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When Graham Woodard is hired to restore part of a previously lost silent horror film—Angel of the Abyss—the last thing he expects is the first in a series of murders clearly meant to keep it lost. With one-time friend Jake Maitland in tow, the two must now navigate the treacherous enigma that is the lost film, while piecing together the story of the film’s ill-fated starle When Graham Woodard is hired to restore part of a previously lost silent horror film—Angel of the Abyss—the last thing he expects is the first in a series of murders clearly meant to keep it lost. With one-time friend Jake Maitland in tow, the two must now navigate the treacherous enigma that is the lost film, while piecing together the story of the film’s ill-fated starlet, Grace Baron, who vanished in 1926. The closer they get to the truth, the more blood is spilled, and it soon becomes apparent that there is much more to the lost film than anyone expected, as there are still forces that will stop at nothing to keep it and its star buried. The darkness the strange film conjured all those years ago has come alive again with its discovery, and now everyone from Graham’s own estranged ex-wife to the LAPD is getting involved. And the body count is growing. From the burgeoning film studios of 1920s Hollywood to the perilous streets and dark underbelly of modern-day Los Angeles, Angel of the Abyss is a dangerous tapestry of cinema, history and murder, at the center of which stand two men with everything to lose.


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When Graham Woodard is hired to restore part of a previously lost silent horror film—Angel of the Abyss—the last thing he expects is the first in a series of murders clearly meant to keep it lost. With one-time friend Jake Maitland in tow, the two must now navigate the treacherous enigma that is the lost film, while piecing together the story of the film’s ill-fated starle When Graham Woodard is hired to restore part of a previously lost silent horror film—Angel of the Abyss—the last thing he expects is the first in a series of murders clearly meant to keep it lost. With one-time friend Jake Maitland in tow, the two must now navigate the treacherous enigma that is the lost film, while piecing together the story of the film’s ill-fated starlet, Grace Baron, who vanished in 1926. The closer they get to the truth, the more blood is spilled, and it soon becomes apparent that there is much more to the lost film than anyone expected, as there are still forces that will stop at nothing to keep it and its star buried. The darkness the strange film conjured all those years ago has come alive again with its discovery, and now everyone from Graham’s own estranged ex-wife to the LAPD is getting involved. And the body count is growing. From the burgeoning film studios of 1920s Hollywood to the perilous streets and dark underbelly of modern-day Los Angeles, Angel of the Abyss is a dangerous tapestry of cinema, history and murder, at the center of which stand two men with everything to lose.

30 review for Angel of the Abyss

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    When a reel from a legendary lost film is discovered, Graham Woodard flies out to LA to help restore it. However, complications arise when the film goes missing and the owner gets herself murdered. But what does all that have to do with Woodard's ex-wife? I got this from DarkFuse via Netgalley. Angel of the Abyss is a short novel. "Modern Hollywood Noir" would be a handy label to slap on it. The timeline shifts from the past, when Gracie Baron was making The Angel of the Abyss, to the present, wh When a reel from a legendary lost film is discovered, Graham Woodard flies out to LA to help restore it. However, complications arise when the film goes missing and the owner gets herself murdered. But what does all that have to do with Woodard's ex-wife? I got this from DarkFuse via Netgalley. Angel of the Abyss is a short novel. "Modern Hollywood Noir" would be a handy label to slap on it. The timeline shifts from the past, when Gracie Baron was making The Angel of the Abyss, to the present, when Graham Woodard is hired to restore the legendary lost silent film. First off, I have to admit that this book probably arrived at the wrong time for me. Consequently, it felt like I was reading it forever. There was nothing wrong with the book but it was definitely not a "drop everything" kind of read. It was more like a "I'll read this during the Cardinal game and maybe while I'm trying to fall asleep" kind of read. Anyway, the shifting viewpoints keep the tension mounting. While I've never heard of Ed Kurtz prior to this, he knows how to use his noir conventions. He surprised me with quite a few of his twists and I should have seen the ending coming but he still got me. While the modern era plot thread was my favorite, I loved Ed's Hollywood noir dialogue during the Gracie chapters. There was a lot of action and both plot threads kept me interested when I made time to read. Like I said earlier, I'm pretty sure this was a case of wrong book, wrong time for me. Since it's a DarkFuse release, I was expecting horror rather than noir. I still enjoyed it, though. Three out of five stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul Nelson

