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27 review for 15 Commitments of Conscious Leadership

  1. 4 out of 5

    V.

    it's one of those books that might be for you or not. if your curiosity is tickled, below i've outlined the first couple of chapters: 15 commitments of conscious leadership: a new paradigm of sustainable business *Tim-leading from below the line: on edge. fear. insecure. runs from silence. sleep deprived. unconscious. emotionally disconnected. judgmental. anxious. ego. surviving. constant hyper-arousal. reactive, stuck in past or imagined story. angry. below the line leadership is closed, defens it's one of those books that might be for you or not. if your curiosity is tickled, below i've outlined the first couple of chapters: 15 commitments of conscious leadership: a new paradigm of sustainable business *Tim-leading from below the line: on edge. fear. insecure. runs from silence. sleep deprived. unconscious. emotionally disconnected. judgmental. anxious. ego. surviving. constant hyper-arousal. reactive, stuck in past or imagined story. angry. below the line leadership is closed, defensive and committed to being right. *Sharon-leading from above the line: healthy. rested. intimately connected. present. living in her genius. organized. well developed system. self-care through yoga/meditation. independent. spirit of play permeates. grounded. secure. candid. master delegator. takes responsibility. conscious leader. candid. self-aware. trust. above the line leadership is open, curious and committed to learning. are you leading from above or below the line? being unconscious is serious. what is it though? a sever blow to the head? by definition, a dramatic alteration of one’s mental state that involves a complete or near complete lack of responsiveness to people and other environmental stimuli. **4 ways of leading & being** “we want to clarify that these four ways of being are states not stages of development. stages are progressive, sequential eras in the life of a person or organization. for example, a person undergoes stages of infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood. states on the other hand, are not sequential. we don’t move from one developmental state to another but rather, in an ongoing irregular way. think of the awake, dreaming and non-dreaming sleep states, people move in and out of these states throughout the day and night. one is not better or more advanced than the other. this is an important clarification for us because when we present the model to leaders, they often interpret it as stages of development and that is not the intention. indeed moving from to-me to by-me to through-me and back to to-me can take a mater of hours or minutes. becoming aware of which state we’re in in any given moment is first key to shifting... where are you living and leading from now?... become masters at answering accurately. only then do we have the real option to shift to another state of leadership.” 1. to-me way of leading: synonymous to being below the line. 95% of people spend 98% of their time in this state, being “at the affect of” meaning the cause of my condition is outside of me, it’s happening to me. cause being a person, circumstance or condition, i believe they’re acted upon by external forces. moody. makes others responsible for their happiness. victim consciousness. 2. by-me way: above the line. living in creator consciousness, instead of being at the affect of they are “consciously creating with”. instead of believing the cause of their experience is outside of themselves they believe that they are the cause of their experience. everything in the world is unfolding perfectly for their learning and development, nothing has to be different (detaching from codependency). life is like a university, lessons beings classes that we can learn from. you can either be at the affect of other students or the teacher or you can be “consciously creating with”. a leader chooses curiosity and learning versus defensiveness and being right. always learning and keeps it going. gateway to shifting from to-me to by-me is radical responsibility. choosing to take responsibility for what’s going on in our lives and letting go of blaming anyone-ourselves, others, circumstances or conditions and opening through curiosity by learning all that life has to teach us. an empowered state. 3. through-me: i am the center of my consciousness, everything relates to me are two main focuses in the above states; however, curiosity guides the leader to a different set of questions in this state-like, am i the center of the universe? is there something going on in addition to me? what is the nature of this other? is it possible to be in relationship to this other? some that ask these questions are religious or scientist, many are not. the scientist conclude that the “other” is the energy of the quantum field. some experience it as love. the universe. presence. god. the key to through-me is that leaders begin to notice something beyond themselves. being clear of your individual purpose and vision is needed. what do you want? dig deeper. what do you really want? sit till you have the answer. align your life with this purpose that wants to manifest through you. what is life’s highest idea of itself that wants to manifest in and through-me? listen attentively to what is being communicated to them. they understand that there’s a source that’s also moving in this world that wants to move through-them. it can be communicated to you through words, sounds, pictures, intuitive impressions... if you’re willing the communication flows. through-me visioning. must let go of wanting to be in control of what we were never in control of in the first place. let go... 4. as-me: most leaders aren’t ready or interested in this state. two aspects. first is oneness, there is no separation there is only one reality and it is not divided. sometimes this is called duality, which simply means not two. energy is all it is and it is not divisible. what appears solid is only space. if you look closely to what separates your resting arm from a table is not solid at all. not only is everything and everyone one but there is no separation and no personal center. this is a unique state because it has no questions. no seeking, no suffering. all questions about identity, life, purpose and so on are replaced by the constant experience by the life in the moment. look at resource section for further tools on state 3 and state 4. this book is about moving from to-me to by-me! 15 COMMITMENTS: master first 2 before moving on, it’s essential to shifting from to-me to by-me and a foundation for practicing the rest. 1. TAKING RADICAL RESPONSIBILITY - shift out of blame/criticism (victim, villain, hero) & into learning, greater co-creativity. try the responsibility worksheet: step 1) identify the issue, state the complaint in unenlightened terms. step 2) step into 100% responsibility, find a place in the room that represents responsibility for situations. step 3) gain insight by repeating these statements until you have a break through: “from the past this reminds me of” “i keep this situation going by” “what i get from keeping this situation going is” “the life long pattern im noticing is” “i can demonstrate 100% responsibility concerning this issue by” step 4) if you don’t shift in step 3, go back to step 1 and repeat the process. pay attention to the questions you ask. learn and move on. 2. LEARNING THROUGH CURIOSITY - i commit to growing and self-awareness. i commit to regarding every interaction as an opportunity to learn. i commit to curiosity as a path to rapid learning. four predictors of sustained success: self-awareness, learning agility, communication and influence. first two are internal, last two are external. drift shift model: presence - people usually are for about 4 seconds, then “something” interrupts the attention then we begin to drift. drifting can look in many different ways, blaming, worrying, intellectualize, rushing, facebooking, rushing, care-taking, sarcastic, getting tired, correcting, getting confused, explaining, comparing, getting shy, seeking approval, dismissing, procrastinating, getting enlightened, organizing, smiling, cleaning... how long do we stay in a drift before we shift? shifting is the master skill of all conscious leaders. am i willing to shift? before we shift, we need to have conscious breathing (4 second inhale & exhale) + change your body posture. then shift move of wonder, a child like “wonder”, open-ended curiosity is not knowing or caring if there is an answer to your question. 3 buckets: what you know, what you know you don’t know and what you don’t know you don’t know.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bragadeesh

