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Estación de tormentas

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Poco sabía el brujo Geralt de Rivia lo que le esperaba al acudir a la villa costera de Kerack. Primero fue acusado injustamente de desfalco, luego fue misteriosamente liberado bajo fianza, y finalmente descubrió que sus preciadas espadas, dejadas en depósito al entrar en la ciudad, habían desaparecido. Demasiadas casualidades, en efecto, y máxime cuando tras ellas está la Poco sabía el brujo Geralt de Rivia lo que le esperaba al acudir a la villa costera de Kerack. Primero fue acusado injustamente de desfalco, luego fue misteriosamente liberado bajo fianza, y finalmente descubrió que sus preciadas espadas, dejadas en depósito al entrar en la ciudad, habían desaparecido. Demasiadas casualidades, en efecto, y máxime cuando tras ellas está la atractiva hechicera Lytta Neyd, llamada Coral. De esta manera, Geralt de Rivia se encuentra de nuevo implicado en los escabrosos asuntos de los magos, y ni la fiel (aunque ocasionalmente engorrosa) compañía del trovador Jaskier, ni el recuerdo de su amada Yennefer, ni toda su fama como implacable cazador de monstruos podrán evitar que se vea cada vez más envuelto en una oscura trama. Más bien al contrario. Estación de tormentas es el esperado regreso de Andrzej Sapkowski al mundo de Geralt de Rivia, su creación de fama mundial. En esta precuela de la Saga vuelven a brillar las virtudes que le han convertido en, posiblemente, el mejor escritor contemporáneo de fantasía: su estilo inimitable, su áspero realismo temperado por el humor negro y su vigor aventurero.


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Poco sabía el brujo Geralt de Rivia lo que le esperaba al acudir a la villa costera de Kerack. Primero fue acusado injustamente de desfalco, luego fue misteriosamente liberado bajo fianza, y finalmente descubrió que sus preciadas espadas, dejadas en depósito al entrar en la ciudad, habían desaparecido. Demasiadas casualidades, en efecto, y máxime cuando tras ellas está la Poco sabía el brujo Geralt de Rivia lo que le esperaba al acudir a la villa costera de Kerack. Primero fue acusado injustamente de desfalco, luego fue misteriosamente liberado bajo fianza, y finalmente descubrió que sus preciadas espadas, dejadas en depósito al entrar en la ciudad, habían desaparecido. Demasiadas casualidades, en efecto, y máxime cuando tras ellas está la atractiva hechicera Lytta Neyd, llamada Coral. De esta manera, Geralt de Rivia se encuentra de nuevo implicado en los escabrosos asuntos de los magos, y ni la fiel (aunque ocasionalmente engorrosa) compañía del trovador Jaskier, ni el recuerdo de su amada Yennefer, ni toda su fama como implacable cazador de monstruos podrán evitar que se vea cada vez más envuelto en una oscura trama. Más bien al contrario. Estación de tormentas es el esperado regreso de Andrzej Sapkowski al mundo de Geralt de Rivia, su creación de fama mundial. En esta precuela de la Saga vuelven a brillar las virtudes que le han convertido en, posiblemente, el mejor escritor contemporáneo de fantasía: su estilo inimitable, su áspero realismo temperado por el humor negro y su vigor aventurero.

30 review for Estación de tormentas

  1. 4 out of 5

    Teodora

    Nope. Just nope. 1.5/5 ⭐ (the extra half star being for Jaskier because he's baby) I’m sorry, it was agonising and all I wanted was for it to be over soon. This book doesn’t even have the same vibe as the initial books, there are no nice, monster-filled legends and myths, the atmosphere is plain and the characters make little sense. It felt (at least to me) written only for the sake of writing or as we say in Romanian, it was written în doru' lelii *winks at my fellow Romanians* Yeah, sure, there is Nope. Just nope. 1.5/5 ⭐ (the extra half star being for Jaskier because he's baby) I’m sorry, it was agonising and all I wanted was for it to be over soon. This book doesn’t even have the same vibe as the initial books, there are no nice, monster-filled legends and myths, the atmosphere is plain and the characters make little sense. It felt (at least to me) written only for the sake of writing or as we say in Romanian, it was written în doru' lelii *winks at my fellow Romanians* Yeah, sure, there is some Geralt in here but he’s just looking for his damn sword and keeps thinking about Yennefer so he’s kind of lame. The action is nearly not there, everything is boring, there are full chapters of nonsense and I honestly don’t think I understood one full since from the beginning to the end because I lost my patience. This book felt exactly how Romanian bureaucracy is – you stay for hours on end in a queue to ask the lady at desk #3 to sign something for you and you have to go to the third floor to pay a fee for it, then after you paid the damn fee you must go back and give the little ticket attesting the fact that you paid the fee to the lady at desk #4 only to give you in exchange a declaration you need to fill out so you can go to the second floor to ask for your signature but then you have to come back to the desk #3 to ask the lady to put an official stamp on it. In simpler words, this book was excruciating and boring and it made me question this series accuracy. #SorryNotSorry