    Angel of the Abyss was an intriguing noir mystery that intertwined stories from the present and one from way back in 1926. Angel of the Abyss was the name of a silent film, staring Grace Baronsky, who was heralded as a future star and the film was an instant sensation, for all the wrong reasons. It broke boundaries never envisioned before, dealing with taboo topics such as rape and occult rituals but the biggest shock was the disappearance of its star who literally vanished without a trace. In 201 Angel of the Abyss was an intriguing noir mystery that intertwined stories from the present and one from way back in 1926. Angel of the Abyss was the name of a silent film, staring Grace Baronsky, who was heralded as a future star and the film was an instant sensation, for all the wrong reasons. It broke boundaries never envisioned before, dealing with taboo topics such as rape and occult rituals but the biggest shock was the disappearance of its star who literally vanished without a trace. In 2013 Graham Woodard receives a phone call from someone claiming to be in possession of a reel from the lost film Angel of the Abyss, a film that disappeared along with its star and a claim that should it be true, would be the find of the film industry and beyond value. Its authenticity verified Graham finds himself on a plane and the job of a lifetime but his plans are thrown into turmoil almost immediately as a maze of murder opens up before him. The story then alternates between 1926 and the filming of the fated movie, and present time as bodies pile up and the keystone cops take on the case, always one step behind. I enjoyed the story set in the past and the slightly naïve Grace Baronsky set the tone & atmosphere of the era. You can sort of guess where it’s going but you hope that it never gets there. The story set in the present was ok, a few incredulous moments especially when a head injury/coma victim is up and running about seemingly without pause. Overall I enjoyed parts of Angel of the Abyss and some not so much but I would certainly read further work from Ed Kurtz. I received Angel of the Abyss from Darkfuse & Netgalley in exchange for an honest review and that’s what you’ve got. http://paulnelson.booklikes.com/post/...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    Graham Woodard is hired to restore part of a previously lost silent movie; Angel of the Abyss starring the rising star Grace Baron that mysteriously disappears after the film had premiered. What he didn't count on was that his little work trip to L.A would result in several murders.  Together with his friend Jake Maitland must he now find out who is willing to kill people for an old lost silent movie and perhaps even find out what happened to Grace Baron. I knew I wanted to read this book when I Graham Woodard is hired to restore part of a previously lost silent movie; Angel of the Abyss starring the rising star Grace Baron that mysteriously disappears after the film had premiered. What he didn't count on was that his little work trip to L.A would result in several murders.  Together with his friend Jake Maitland must he now find out who is willing to kill people for an old lost silent movie and perhaps even find out what happened to Grace Baron. I knew I wanted to read this book when I saw this on NetGalley. I mean love old Hollywood movies and Darkfuse books. What a perfect combination. The book was good, the story intriguing, Graham was a good and likable main character, Jake was a bit annoying first, but I started to warm up to him when the book shifted focus to him. Also, I enjoyed that the book shifted between 2013 and 1926 so that we both followed Graham and Jakes pursuit after answers in the present and Grace Baron in the past acting in Angel of the Abyss and everything that happened around the movie.  But and this is for me a big BUT, I was expecting a horror novel, not a mystery/ crime novel. All the time I read the book I just waited for the story to turn horrific. But it never did. As a mystery/crime novel is it great, but I was disappointed never less. Because I really was looking forward to something weird, not an ordinary crime novel. But if you are into mystery/crime novels, or/and have a fondness for old silent movies or just looking for a good book this is the one. But if it is horror novel you are after then pick another Darkfuse novel like Sunblind or Blackout! Thank you Netgalley for providing me with a free copy for an honest review!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    ANGEL OF THE ABYSS is the story of a controversial, silent film that--along with its star, Gracie Baron--has been missing since it's release in 1926. When Graham, a film restorer, gets a call from a woman who asserts to have part of this legendary reel in her custody, he wastes no time in going back to his former home of Hollywood to examine this "holy grail" of finds for himself. Meeting him there, is his sometime-friend/sidekick, Jake. The novel alternates from Graham and Jake's current situati ANGEL OF THE ABYSS is the story of a controversial, silent film that--along with its star, Gracie Baron--has been missing since it's release in 1926. When Graham, a film restorer, gets a call from a woman who asserts to have part of this legendary reel in her custody, he wastes no time in going back to his former home of Hollywood to examine this "holy grail" of finds for himself. Meeting him there, is his sometime-friend/sidekick, Jake. The novel alternates from Graham and Jake's current situation, and that of the events that transpired to Gracie during the 1926 filming. I was absolutely hooked on the scenes of Gracie's Hollywood experiences, and the history of the film industry, in general. Although I found the end to that section all too predictable, it was a journey that was well worth taking! As for the current situation, Graham and Jake find themselves in a bloody mystery with a rapidly rising body count. Graham's obsession overrides all sense of self-preservation as he relentlessly continues on attempting to find the rest of the film--and trying to uncover the nearly century-old mystery, as he does. Jake's character seemed a little "too" convenient at times, although made somewhat more plausible by the idea that Graham seemed to be the only "real" friend that he had. I loved the ultimate conclusion to the story, and how well Ed Kurtz was able to put together both timespans into one, unforgettable ending. Recommended! *I received a copy of this e-book from NetGalley/DarkFuse in exchange for an honest review.*

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    4.5* Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Graham Woodward is hired to restore a rare movie reel, Angel of the Abyss. The movie itself is somewhat controversial and has the added mystery of what happened to the beautiful young starlet, Gracie Baron, who went missing after the movie was released and presumed dead many years later. When Graham arrives in L.A. he finds his employee murdered, the movie reel stolen and his ex-wife missing, it seem 4.5* Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Graham Woodward is hired to restore a rare movie reel, Angel of the Abyss. The movie itself is somewhat controversial and has the added mystery of what happened to the beautiful young starlet, Gracie Baron, who went missing after the movie was released and presumed dead many years later. When Graham arrives in L.A. he finds his employee murdered, the movie reel stolen and his ex-wife missing, it seems to be too much of a coincidence and Graham, along with his 'friend' Jake, try to get to the bottom of why someone will kill to keep the movie under wraps. This is essentially two stories intertwined, the 2013 story with Graham and Jake and the 1926 timeline that tells the story of Gracie Baron. These two storylines work incredibly well together, each moving the story along to the conclusion and both in their own right as excellent reads. The author also changed the modern storyline pov from Graham to Jake halfway through. I really enjoyed getting to know Jake more as his initial set up wasn't very flattering and he was someone that Graham tolerated rather than enjoyed spending time with. Jake's character really came into his own and I was completely immersed in where the story took him. I found more character development in Jake than in Graham, he was a sympathetic character and his acknowledgement that their friendship was one sided made me like him all the more, especially as he risked his life for his friend. The pacing was fast and it was impossible to put this down once the bodies started turning up and I had to know how the pieces all fitted together, as each chapter was a different timeline it kept the read fresh and not too fixed in one story. A great read that I would highly recommend.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I received an ARC e-book of this novel from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Once again, a very good monthly selection from Darkfuse. Not horror, this time. One half historical mystery, one half modern LA Noir---which made for a very interesting read. I found the historical elements of this novel so interesting that I loaded up several classic silent films into my Netflix queue. Plot-wise, a copy of an (in)famous silent film, thought to be long lost, has surfaced. However, not everyone I received an ARC e-book of this novel from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Once again, a very good monthly selection from Darkfuse. Not horror, this time. One half historical mystery, one half modern LA Noir---which made for a very interesting read. I found the historical elements of this novel so interesting that I loaded up several classic silent films into my Netflix queue. Plot-wise, a copy of an (in)famous silent film, thought to be long lost, has surfaced. However, not everyone is enthusiastic about this discovery. In fact, it is clearly quite dangerous to know anything about his film as everyone connected with this discovery soon winds up dead. I knew that I would enjoy this novel the minute that I read the plot-line. I am fascinated by horror movies, the older the better, and the idea of a “lost” classic (eg. “London After Midnight”) being found really gets me going. Add to that the fact that the back-story works in the framework of a modern LA Noir tale and you have me standing in line for a ticket. And Angel of the Abyss did not disappoint. Enough history to satisfy film buffs and enough dark menace to create a very good modern LA Noir tale and you have a thoroughly satisfying read. Not terribly gritty as Noir goes---this is not a James Elroy novel, but the humorous characters provided a freshness that I enjoyed. Four stars and two thumbs up. Check it out.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andi Rawson