    Wow, a really wonderful book that defines leadership from an entirely different angle. I thought it would present things about this subject in a stereotypical way, but to my surprise this was entirely at a different level. This book also indirectly touches things at a spiritual level. The difference between the commitment levels for each of the 15 commitments are effectively communicated throughout the book. Following/Practising these commitments are not at all easy, but one can see why it is ex Wow, a really wonderful book that defines leadership from an entirely different angle. I thought it would present things about this subject in a stereotypical way, but to my surprise this was entirely at a different level. This book also indirectly touches things at a spiritual level. The difference between the commitment levels for each of the 15 commitments are effectively communicated throughout the book. Following/Practising these commitments are not at all easy, but one can see why it is extremely important to abide by these rules especially for leaders and organizations at top positions and also for budding leaders. Overall, I was extremely satisfied with this book and I highly recommend it!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark Sturgell

    This will likely become one of the seminal books on leadership in my library. The authors dissect many of the aspects of authentic leadership that I already believe and practice, providing helpful distinctions and mnemonics, but also practical applications for desired results, which is too often left to theory in leadership books. I look forward to expanding these Commitments into my own personal living and professional practice. The one downside worth mentioning is the authors' tendency toward This will likely become one of the seminal books on leadership in my library. The authors dissect many of the aspects of authentic leadership that I already believe and practice, providing helpful distinctions and mnemonics, but also practical applications for desired results, which is too often left to theory in leadership books. I look forward to expanding these Commitments into my own personal living and professional practice. The one downside worth mentioning is the authors' tendency toward "new age" language, which nearly kept me from reading past the introduction and first chapter or two. I remained open to what I might learn, kept reading, and am delighted that I stayed with my commitment long enough to at least understand the commitment behind the authors' choice of words. This reminds of the old saying, "If you meet the Buddha on the Road, Kill Him." Well, I would say, don't kill him, but learn all you can from him and keep moving, learning and growing toward a greater truth.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Diane Murray