  2. 5 out of 5

    James Tivendale

    I received a review copy of Season of Storms in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to Andrzej Sapkowski and Gollancz for the opportunity. Season of Storms begins with the Witcher successfully completing a contract to eradicate the threat of a monster known as an Idr. Upon receiving payment Geralt opts to travel to Kerack where another mission may be waiting. Upon arrival at Kerack's Watchtower he is made to disarm and hand over his two legendary Witcher swords which he does begrudgingly. H I received a review copy of Season of Storms in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to Andrzej Sapkowski and Gollancz for the opportunity. Season of Storms begins with the Witcher successfully completing a contract to eradicate the threat of a monster known as an Idr. Upon receiving payment Geralt opts to travel to Kerack where another mission may be waiting. Upon arrival at Kerack's Watchtower he is made to disarm and hand over his two legendary Witcher swords which he does begrudgingly. His first act in the City is to frequent an inn and relax with some food and wine. Before he is able to tuck in though he is posed a question by three characters dressed in black who approached his table without a sound. "Geralt of Rivia?" "It is I." "You are arrested in the name of the law." The Witcher Wiki states that this standalone novel is a midquel, set before "The Witcher" short story but after most of the other stories in The Last Wish. Although much longer at 368 this entry has much more in common with the short tales in both The Last Wish and Sword of Destiny than the other full-lengths in the saga. Instead of character and point of view hopping which was introduced in Blood of Elves and continued up until The Lady of the Lake, we only follow Geralt's actions here. This is with the exception of certain interludes which include letters, a story draft, and the happenings at an auction house. For me, the interludes were hit and miss for enjoyment/excitement and were really just a device to colour the reader slightly more informed of the current happenings than they would be if only isolated to the Witcher's point of view perspective. The world-renowned poet and Geralt's best friend Dandelion is one of the main characters throughout this narrative and like quite a few other The Witcher tales, he just happens to randomly come across Geralt in random cities and towns all over the world without planning to. The amount of times this happens throughout the series seems farfetched but I'm willing to forgive Sapkowski as the womanising troubadour is one the best characters in the overall story. The majority of the ensemble here are new creations such as the mysterious fire-haired sorceress Coral and the trusty drawf friend Addario Bach. There are mentions of other characters that are present in the series that readers will know and a few surprising 'easter-egg' moments. One, in particular, you will only understand if you have completed the whole series. As mentioned, this book does work finely as a standalone, however; I wouldn't recommend reading it until a potential reader had read The Last Wish as this collection introduces the character of The Witcher well and would, therefore, heighten the enjoyment experience in Season of Storms. After that though, it can be read at any time. It is written in similar fashion to the short stories but does feature one of two styles of writing that Sapkowski toyed with more in the latter half of the full series such as dream sequences and transportation/place/world hopping scenes ala The Lady of the Lake. The place/world hopping scenes in the aforementioned book were one of my least favourite parts in the series as a whole so I was glad that it is only limited to half a dozen or so pages here before it proceeds back to the author's fashion of writing style I enjoy a lot more. Geralt, as always, has unshakable morals and his dependable horse Roach. There are many highs and lows for him here and throughout, more often than not, his luck seems to really be against him. In addition to his talents with blades, he has an encyclopedic knowledge of seemingly everything including law and magic but especially monsters. There are a large number of different sorts of monsters dotted throughout these pages including a she-fox, werewolves and ogrotrolls. Season of Storms features demon hunts, corrupted magic, uncertainty over monarchy ascension, and a battle with a gigantic sea monster. It's not the finest entry but it should be read by all fans of The Witcher as there is a lot to enjoy here. I devoured it in 48-hours and loved being back in the world of The Witcher. Recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    First a disclaimer: the book blurb has nothing in common with the content. They both talk about Geralt the Witcher, but this is where the similarities end. What did Geralt do most of the time in the series? People familiar with him only through the games or not at all would foolishly say he hunted monsters. Wrong! He brooded non-stop from the middle of the second book all the way to the end. I am happy(?) to say here he did exactly this for about third of the length. After which he was forced to First a disclaimer: the book blurb has nothing in common with the content. They both talk about Geralt the Witcher, but this is where the similarities end. What did Geralt do most of the time in the series? People familiar with him only through the games or not at all would foolishly say he hunted monsters. Wrong! He brooded non-stop from the middle of the second book all the way to the end. I am happy(?) to say here he did exactly this for about third of the length. After which he was forced to do some extermination and to nobody's surprise the story became interesting. On the positive side the book is Ciri-free. She was only mentioned once!!! I was fine with her when she was a cute kid, but reading about adult Ciri who was first very miserable, then became a drug-addicted robber, then became even more miserable never failed to make me equally miserable. This is clearly author's tribute to fans. If you liked the original series you are guaranteed to like this book. If you were disappointed with it, you will find nothing groundbreaking here. As to me I was sure I rate it with 3 stars during the first third aka Geralt the Brooder. However I started having doubts about this decision when Geralt actually lifted his butt and began doing something. So 3 or 4 stars? Absence of Ciri firmly determined the rating. As to the plot: Geralt came to a tiny kingdom never mentioned in the main series. It turned out to be a bad decision. Upon the arrival he got thrown in jail, his swords were stolen, and he almost got beaten to death by a squad of female goons guards. It turned out this was just the beginning. P.S. I never knew Geralt could be such a jerk - and he was toward a young woman for no reason whatsoever. And no, breaking up with Yennifer is not a good excuse for such behavior.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Markus

    "They say that progress illuminates the darkness. But there will always be darkness. And in that darkness there will always be Evil, in that darkness there will always be fangs and claws, murder and blood. There will always be things that go bump in the night. And we, witchers, are the ones who bump back at them." - Vesemir of Kaer Morhen A difficult book to rate. I enjoyed reading it, of course, as it is a Witcher book. At the same time, it offered nothing new to the series, did not add anything "They say that progress illuminates the darkness. But there will always be darkness. And in that darkness there will always be Evil, in that darkness there will always be fangs and claws, murder and blood. There will always be things that go bump in the night. And we, witchers, are the ones who bump back at them." - Vesemir of Kaer Morhen A difficult book to rate. I enjoyed reading it, of course, as it is a Witcher book. At the same time, it offered nothing new to the series, did not add anything of value, and overall felt like it was completely unnecessary. Season of Storms is set in between the original short stories, and so before the main Witcher saga. It explores Geralt of Rivia on a minor adventure just prior to him going to Vizima to fight the striga for King Foltest (as fans of The Witcher will know, an integral plot point of both the first book and the first game). Unfortunately, the storyline is rather dull. The court intrigue is exceedingly poor when compared to Cintra, Nilfgaard and Skellige. The villain suffers equally when compared to Vilgefortz or Letho. The direct approach to real-world social issues felt both strange and forced, and appeared to be Sapkowski attempting to fire back at feminist critics rather than anything that fit well with the other themes of the book. And the great characters and fascinating monsters who have made this series what it is, are few and far between. It sadly seems as if Sapkowski has gotten less and less interesting with time. The Last Wish is the best book in the Witcher series, and this along with Lady of the Lake are the two worst ones. Sadly, I cannot escape the feeling that CDProjektRed's vision for the world of the Witcher is much more skilfully crafted than Sapkowski's. Ah, well. This does not renege his achievement in creating one of the most interesting fantasy worlds out there.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    1.) The Last Wish ★★★★★ I'm sorry, friends, but I'm just not going to write a review for this one, because I feel so much dread every time I think about doing it. This book was just so different than what I've come to expect with other Witcher novels. It breaks my heart to say it, but I just didn't enjoy this one. I still love Dandelion with my whole heart and soul, Geralt is daddy, and Horse is a good boy. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Youtube | Twitch Content and trigger warnings for blo 1.) The Last Wish ★★★★★ I'm sorry, friends, but I'm just not going to write a review for this one, because I feel so much dread every time I think about doing it. This book was just so different than what I've come to expect with other Witcher novels. It breaks my heart to say it, but I just didn't enjoy this one. I still love Dandelion with my whole heart and soul, Geralt is daddy, and Horse is a good boy. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Youtube | Twitch Content and trigger warnings for blood depictions, violence, gore, misogynistic comments (always in a negative light), and war themes.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I mean I love the freaking cover of the book! Guess I just need to get a print out! But... the book fell flat for me! I don't know if it's because I have been reading some amazing books lately or what! Either way, I'm happy for the ones that love it! Mel 🖤🐺🐾 I mean I love the freaking cover of the book! Guess I just need to get a print out! But... the book fell flat for me! I don't know if it's because I have been reading some amazing books lately or what! Either way, I'm happy for the ones that love it! Mel 🖤🐺🐾