    Review of Angel of the Abyss by Ed Kurtz 4.5 stars, rounded up.   Angel of the Abyss is film noir of the 1920's. In an era of silent films and film censoring, controversial Angel of the Abyss was meant to revolutionize the entire film industry. When the main star, Grace Baron, along with the film go missing shortly after production, all that is left of the Angel is rumors and myth.   It is 2013 and Graham Woodard is a film restoration specialist living in Boston. Out of the blue Graham receives a ca Review of Angel of the Abyss by Ed Kurtz 4.5 stars, rounded up.   Angel of the Abyss is film noir of the 1920's. In an era of silent films and film censoring, controversial Angel of the Abyss was meant to revolutionize the entire film industry. When the main star, Grace Baron, along with the film go missing shortly after production, all that is left of the Angel is rumors and myth.   It is 2013 and Graham Woodard is a film restoration specialist living in Boston. Out of the blue Graham receives a call from a woman claiming to have a reel from a film from the late 1920's that she would like restored, which happens to be the long-lost Angel of the Abyss. What starts out as the job of a lifetime quickly turns into a real life murder mystery where Graham is the unwitting star.   Add in a personal recommendation from his evil ex-wife, his feckless friend Jake Maitland, and a city that already spurned him once and what you have is one great story from Ed Kurtz.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Graham Woodwood receives a call one day from Leslie Wheeler of the Silent Film Appreciation Society, to say she has found a reel from the 1920’s. At first, he is unimpressed. Although he is an expert on silent films, so often a long lost discovery turns out to be nothing of any importance. However, when she sends him a clip of Grace Baron in, “Angel of the Abyss,” he is nonplussed. Grace Baron only made one film, the thought long destroyed, “Angel of the Abyss,” and no footage of her is thought Graham Woodwood receives a call one day from Leslie Wheeler of the Silent Film Appreciation Society, to say she has found a reel from the 1920’s. At first, he is unimpressed. Although he is an expert on silent films, so often a long lost discovery turns out to be nothing of any importance. However, when she sends him a clip of Grace Baron in, “Angel of the Abyss,” he is nonplussed. Grace Baron only made one film, the thought long destroyed, “Angel of the Abyss,” and no footage of her is thought to exist. Graham is surprised that his ex-wife, Helen, has suggested him as the man to restore the film, but, nevertheless, the promise of watching the rest of the reel is enough to make him leave Boston for Hollywood. Once Graham arrives, he finds nobody at the airport to meet him, although there is a hotel room booked. The next day he sets out to begin work, but finds the offices of the Silent Film Appreciation Society ransacked and Leslie Wheeler dead. Needless to say, the reel of film is missing and so is his ex-wife. In the company of his friend, Jake Maitland, Graham sets out to discover the truth of why the long missing film is so precious to anyone outside of a small group of film buffs and – more importantly – why someone wants him dead… This is a well plotted and nicely realised mystery. The story follows not only Graham’s search for the missing film, but the mystery of what happened in 1926. A controversial film, a missing movie star and ruined reputations, alongside the modern mystery, make this an atmospheric novel. I had never read anything by this author before, but I am sure I will in the future. If you enjoy mysteries set in early Hollywood, this is sure to have appeal. Lastly, I received a copy of this book from the publisher, via NetGalley, for review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jon Recluse

    This was an eARC from Netgalley. An engaging blend of film history and noir, weaving the mystery behind a lost silent film, tainted by rumors of scandalous content, the unexplained disappearance of the film's star shortly after it's completion, and the deadly conspiracy intent on keeping both buried secrets buried forever. Offering up alternating views of TinselTown, seperated by time, the tarnished side of the Golden Age that destroyed the likes of Fatty Arbuckle, to the mean streets of modern L. This was an eARC from Netgalley. An engaging blend of film history and noir, weaving the mystery behind a lost silent film, tainted by rumors of scandalous content, the unexplained disappearance of the film's star shortly after it's completion, and the deadly conspiracy intent on keeping both buried secrets buried forever. Offering up alternating views of TinselTown, seperated by time, the tarnished side of the Golden Age that destroyed the likes of Fatty Arbuckle, to the mean streets of modern L.A. where life is cheap, this is a fun, fast paced novel of neo-noir that will entertain both mystery fans and silent film buffs alike. Highly recommended.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Frank Errington

    Review copy Footage from a lost film from the age of silent movies is discovered and Graham Woodard is brought to Hollywood from his home in Massachusetts to work on restoring and preserving what's been found. Unknown to Graham when he takes the assignment, there is a reason the film has been "lost" all these years and certain people will do whatever it takes to keep it's secrets from being revealed. Angel of the Abyss was to be the debut film of a new starlet, Grace Baron, formerly Grace Baronsky, Review copy Footage from a lost film from the age of silent movies is discovered and Graham Woodard is brought to Hollywood from his home in Massachusetts to work on restoring and preserving what's been found. Unknown to Graham when he takes the assignment, there is a reason the film has been "lost" all these years and certain people will do whatever it takes to keep it's secrets from being revealed. Angel of the Abyss was to be the debut film of a new starlet, Grace Baron, formerly Grace Baronsky, from Boise, Idaho. There are two stories here. The one where Graham Woodard and his friend Jake Maitland are trying to find the rest of the film, while becoming embroiled in a series of murders, potentially their own, and another about the actual making of the film and what really happened to it's star. The author, Ed Kurtz, does a very nice job of pacing the two stories, revealing the secrets a bit at a time, and dove-tailing them nicely at the book's end, where all is revealed. The characters are fully developed, even bit players are richly fleshed out. Crime novels are generally not my thing, but there are definite similarities between the crime and horror genres and there is certainly a touch of horror in Angel of the Abyss. Due to be released on December 2, 2014, Angel of the Abyss is published by Darkfuse and will be available at Amazon.com. You can pre-order the book now at Amazon and if you subscribe to Kindle Unlimited you can read this one at no additional charge . Highly recommended.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This was the first novel by Ed I have read. This one is a little hard for me to review. On one hand I liked how the story was told going back and forth between two different times. In 1926 with Grace Baron and the filming of Angel of the Abyss. And in 2013 with Graham Woodard called to restore Angel of the Abyss with his friend Jake Maitland stepping in and the search for the lost reels. On the other hand the story seemed to drag at times and made it hard to keep reading for me. What's funny is This was the first novel by Ed I have read. This one is a little hard for me to review. On one hand I liked how the story was told going back and forth between two different times. In 1926 with Grace Baron and the filming of Angel of the Abyss. And in 2013 with Graham Woodard called to restore Angel of the Abyss with his friend Jake Maitland stepping in and the search for the lost reels. On the other hand the story seemed to drag at times and made it hard to keep reading for me. What's funny is I like the two story lines but couldn't seem to read a lot of the book at one time. The story was well written and I will be reading more of Ed Kurtz's books down the line. This book was a good read. I gave Angel of the Abyss 3 1/2 stars. I received an e-arc of this book from DarkFuse/NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bandit