    A "self-help" book that will absolutely transform your life, whether you're a "leader" by standard definition or not--and this is coming from a strong skeptic with a dislike for self-help and life improvement fads. Everything in here is just solid advice for shifting your perspective and expectations for a more contented, compassionate, and mindful life experience. I normally skim this sort of book to get the main points, but for this one reading it word for word is what gave it its impact. I def A "self-help" book that will absolutely transform your life, whether you're a "leader" by standard definition or not--and this is coming from a strong skeptic with a dislike for self-help and life improvement fads. Everything in here is just solid advice for shifting your perspective and expectations for a more contented, compassionate, and mindful life experience. I normally skim this sort of book to get the main points, but for this one reading it word for word is what gave it its impact. I definitely recommend a close read. ...if you're a copyeditor at heart, though, steel yourself for some typos and strange word choices

  5. 5 out of 5

    Philip Joubert

    I'm working through the concepts in this book with a leadership coach - so my experience of the book is massively shaped by that. A few of the concepts can sound quite wanky at first glance and I think they might continue to sound wanky to some. Good companion books: - Leadership and Self Deception - Anatomy of Peace - The Courage to be Disliked I'm working through the concepts in this book with a leadership coach - so my experience of the book is massively shaped by that. A few of the concepts can sound quite wanky at first glance and I think they might continue to sound wanky to some. Good companion books: - Leadership and Self Deception - Anatomy of Peace - The Courage to be Disliked

  6. 4 out of 5

    Oriana

    It is a book that touches many different aspects of the human being. What is leadership and what differentiate leaders from others. What it takes to give the extra percent that makes us unique, valuable and feel satisfy by our actions. To take fulk responsibility for our actions and to don't adopt a victim role that clouds our purpose. It also guides you through, how to feel our feelings to identify patterns in our behaviors and the way we react to the world. Furthermore, another big learning was It is a book that touches many different aspects of the human being. What is leadership and what differentiate leaders from others. What it takes to give the extra percent that makes us unique, valuable and feel satisfy by our actions. To take fulk responsibility for our actions and to don't adopt a victim role that clouds our purpose. It also guides you through, how to feel our feelings to identify patterns in our behaviors and the way we react to the world. Furthermore, another big learning was the art of releasing, what is not helping us move forward. To speak candidly and staying truth to your reality and beliefs but also accepting the reality of others. I cannot express in a sole page how this book have contributed in my life, it have revolutionized the way I think, act and perform every day. It has reinforced me to be a more loving, caring and accepting person. It is the beginning of a beautiful journey. A revelation of how to become a better human being, and to influence others in a personal, professional and spiritual environment. It is the type of book you read over many times, and get something new from it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alisa

    This was a great book! This book gives a lot of practical ways to consciously live above the line, in a place of being open, curious and open to learning. And while the authors acknowledge that being human we will all at times fall below the line (into a place of being closed, defensive and committed to "being right"), they give a lot of practical ways to get yourself back above the line. I highlighted a lot of references and ideas in this book, and this is a book I will continue to reference and This was a great book! This book gives a lot of practical ways to consciously live above the line, in a place of being open, curious and open to learning. And while the authors acknowledge that being human we will all at times fall below the line (into a place of being closed, defensive and committed to "being right"), they give a lot of practical ways to get yourself back above the line. I highlighted a lot of references and ideas in this book, and this is a book I will continue to reference and re-read and study! I highly recommend this!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Becky Aguirre