  7. 5 out of 5

    Milda Page Runner

    It was so wonderful to be back in Witcher's world - I feel nostalgic already. There is everything in this book one could hope for: breathtaking close-up fights with horrible monsters, light-hearted funny banter with Dandelion, court intrigues and conspiracies, mysterious beautiful women and hot nights, power drunk insane wizards, plenty oh humour sarcasm and irony, haunting full of horrors events, kind monsters and monstrous cruel people. Highly recommended to all Witcher fans. I can only hope that this It was so wonderful to be back in Witcher's world - I feel nostalgic already. There is everything in this book one could hope for: breathtaking close-up fights with horrible monsters, light-hearted funny banter with Dandelion, court intrigues and conspiracies, mysterious beautiful women and hot nights, power drunk insane wizards, plenty oh humour sarcasm and irony, haunting full of horrors events, kind monsters and monstrous cruel people. Highly recommended to all Witcher fans. I can only hope that this is not a singular event and Sapkowski will surprise us once again with the new release. And as I don't want to say Good Bye - I can only say - See you later, Geralt of Rivia. I very much hope so.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anton

    Overdue review notes... The first thing to know about it - it is a full-length novel. Not a collection of short stories like The Last Wish or Sword of Destiny. But despite that, this story is much closer in spirit to these prequel instalments as opposed to the main saga Blood of Elves and onward. It is an easy and enjoyable read. But it would naturally appeal to those who already love the series. If you are new to Witcher - you can start here... but I am not sure I would recommend it. I would rath Overdue review notes... The first thing to know about it - it is a full-length novel. Not a collection of short stories like The Last Wish or Sword of Destiny. But despite that, this story is much closer in spirit to these prequel instalments as opposed to the main saga Blood of Elves and onward. It is an easy and enjoyable read. But it would naturally appeal to those who already love the series. If you are new to Witcher - you can start here... but I am not sure I would recommend it. I would rather go through Last Wish > Sword of Destiny and then stop by here before diving into the main story. Or even keep it as a sweetener farewell entry. It has all the thing that we enjoy about Mr Sapkowski's world: rich worldbuilding with historical allusions, modern themes raised in the medieval setting and a lonely path of a hero in a cynical world around him. Lots of things to love here... but I don't think this particular book has enough oomph to stand on its own as a stand-alone. So - 4* from me and hopefully we will hear more about Geralt of Rivia in the future. *** Dear Orion/Gollancz, I am so very grateful for this NetGalley ARC! It is probably the very first time I was approved for the book I really really wanted. So: thanks again for making my day today ;) Witcher/Ведьмак is on my best ever fiction shelf. I fondly remember it as one of my taste formative reads. I read it originally in a wonderful Russian translation and absolutely adored it for years. I think the themes and a style of these books provides a curious missing link between fantasy of JRR Tolkien and sword&sorcery of GRR Martin; set in a western Slavic environment. If you haven't read it - I strongly recommend. It is NOT a fanfic to the video game. (It is rather the video game is a fanfic to this awesome series and the world it portrays). Anyhow, Season of Storms is the only book I haven't read yet (it is a prequel released many years after the publication of the main series). Since my Polish is very poor I have tried reading Russian and Ukrainian translations (fan and official ones) but unfortunately left underwhelmed with their clumsy language. So this new English translation is my last resort to re-live the magic of my first encounters with the series. So, I am crossing my fingers and diving in with excitement and anticipation of awesome ;) Will be sharing my field notes as I progress...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    In a lot of ways, this book is more like The Last Wish and Sword of Destiny than the core five books of the series. It's not to say that this is broken up into many short stories that flesh out the universe, but it reads more like books 4 or 5 in that there are mini-adventures that are more or less self-contained and don't push an overarching plot. In other words, this isn't about the great war or Ciri. It is, however, fascinating as hell and sometimes humorous and often I just want to scream at G In a lot of ways, this book is more like The Last Wish and Sword of Destiny than the core five books of the series. It's not to say that this is broken up into many short stories that flesh out the universe, but it reads more like books 4 or 5 in that there are mini-adventures that are more or less self-contained and don't push an overarching plot. In other words, this isn't about the great war or Ciri. It is, however, fascinating as hell and sometimes humorous and often I just want to scream at Geralt's bad luck. One more bad thing after another. It definitely makes for a fun read, however. I had as much fun during this as I had during the first two short story collections. And Dandelion? Always a treat. :) As a matter of fact, this one really feels like some of the old classics of Fantasy. Fafhrd and Gray Mouser comes to mind. Great dialogue, fun, rather dark adventures, and a much-updated fantasy ethic. I could honestly read things like this forever. :) Pure adventure. Of course, don't come into this one expecting a huge fantasy arc, because this is not that.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Caro the Helmet Lady