    This was suppose to be the perfect birthday read. A book awesome enough to make a person forget about aging and all that crap for an evening. And Angel of the Abyss came dangerously close too, though ultimately rendered slightly less awesome for having such a major plot snafu. Kurtz is a recent discovery for me via an exceptional existential nightmare that was The Rib From Which...This book is his earlier effort, which may account for the somewhat less congealed/logical narration, but there's st This was suppose to be the perfect birthday read. A book awesome enough to make a person forget about aging and all that crap for an evening. And Angel of the Abyss came dangerously close too, though ultimately rendered slightly less awesome for having such a major plot snafu. Kurtz is a recent discovery for me via an exceptional existential nightmare that was The Rib From Which...This book is his earlier effort, which may account for the somewhat less congealed/logical narration, but there's still that neo noir sort of style, great pacing and descriptions, it still reads very nicely. Plus I love books about movies, usually more horrific, but any will do. This one is strictly suspense thriller/murder mystery about a man who gets involved with trying to find an old silent picture thought to be long disappeared and, along the way, the fate of its starlet. Told via alternating timelines, one of which takes the readers back to the year 1926 in glorious Tinseltown. And glorious it was, just google it sometime, absolutely scandalous time in cinema, from a historical perspective. Sure to an extent this one lacks the maturity and sophistication of the author's later work, sure it's too patently convenient at times and occasionally stretches the credulity, that's all minor really but..here's the thing (and maybe don't read this if you haven't read the book yet) if you are very proud of your family's name and reputation and have a lot riding on it and the only thing that can cast all that permanently into a negative light is one old reel conveniently ready made to be destroyed via nitrate...why on earth would you hold on to that? Would you leave it in an abandoned building with a junkie watching over it? Would you use your own sons to go on a killing rampage to protect it instead of just, you know, destroying it? Sure, that wouldn't make for much of a story, but it's just too frustratingly logic defying for me not to affect the otherwise really enjoyable reading experience. And we're back. You can read this now. It's just a few more words about how talented of an author Kurtz is, how entertaining his writing is and how much fun this book was for the most part. Many thanks to Bill, the best book friend a zombie can have. And silent cinema was fascinating...all but over only a year after some of the events in this story, taken over by talkies we know and love today. Majority of the works from that time are irretrievably gone destroyed either intentionally by studios or unintentionally by time and fires. Though some do occasionally turn up and can be preserved and saved, and while maybe they won't live up quite to the author's imagination, you can see Angel of Abyss playing in the theatre of your very own mind palace. Enjoy the show.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marvin

    At the start of this atmospheric mystery, Angel of the Abyss echoes Indiana Jones more than Sam Spade. Film archivist and wannabe movie maker Graham Woodward gets a call about a long lost film. It is titled Angel of the Abyss and was the only film starring Grace Baron, an actress that disappeared after the film was made. A rich woman in Hollywood wants him to look at the film and pays for him to come to California. But when he arrives he finds the woman dead. Pretty soon, he is being shot at too At the start of this atmospheric mystery, Angel of the Abyss echoes Indiana Jones more than Sam Spade. Film archivist and wannabe movie maker Graham Woodward gets a call about a long lost film. It is titled Angel of the Abyss and was the only film starring Grace Baron, an actress that disappeared after the film was made. A rich woman in Hollywood wants him to look at the film and pays for him to come to California. But when he arrives he finds the woman dead. Pretty soon, he is being shot at too and his ex-wife who lives in California is also missing. So we enter at the prospect of finding "the holy grail" of silent films and soon blend into a parade of bad guys and suspects as our hero attempts to find out why anyone wants him dead and why death and violence follows the film. We also get a slacker sidekick who gets some of the the first person narration along with Graham. It is a fun ride to the end. As if that is not enough, there is an alternating third person narrative in the form of the making of the film in 1926 through the eyes of the unfortunate starlet Grace Baron. It's that switching back to past and present that makes this such a good novel. Aside from worrying about our hero, we get a nice glimpse of the victim and a tasty look at Hollywood in the silent film era. It is a lot to handle in a relatively short novel but author Ed Kurtz handles it like a pro. While the novel has some Raymond Chandleresque echoes, mainly due to the LA setting, the main protagonist is not a detective but just a poor working guy who gets into a mess and finds he has the cajones to fight it. I like that. The only thing that keeps this from going out of the ball park is that it feels a bit formula at first. It doesn't feel like it is going anywhere new and the mystery is a bit easy to figure out. Perhaps it was a little too short for its own good. But it is still a really good read by a writer that has what it takes to go the distance. If you like mysteries, especially those that delves into Hollywood and the alternately glossy and gritty shades of its past, then you will like this novel. Three and a half stars.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kaisersoze