    This book has had a deep impact on my life and relationships. It is easy to read and comprehend and presents very practical tools for making big lofe-changes! It's a book I will be referring back to for years to come! Check out the free downloads and other related resources at concious.is! This book has had a deep impact on my life and relationships. It is easy to read and comprehend and presents very practical tools for making big lofe-changes! It's a book I will be referring back to for years to come! Check out the free downloads and other related resources at concious.is!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Randall

    Reading a bunch of leadership books whilst work is slow. This one is crazy good and reflects a ton of stuff I tried in the mid 2010s. It begins with some stories of showing the normal below the line leadership of needing to be right, being closed to new things and then it instantly goes into discussing blame. who did this? they need to take the fall. Which is discussed comes from toxic fear right? How much of our working lives is influenced by toxic fear. of our bosses or the culture around hitti Reading a bunch of leadership books whilst work is slow. This one is crazy good and reflects a ton of stuff I tried in the mid 2010s. It begins with some stories of showing the normal below the line leadership of needing to be right, being closed to new things and then it instantly goes into discussing blame. who did this? they need to take the fall. Which is discussed comes from toxic fear right? How much of our working lives is influenced by toxic fear. of our bosses or the culture around hitting targets. Which closes us off from fun, and new things. The leadership described in this book is about being comfortable with who we are. Being able to learn, and grow, and be honest, and be in touch with what our insides are doing, being good at what we are good at and supercharging that in ourselves as well as others. Being curious. and seeing the opposite side. They have so many different exercises that I want to do including a simple write down what you think and turn it around. "B hates me" into "B loves me" and looking at what would change, if it could be true. what evidence we can find to back up the opposite of what we think. what currently has our attention and why. The conscious leader is able to lead in more areas than just the simple target. and if the target isn't hit, they can learn and improve. Good book. did take notes :D

  10. 4 out of 5

    Prabhu

    Listened to the Audiobook version of this book, after listening to Jim Dethmer @ Knowledge project podcast with Shane Parrish. I felt, this book had some really great insights and ideas about leading and most importantly living consciously. In my opinion, the radical changes that were discussed in this book would need to be combined with some kind of conscious living practices like meditation or similar.. the reason I say this is even though one might intellectually understand and appreciate the Listened to the Audiobook version of this book, after listening to Jim Dethmer @ Knowledge project podcast with Shane Parrish. I felt, this book had some really great insights and ideas about leading and most importantly living consciously. In my opinion, the radical changes that were discussed in this book would need to be combined with some kind of conscious living practices like meditation or similar.. the reason I say this is even though one might intellectually understand and appreciate the concepts and its practical benefits, it would be hard to make these changes in real life without any mindfulness practice, even if you don’t want to label that way.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Desinka

    Concise and useful! I with there were more examples of how to practice the commitments.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Spencer

    A true waste. Anyone with healthy skepticism and backed with intelligence and reason is going to be very disappointed reading this "how-to" book. If you took an intro college-level philosophy or comparative religion class, you'd recognize this as just a mix of traditional Taoism and Stoicism philosophy trying unsuccessfully to be applied as a guide for the enlightened business leader. However, its authentic and only useful application in the workplace is a handy guide and convenient way to dismi A true waste. Anyone with healthy skepticism and backed with intelligence and reason is going to be very disappointed reading this "how-to" book. If you took an intro college-level philosophy or comparative religion class, you'd recognize this as just a mix of traditional Taoism and Stoicism philosophy trying unsuccessfully to be applied as a guide for the enlightened business leader. However, its authentic and only useful application in the workplace is a handy guide and convenient way to dismiss likely legitimate HR complaints at the office. After reading this book, all disagreements are categorized as someone "below-the-line and patterning the victim/accuser/hero," et al. New age wordiness that means "having a bad day," and so nothing changes. Lazy office managers who rely on paid "Leadership coaching" and using this book as a conflict resolution guide are likely to be deflective and hide from direct response responsibilities. Its only value is to teach how to argue against everything without attempting to understand anything. Many other books will offer better insights with reality-based resolution success. Save your money.