    It's really easy to bitch and pout about this book, as some did. And I could point at same things they pointed at too, I'm not blind. But I wasn't disappointed by it and forgive it all easily. I am really happy I could return to the world that became sort of my second home almost two decades ago. Sure thing, I can always do it with the help of old saga, or new games, but it's just not the same. Because, simply as it is - And I did get some more. And it was interesting, it was funny, it added som It's really easy to bitch and pout about this book, as some did. And I could point at same things they pointed at too, I'm not blind. But I wasn't disappointed by it and forgive it all easily. I am really happy I could return to the world that became sort of my second home almost two decades ago. Sure thing, I can always do it with the help of old saga, or new games, but it's just not the same. Because, simply as it is - And I did get some more. And it was interesting, it was funny, it added some new aspects to the world of humans, non-humans and monsters (loved the vixena line!), although (view spoiler)[main villain was sorta meh (hide spoiler)] . And the ending was beautiful, the one you'd expect from Sapkowski. Should I add that I guess it was promising? I do expect more stories, master Andrzej, please! And...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum: https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/06/17/... There really is no such thing as a bad Witcher book, just some are better than others. Season of Storms is probably one that I would put on the lower end of the spectrum—meaning I enjoyed it, but compared to the rest of the books in the series, it simply didn’t stand out as much as I’d hoped. While this is the eighth one overall (when you include all the novels and collections), it is also something of a standalone preq 3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum: https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/06/17/... There really is no such thing as a bad Witcher book, just some are better than others. Season of Storms is probably one that I would put on the lower end of the spectrum—meaning I enjoyed it, but compared to the rest of the books in the series, it simply didn’t stand out as much as I’d hoped. While this is the eighth one overall (when you include all the novels and collections), it is also something of a standalone prequel, taking place between the short stories featured in The Last Wish and well before the events of the main saga. In Season of Storms, readers are given insight into the events occurring just prior to Geralt of Rivia’s fateful visit into the city of Vizima to deal with King Foltest’s striga problem, which was chronicled in what was Andrzej Sapkowski’s debut work, a tale simply titled “The Witcher”. When the story opens, we get to catch up with our protagonist in a quiet seaside kingdom, though in true Geralt fashion, it’s not long before he finds himself embroiled in a spot of trouble and winds up getting arrested and thrown in jail. Unfortunately, this also means that his swords are taken from him. A Witcher without his iconic weapons? Say it isn’t so! After all, what use is a monster hunter without the tools of his trade? As a result, the main plot of this book mostly focuses on Geralt as he is roped into taking on all kinds of dangerous and daring missions to try and get his swords back. It involves a lot of the elements you would expect—shady sorcerers, political intrigue, monster killing, and sexy times. In other words, Season of Storms is full of your usual Witcher shenanigans. It means that if you’ve enjoyed the previous books in the series, then there is a good chance that you’ll enjoy this one too. This novel also felt more light-hearted to me, though of course, when it comes to The Witcher, words like lightness and darkness are all relative. Since this one is a prequel, there are quite a few people who haven’t yet made their appearances in Geralt’s life, the most notable of these being Ciri, which does mean the story is generally free of the kind of angst that typically follows her character everywhere. There’s also a general nonchalance and more laidback tone to the story which gives the impression of much simpler times. In fact, that might be part of the problem. Season of Storms doesn’t really add anything new or special to what we already know of the world or protagonist; everything feels like it has been done before—in bigger, better, and more complex ways. Its status as a standalone prequel might also have a lot to do with this, since the main saga itself is over and done with, leaving this one to feel “tacked on” and apart from the other novels. Whatever intrigues and challenges Geralt has to deal with in this book, they simply pale in comparison to those he has faced in the overarching series. Likewise, when it comes to the relationships he forges, the villains he fights, or the monsters he kills, all of them feel rather like superficial throwaway encounters in the context of this novel. Does this mean you shouldn’t read Season of Storms? Not at all. As a matter of fact, it might make a good choice if you are new to Sapkowski or The Witcher. While I would still recommend starting with the main series, this book would be an ideal jumping off point to dip a toe into the world if you just want a little itty-bitty taste of the series’ overall tone or writing before taking the full plunge. Plus, it would also make for a nice, light introduction to the author’s style, which can be tough to get on board with if you are not used to non-linear storytelling. Devices like time jumps, flashbacks, multiple plot threads are all employed here, giving new readers a good idea of what to expect from the main saga. There’s plenty of things to like too, if you’re an old fan—as long as you’re not hoping for big revelations or anything earth-shattering. As a longtime follower of this series, I would describe Season of Storms as a comfortable read, full of references and cool easter eggs you might catch, but it is far from being Geralt’s best adventure. For completion’s sake though, I would still deem it a must-read, and at the end of the day, the uncomplicated spirit of this novel meant that I had a fun time with it. Audiobook Comments: Obviously, I’m a huge fan of Peter Kenny. I started listening to the audiobooks of this series with Blood of Elves, and because of his excellent narration, I’ve never looked back. Kenny’s voice has an intensity to it that makes it perfect for Geralt of Rivia, and yet he is also versatile enough to portray every single other character, bringing all the humor, magic, and charisma of this series to life.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Celise