    Probably the "lightest" release from DarkFuse I've yet read, Angel of the Abyss is a reasonably interesting noir thriller told via two interchanging arcs - one set in modern LA, the other in 1926 Hollywood. In essence, the novel details film restorer Graham and his pseudo-friend Jake's efforts to discover the whereabouts of a mysterious film that disappeared soon after it was made, even as nefarious types seem determined to stop them from unearthing it. In the other arc, the story of the film it Probably the "lightest" release from DarkFuse I've yet read, Angel of the Abyss is a reasonably interesting noir thriller told via two interchanging arcs - one set in modern LA, the other in 1926 Hollywood. In essence, the novel details film restorer Graham and his pseudo-friend Jake's efforts to discover the whereabouts of a mysterious film that disappeared soon after it was made, even as nefarious types seem determined to stop them from unearthing it. In the other arc, the story of the film itself is told, largely from the POV of the beautiful star who disappeared soon after making her one and only film. Author Ed Kurtz here delivers an interesting noir thriller that I nevertheless found to be uneven in its pacing. On the one hand, Graham and Jake's investigations were exciting enough to hold my interest, but I found Grace's story to be far less compelling. It was fairly obvious how this arc was going to end (and it's not meant to be in doubt), but the getting there was supposed to be the hook and I rarely found it overly engaging. I also had some issue with the heavy-handed playing of the noir elements in the modern storyline. As much as I know this is a genre convention, every time I read something from one of the characters in that storyline that sounded like it came from the '20s, I inwardly cringed. Still, that's just my reaction. Those who enjoy this type of crime thriller are likely to have a ball. And I really did appreciate the way in which Kurtz wasn't afraid to cull his cast at key points in the story. In fact, a mid-tale development struck me as courageous in a James Ellroy kind of way. (view spoiler)[Though to be fair, Ellroy actually killed his main protagonist off, rather than having him bounce back from being shot in the head. (hide spoiler)] Overall then, I found Angel of the Abyss to be a bit of a mixed bag, but reasonably enjoyable nonetheless. 3 Bum Steers for Angel of the Abyss. The preceding was based on an eARC of the novel provided by DarkFuse Publishing through Netgalley.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pamellia

    Angel of the Abyss by Ed Kurtz January 2 to January 5, 2015 Dark Fuse per-publication read The book is a thriller sprinkled with intrigue, missing people, old Hollywood characters and a modern day film restoration specialist. What a group for a story that is weaved together with development and care. Graham lives in Boston and has been hired by a LA firm to restore the century old lost film, Angel of the Abyss. However when Graham arrives to complete this all expenses paid job, plus, he doesn't find Angel of the Abyss by Ed Kurtz January 2 to January 5, 2015 Dark Fuse per-publication read The book is a thriller sprinkled with intrigue, missing people, old Hollywood characters and a modern day film restoration specialist. What a group for a story that is weaved together with development and care. Graham lives in Boston and has been hired by a LA firm to restore the century old lost film, Angel of the Abyss. However when Graham arrives to complete this all expenses paid job, plus, he doesn't find what he thinks he will. What's going on? What is Graham to do? Does he just leave LA and go back to his mild mannered job in Boston? Well even more happens and Graham is stuck in LA. The story goes back and forth giving a story line from 1926 when the original movie was made. Oh, it was going to make everyone rich and famous!! Well, then what happened there. I enjoyed the way the author takes us from one century to the next. Just as we find out one thing in the 1926 setting, it is explained further in the 2013 setting or the other way around. Nothing is lost and I see a lot of character development in both centuries. I like the way the lead actress, Grace, is a strong female character...not just some dumb little girl from the mid-west. There were several grammar or typo error in this book. I had to stop several times and re-read a section two or three time until I understood exactly what the author was saying. The amount of errors would not discourage me from recommending the book, but does effect my overall rating of the book by a little. I recommend this book 4 stars.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Angel of the Abyss is a pretty good crime noir tale from Ed Kurtz. The story switches back and forth from 1926 during the making of the film to 2013 and the search for the truth behind it. A Hollywood legend. A long lost and extremely valuable silent film has surfaced and uncovered some deep dark secrets with it. Bodies are starting to pile up as the mystery is slowly revealed. (view spoiler)[ I had a bit of a problem with the character Frank who seemed to be a waste of space and added really not Angel of the Abyss is a pretty good crime noir tale from Ed Kurtz. The story switches back and forth from 1926 during the making of the film to 2013 and the search for the truth behind it. A Hollywood legend. A long lost and extremely valuable silent film has surfaced and uncovered some deep dark secrets with it. Bodies are starting to pile up as the mystery is slowly revealed. (view spoiler)[ I had a bit of a problem with the character Frank who seemed to be a waste of space and added really nothing to the story line itself and ended up disappearing with no rhyme or reason behind it. I also had a bit of a hard time with the search for the film itself. For a “long, lost” film, it sure wasn’t very hard to find and as a matter of fact several reels were just sitting in an old theater that one of the characters owned. (hide spoiler)] It sounds like I did not like it very much, but I did enjoy it. Minus a few plot holes I thought it was a very well written novel that could have used a wee more “juice” to keep it moving. 3 Stars. I look forward to reading more Kurtz in the future. *As a member of the DarkFuse / NetGalley Readers Group, I received an advanced copy of this e-book in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    I had never read anything by Ed Kurtz before so I was looking forward to this one.  The tale revolves around a film thought to be lost long ago until recently rediscovered.  Kurtz then swaps the story back and forth between the past and the present, keeping the reader on the edge of their seat for the duration of the book until the unforgettable conclusion. Besides a few plot issues in the story, this one was very enjoyable and I look forward to more of Kurtz's work. I can see this one appealing I had never read anything by Ed Kurtz before so I was looking forward to this one.  The tale revolves around a film thought to be lost long ago until recently rediscovered.  Kurtz then swaps the story back and forth between the past and the present, keeping the reader on the edge of their seat for the duration of the book until the unforgettable conclusion. Besides a few plot issues in the story, this one was very enjoyable and I look forward to more of Kurtz's work. I can see this one appealing to a wide variety of people so be sure to check it out!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Hicks

