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Facehooked: How Facebook Affects Our Emotions, Relationships, and Lives

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The number of Facebook users worldwide exceeded one billion in August of 2012. With the increase in Facebook users, psychologists have seen an alarming increase in the number of Facebook related complaints from their clients. Dr. Suzana E. Flores, clinical psychologist, has interviewed Facebook users of all ages for three years exploring the positive and negative features The number of Facebook users worldwide exceeded one billion in August of 2012. With the increase in Facebook users, psychologists have seen an alarming increase in the number of Facebook related complaints from their clients. Dr. Suzana E. Flores, clinical psychologist, has interviewed Facebook users of all ages for three years exploring the positive and negative features of Facebook and evaluating the effect it has on our lives. Facehooked explores the problems most commonly found on Facebook, including controversial topics such as self-esteem, privacy, peer pressure, stalking, emotional manipulation, among others. Readers are not only provided with practical tools to help identify and avoid unhealthy behaviors, but also suggestions for healthier interaction on Facebook.


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The number of Facebook users worldwide exceeded one billion in August of 2012. With the increase in Facebook users, psychologists have seen an alarming increase in the number of Facebook related complaints from their clients. Dr. Suzana E. Flores, clinical psychologist, has interviewed Facebook users of all ages for three years exploring the positive and negative features The number of Facebook users worldwide exceeded one billion in August of 2012. With the increase in Facebook users, psychologists have seen an alarming increase in the number of Facebook related complaints from their clients. Dr. Suzana E. Flores, clinical psychologist, has interviewed Facebook users of all ages for three years exploring the positive and negative features of Facebook and evaluating the effect it has on our lives. Facehooked explores the problems most commonly found on Facebook, including controversial topics such as self-esteem, privacy, peer pressure, stalking, emotional manipulation, among others. Readers are not only provided with practical tools to help identify and avoid unhealthy behaviors, but also suggestions for healthier interaction on Facebook.

30 review for Facehooked: How Facebook Affects Our Emotions, Relationships, and Lives

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    ...I'm an open and honest person. I'm positive -optimistic -intelligent- creative - ...I'm a good person ...I have good hygiene habits ...I always wash the dishes before I go to bed and make my bed in the morning before I leave the house. ...I'm fit... Definitely a fit person ... no slacker couch potato here. ...I never pick my nose ...I know how to be with unwanted emotions without making them worse...( aren't I just a dandy person?) I hope you "LIKE" my review If you "Like" my review....I'll get a do ...I'm an open and honest person. I'm positive -optimistic -intelligent- creative - ...I'm a good person ...I have good hygiene habits ...I always wash the dishes before I go to bed and make my bed in the morning before I leave the house. ...I'm fit... Definitely a fit person ... no slacker couch potato here. ...I never pick my nose ...I know how to be with unwanted emotions without making them worse...( aren't I just a dandy person?) I hope you "LIKE" my review If you "Like" my review....I'll get a dopamine brain reward. You'll have rewarded me for my good behavior ... and I'll be motivated to post again so you can "Like" me again... so I can have a healthy positive addiction with our 'community-social-global-relationships. Doesn't that sound fun? TO ENJOY MORE FUN .... make sure to "like" me" Just a friendly reminder..... If you have 'ever' owned a smart phone or computer... Don't forget to read "FACEHOOKED", by Dr. Suzana Flores. Her book was published two years ago...( 2014), If you are reading this review - today (2016), and never felt this book was for 'you'....I invite you to re-consider - as I did ....( but be sure to "like" my review)....lol I promise... Your privacy will be protected ... nobody needs to know what you'll be thinking as you read Dr. Flores important book about our daily lives. Oh, yes... (shhh)... I learned a few 'boo-boo's' which I've made in the social media world....(not just the other one billion people on the planet). However, with Dr. Suzana Flores "clear guidelines", I'm now a SUPER-SOCIAL -ADAPTIVE SOCIAL MEDIA all-around emotionally stable -girl. I invite you to "Like" this review......(LOL)....That's laugh out loud for you FACEHOOKED newbies! Thank You "Reputation Books"... ( I "like" you), Thank you to Netgalley....( I "like" you, too) Thank You to Dr. Suzana Flores....( you sincerely wrote a valuable - spot on - truthful book). .... I "like" you too.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Veronica ⭐️

    With the advent of social media the pressure of keeping up with the Joneses has never been so great or far reaching. Facehooked is an excellent resource for parents of tweens and primary school teachers. This book had a lot of good advice for people of all ages. A few things that everyone must remember: -Whatever you put out there on social media is anyone’s for the taking. -Don’t be too sensitive. If something bothers you call the person – not in a confrontational sense but just as friends. -Don’t th With the advent of social media the pressure of keeping up with the Joneses has never been so great or far reaching. Facehooked is an excellent resource for parents of tweens and primary school teachers. This book had a lot of good advice for people of all ages. A few things that everyone must remember: -Whatever you put out there on social media is anyone’s for the taking. -Don’t be too sensitive. If something bothers you call the person – not in a confrontational sense but just as friends. -Don’t think “friending” your teen is going to allow you to see what they are doing. They are smarter than that. -If you are clicking around on other people’s profiles be assured that someone out there will be looking at yours. Teens get bored with anything quickly and are soon on to the next thing. Facebook is fading quickly for teens in Australia and they are moving on to Instagram, Tumblr and Snapchat to stay in touch. Facebook is not a true picture of someone’s life. Some extremes are the sympathy poster that always posts bad news and then you have the person that only posts about their perfect children and perfect husband. Some always seem to be on a permanent holiday. We must remember this is just a snapshot of a moment in time and we cannot judge our own life by these posts. We are losing the art of talking and written words can sometimes convey a wrong mood. Just remember to finish every sentence with a smiley :) I was taught this little area of social etiquette by my daughters :) We all know someone who is Facehooked but it’s not us, right! I would like to thank Reputation Books via Netgalley for my copy to read and review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Arthur Graham