    This is the most recently translated book in The Witcher saga, the series which inspired the video games by the same name. I have heard rumours that another book is in the works, but as of now, this is the last one. First I'd like to comment quickly on where this fits into the reading order. This is it without Season of Storms: The Last Wish (short story collection) The Sword of Destiny (short story collection) The Blood of Elves (novel) The Time of Contempt (novel) Baptism of Fire (novel) The Tower of This is the most recently translated book in The Witcher saga, the series which inspired the video games by the same name. I have heard rumours that another book is in the works, but as of now, this is the last one. First I'd like to comment quickly on where this fits into the reading order. This is it without Season of Storms: The Last Wish (short story collection) The Sword of Destiny (short story collection) The Blood of Elves (novel) The Time of Contempt (novel) Baptism of Fire (novel) The Tower of Swallows (novel) The Lady of the Lake (novel) Season of Storms is a full length novel which chronologically takes place between two of the short stories in The Last Wish (read The Last Wish first). You could read this after the short story collections, or after you've finished the entire series. I read it last which I think worked out well for me on my first time through. On a reread I think I might read it after Sword of Destiny just to see how that feels. This book is considered a standalone, so no matter where you read it, it is self-contained. This book follows Geralt, a witcher who kills monsters to both protect people, and earn a profit. The story revolves around one "what if" question. What if Geralt lost his two swords? His steel blade, and his silver witcher blade. This book is one of the lighter ones in the series. There's a fairly even mix of philosophizing dialogue and action. The stakes don't feel super high, because you know it has to have a satisfying conclusion. It can't really leave anything hanging, being a standalone published after the rest of the series. This book feels a little bit like a video game in the way that one event leads to the next. You have one main quest objective, but in order to get what you need out of the people you encounter, you have to complete other missions. Then to complete those other missions you have to do something else for someone else. Before you know it you're kind of on a wild goose chase barely holding onto sight of your original goal. That is this book. That structure doesn't work for some people, I know. Personally I found it very entertaining. It all ties together in the end, so as random as some parts may seem, they're all important in the end. The book also features quite a bit of the character Dandelion, who always lightens the mood. There is a sorceress love interest in this one, (what's new with Geralt) who is important for this book only. I was a bit disappointed at the absence of Yennefer, though she is mentioned throughout and does have an influence on the story. There is no Ciri in this one, this is a pre-Ciri book. Many fans would be excited by that, but personally I like her. That said I didn't miss her. All of the Witcher novels that I've read have been translated by David French, but they feel very different from each other, as if it were a different translator or author between books. Personally, I think Season of Storms falls on the clumsier end of the spectrum. Some words or sentences just seemed clunky or not quite right. Dandelion also has a few poems that are super clunky once translated. Of course, it's hard to translate poetry when rhythm and rhyme are so important, so that's to be understood. The Blood of Elves and the rest of the novels read more like high fantasy to me- it's on a grander scale with more characters, armies, wars, etc. I would probably categorize Season of Storms as Sword and Sorcery- it quite literally deals with sorcerers as well as a pair of missing swords, but that's not why. It's very self-contained, doesn't appear to have grand-scale consequences, and follows one character who might be considered morally ambiguous, or at least whose actions are very financially motivated. It is really dark as well; there are a few horror elements in it- graphic depictions of massacres and the like. For this reason, Season of Storms is more similar in tone to short stories. This is why I was glad I read it last. For many readers (including myself), The Lady of the Lake doesn't end on the most satisfying note. It's nice to then have one final book to pick up that feels more like the Last Wish, if only for nostalgia's sake. The epilogue also takes place post Lady of the Lake and in some ways pacified some of my earlier dissatisfaction. I hope that, if Sapkowski is writing another Witcher book, it explores more of what happens 100 years after the ending of the series. I would like to know more about Nimue. My video review of this book is up HERE.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Franzi

    3.5 Stars Like The Last Wish and Sword of Destiny this entry to the Witcher Saga is a short story collection. Unlike the other two Season of Storms does not have clearly seperated stories. I enjoyed the way the shorter stories were connected into a bigger story, but sometimes it took me some time to understand a new setting (since I didn't always notice that a new story started). This made the story feel a bit messy for my taste. The stories themselves were interesting, but not the best in the Wi 3.5 Stars Like The Last Wish and Sword of Destiny this entry to the Witcher Saga is a short story collection. Unlike the other two Season of Storms does not have clearly seperated stories. I enjoyed the way the shorter stories were connected into a bigger story, but sometimes it took me some time to understand a new setting (since I didn't always notice that a new story started). This made the story feel a bit messy for my taste. The stories themselves were interesting, but not the best in the Witcher universe. That's pretty much how I feel about the whole book: good but not great. The cover is still amazing though.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sad Sunday (If I say it's bad, it's bad)

    Read the fan translated version. OK, I am quite speechless right now and it's very hard to put my thought to words, so I will cut the small talk and tell you everything that's on my heart. Geralt (AKA The Witcher) is one of the best characters in the universe. Somehow I always refer to A.Sapkowski books as "true fantasy" ones since they are not only interesting, but have that specific feeling of reality, that makes you plunge into all adventures and experience them vividly. This book had some f Read the fan translated version. OK, I am quite speechless right now and it's very hard to put my thought to words, so I will cut the small talk and tell you everything that's on my heart. Geralt (AKA The Witcher) is one of the best characters in the universe. Somehow I always refer to A.Sapkowski books as "true fantasy" ones since they are not only interesting, but have that specific feeling of reality, that makes you plunge into all adventures and experience them vividly. This book had some fantastic flaws like: And it was in use, and quite intense at that. That he was right it turned out as soon as he left the forest. Beautiful blond sorceress was a bit higher. But some were hilarious: Slippery as a shit in mayonnaise. Among the tree waling with a stiff walk was something that looked by its posture and face like a zombie, but turned out however to be an old man looking for mushrooms. In the afternoon I'd like to visit my river with my fly fishing rod. Master Witcher, we talk and we make beer into urine. Are you ok? (I am forever thankful for a person who decided to translate this book.) Reading it felt like traveling with a ship through the stormy sea. The begging was messy and all over the place, the plot was unclear and unfinished, oversimplified, the middle - fantastic and awesome, and the end - somehow messy too. I might blame the translation, and I might be bias since I loved previous books and games. But I can't give it less than 5*. It was wonderful to go back to Geralt's universe, and I still hope it's not the end. P.S I am pretty sure Geralt was traveling or at least visiting Lithuania. The name of Biruta Ircati, comes from Lithuania - we even have small village called "Biruta", name has Lithuanian roots and is quite popular here. So, Geralt = Lithuanian :P Mind blowing, ya? Keep calm and read The Witcher.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    ARC received in exchange for an honest review. A prequel of sorts to the main Witcher series, this story sees Geralt loose his Witcher swords and go on a quest to find them. Along the way he teams up with old pal Dandelion and ends up getting embroiled in a sorcerer's mutant conspiracy and getting hired as a bodyguard at a wedding. This has glimmers of the Geralt wit I know and love, with death by books and hybrid trolls/ogres, but ultimately the story itself is rather dull. It drags and drags, w ARC received in exchange for an honest review. A prequel of sorts to the main Witcher series, this story sees Geralt loose his Witcher swords and go on a quest to find them. Along the way he teams up with old pal Dandelion and ends up getting embroiled in a sorcerer's mutant conspiracy and getting hired as a bodyguard at a wedding. This has glimmers of the Geralt wit I know and love, with death by books and hybrid trolls/ogres, but ultimately the story itself is rather dull. It drags and drags, without much of anything happening. Not getting to know any of the newly introduced vast cast doesn't help either, as I found I wasn't invested in anything or anyone. The one redeem chapter involves Geralt and Dandelion joining the aristocracy at a wedding, where we get many the cutting mark from Geralt's current squeeze, the red headed sorceress Coral, regarding the new bride. If only there has been more scenes like this. The other main issue I had with this was where exactly it fits chronologically with the rest of the series. Geralt, obviously, knows Dandelion here and spends a portion of the book discussing Yennefer, but no mention I'd made of Ciri. This would suggest it's set sometime after Sword of Destiny, but its not explicitly clear. Some concept of time may have helped orientate myself to the story, or perhaps make me care more. I still love the writing, but the pacing for this is just too slow for me to rate it any higher.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amanda NEVER MANDY