    Angel of the Abyss, by Ed Kurtz, grabbed me right off the bat, and I had a hard time letting go of this one. The story unfolds in a dual narrative between film restoration expert Graham Woodard in the present-day, and through the eyes of lost 1920s starlet, Grace Baron. Woodard is hired to restore the footage of a recently rediscovered silent-era film that was thought lost to history. It is also the only film Baron ever appeared in, and the subject matter was rather unsettling - and unseemly - fo Angel of the Abyss, by Ed Kurtz, grabbed me right off the bat, and I had a hard time letting go of this one. The story unfolds in a dual narrative between film restoration expert Graham Woodard in the present-day, and through the eyes of lost 1920s starlet, Grace Baron. Woodard is hired to restore the footage of a recently rediscovered silent-era film that was thought lost to history. It is also the only film Baron ever appeared in, and the subject matter was rather unsettling - and unseemly - for its era, rife with depictions of occultism, female nudity, and erotic scenes between Baron and a demonic creature. With the Hollywood backdrop, and the murder of Woodard's employer, Kurtz infuses his narrative with a cool noir sheen. The Roaring '20 are well written as well, with the dialogue coming off as rapid-paced back-and-forths with the actors, actresses, directors and producers imbibing on alcohol made illegal thanks to Prohibition. The time-jumps are very well written, and each half of the narrative make for compelling stories in their own right. These split narratives converge into a satisfying finale. Overall, Angel of the Abyss was a very enjoyable read, and a cool and elegant crime thriller. I really appreciated the bit of fictional film history, largely influenced by the off-set dramatics during this period in Hollywood's still largely infantile state, where rich producers and burgeoning gangsters reined as the nation began moving toward the Red Scare. Kurtz does an excellent job capturing the feel of that era, while keeping the present-day narrative grounded and within the realm of credibility. Highly recommended.

  19. 4 out of 5

    F.R.

    Undoubtedly, it’s because I read too much Raymond Chandler when I was young, before moving on to read too much James Ellroy, but the sub-genre I love most is probably the Hollywood-set murder mystery/thriller. What I find so fascinating is the mixture of that impossible Technicolor glamour, with tawdry and brutal crime. It’s the tearing down of that wonderful façade – the sound stages, the beautiful women made-up and coiffured to look more incredible than anyone ever had before – to reveal someth Undoubtedly, it’s because I read too much Raymond Chandler when I was young, before moving on to read too much James Ellroy, but the sub-genre I love most is probably the Hollywood-set murder mystery/thriller. What I find so fascinating is the mixture of that impossible Technicolor glamour, with tawdry and brutal crime. It’s the tearing down of that wonderful façade – the sound stages, the beautiful women made-up and coiffured to look more incredible than anyone ever had before – to reveal something more far more fragile and damaged underneath. But of course, it being Hollywood you just put the painted backdrop back up, reapply the luscious lipstick to your leading lady (or new leading lady, if the old one was an unfortunate victim) and carry on. No matter how many murders take place, the pretence always wins. Of course, it helps that I imagine all these stories with noir lighting, but actually ANGEL IN THE ABYSS doesn’t have a 1940s segment. Instead it’s the tale of a film restorer of today leaving the comfort of his projector in Boston to restore a legendary silent film in L.A., and finding dead bodies piling up around him. It’s entertaining stuff, with ‘poor nobody suddenly finding himself out of the depth on the mean streets’ being such a Hollywood cliché itself, that of course it can be played around with in fiction. Here we even have two nobodies out of their depth, taking turns at the investigation, and such are the conventions of this kind of story that you don’t even mind when they both get suddenly quite good at the hard-ass stuff. The film to be restored is a legendary lost silent classic called (of course) ‘Angel of the Abyss’, and the action in the present alternates with flashbacks to the 1920’s making of the film. This though is where the novel isn’t on such sure footing. Kurtz never quite convinces in the 1920’s milieu like he does in the current day, and there’s an artificiality to these chapters. But then maybe I’m being too harsh, as the characters here are actors and directors and producers filming in front of painted backdrops, and so maybe that artificiality is fitting. It’s a story that hinges on trying to create something real out of the phoniness of Tinsel-Town and so, even though it takes a little getting used to, the artificiality might actually work to its benefit. ANGEL OF THE ABYSS isn’t Chandler or Ellroy. It isn’t Megan Abbot. It also lacks the playfulness of a Stuart Kaminsky. But actually this is a good, gritty and unassuming thriller written by a man who clearly loves old films. I love old films myself – and adore this kind of novel – so I enjoyed the hell out it. If you get chance, please visit my blog for book, TV and film reviews - as well as whatever else takes my fancy - at frjameson.com LIke my Facebook page Or follow me on Twitter or Instagram: @frjameson.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nev Murray

    I received an advance copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Also this book is published by DarkFuse and you generally cannot go wrong with anything they put out to the masses. First thing I ever read from Ed Kurtz was his contribution to Widowmakers Angel & Grace, which was horrifically gory and delicious and incidentally one of my favourite short stories now. Angel of the Abyss is so far removed from Angel & Grace I couldn’t believe it. This is a crime thriller. Half I received an advance copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Also this book is published by DarkFuse and you generally cannot go wrong with anything they put out to the masses. First thing I ever read from Ed Kurtz was his contribution to Widowmakers Angel & Grace, which was horrifically gory and delicious and incidentally one of my favourite short stories now. Angel of the Abyss is so far removed from Angel & Grace I couldn’t believe it. This is a crime thriller. Half of the story is set in Hollywood in 1926 and the other half in current times. True LA Noir. Angel of the Abyss is a silent movie that was filmed in 1926. The starlet in this film was Grace Baron (Baronsky) and it was directed by Jack Parson. Her reason for doing it was simple – become famous. His reason for doing it was more complicated. He wanted to create something “dark” that had never been done before. Shortly after the films premier both Grace and the movie itself go missing. 2013 and movie restorer Graham Woodard gets a call from a lady in Hollywood claiming to have found the movie. She emails Graham a section of the film and after he views it, his excitement puts him directly on a plane to Hollywood to help restore the film to its former glory and digitise it. An old friend Jake tags along with him basically because he has nothing better to do. Once they arrive in Hollywood they are immediately thrown into a wild chase to try and find the remaining reels of the film. Someone doesn’t want them found though and Graham and Jake encounter murder at seemingly every turn. That is all I can give you without giving it away. This book was brilliant. It chops and changes between 1926 Hollywood and 2013 Hollywood. The 1926 portions describe Grace’s life and the film being made. It gives you, in my opinion, an excellent insight into what went on in the film industry in those days and how the silent movies were made. It weaves a lovely atmosphere of the times with visits to speakeasies and examining the prudish nature and attitudes towards films. The 2013 portions are equally good following Graham and Jake on a murderous chase for answers and opportunities to right some wrongs. Ed Kurtz has done a very good job on this novel. By intertwining the two different time periods he has created a very effective story of people today searching for truth and people of the past giving you the truth. A solid 4 stars for me on this.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Robert Mingee

