneur that I have never known before. I didn’t realize so much about Andrew Carnegie‘s life. He led an extraordinary life, and I love the fact that he decided from a young age to give away at least 90% of his fortune before he died realizing that he couldn’t take his fortune with him. And the better thing, is that he actually followed through with it. Just look at all the different things with his name on it such as Carnegie Hall in New York. I highly recommend this book as a way to understand business and to implement a vision into your own life.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ian Carswell

    The first chapter or so is slow going, but once he gets into the story of his career the narrative really takes off. Very optimistic guy, fun to hear that come through in his perspective. He noted that his optimistic tendencies lead folks to say of him that he makes "all my ducks swans", which does make me want to read biography's of him written by third parties to hear another perspective. Was quite interesting to learn that he was strongly familiar with and influenced by the religious writings The first chapter or so is slow going, but once he gets into the story of his career the narrative really takes off. Very optimistic guy, fun to hear that come through in his perspective. He noted that his optimistic tendencies lead folks to say of him that he makes "all my ducks swans", which does make me want to read biography's of him written by third parties to hear another perspective. Was quite interesting to learn that he was strongly familiar with and influenced by the religious writings of Swedenborg.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott Appleton

    A more insightful view of the economically and socially powerful individuals of the 18th to early 19th century would be hard to find. Andrew Carnegie’s life intersected with a diverse group of influential individuals. His rise to power, told from his personal perspective, demonstrates both the positive and the negative aspect of enormous wealth. In the first, he used his money to help many people. In the last, he lost his moorings in Christianity and fell prey to the tenets of Darwinism. A human A more insightful view of the economically and socially powerful individuals of the 18th to early 19th century would be hard to find. Andrew Carnegie’s life intersected with a diverse group of influential individuals. His rise to power, told from his personal perspective, demonstrates both the positive and the negative aspect of enormous wealth. In the first, he used his money to help many people. In the last, he lost his moorings in Christianity and fell prey to the tenets of Darwinism. A humanist in his best form whose pride in his achievements marred his otherwise admirable work ethic.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    "And that is how, in 1850, I got my first real start in life. From the dark cellar [of my previous job] running a steam-engine at two dollars a week, begrimed with coal dirt, without a trace of elevating influences in life, I was lifted into a paradise, yes, heaven, as it seemed to me, with newspapers, pens, pencils, and sunshine about me. There was scarcely a minute in which I could not learn something or find out how much there was to learn or how little I knew. I felt that my foot was upon th "And that is how, in 1850, I got my first real start in life. From the dark cellar [of my previous job] running a steam-engine at two dollars a week, begrimed with coal dirt, without a trace of elevating influences in life, I was lifted into a paradise, yes, heaven, as it seemed to me, with newspapers, pens, pencils, and sunshine about me. There was scarcely a minute in which I could not learn something or find out how much there was to learn or how little I knew. I felt that my foot was upon the ladder and that I was bound to climb." from James Clear's newsletter.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Martin Higgins

    Excellent book for any one who is of course interested in the success story of Andrew but that aside just the overall drive this man had to succeed in life and in his work all the way till his retirement is very motivating indeed and then how he distributed his wealth is fantastic read, being Scottish and from Edinburgh it’s also good to picture the places he is talking about in the book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dimitri

    If you like to time travel in the nineteenth century and into the mind of a shy Scottish child and his path to becoming one of the richest men, than prepare your sit for you are heading into a journey of meeting high ranked people, amazing friends and the wisdom that leads not only to the accumulation of material wealth but also spiritual wealth!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joel Everett

    This was an unexpected find and useful read; despite the age of the book there are hidden gems and universal principles to success to be found within. Admittedly, being an autobiography, it tends to paint a rosy of picture of Mr. Carnegie's life, but still work a read about a pivotal Industrialist and businessman in the 19th century. This was an unexpected find and useful read; despite the age of the book there are hidden gems and universal principles to success to be found within. Admittedly, being an autobiography, it tends to paint a rosy of picture of Mr. Carnegie's life, but still work a read about a pivotal Industrialist and businessman in the 19th century.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Mierau

    Amazing insides into the brains of an outstanding person. Driven by doing good and being good, Andrew Carnegie build partnerships and teams in the 19 century that had values, ethics and principles in its core. Great encouragement to do well in business and create the change that one want to see in the world.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anwar Maricar

    When people think of changing the world, a person who literally changed the world and the lives of the ordinary. When the literary world was poorly served, a man who took it to the heights by donating almost all his wealth, being the second richest person on the planet. Once again hats off to you Andrew Carnegie.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Two Readers in Love

    Both the Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth are available in the public domain on Project Gutenberg .org -- including a January 20, 1914 recording of "The Gospel of Wealth" at the Edison Motion Picture Film Studio, Bronx, New York. The motion picture element of this sound film is believed lost. Both the Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie and The Gospel of Wealth are available in the public domain on Project Gutenberg .org -- including a January 20, 1914 recording of "The Gospel of Wealth" at the Edison Motion Picture Film Studio, Bronx, New York. The motion picture element of this sound film is believed lost.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ron Schaffer

    A very enjoyable read. We have lots of great stories here, such as Carnegie listening to Wagner for the first time, meeting Abraham Lincoln, etc. I particularly enjoyed the part(s) of the story regarding his early rise to success. This is another important piece of American history.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brendan Hallinan

    Nice guy Seems like a great person. I would have liked more business stories. I lost interest during the final 1/3 of the book but it wasn’t bad just not what I was interested in reading about.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Very easy and enjoyable read. What a man and what a time in our history.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Yushi Wei

    Book was pretty interesting for the most part until you hit the "ends" where he is talking about politics....thankfully, the Gospel of Wealth was able to bring this to an enjoyable ending for me. Book was pretty interesting for the most part until you hit the "ends" where he is talking about politics....thankfully, the Gospel of Wealth was able to bring this to an enjoyable ending for me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alecia

    Being a native of Pgh, PA, I found this read absolutely fascinating!! I loved Carnegie’s “voice,” humor, & straight-forward advice. A really great read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.