    This book is a standalone in the Witcher Saga. I did not realize this until I was a few chapters in because I did not research it much out of a fear of spoilers (I despise them). I did have to close the book to allow for time to rethink my thoughts and feelings on what happened in the previous book (what I now realize was the final one in the series). I also had to reset my bearings so I could properly place this piece of the story in the timeline. It was an enjoyable little stroll through Geralt This book is a standalone in the Witcher Saga. I did not realize this until I was a few chapters in because I did not research it much out of a fear of spoilers (I despise them). I did have to close the book to allow for time to rethink my thoughts and feelings on what happened in the previous book (what I now realize was the final one in the series). I also had to reset my bearings so I could properly place this piece of the story in the timeline. It was an enjoyable little stroll through Geralt’s past but not as great as the series itself or the short story collections that came before that. It had a different feel to it, like the weight of the series was not pressing down upon it. I guess a more lighthearted feel would be the best way to describe it and it really wasn’t something I wanted on my plate in that moment. Because of this I would rank it my least favorite book out of all of them, but I do still consider it a decent read worth four stars.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jessica {Litnoob}

    I didn’t expect this but damn, I loved this so much. It’s now my favorite Witcher book. It was peak Geralt wandering around and getting into trouble and kicking ass and taking names. It’s just so good. There’s no ciri or yen but honestly I didn’t miss them here. It was about Geralt and that just made this story for me. Even when he was getting into panties or stupid ass trouble it was good, made me chuckle and kept me engaged.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vikas

    The rating may be a little higher than 3 maybe 3.25 or 3.4 I feel like even though this was a decent experience we could've very well lived without this little adventure too. In this standalone novel in the Witcher series, Geralt finds himself in a city where his swords are promptly stolen and to find the swords Geralt has to move from one place to another and has found himself under different scenarios. This time there is no Ciri and no destiny, Geralt has broken up with Yennefer and now travel The rating may be a little higher than 3 maybe 3.25 or 3.4 I feel like even though this was a decent experience we could've very well lived without this little adventure too. In this standalone novel in the Witcher series, Geralt finds himself in a city where his swords are promptly stolen and to find the swords Geralt has to move from one place to another and has found himself under different scenarios. This time there is no Ciri and no destiny, Geralt has broken up with Yennefer and now travels far from her but Yenn still sneaks into a scene or two here. Like I said a decent adventure but hardly something you would've missed if it wasn't there. But with this now I am done with all the witcher books, Netflix series is already done now it's time to embark on the journey in the Witcher games. Here I come to waste away 100s of hours. People who don't read generally ask me my reasons for reading. Simply put I just love reading and so to that end I have made it my motto to just Keep on Reading. I love to read everything except for Self Help books but even those once in a while. I read almost all the genre but YA, Fantasy, Biographies are the most. My favorite series is, of course, Harry Potter but then there are many more books that I just adore. I have bookcases filled with books which are waiting to be read so can't stay and spend more time in this review, so remember I loved reading this and love reading more, you should also read what you love and then just Keep on Reading.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    This volume is a lot more thoughtful and deliberately paced than The Last Wish, even taking into consideration that that novel was mainly a bunch of short stories with an overall framing narrative. Here, Geralt is more "detective Witcher" rather than "monster slaying Witcher" (although he does a bit of that, too, of course) as various factions try to use Geralt as a playing piece in their political and sorcerous games while he investigates some brutal slayings. Fans of Moorcock and/or George R.R This volume is a lot more thoughtful and deliberately paced than The Last Wish, even taking into consideration that that novel was mainly a bunch of short stories with an overall framing narrative. Here, Geralt is more "detective Witcher" rather than "monster slaying Witcher" (although he does a bit of that, too, of course) as various factions try to use Geralt as a playing piece in their political and sorcerous games while he investigates some brutal slayings. Fans of Moorcock and/or George R.R. Martin will find a lot to like here, and fans of the Witcher will obviously want to pick this up.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alina