    This was an enjoyable crime noir story that alternated back and forth between the silent film era, chronicling the making of a lost masterpiece, and current times, when a reel from the film has resurfaced. Even in present times, the story is told 1st person from 2 different characters, which sounds like it would get confusing and possibly even annoying, but the author handled it pretty well, and there was good reason for it. It's hard to say which storyline was more enjoyable, because they were q This was an enjoyable crime noir story that alternated back and forth between the silent film era, chronicling the making of a lost masterpiece, and current times, when a reel from the film has resurfaced. Even in present times, the story is told 1st person from 2 different characters, which sounds like it would get confusing and possibly even annoying, but the author handled it pretty well, and there was good reason for it. It's hard to say which storyline was more enjoyable, because they were quite different. The young starlet was the central focus of the past storyline, and she was a complex and strong character. It really felt authentic, though I have no firsthand experience to back that up. :-) I knew where that storyline was going, and I was right, but I don't think the author intended for there to be any mystery there. The present storyline was played much less seriously, and was even quite amusing at times, with the main characters being in over their heads and yet still managing to survive while the body count rises. This storyline sort of reminded me of Jeff Strand's "Andrew Mayhem" books, and that's a good thing. It all held together well, aided by the short chapters that kept each half of the story fresh in my mind. I did not guess accurately where the current story was going, and that part felt a little anticlimactic, as well as maybe a little implausible. But overall, this was a solid and entertaining book. I will definitely read more from Ed Kurtz. Recommended, especially for noir fans and old movie buffs.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

    Fast paced with a very interesting mystery. Really enjoyable blend of old Hollywood, grifters, struggling starlets and sudden violence. (The criminals in this book don't make speeches. They show up to kill.) The story switches between the filming of "Angel of the Abyss" in 1926 and the hunt for the lost reels of the same film many years later, in 2013. Time alternates between pretty much each chapter and this is handled smoothly. We get to learn more about some characters than others (for example Fast paced with a very interesting mystery. Really enjoyable blend of old Hollywood, grifters, struggling starlets and sudden violence. (The criminals in this book don't make speeches. They show up to kill.) The story switches between the filming of "Angel of the Abyss" in 1926 and the hunt for the lost reels of the same film many years later, in 2013. Time alternates between pretty much each chapter and this is handled smoothly. We get to learn more about some characters than others (for example, Graham is developed more than Jake), but I don't see that it harms the story in any way. Graham is more connected to the mystery anyway. Dialogue flows well, whether it is 1926 or 2013. It's a pretty safe bet that many readers will get pulled in right at the beginning. The film (of the title) is creepy, its loss is compelling, and you do really want to know what happened to the young actress, why she went missing (or, was killed?) along with her one and only film...and why would anyone still be trying to keep it hidden at all costs. *I received an advanced copy from Netgalley in exchange for posting an online review.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Majanka

    Book Review originally published here: http://www.iheartreading.net/reviews/... Angel of the Abyss is a noir mystery that will keep readers on the edge of their seats. Graham Woodard is hired to restore part of a lost silent horror film called “Angel of the Abyss”. It was one of the only movies featuring a particular actress, Gracie Baron. The plot switches between past and present, between Gracie Baron prepping to make the film and making it, and Graham trying to restore it. Gracie Baron went mis Book Review originally published here: http://www.iheartreading.net/reviews/... Angel of the Abyss is a noir mystery that will keep readers on the edge of their seats. Graham Woodard is hired to restore part of a lost silent horror film called “Angel of the Abyss”. It was one of the only movies featuring a particular actress, Gracie Baron. The plot switches between past and present, between Gracie Baron prepping to make the film and making it, and Graham trying to restore it. Gracie Baron went missing after filming “Angel of the Abyss”, so there’s a whole mystery attached to the film already. As soon as Graham flies to LA to start working on the film, murders start to happen, and someone clearly doesn’t want that film restored. Graham nad his best friend Jake will have to team up to find out who doesn’t want the secrets behind the movie uncovered, and who is willing to kill for that. The book reads like a modern Hollywood noir. Definitely not a bad book, but the parts in the past were better than the parts set in the present. You can almost feel Grace’s naivité, whereas in the present we just get a cut-and-dry murder mystery.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mommacat

    A lost Cinematic masterpiece. An actress lost to history. Murders occurring in the present. It makes a nice sounding story, huh? Ed Kurtz was telling it well. I like mysteries. I like L.A., so I stuck with ANGEL. Silent movies don't thrill me all that much so masterpiece seems like a heavy handle to hang on any picture from that time. It just seemed to me to be a lot of fuss over what??? You know, much ado about... We really need those half stars. I went with 3.5 stars for ANGEL. I wanted to go A lost Cinematic masterpiece. An actress lost to history. Murders occurring in the present. It makes a nice sounding story, huh? Ed Kurtz was telling it well. I like mysteries. I like L.A., so I stuck with ANGEL. Silent movies don't thrill me all that much so masterpiece seems like a heavy handle to hang on any picture from that time. It just seemed to me to be a lot of fuss over what??? You know, much ado about... We really need those half stars. I went with 3.5 stars for ANGEL. I wanted to go higher, but just couldn't. I received an e-arc of this book from Netgalley in exchange for my review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Baker St Shelves

    A good old fashioned mystery featuring the love of classic movies. Kurtz is quickly becoming a good writer to me. A mystery that takes place both in the 20's and in modern day with a long lost movie caught in the center, this was such a fun book to read and it kept me fully invested trying to fully appreciate what was being written. Definitely keeping up with this writer A good old fashioned mystery featuring the love of classic movies. Kurtz is quickly becoming a good writer to me. A mystery that takes place both in the 20's and in modern day with a long lost movie caught in the center, this was such a fun book to read and it kept me fully invested trying to fully appreciate what was being written. Definitely keeping up with this writer

  26. 4 out of 5

    John

    A raw, unflinching love letter to tales of old Hollywood. Noir grounded in human truth.