    Disclosure: I'm one of those people who harbors an active dislike for Facebook. Of course, this does nothing to set me apart from the hundreds of millions of dissatisfied Facebook users out there, but what does is my decision to eschew the world's most popular social media site altogether. waits for applause Thank you. Yes, I deleted my personal profile years ago, plus my disused author profile only somewhat more recently, and frankly it's been quite liberating. I never really was all that into Fac Disclosure: I'm one of those people who harbors an active dislike for Facebook. Of course, this does nothing to set me apart from the hundreds of millions of dissatisfied Facebook users out there, but what does is my decision to eschew the world's most popular social media site altogether. waits for applause Thank you. Yes, I deleted my personal profile years ago, plus my disused author profile only somewhat more recently, and frankly it's been quite liberating. I never really was all that into Facebook to begin with, so the decision to jettison it from my life was not what I would call a painful one, although I've certainly retained enough painful memories of the place (mostly babble and bickering) to remind me why I left. Now, I ain't trying to get all hipster on ya by decrying the abomination that is Facebook (because let's face it, even most hipsters aren't too hip for their profiles), but I can tell you that I definitely don't miss it there. Sure, I'm more prone to forgetting people's birthdays and occasionally I'll get overlooked on invitations to things, and lord only knows how woefully behind I am on memes and such, but none of this seems to have had much of a negative impact on my existence. I still manage to maintain some semblance of a social life, offline to boot. The demand on my time and energy from physically present human beings is often quite enough already, so the last thing I need is multitudes of their virtual analogues flame warring and circle jerking and constantly vying for my (mostly undeserved) attention. Plus, I can be enough of a tactless, insensitive bastard in real life as it is, and there probably aren't enough emoticons in the world to get my point across online without offending some idiot with too many electronic devices and seemingly not enough of anything else in his/her life. Says the guy currently typing a long-winded rant in place of a book review on Goodreads. Well, the irony of using one social media site to trash another is not entirely lost on me. It's hard to do anything in this day and age without automatically making a hypocrite of oneself -- yet another reason to step away from the phone/tablet/laptop and limit one's online presence in general. At least on this site the drama tends to revolve around subjects I'm actually interested in (books and literature), but even then, it's basically just Facebook for people who read. Still, now I'm coming off as even more of a condescending elitist than I was already, so perhaps it's time I kindly STFU. You won't find me on Facebook, no, and honestly I hope never to return. Most likely I will die alone, with nary a Wi-Fi hotspot for miles around, clutching my sad little flip phone until the bitter end. So be it. In the meantime though, I refuse to live so much of my life online, and I encourage others to at least consider the possibility for themselves. Show your "like" for me by "liking" this post and sharing it with all your "friends"! As I may have mentioned already, I'm not on Facebook, so I'm kinda just dyin' for the attention here, LOLz...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    This is a read that is probably more pertinent to our present time than any other in non-fiction for the year. Facebook- how could that be so important when so much else of critical concern exists? Reading this, you'll know why. Among those I know the best and for the longest, I find the most active on Facebook are the most "open", absolutely giving, and yes, they are social. But often, all that sociability does have more than a few slight negatives attached. The length of time is seems to have c This is a read that is probably more pertinent to our present time than any other in non-fiction for the year. Facebook- how could that be so important when so much else of critical concern exists? Reading this, you'll know why. Among those I know the best and for the longest, I find the most active on Facebook are the most "open", absolutely giving, and yes, they are social. But often, all that sociability does have more than a few slight negatives attached. The length of time is seems to have captured with some users, not the least of those negatives either. Good people, social manipulators, narcissists, stalkers, and also those of positive good intent and will to affirm love, affection, connection. Beware, because one can so easily be two or three of these things at the same time. This is written by a clinical psychologist who sees people devastated or in break down of emotion or situation from Facebook revelations. It has pages and pages of real posts and outcomes. And more importantly, she investigates the emotional mountains and valleys that result from Facebook use. Sometimes the affirmations also produce emotive changes and perceptions. Do we really know the difference between cyber words, their fall-outs of feelings and the reality of our true associations in a physical community sense? Which are "real"? It's the photos and the "like" contests (how people feel chided when their posts are not liked) that put me off, personally, the most. So much private material that is shared by "friends" only. YOU think? And still I see the positives of the friends' found and reconnected. And also the workplace connect that should never have happened too- that can works numerous ways- nothing ever "goes away", you know. (So that's were you were when you were out "sick", my dear associate. So helpful for me when I was the student workers' boss.) But am very, very glad that my own kids have themselves and their own children off of it. Because there are many, many crazy people on there. And some of them ARE people you know, and hurt (mostly peers or family) others with words as a daily habit. I'm witnessed that myself. And at times, especially with the younger uses, they either do not care or have no clue that they have done so. This book has a crux core of why the emotional "hurt" I just, in one aspect, described. Because our psyches are truly not geared/ hard-wired towards this level of pleasing, displeasing or even reaction. Sometimes I wonder what the eventual result of Facebook and other social media methods will be for the long term on employment investigation, our core or nuclear family sense. And possibly even for long-term acquaintance.

  5. 5 out of 5

    JanB

    This is a compelling look into the psychology of social media and how it has changed how we interact with one another, both positively and negatively. The author uses research, personal interviews, and case studies from her private practice to highlight the dangers of social media sites like Facebook. Social media isn't going away anytime soon, and the author gives readers tools to recognize problems, avoid the pitfalls and identify toxic personality types and behaviors in others (or yourself). T This is a compelling look into the psychology of social media and how it has changed how we interact with one another, both positively and negatively. The author uses research, personal interviews, and case studies from her private practice to highlight the dangers of social media sites like Facebook. Social media isn't going away anytime soon, and the author gives readers tools to recognize problems, avoid the pitfalls and identify toxic personality types and behaviors in others (or yourself). This is a must-read for anyone with a social media presence, and would be especially helpful for parents and those who work with children. I'm not particularly active on Facebook but I still found this book fascinating from a psychological standpoint. ** I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  6. 4 out of 5

    Eliza Cross

    Reading Facehooked has inspired me to be more conscious and balanced about the time my family and I spend online. Dr. Suzana Flores presents a compelling, eye-opening look at how Facebook has dramatically changed the way we socialize and connect with others. As the mother of a preteen, I appreciated the chapter on "Teen Cliques and Clicks," especially Flores' tips for helping young adults use social media appropriately. I also enjoyed the real-life stories from other Facebook users woven through Reading Facehooked has inspired me to be more conscious and balanced about the time my family and I spend online. Dr. Suzana Flores presents a compelling, eye-opening look at how Facebook has dramatically changed the way we socialize and connect with others. As the mother of a preteen, I appreciated the chapter on "Teen Cliques and Clicks," especially Flores' tips for helping young adults use social media appropriately. I also enjoyed the real-life stories from other Facebook users woven throughout the book. As a result of reading this book, I know I'll be more thoughtful and deliberate about engaging in social media.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    A fascinating--and frightening--look into a cultural obsession. I've been on Facebook for a decade, and it's served me well in my career, keeping in touch with friends (albeit from a safe, easier distance), and, sure, I've seen the penchant for trouble--the drama seekers and narcissism, the vaguebooking, etc. But I never recognized how truly dangerous Facebook could be. I am not talking about merely predators and stalker exes. That exists in the "real" world too. Dr. Suzana Flores's brilliant ex A fascinating--and frightening--look into a cultural obsession. I've been on Facebook for a decade, and it's served me well in my career, keeping in touch with friends (albeit from a safe, easier distance), and, sure, I've seen the penchant for trouble--the drama seekers and narcissism, the vaguebooking, etc. But I never recognized how truly dangerous Facebook could be. I am not talking about merely predators and stalker exes. That exists in the "real" world too. Dr. Suzana Flores's brilliant exposes a much deeper, more sinister danger: what happens when we cease being able to tell the difference between what is real and what is virtual? What used to be only apocalyptic sci-fi plots, with scary monsters and ghouls, has arrived with a vastly different face. Status updates and colorful snapshots of dinner, begging "likes" and sharing cat videos. Flores dives into, and picks apart, the psychology driving our neurosis and desires. How much are we willing to sacrifice to be loved by strangers? An absolute must read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charity