    4.5 of 5 stars Notwithstanding the fact that there are some flaws in this book, it was so captivating (especially the second part of the book) that I couldn’t fall asleep the night I finished it. In this prequel story we meet the same old Witcher with Dandelion and their adventures! I’m not going to retell the whole plot, but I can say that it is swirling around the fact that Geralt has lost his two swords – the pride of every witcher and now he has to find the way how to return them back. Through 4.5 of 5 stars Notwithstanding the fact that there are some flaws in this book, it was so captivating (especially the second part of the book) that I couldn’t fall asleep the night I finished it. In this prequel story we meet the same old Witcher with Dandelion and their adventures! I’m not going to retell the whole plot, but I can say that it is swirling around the fact that Geralt has lost his two swords – the pride of every witcher and now he has to find the way how to return them back. Throughout his journey he met a bunch of new people, some of them were pleasant (even too much), meanwhile others were pretty hideous. As a person who has read “The Last Wish” and was lost because it was a collection of stories which took place at different times and not in a chronological order, I was happy to know that “Season of Storms” follows a straightforward timeline, thus it was very easy and enjoyable to read! However, there are some references to the future and I was very anxious when I was reading epilogue, (I was afraid to read spoilers) I can assure you that there is nothing to be afraid of. Now I would like to touch on the situation between Yennefer and Geralt. I am a huge fan of their relationship, therefore I felt sorry for him because he was obviously trying to fill the void with other women. I was so excited every time a mention about Yennefer popped up throughout the story. Although we met her only several times, they were significant in terms of realizing how deep their feelings were for each other. “She was aware of somebody observing her and glanced surreptitiously. A woman. With black hair. Attired in black and white. With an obsidian star hanging in her cleavage.” – after this sentence I was overcome with emotions so much that I had to reread it several times! “Because you didn’t know him, Coral,” Yennefer replied calmly. “You didn’t know him at all.” I would like to move on and talk about Lytta Neyd. After Geralt’s first encounter with her she remotely resembled Yennefer (at least for me). Lytta Neyd or Coral is a sorceress and highly confident, abusive and seductive woman. This character definitely spiced things up in this book. Those sentences below perfectly illustrate her nature. “Erotically alluring red hair wasn’t the sorceress’s only attractive attribute. Her snow-white dress was modest and utterly without effects, which was the aim, the intended aim, and without the slightest doubt deliberate.” “She placed her hand on her cleavage, with the clear intention of drawing his gaze there.” Unfortunately, there is one flaw I couldn’t omit. Although the Witcher’s universe is Neverland, from time to time I was bumping into the references to our world. For example: science, goetia, symptoms of bipolar disorder, the theory of evolution. Overall, it is an amazing installment in the Witcher saga and I highly recommend it to read not only for Witcher fans, you won’t be disappointed!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Esther

    Thanks to Arjen for introducing me to this series and for doing a buddyread with me. I have been playing The Witcher games, but I did not know that there were books about Geralt too. I was excited to immerse myself into his world, but I did not like it as much as I hoped and I'm not sure if I'll continue this series. A longer review can be found at Bite Into Books I do realize that this book is #0 in a series. It could definitely get better. I think this book should have just been written as a nov Thanks to Arjen for introducing me to this series and for doing a buddyread with me. I have been playing The Witcher games, but I did not know that there were books about Geralt too. I was excited to immerse myself into his world, but I did not like it as much as I hoped and I'm not sure if I'll continue this series. A longer review can be found at Bite Into Books I do realize that this book is #0 in a series. It could definitely get better. I think this book should have just been written as a novella, a short story and not cover all the 400-something pages. If you liked The Witcher games you could try this book, or maybe just start with book #1.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    An enjoyable and well written standalone story that manages to give us insight into various holes in the Witcher lore whilst also telling a fascinating tale. This is a book for the fans, you could read and enjoy this without reading any of the other books but there are so many references and easter eggs it's plain to see that this was written for those intimately familiar with the Witcher series. An enjoyable and well written standalone story that manages to give us insight into various holes in the Witcher lore whilst also telling a fascinating tale. This is a book for the fans, you could read and enjoy this without reading any of the other books but there are so many references and easter eggs it's plain to see that this was written for those intimately familiar with the Witcher series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kinga

    “A witcher’s only love is blood and suffering. And you turned out to be a good person. And kind.” I am so happy that I left this part for the last in this series; this is the ending that I can accept and be left very much satisfied. This whole series was incredible from the start, and I’m so glad that it gets even more hype due to the Netflix series (not to mention the even more amazing video games). I love getting on the hype trains and this time I was not disappointed either. This particular “A witcher’s only love is blood and suffering. And you turned out to be a good person. And kind.” I am so happy that I left this part for the last in this series; this is the ending that I can accept and be left very much satisfied. This whole series was incredible from the start, and I’m so glad that it gets even more hype due to the Netflix series (not to mention the even more amazing video games). I love getting on the hype trains and this time I was not disappointed either. This particular part felt more like the video game to me, where every quest led to a sidequest for which to be completed there was another quest to be carried out… I loved it. I loved the whole mystery of the swords’ disappearance, it was so… real. “Dubhenn haern am glandeal, morch am fhean aiesin. My brilliance cuts the gloom, my light dispels the darkness.” I’m sad that these series are now over, although I would seriously consider a reread of these books, it would be definitely worth it. And there were so many Hungarian names in this one, wow! Zoltan, Horvath, Borsodi, Kovacs! Hungarian-Polish friendship at its best. “Witcher’s are for monsters. They defend people only from monsters.” I’m going to miss Geralt, Dandelion, Yennefer, Ciri, Zoltan Chivay and so many more characters terribly. The dwarves never disappointed me or Geralt, they were definitely the best companions out there. Oh, and Dandelion though, I would give everything to read the full Half a Century of Poetry, if he wrote it like this: ”’If you have such a pressure,’ he said brightening up, and leaving, ‘then know that I’ve come to know in the local court, a certain lawyer. She seemed eager. Court her.’ Well. What, was I supposed to f*ck with justice? On the other hand…”