  27. 5 out of 5

    A Reader's Heaven

    (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.) When Graham Woodard is hired to restore part of a previously lost silent horror film—Angel of the Abyss—the last thing he expects is the first in a series of murders clearly meant to keep it lost. With one-time friend Jake Maitland in tow, the two must now navigate the treacherous enigma that is the lost film, while piecing together the story of the film’s ill-fated starlet, Grace Baron, who vanished in 1926. T (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.) When Graham Woodard is hired to restore part of a previously lost silent horror film—Angel of the Abyss—the last thing he expects is the first in a series of murders clearly meant to keep it lost. With one-time friend Jake Maitland in tow, the two must now navigate the treacherous enigma that is the lost film, while piecing together the story of the film’s ill-fated starlet, Grace Baron, who vanished in 1926. The closer they get to the truth, the more blood is spilled, and it soon becomes apparent that there is much more to the lost film than anyone expected, as there are still forces that will stop at nothing to keep it and its star buried. The darkness the strange film conjured all those years ago has come alive again with its discovery, and now everyone from Graham’s own estranged ex-wife to the LAPD is getting involved. And the body count is growing. Do you know those books where you think "Ok, I'll give it a go and see what happens..." and then by the end of the book you wanted to go back to the start and begin again cos you had underestimated what it was going to be like? Well, that was me with this book... I have always liked books with settings in the 1920's and 30's - I don't know why, exactly, but there is something about that period, especially in print, that I do enjoy getting immersed in. And the historical sections of this book were very good. The "What Happened to Gracie?" mystery is very very good - the details of Hollywood and the industry during that period were interesting; the story-telling was of a really high standard. The modern section of the book - the story of Graham and Jake - didn't hold quite as much fascination for me. I don't think I enjoyed it as much as it felt like a more predictable angle than the historical part. Maybe that's just me. Don't get me wrong - this is still a very good book. Go and read it. For sure. I do find it hard to give books 5 stars so this is a really highly-rated story. Paul ARH

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Delamare

    What's good about it Film buffs will be delighted with this novel that gives pride to the cinema and mainly to silent movies. It talks about the premise of talking pictures, Los Angeles and the superficial life of local people, the beginnings of the great Hollywood companies, in short, a real plunge into a passion Ed Kurtz makes us share. A special feature of the book I liked is that the story is written in several views (so far nothing new you could say), but it's also partially written in the fi What's good about it Film buffs will be delighted with this novel that gives pride to the cinema and mainly to silent movies. It talks about the premise of talking pictures, Los Angeles and the superficial life of local people, the beginnings of the great Hollywood companies, in short, a real plunge into a passion Ed Kurtz makes us share. A special feature of the book I liked is that the story is written in several views (so far nothing new you could say), but it's also partially written in the first person for two of the protagonists. Depending on who's physically restricted between Graham and Jake, it's either talking. I admit that the change of "I" surprise me, but the differentiation between the two characters is carefree and easy. We going from the investigation about the film today to the shooting of the film at the time, which allows us to understand the atmosphere and ultimately the reason for the disappearance of Grace and the murderous desire to leave the film to oblivion. Both intrigues conclude one another. On one side you will find the scenes of the film and the characters' lives around the film, on the other the two partner in crime (pun intended!) seek to discover the reason behind the two disappearances (Grace and the film). Some were disappointed by finding out that it's not a horror book (but about a vanished horror film). As for me, I was expecting a mystery and crime fiction and I was not disappointed with the noir Los Angeles atmosphere, the humor and the action too. In a nutshell A dark novel about the lies behind Hollywood, two well conducted intrigues and sympathetic characters, it's a 4/5 for me. Disclaimer: An e-galley of this title was provided to me by the publisher. No review was promised and the above is an unbiased review of the novel (Originally posted at vanessa-s-bookshelves.blogspot.ca)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Angel of the Abyss is an enjoyable, well-witten thriller whose story takes place in two different eras, one the era of silent movies and the second, our era . What makes the book so goo is that the author moves between the two in alternating chapters and that he does it so well, without confusing the story line's flow and without irritating thiis reader , as often happens when a writer loses control of his material. Everything flows, everything comes together as the two story lines make for a th Angel of the Abyss is an enjoyable, well-witten thriller whose story takes place in two different eras, one the era of silent movies and the second, our era . What makes the book so goo is that the author moves between the two in alternating chapters and that he does it so well, without confusing the story line's flow and without irritating thiis reader , as often happens when a writer loses control of his material. Everything flows, everything comes together as the two story lines make for a thrilling climax. The plot, briefly: graham Woodard, a film restorer technician, is hired by a silent film buff who has found a reel of a lost silent Classic, Angel of the Abyss. This movie had been thought lost forever, it's highly volatile nitrate film stock probably degraded into bits. But here was one reel, with most of the rest of the reels waiting back in Hollywood for Graham to restore. One reason the movie is considered to be a classic was that the ingenue star, Grace Baron, mysteriously disappeared before the film was ever released; another was that the silent film was rarely exhibited inthe USA, and the director left the country. When Graham Woodard arrives at the California office of the Silent Film Society director who hired him, he finds her dead, murdered. Back and forth, between chapters describing the making of A ot A, and chapters of the danger and death stalking Woodard and his search for why this simple film project has become so dangerous the tension grows. An entertaining, interesting, different crime novel. As one who loves classic movies, classic black and white " noir" mysteries and thrillers in general. This book really appealed to me, and I recommend it highly.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Angel of the Abyss is a true mystery novel. By this I mean that it is not just written in the style of a mystery, but the mystery itself is compelling and demands the reader keep reading to find the answers. This is much more than a standard "whodunit". In the process of unraveling the story of a lost silent film, Ed Kurtz shuttles the story back and forth between present day Hollywood and 1926. These threads are quite different and juxtapose nicely with each other. In the past we follow rising a Angel of the Abyss is a true mystery novel. By this I mean that it is not just written in the style of a mystery, but the mystery itself is compelling and demands the reader keep reading to find the answers. This is much more than a standard "whodunit". In the process of unraveling the story of a lost silent film, Ed Kurtz shuttles the story back and forth between present day Hollywood and 1926. These threads are quite different and juxtapose nicely with each other. In the past we follow rising actress Grace Baron and discover her tragic back story, while in the present our protagonists are two failed filmmakers doing some amateur detective work as they are unwittingly drawn in to a plot to keep the lost film hidden forever. I particularly like the hard-boiled writing style of the present day sections. Told in first person, there is tough talk but also a lot of humor that breaks up the grimness. While not the type of dark fiction that Darkfuse is generally known for, Angel of the Abyss is a novel they can be proud of. Mystery fans in particular should seek this one out. 5 stars!

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