    I received this book through Goodreads First reads program and am not being reimbursed to provide this review. "Facebook makes drama easy!" --Dr. Suzana E. Flores, "Facehooked." When I got "Facehooked" in the mail I was excited and started reading it almost right away. I have to admit that initially, I was a little worried about what the "leaning" would be, if there was one, because one of the first few "praise" quotes listed at the front of the book was given by someone I don't agree with polit I received this book through Goodreads First reads program and am not being reimbursed to provide this review. "Facebook makes drama easy!" --Dr. Suzana E. Flores, "Facehooked." When I got "Facehooked" in the mail I was excited and started reading it almost right away. I have to admit that initially, I was a little worried about what the "leaning" would be, if there was one, because one of the first few "praise" quotes listed at the front of the book was given by someone I don't agree with politically and quite frankly, find pretty off-putting in general. I found myself wondering what one had to do with the other. However, I was interested in the topic, the author, Dr. Suzana E. Flores, has solid credentials and good research so I put that person out of my mind and moved forward. First, I want to point out that I LOVE how she organized the book! Each chapter is about a challenge of Facebook and throughout the chapter, Facebook users individually provide feedback on that particular issue complete with a "status update" that includes a silhouetted profile picture and basic information (gender, age, location). Flores finishes each chapter with the question "Where do we go from here?" and offers readers suggestions of how they can handle that issue in their life. I would think it would be nearly impossible for ANY reader of this day and age to read this book and not relate to SOMETHING in it. Dr. Flores is a clinical psychologist who no longer goes even a day in her practice without hearing how one of her patients has been affected by Facebook. She has patients who have a very difficult time putting down their phones even for a whole session. Some of her patients exhibit OCD-like behaviors like constantly having to check their phones or shaky hands if they don't have their phone right with them. And she asks...who are we trying to represent on Facebook? Is it ourselves? Is it a version of ourselves? Is it someone completely different? Flores points out that at best, creating online personas is just fun but at worst, it can be a very manipulative way to deceive others. Additionally, how are we responding to the perceived profiles of others? There has been research done that shoes that when people see pictures on Facebook of good times other "friends" are having (vacations, weddings, etc.) they feel envious and many people feel worse about themselves after getting off their computers. Another issues Dr. Flores deals with is the issue of privacy, or rather, the lack thereof. It seems as though privacy is becoming less and less important to us and that has repercussions. Before Facebook, people had a public life (what everyone saw) and a private life (what went on behind closed doors) and now, there is almost no distinction. This is primarily scary as it applies to kids because, even if they are told over and over, they don't grasp that EVERYTHING they put online will be accessible by potential colleges, people awarding internships, employees, etc. Even worse, they don't realize when they compromise their own safety. On a personal note, I'll never forget when I opened up my Facebook to find my 13-year-old niece, profile picture of her in a bikini, with a status that read: Hey, I'm home alone and bored! Hit me up/text me at ###-####!. Her profile was COMPLETELY public. It didn't occur to her that ANYONE could've found her best friend's name on her page, texted her and said, "Hey, this is ________, I have a new number but my mom needs your address again..." and BAM, a child predator could've been at their door in 10 minutes. I called my brother and he took care if it immediately but still, she was only protected in that instance because I happened to check out my FB page! Flores asks us to think about who are friends really are. Are they really the HUNDREDS of people we "know" on Facebook or the group it has always been? And, what can Facebook do to our friendships? When we're communicating with friends on FB and can't determine their body language or tone of voice, it can lead to some nasty misunderstandings that can end friendships. And if FB can interfere with friendships, what havoc can it reek on relationships? From people being tricked into dating someone who is completely different than who they say they are online to people discovering they're husband wants a divorce because he changed his relationship status to "divorced" and threw up a picture of him and another woman, it can just be BRUTAL. Flores relayed a story about a man who had become SO angry at his wife for "liking" so many posts about a certain man and "following" him online, etc. that he smashed her laptop and assaulted her. The man? Mitt Romney. She presents examples of couples who break up (and sever FB ties as well) and who might have a mutual friend who is informing the other about everything he or she does. It's scary! The part of her book that resonated most with me when she presented information about teenagers and bullying, etc. I actually read parts of it to my 10 and 12-year-old daughters (neither of whom are on FB) because I thought it was so important. Kids who are on Facebook all the time rarely TRULY understand that NOTHING they do is private. Being on Facebook during the time their brains are developing the most can actually change things like their ability to function in an organized way. Also, when kids start getting bullied online, they become frantic and don't know how to respond. After talking to a 16-year-old girl named Marlene, Flores says, "Marlene is absolutely right; school administrators must make efforts to understand their students' interactive world. How else can they conceptualize what cyberbullying is or how it emotionally affects teens?" She goes on to provide parents with action based advice to help them navigate this new territory. The psychology of addiction is the same, no matter what the "substance"; Facebook is one such substance. We are often so obsessed with the newest technology that we can't seem to get enough and never worry along the way about what the search might be doing to us. Flores says, "We've gotten so busy focusing on whether or not we can gain more and more online information that we've forgotten to question whether or not we SHOULD." And, just like any other addiction, FB is just masking the real problem; whatever we're missing in our lives that we are trying to fill up using Facebook is the real problem. Toward the end of the book Flores points out that, "The internet and social media have made our lives easier and more enjoyable in many ways, but they were never meant to replace life." I think that sums up the many thought-provoking points she made in this must-read book for anyone who uses the internet for more than email! *And let's face it, that's pretty much all of us!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Oh, the vanity! I am guilty. I have sinned. But Facebook is just getting creepier. I don't want to see my fb friends' friends posts. That's just weird. And, despite my privacy settings, I believe my fb friends' friends can see my posts if my friends "like" them. WTF? Bad idea. Except probably most people don't even care. Frowny face. This constant need to be entertained (Flores calls it "distracted") has got me apoplectic. We have created the Kardashians and this haunts me. Our society is in dec Oh, the vanity! I am guilty. I have sinned. But Facebook is just getting creepier. I don't want to see my fb friends' friends posts. That's just weird. And, despite my privacy settings, I believe my fb friends' friends can see my posts if my friends "like" them. WTF? Bad idea. Except probably most people don't even care. Frowny face. This constant need to be entertained (Flores calls it "distracted") has got me apoplectic. We have created the Kardashians and this haunts me. Our society is in decline. Our addiction to entertainment, our overfull bellies and those still grasping at the American Dream (I get the feeling Trump supporters are not an upwardly mobile bunch) must explain why we are not in a revolution or civil war. We're too busy with fb to notice how obscene, and obscenely wealthy, the Trumps and the Kardashians of our country are. OTOH, I LIKE seeing my friends' pictures of their kids, dogs and cats, cocktails at sunset, milestones, etc. Idk. Part primer: I learned you should not share your friends posts without asking. Despite the fact that they are up there, your friends might not want them to go further. TDLR is a thing, Too Long, Didn't Read! Love that one. FOMO is a thing. Millions of people are apparently compulsively checking fb for Fear of Missing Out. Frowny. Part psychoanalysis: Obviously, we seek validation but doing so electronically can really mess a human up. Not healthy. I suffer from "technology overstimulation." I knew it but not the phraseology. I thought I was a technophobe but that's not quite accurate. Part science: "Internet Addiction Disorder (IAD) ... is linked with certain brain abnormalities and changes blood flow." It is, in all likelihood, CHANGING OUR BRAINS, potentially leading to a panoply of behavior problems. How dystopian can we get? Can we win this one? Do we want to? Coming soon, navel-less humanoid creatures bred by machines. Wait. Maybe the Kardashians are the vanguard. "Fb is no longer just a bridge between our thoughts and the world; fb has become an alternate reality." On phantom phone vibration: "Something in your brain is being triggered that's different than what was triggered just a few short years ago." (Dr. Larry Rosen). I want to go back in time. Sort of. On the confusion of fb cacophony: "What is schizophrenia but the inability to make the distinction between reality and hallucination?" Good lord! She's right. On the loss of human interaction, paraphrasing Kant: "... our self-awareness is a direct consequence of things outside us. We get to know ourselves only through our interaction, and therefore we are dependent on the feedback of others." "A dependency on online approval makes us lose our sense of self-reliance...We will stop relying on our knowledge and intuition... and instead look to others for direction." "When we rely too much on approval [the "like" button], we give away our power... which in turn causes us to lose all sense of self." Do the extremely fragile SJWs on college campuses lack these experiences? I sometimes feel like kids these days a ready to burn our first amendment because it causes them to feel unsafe. Are we all gonna get Asperger-y? Are we already? I recommend the book although I thought it could've been tightened up a bit. Perfect title. I picture a fish hook in my cheek pulling me into the frame of my fb profile pic. Everyone time I complain about bloated book length my husband insists it's about sales. People apparently want heft in their hands if they're gonna shell out for it. Editors apparently even increase font size and white space to add bulk. So, so counterintuitive to me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katie/Doing Dewey