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dawn C

    I may change the rating later. The thing is, this standalone novel, which takes place during The Last Wish short story collection but published after the saga has ended, but chronologically takes place before it, is so vastly different in style than the previous 7 books. It's outrageous and bonkers. It feels like a pastiche of the universe. I imagine, in a way, that this was the author's response to a lot of readers back then begging for more, and him going, "alright, here are my 15 half finished I may change the rating later. The thing is, this standalone novel, which takes place during The Last Wish short story collection but published after the saga has ended, but chronologically takes place before it, is so vastly different in style than the previous 7 books. It's outrageous and bonkers. It feels like a pastiche of the universe. I imagine, in a way, that this was the author's response to a lot of readers back then begging for more, and him going, "alright, here are my 15 half finished scripts, scenes, ideas and whatnot, mixed up and spewed onto pages, tada, the next Witcher novel you asked for." I'd believe that, because it changes style and momentum and focus constantly. Geralt is completely out of character, acts like a hormone crazed teenager, is dumb and thick as a board through the first half, Dandelion is straight out of fanfiction, and everything that happens and everything anyone do is so bonkers and crazy and I spent most of it going wtf????? It's mad. It's stylishly all over the place. It has awful, awful scenes of sexual harrassment towards Geralt, which was so uncomfortable for me, but I take small comfort in the fact that it was for Geralt, too, so the author must be aware, somehow. However the actual plot is super interesting and very fast paced. And the last half is brilliant (when it isn't totally overboard). There's a section that was made into a comic, with a she-fox reclaiming her stolen child, and Geralt has to pay the price for humans' stupidity, yet again. It's an excellent story of taking responsibility, and reads like a standalone story within the actual story, so I'm not surprised it was adapted into a separate media. And oh Melitele, it has all of the gay tropes. Sorry. I live for them, alright? It's very focused on Geralt and Dandelion sharing rooms at inns, pampering each other, protecting and caring about each other, the whole thing that I want. It has actual queer male characters and a lot can be interpreted in maaaany ways. It's just pretty gay. I'm easy that way. And I loved the ending. Hated it and loved it. It's a highly uneven read and I understand why fans of the original dislike this, and I was on the fence for a LONG time, but ultimately it moved me, it excited me, it also upset me and baffled me, but it did *something* to me, which is all I can ask for in art.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

    I hate giving this one a 3 because I enjoyed the rest of the series so very much. The truth of the matter is, Season of Storms would have benefited from being much shorter. The story takes us back to Geralt's earlier days, happening somewhere between The Last Wish and Sword of Destiny. Shedding the problems that come with older age and the sudden debilitating interest in staying alive for a greater cause that ensnare Geralt in the later books, we see a lot of action in this one, along with some S I hate giving this one a 3 because I enjoyed the rest of the series so very much. The truth of the matter is, Season of Storms would have benefited from being much shorter. The story takes us back to Geralt's earlier days, happening somewhere between The Last Wish and Sword of Destiny. Shedding the problems that come with older age and the sudden debilitating interest in staying alive for a greater cause that ensnare Geralt in the later books, we see a lot of action in this one, along with some Signs/spells not used in any of the later books. The problem is that this book's main plot thread is the loss of Geralt's signature swords. This makes it difficult to fight things. The man is a Witcher who can't Witcher properly. Though this leads to some interesting situations that show Geralt's ability to think outside of the box, it virtually always leaves him making a mess of things. A good number of the situations he stumbles into (or instigates) aren't even resolved by his own hands, but on the side, almost in a footnote. I want to believe that this is done to appear more realistic, to avoid making Geralt overly blessed with the power of Plot, which I'm usually a big fan of. I also want to believe that these events are meant to show the influence of Destiny that Geralt hates to acknowledge early on in the books. But for the majority of this book, it just leaves Geralt looking like an accidental badass. I know he is one of the best warriors in all the lands. I just wish we'd actually get to *see* him in top form. The ending was almost enough to bump this back up to a 4, but I can't ignore how I felt along the way. Season of Storms is diluted by a plot that tries to do a lot more than it needs to, and ends up feeling inconsequential to the saga for most of the way.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maja

    Almost made up for The Lady of the Lake.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    I decided to read Season of Storms before getting into Blood of Elves. I have already read The Last Wish which I think is important to any reader wanting to get into the series and understand the world of Geralt. This book is a side story, encompassing all that Geralt loves to do, fight monsters (which can sometimes be human monsters), wax lyrical with Dandelion, sup with many different races, take baths and sleep with Sorceresses whilst giving the loving eye to other women in his proximity. I d I decided to read Season of Storms before getting into Blood of Elves. I have already read The Last Wish which I think is important to any reader wanting to get into the series and understand the world of Geralt. This book is a side story, encompassing all that Geralt loves to do, fight monsters (which can sometimes be human monsters), wax lyrical with Dandelion, sup with many different races, take baths and sleep with Sorceresses whilst giving the loving eye to other women in his proximity. I didn't even mention his swords, his true love. I have played the Wither 3 game extensively, so I am very much into this world and what has become apparent to me, now that I am reading the series, just how close the game designers stuck to the characters and the feel of the story. I only hope netflix follow this lead. If you've played the game, this book is like a DLC that adds a side story with some quests. It is well worth the read for any Witcher fan. Right then, time to get stuck into Blood of Elves.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    „Guard against disappointments, because appearances can deceive. Things that are really as they seem are rare. And a woman is never as she seems.“ Unfortunately I didn‘t enjoy this as much as the main saga. It wasn‘t bad, just not as good.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Helena

    The story was okay-ish. My problem with Sapkowski is that his writing style reminds me of eating an old stale cookie without anything to drink.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Izabelle Holmgren

    This is the second Witcher book that I have read, I started with The Last Wish. I was very unsure about the reading order so before I started this book I looked it up. It seemed like there is a bunch of different opionions about in which order a Witcher beginner should read the series now with the Season of Storms being published. I can't really say if I did the right thing reading this directly after The Last Wish or if I should have read the entire main series first. But I think it would be in This is the second Witcher book that I have read, I started with The Last Wish. I was very unsure about the reading order so before I started this book I looked it up. It seemed like there is a bunch of different opionions about in which order a Witcher beginner should read the series now with the Season of Storms being published. I can't really say if I did the right thing reading this directly after The Last Wish or if I should have read the entire main series first. But I think it would be interesting rereading the epilogue because I think that specific part of Season of Storms are flirting with people that read the main series before. So about this book. I'm sad to say that I'm a bit disappointed. It wasn't bad but it wasn't nearly as good as The Last Wish. I really enjoyed the characters but I found the plot lacking. It just seemed a bit confused and all over the place. A LOT of stuff happened just based on the fact that Geralt lost his swords and I grew a bit tired of that after a while to be honest. It's still a decent book and it hasn't put me off reading the rest of the Witcher Saga.

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