    I love books about the way technology affects our lives, so I was excited to hear what psychologist Suzana Flores thought about the way Facebook can influence our mental health. After noticing that many of her clients had Facebook related complaints, Dr. Flores began interviewing people specifically about their experiences with Facebook. In Facehooked, she shares many of the stories she heard, discusses some of the problems she believes Facebook can cause, and offers some advice for fighting bad I love books about the way technology affects our lives, so I was excited to hear what psychologist Suzana Flores thought about the way Facebook can influence our mental health. After noticing that many of her clients had Facebook related complaints, Dr. Flores began interviewing people specifically about their experiences with Facebook. In Facehooked, she shares many of the stories she heard, discusses some of the problems she believes Facebook can cause, and offers some advice for fighting bad Facebook habits. The anecdotes in Facehooked were my favorite part. It’s amazing the crazy things people do. Some of the behavior in this book is clearly Facebook-specific, such as hounding friends for “Likes”, and some could happen anyway, such as stalking an ex, but it’s all interesting. If this were simply a collection of anecdotes, I’d have loved it. Unfortunately, the author also makes wide-ranging generalizations without references to back them up. Many of the things she says sound reasonable, such as her claim that Facebook is changing our understanding of how to engage with others or her claim that a mismatch between our Facebook presentation of ourselves and our real selves will cause cognitive dissonance. They’re also things I could hear from anyone with a negative opinion of Facebook though and the predictability made this book somewhat boring. Although the author’s claims didn’t feel novel, they were still very broad claims and they needed to be backed up by research. Sadly, in the whole book , the author references specific research approximately twice. She mentions “studies” without a citation four or five times and cites the sort of non-academic sources one could find via a quick google search another half dozen times. And that’s it in terms of references. Because of the lack of references, even though I found this book a generally enjoyable read, it let me down. I don’t pick up a nonfiction book to have an author to regurgitate common ideas on a subject without verification. Even if the author had simply presented research supporting common opinions, I would feel like I’d learned something, but the lack of sources makes me think I just wasted my time learning someone else’s opinions instead of learning the facts. To be fair, it should be noted that what I have might be a review copy (although from my communication with the publisher, I don’t think it is). I e-mailed the publisher 9 days ago asking about references and double-checking if what I have is a review copy. I’ll update my review if I hear anything back. As is, I’m left with the impression that this is a particularly poor example of pop science. If you want to learn about social media, I’d recommend instead picking up the extremely interesting and well-researched  It's Complicated by Danah Boyd. This review was originally posted on Doing Dewey.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Billy

    This book was amazing and very horrifying. It never really occurred to me how we allow facebook to influence are lives in good, bad and sometimes disastrous ways. People really get angry and hurt when they get unfriended! All this time I thought it was 19 year-olds who acted like that — nuh-uh, I mean grown adults in their 40s and 50s letting an unfriending snowball into ruined marriages, losses of jobs, divided families, suicides – the Works, people! I was dumbfounded and infinitely intrigued. This book was amazing and very horrifying. It never really occurred to me how we allow facebook to influence are lives in good, bad and sometimes disastrous ways. People really get angry and hurt when they get unfriended! All this time I thought it was 19 year-olds who acted like that — nuh-uh, I mean grown adults in their 40s and 50s letting an unfriending snowball into ruined marriages, losses of jobs, divided families, suicides – the Works, people! I was dumbfounded and infinitely intrigued. Flores' stance is that social media can cause addiction as much as cigarettes, booze, gambling, etc. She brought up an array of terrific points that were easy to digest, as well as, some broad guidelines for internet use. The chapter on privacy was horrifying. I don't know how much research on Flores' part went into the points she argued, but I found that because facebook is so immediate and relevant in most of our lives the points she argued I had all of my own experience from using fb to go on to really understand that what she said carried a lot of weight. Some people cannot put their smartphones down and will get vicious when pressed to. Some people get so anxious at the thought of a post not being liked that they will either erase it (guilty), or ask their friends to like it. Omigod and the limitless amount of cyber-stalking that goes on on that website! Then there's the whole "keeping up with the Jones'" thing where we pore ourselves over other people's profiles believing their lives are better than ours while taking some heavy fire to our self-esteem. She also cited a phenomenon that I am all too familiar with, which she dubbed FOMO (Fear of Missing Out), in which people experience anxiety, depression, loss of sleep because they're afraid that while they're away from facebook amazing stuff is going on and they're not there to take part. She also cited BF Skinner's work on, uhm, conditioned responses I think it was. Overall, I was impressed and not expecting to enjoy this one as much as I did. This was a bit of a gamechanger for me, I'll admit...on this social media site haha

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Lane Beittel

    Facehooked is an important addition to psychological literature in the new media age. It’s an easy read, full of fascinating case studies, clinical detail, and most importantly, great advice for all of us living in the age of social media. Flores has researched and comments on the many positive aspects of Facebook and other social media, as well as their darker dangers and traps. She brings years of clinical experience to the table. The anecdotes she presents are sometimes funny, sometimes scary Facehooked is an important addition to psychological literature in the new media age. It’s an easy read, full of fascinating case studies, clinical detail, and most importantly, great advice for all of us living in the age of social media. Flores has researched and comments on the many positive aspects of Facebook and other social media, as well as their darker dangers and traps. She brings years of clinical experience to the table. The anecdotes she presents are sometimes funny, sometimes scary, and sometimes sad, but what I liked most of all about this book was the helpful, action-oriented advice she gives at the end of each chapter that can provide real help for those who find themselves stuck in a difficult situation because of Facebook or some other online interaction. This book is a must-read for adults, youth, parents of youth, educators, psychologists, and anyone who wants to have a better understanding of the role social media has on the modern mind.

  13. 5 out of 5

    T.J. Turner

    In a society saturated by social media, we are only just beginning to grasp the implications of our more instant, on-demand world. Looking back over the past few years, we can see the enormous good that may come from avenues like Facebook and Twitter, but of course truth is always more nuanced than the skin-deep outward appearances we all subscribe to when trolling through our news feed. Facehooked is an awesome dive into the implications of social media, our relationship to it, and with one ano In a society saturated by social media, we are only just beginning to grasp the implications of our more instant, on-demand world. Looking back over the past few years, we can see the enormous good that may come from avenues like Facebook and Twitter, but of course truth is always more nuanced than the skin-deep outward appearances we all subscribe to when trolling through our news feed. Facehooked is an awesome dive into the implications of social media, our relationship to it, and with one another as our world changes. Dr. Suzana Flores is a knowledgeable expert with fantastic insight. Her writing challenges our beliefs about everything form the world around us to who we truly are, while being humorous and engaging. This is a great read for anyone in our face-paced social media blitzed world. Bravo! Now I need to get back to my Facebook feed!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    I received this book in exchange for an honest review. Facehooked really made me realize some things about my life. I spend entirely too much time on Facebook, and while I do use it to communicate with my brother, who is over seas, and my family members in other states, I also do other things, like waste far too much time saving memes to my phone and reading comment on public figures statuses...especially if people are fighting in the comments. These things take away from my quality of life, so I received this book in exchange for an honest review. Facehooked really made me realize some things about my life. I spend entirely too much time on Facebook, and while I do use it to communicate with my brother, who is over seas, and my family members in other states, I also do other things, like waste far too much time saving memes to my phone and reading comment on public figures statuses...especially if people are fighting in the comments. These things take away from my quality of life, so I am now limiting my time on facebook and improving my quality of life due to this book. It's a great read, and I would suggest that anyone who spends more than a few hours a day on facebook check it out.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lynne

    3 stars. An interesting perspective of a clinical psychologists view of Facebook. We read many accounts of her patients' negative experiences with Facebook. The downfall is that these are then generalized to society overall. People who have anxiety, depression or more are most likely going to have negative experiences with Facebook. Those who are well adjusted and mentally healthy are going to find Facebook to be a way to stay connected to friends and loved ones. I do appreciate the opportunity 3 stars. An interesting perspective of a clinical psychologists view of Facebook. We read many accounts of her patients' negative experiences with Facebook. The downfall is that these are then generalized to society overall. People who have anxiety, depression or more are most likely going to have negative experiences with Facebook. Those who are well adjusted and mentally healthy are going to find Facebook to be a way to stay connected to friends and loved ones. I do appreciate the opportunity to read this through NetGalley.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mary C. Moore

    A fascinating look into the psychology of social media addiction. I especially loved the multiple case studies highlighted throughout the book. A must read for those of you who find it hard to put your phone down.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Suzana E.Flores is a clinical psychologist and she wrote Facehooked published by Reputation Books for trying to let us understand how much social medias in particular Facebook changed our daily life. All "hooked" by Facebook this one of Flores is a shocking and at traits sad, but always interesting reportage on the mind and behavior altered thanks to Facebook. While I was reading the book I thanked Lord we still have dial-up in our corner of the world. If sometimes I complain, I see now all the p Suzana E.Flores is a clinical psychologist and she wrote Facehooked published by Reputation Books for trying to let us understand how much social medias in particular Facebook changed our daily life. All "hooked" by Facebook this one of Flores is a shocking and at traits sad, but always interesting reportage on the mind and behavior altered thanks to Facebook. While I was reading the book I thanked Lord we still have dial-up in our corner of the world. If sometimes I complain, I see now all the positive sides :-) ;-) Surely Facebook gives addiction. Surely Facebook is able to reduce the connections between real people, like also other social appls as whatsup. Facebook is attractive, and the Big Brother of the world. More than other virtual communities. Yes because Twitter is for business and for people who wants to spread important messages. In general more adapted for communication and media. Facebook is a beautiful virtual land where to spend time without anymore...privacy. It is a strange phenomenon this one: if in real life we wouldn't never, never communicate certain things, from the most common to the most sensitive ones to strangers, once online every kind of inhibition is over, and we are the protagonists of a never ending show where we post this world and the other, where we comment, where we share also sensitive topics sometimes with people we haven't never met and that surely will be incredibly good people but that they can be also potentially dangerous. Facebook has also created for people passed away the possibility of keeping alive their FB page... 13 millions of people tells the author never changed the privacy of Facebook although it's important to keep Facebook protected under many aspects in particular if we added complete strangers on our community. The author analyzes then the various behavior people starts to adopt once online. They want to be more beauty, more stunning because comparison with models or actors, or other people and their beautiful estates, children etc, can be cause of frustration. So they tend to Photoshop their life. What it means? They alter their life for trying to be more beauty, more attracting, more interesting, more...everything. The result? In general it's a failure when we project a different ideas of us, but we are online and so who cares? Facebook and people. It's like if every person is suffering of a sort of schizophrenic problem. In real life they're controlled. Once online they're different ones with maybe sometimes different identities, created for the most diversified purposes, stealing friendship, love, informations. They create a different self for loving maybe themselves more than the real self. Who knows? It's a dangerous place under many aspects, as also can be potentially, good because you can post pictures of our life for our distant friends, correspondents and connections and where to share your thoughts. It's not all negative, but it's important to try to prevent the negativity that there is in this powerful social network. At first it was Myspace. It's in that case a place dedicated mainly at people of the showbiz, where you can find bands, actors, musicians, writers. It's a place for creative people with a different philosophy if compared to Facebook. Then the arrival of Facebook. Facebook thanks to its scheme, a lot of games, an attractive interface, captured millions of people. People started to share all their thoughts, pictures, publicly, commenting, and sharing their life. There are active users who love to sharing with others their life in a daily base thanks also at the new deviceS like smart phones and tablets and a simplified access to the virtual community. The risks? Being used by many kind of people that we add with simplicity although we don't know anything of them. Plus, a powerful part of the book dedicated at the so-called Cyber-Native youngsters born and grown up with the internet, and these instruments and cyberbullysm. As reported by the psychologist, youngster find less attracting to talk to real people than not playing or using their smart phone. But same is for adults. There is not anymore peace during lunch or dinner. People, adults and teen-agers use constantly their smart phones. Why this? There is not a precise reason. After all in the past we brought a book at the doc's studio and while we were waiting we read. Now, same happens with smart phone but in a much more massive level and with more interactions. We didn't read during lunch or dinner. I did but I guess I was just a sporadic case. Maybe it's a sort of refusal to speak and interact with people in that place, it can be a bar, it can be a cafe a social place. The smart phone the best instrument for finding refuge in the "other world" in the virtual life, and where to escape and find some peace, if virtual life means that. No stress. Or just, googling also while we lunch or we have dinner time gives us the possibility of searching while we talk with the rest of family of certain informations immediately. A writer, a place, a pic. For certain people the net is a place where to cause messes of various genres and there are various kind of profiles portrayed by the psychologist and their modality for approaching people, "ruining" their own consideration for a little while. Most of the people interviewed, some clients of the author focused on their massive problematic derived by the use and abuse of Facebook. Big dependence, great discussions, break up with their real partner, because partner thought that their girlfriends or wives talked with other men online or vice versa. There was a story of a girl and boy. They chatted for 7 years, she Photoshopped her pics because she didn't like her body and when she met this boy deluded by the encounter. Virtual life creates myths and different expectations. Maybe because there is not real life to live. Virtual life is more light. You can send as a gift a virtual heart, a virtual kiss, a virtual dish of pasta, a virtual donuts without hug, without cooking or baking thanks to various game applications. You save time and you think that you are interested in the other human beings. Surely is true but... How much can be true without also a physical interaction? There are also big misunderstanding. A man caused a mess, because he saw his girlfriend close to a man. It was in a FB pic. He didn't know who this smiling man was and thinking maybe he could be a new lover of his girlfriend, he broke her PC, was violent with her, till he discovered that the guy was Mitt Romney, a republican candidate the lady was supporting. Funny and comical isn't it true? Pity that there was violence in this episode. A virtual community must be a place where we start to wisely interact with other ones and trying to carefully add new people. It's all up to us, if we want to share thoughts, feelings, with others, or just we want to use e-mail for it. Surely Facebook gives a stage, a place where to perform who we are or who we are not and this is what, mainly makes the difference. Each of us wants 15 minutes of fame and Facebook can gives us more than 15 minutes. An entire virtual life. Wonderful book, because you will learn a lot about the big potentialities and damages caused by Facebook and our so-called virtual life. Thanks to netgalley for this book!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Babette

    I am not so good at putting my thoughts into words, or rather, I don’t have the patience to take the time to do it. And so, I rarely leave a review. But, after having a few days to think about this book I’d like to leave a short one, and may possibly add more later on. If you have picked up this book, or have read it, chances are you are already questioning your use of social media/Facebook and this book really just affirms your thoughts and feelings. I think the title is a little misleading, as I am not so good at putting my thoughts into words, or rather, I don’t have the patience to take the time to do it. And so, I rarely leave a review. But, after having a few days to think about this book I’d like to leave a short one, and may possibly add more later on. If you have picked up this book, or have read it, chances are you are already questioning your use of social media/Facebook and this book really just affirms your thoughts and feelings. I think the title is a little misleading, as it doesn’t focus wholly on the “Facebook addiction”, but only a small part. I feel that may turn people off to reading it, especially those like me who already may not use it much. This book delves into behaviors such as narcissism, performing, self-expression, feelings of self-doubt and self-esteem, etc. and HOW the use of Facebook affects relationships with not only those who we connect with on there, but also those who are around us in our daily, real lives. Perspective would be a great word to describe how I felt after reading this book. There were a few take away points that have left an impact with me. There is one point that struck me, and I’ve found myself applying it to all areas of my life in the last few days. The author asks the question: “Does this add value to your life?” I’ve been asking myself this question in different areas of my life, and it is giving me the power and a deeper focus that I’ve needed for a long time, to make better decisions on what I do or do not allow into my life.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    This was interesting to read about the way in which Facebook effects people in mostly a bad way and how a lot of people now doctor there lives to "show" what they want to appear as in social media and how that doesn't always reflect the true person in real life. Perfect husband/wife, best car, great job etc etc and how that can lower other people's self worth just by comparing them self to others. Maybe for younger people it's worse too as you always want to show your best side as a teenager. An This was interesting to read about the way in which Facebook effects people in mostly a bad way and how a lot of people now doctor there lives to "show" what they want to appear as in social media and how that doesn't always reflect the true person in real life. Perfect husband/wife, best car, great job etc etc and how that can lower other people's self worth just by comparing them self to others. Maybe for younger people it's worse too as you always want to show your best side as a teenager. An interesting book but I didn't learn anything new to what I would assume is basic psychology.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ursula

    Fascinating! Energising! Will need bringing up to date frequently as things are changing so fast - but the first thoughts here will retain their validity for those fresh to the scene.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Bauer

    Chicago-based psychologist Dr. Suzana Flores explores the mental, emotional and often detrimental effects of Facebook in her first book Facehooked: How Facebook Affects Our Emotions, Relationships, and Lives. Flores offers both advice and psychological perspective while also including case studies and testimony from Facebook users of all ages, locales and backgrounds. Facehooked, while most definitely a critique of contemporary media driven culture, looks at the issues associated with social medi Chicago-based psychologist Dr. Suzana Flores explores the mental, emotional and often detrimental effects of Facebook in her first book Facehooked: How Facebook Affects Our Emotions, Relationships, and Lives. Flores offers both advice and psychological perspective while also including case studies and testimony from Facebook users of all ages, locales and backgrounds. Facehooked, while most definitely a critique of contemporary media driven culture, looks at the issues associated with social media and other forms of technological communication from a very realistic and level-headed viewpoint. Flores does not by any means advocate for the dissolution of the site; rather, she “help[s] readers understand how Facebook is affecting us personally and globally,” while also calling on users to rethink their relationship to Facebook and other social media outlets. Flores focuses on a variety of issues associated with Facebook including the self-editing process, the issue of performance and addiction to name a few. From the simplest of decisions, such as deciding to post one photo and not another, we engage in a constant exchange of self-edited content. Flores argues that this directly interrupts the social process of forming relationships. Not only are we are now divided by a screen, but we also receive false impressions of our friends’ lives due to the lack of an authentic mode of sharing. We share what we want to share and no more. Similarly, digital media platforms allow us to create personas entirely separate from ourselves. We can alter our photos or post fake photos; we can alter our career or how we want people to think we feel about our career. Flores notes that “even those of us who don’t exaggerate who we are online, edit ourselves in some way.” This not only affects the way we interact with others, but the way that we think about ourselves: it feeds our need for attention in the form of “likes” and “friends.” True to the title of her work, Flores also spends a significant chuck of time discussing how addicted people really are to Facebook. There is the phenomenon of FOMO (Fear of Missing Out) which propels people to scale the walls of social media hour after hour. There is also the fact that “our brains release a burst of dopamine whenever a post captivates us.” Now, in the midst of our digital age we are faced with disorders such as Internet Addiction Disorder (IAD), which “is associated with depression, suicidal behavior, obsessive compulsive disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, as well as alcohol and illicit drug use.” While it is clear that many of the people that Flores profiles, as well as those mentioned in the statistics above, have deep seated psychological issues which probably incite or at least encourage such behavior, the concerns that are raised in Facehooked are made no less pertinent. In our digitally driven culture we are faced with a host of issues, disorders and blockades that our ancestors never had to experience. In fact, Flores points out that it is not Facebook that causes these issues and that if it was not social media, it would be another activity or another culturally driven experience that would be the platform for equally unhealthy behavior. Flores does an excellent job of recognizing both sides of the social media coin noting that “the primary purpose of Facebook…should be one of positive and personal growth.” Further, Flores’ use of case studies and her own life experiences makes the book a very real and often emotionally charged piece of non-fiction. http://chicagoist.com/2014/09/30/face...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Mauldin

    About a month ago, I decided to participate in a study called 99 Days of Freedom. Basically, you "disconnect" from Facebook for just over three months and see what kind of impact foregoing Facebook has on your life. When I came across this book, I was very excited to read it. One of the most unfortunate things about our society is that despite being "connected", we are more disconnected than ever. People essentially create this online persona where they lie about their real lives, filtering out About a month ago, I decided to participate in a study called 99 Days of Freedom. Basically, you "disconnect" from Facebook for just over three months and see what kind of impact foregoing Facebook has on your life. When I came across this book, I was very excited to read it. One of the most unfortunate things about our society is that despite being "connected", we are more disconnected than ever. People essentially create this online persona where they lie about their real lives, filtering out the bad and creating a life they don't have. The author lists a few examples, such as a woman who only posted pictures of her husband and her where they seemed really happy. When her friend told her how happy they looked, she broke down in tears and told her friend they were getting a divorce. Another man became suicidal because his recent fiance broke up with him over Facebook without even telling him, then she instantly began a relationship with his best friend. In a third example, a man found out his parents died in a car crash on Facebook because somoene posted a picture of a totaled car. How terrible! Is this really what some people have come to? What is wrong with people?! Aside from that, people do other weird things such as add a lot of people they don't even know and then post very personal, intimate, and sometimes awkward statuses. The author comments about how she once very awkwardly posted on facebook about having a cold. Sometimes people will post about being on their period or other embarassing things too, or downrght weird things like a picture of their gorey toe they stubbed on something sharp... ick. This book made me have a suden realization: Life is for living, not for posting online. Although I still have two months left of my facebook hiatus, this book has helped me to realize that maybe I won't be going back... I have some good friends on there, but to the friends who really care, they will find other ways to contact me. It's time for me to take my life back and just live it and enjoy it to the fullest. No comparing myself to anyone but me, no nonsense, no time wasting scrolling through feeds of strangers. I would reccomend this book to anyone. It says what needs to be said about a growing epidemic. We should all learn to use social media responsibly, if it all. Disclaimer: I was given a copy of this book to review thanks to Netgalley.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Henk-Jan van der Klis

    Over the past three years Dr. Suzana E. Flores has studied the Facebook phenomenon extensively, interviewing people from across the globe on their experiences with social media addiction, and how social media has affected their sense of self, social interactions, sense of privacy, need for validation, relationships, along with their emotional responses to stress encountered online, cyber-bullying, and emotional manipulators. In Facehooked: How Facebook Affects Our Emotions, Relationships, and Li Over the past three years Dr. Suzana E. Flores has studied the Facebook phenomenon extensively, interviewing people from across the globe on their experiences with social media addiction, and how social media has affected their sense of self, social interactions, sense of privacy, need for validation, relationships, along with their emotional responses to stress encountered online, cyber-bullying, and emotional manipulators. In Facehooked: How Facebook Affects Our Emotions, Relationships, and Lives the author confirms that Facebook is a significant part of our lives, and as the No. 1 leading social media website, it is likely to be a long-term player in our lives and the lives of our children and families. Through Facebook and other social media, we have opened ourselves to a larger community and, thus, critics. Facebook's features like posting updates, photos, checking in at locations and showing off who we want to be perceived as makes it easy to get pulled into a cycle of self-editing and validation seeking. That may undermine our self-identity and create problems of self-worth. How many 'friends', 'followers' and 'likes' do you gather? How compulsive is your check the news update feed behavior? Facebook has become not only a field to study as sociologists, but also a cause for addicts turn into a psychiatrist for serious treatment. Like a drug controlling the drug addict, we love Facebook and we hate it. Not only is Facebook changing our choices, but it's also changing our brains. Three factors - Fear of Missing Out (FOMO), checking-in, and sharing photos - appear to be the main culprits that get us hooked on Facebook, but the instant accessibility of the mobile device has further enabled our addiction. Flores elaborates on the dysfunctional types of behaviour on Facebook, the effects of cyber-bullying and the way relationships, our understanding of friendships change over time. Facehooked is a wake-up call for every (latent) addict out there with practical hints and advice to clean up your life and reset priorities.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

    First, can we acknowledge that the title sounds like something you really don’t want to have done. That being said, I get what it means. As a society, we are hooked on Facebook. Dr. Suzana Flores has done a wonderful job offering insights and gathering anecdotes that objectively explore the effects of Facebook on people. She does not make a claim that Facebook is good or evil; she simply reviews how it is used and offers suggestions for balance. This is a quick and easy read, accessible for audie First, can we acknowledge that the title sounds like something you really don’t want to have done. That being said, I get what it means. As a society, we are hooked on Facebook. Dr. Suzana Flores has done a wonderful job offering insights and gathering anecdotes that objectively explore the effects of Facebook on people. She does not make a claim that Facebook is good or evil; she simply reviews how it is used and offers suggestions for balance. This is a quick and easy read, accessible for audiences as young as high school, but geared more toward adults. She includes a section about teens and Facebook for parents. Throughout the book, Dr. Flores explains what happens mentally, emotionally, and physiologically when we use Facebook. She gets into how we edit the version of ourselves that we share online and seek validation through “likes,” shares, and comments. She addresses that Facebook can become an addiction and also how it affects our self-esteem and our real-life interactions with family and friends. One of her final thoughts about creating balance was this: “If you compliment a friend on Facebook, make it a point to compliment someone in real life--that same day.” That is a refreshing thought. Pick this book up if you’re interested in social media, human behavior, or if you had to pause in the middle of reading this to check Facebook. Please note: I received the ebook version for free. That being said, I review with my honest thoughts. This book is worth reading.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Celia

    I am a middle-aged woman who loves social media. Perhaps some of the problems I had with this book is that it did not relate to me. I think me and my friends are old enough to be able to wisely use Facebook. One problem with the book is that it started with troubled Facebook users and then ended with problems of Facebook with more average users. When I was reading about the more troubled users, I kept on saying to myself this is not me or my friends. The middle of the book dealt with the problems I am a middle-aged woman who loves social media. Perhaps some of the problems I had with this book is that it did not relate to me. I think me and my friends are old enough to be able to wisely use Facebook. One problem with the book is that it started with troubled Facebook users and then ended with problems of Facebook with more average users. When I was reading about the more troubled users, I kept on saying to myself this is not me or my friends. The middle of the book dealt with the problems of teenagers with Facebook. I feel that Facebook can cause unique problems for young people as many other forms of social interaction can because young people have not yet developed certain life skills. However, I feel these problems should have been more clearly separated in the book. As with books on problems with the Internet, several issues can get confused. For example when the author talks about Facebook on smartphones, I think some of the problems come with the use of smartphones and the need to feel constantly connected rather than Facebook per se. However, I am giving this book four stars because I liked the ending of the book. I do feel that incredible high when someone likes one of my posts which the author describes at the end of the book. I received a free copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for a honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Connor

    I received a kindle version from net galley. I really believe this book would be great for anyone studying or very interested in psychology, media studies, communication etc. The book is easy to read and understand and incredibly relatable. There were many good points made in the book that really helped me realize what I was really seeing when I used Facebook. There is so much more than just updates, Facebook can really affect people and what people do on it can have man unintentional (and intent I received a kindle version from net galley. I really believe this book would be great for anyone studying or very interested in psychology, media studies, communication etc. The book is easy to read and understand and incredibly relatable. There were many good points made in the book that really helped me realize what I was really seeing when I used Facebook. There is so much more than just updates, Facebook can really affect people and what people do on it can have man unintentional (and intentional) results. I liked that she did not make Facebook sound like they are the enemy or that they should be blamed. I enjoy Facebook and this book helps me manage my feelings and realize why I feel that way when I see certain things. I would definitely recommend.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Roche

    I would like to thank NetGalley and Reputation Books for giving me the opportunity to read this in exchange for an honest and open review. This is the perfect book for parents of teenagers to read, especially if they don't use Facebook much. It exposes some of the real problems that children, and adults, can come across. One of the issues that Dr. Flores focuses on is privacy, or rather, the lack of it. Children don't realise the dangers of posting everything online. The following quote from the bo I would like to thank NetGalley and Reputation Books for giving me the opportunity to read this in exchange for an honest and open review. This is the perfect book for parents of teenagers to read, especially if they don't use Facebook much. It exposes some of the real problems that children, and adults, can come across. One of the issues that Dr. Flores focuses on is privacy, or rather, the lack of it. Children don't realise the dangers of posting everything online. The following quote from the book sums up perfectly the points she made: "The internet and social media have made our lives easier and more enjoyable in many ways, but they were never meant to replace life".

  28. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Box

    Reading FACEHOOKED feels like it was directed at me. Sure, I don’t stalk people and lie about myself (or do I?) but there are so many revelations about why we share, our need to get likes, to view other people’s lives and to be heard. Facebook is a bipolar experience; it makes us feel great, it makes us feel terrible. Do you want to know why? You’ll have to read the book and find out things about yourself that you didn’t know. It’s a GREAT read and you’ll be retelling the real crazy Facebook sto Reading FACEHOOKED feels like it was directed at me. Sure, I don’t stalk people and lie about myself (or do I?) but there are so many revelations about why we share, our need to get likes, to view other people’s lives and to be heard. Facebook is a bipolar experience; it makes us feel great, it makes us feel terrible. Do you want to know why? You’ll have to read the book and find out things about yourself that you didn’t know. It’s a GREAT read and you’ll be retelling the real crazy Facebook stories to all your friends.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ilana

    An analytical perspective of a psychologist of our lives in times of Facebook. Based on the daily practice and various interviews of the author, it outlines the risks and identity challenges presented by the most popular social network and what we can do to integrate social life into our daily routines without the risk of becoming dependent or destroying our offline relationships. More about this book on my blog: http://boiledwords.blogspot.de/2016/0... Disclaimer: I was offered the book via NetGa An analytical perspective of a psychologist of our lives in times of Facebook. Based on the daily practice and various interviews of the author, it outlines the risks and identity challenges presented by the most popular social network and what we can do to integrate social life into our daily routines without the risk of becoming dependent or destroying our offline relationships. More about this book on my blog: http://boiledwords.blogspot.de/2016/0... Disclaimer: I was offered the book via NetGalley.com, in exchange of an honest review

  30. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    This has made me look at how often I check fbook and Im definitely making an effort to cut down, bored has a lot to answer to! Very informative and as an ex counsellor I enjoyed looking at it in this way.

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