  13. 4 out of 5

    marilyn flower

    Amazing! Leadership Principles with a metaphysical perspective...a new way of being and managing energy in organizations and in our lives!!!! At any given moment we can be open and curious or rigid and right, our choice! The book takes us through a process towards openness, honesty, clarity, candor, and taking full responsibility without judging or complaining-- a true place of empowerment. Drawing on Rev Michael Beckwith's four stages of consciousness, Byron Katie's Work, and helpful distinctio Amazing! Leadership Principles with a metaphysical perspective...a new way of being and managing energy in organizations and in our lives!!!! At any given moment we can be open and curious or rigid and right, our choice! The book takes us through a process towards openness, honesty, clarity, candor, and taking full responsibility without judging or complaining-- a true place of empowerment. Drawing on Rev Michael Beckwith's four stages of consciousness, Byron Katie's Work, and helpful distinctions between unarguable facts and our made up stories, the book is chock full of tools to light the way towards a real win-win way of working and being. I plan to invite our church leadership to read and work this along with me. Join us!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Greene

    I listened to this book through AUDIBLE. It was incredible. I was challenged and strengthened. What a difference these shifts are making in my life. I now want to purchase so that I can read and ingest these powerful truths again. If you are a leader this is a MUST read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    LeMira

    A MUST READ!!!! This book has helped me change the way I run my business, my personal relationships, and my life. It's an easy read, and a great one to read one chapter a week to practice the commitments. A MUST READ!!!! This book has helped me change the way I run my business, my personal relationships, and my life. It's an easy read, and a great one to read one chapter a week to practice the commitments.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Deidre Schwartz

    This sounds like a leadership book, and it is, but so much more. I would recommend this to anyone as an excellent guide to leading a happy life. So many exellent points on how best to lead, manage, and inspire people while getting the most of life for your own well-being.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    Nice to glance through now and then. I liked the theme of “above the line” and “below the line” along with the many examples of the commitments throughout. As with many business books, you have to be in the right mindset to really benefit from the ideas presented.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Deralex

    Start is a little esoteric but overall one of best leadership books. Chapter structure really good with exercises..

  19. 5 out of 5

    Oleksiy Kovyrin

    New age bullshit. Don’t waste your time on this.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    I recently read 15 Commitments of Conscious Leadership and wanted to write about one of the commitments they described to summarize it and help me begin to practice it: The commitment to speaking candidly. For context, the core idea of the book is when you lead consciously you’ll be happier and more successful. They outline 15 commitments to help with this. For speaking candidly the commitment they outline is as follows: “I commit to saying what is true for me. I commit to being a person to whom I recently read 15 Commitments of Conscious Leadership and wanted to write about one of the commitments they described to summarize it and help me begin to practice it: The commitment to speaking candidly. For context, the core idea of the book is when you lead consciously you’ll be happier and more successful. They outline 15 commitments to help with this. For speaking candidly the commitment they outline is as follows: “I commit to saying what is true for me. I commit to being a person to whom others can express themselves with candor.” I liked many things about this commitment. First is that it was about listening and speaking, that to speak candidly you had to be in deep conversation with another. Second, I loved the attention paid to the idea of withholding vs. lying. Lying they claim is morally wrong, but withholding is more prevalent and causes lots of damage too. Withholding is refraining from revealing everything to all relevant parties. I can honestly say I do this a lot today. I’m afraid of what someone will think if they know my true feelings. What I loved about the discussion was how the authors claim you lose so much energy doing this it isn’t worth it for you to be an effective leader even if it isn’t morally wrong. They summarize the idea well with a venn diagram with 3 circles: Lying vs. Truthfulness: What I say represents my reality accurately Withholding vs. openness: I say everything I need to say/ I don’t refrain from revealing everything to all relevant parties Uninformed vs. awareness: I see as much as there is to see From 15 Commitments of Conscious Leadership They have several other interesting points about withholding too I’ll summarize. Withholding also happens because: We don’t want to hurt feelings We don’t want conflict We think a person/organization will never change Culturally it is the norm I’d also recently heard from someone this statement about withholding feedback that motivates me to give feedback: withholding is also saying I don’t respect you enough to believe you can handle my opinions or information about reality. The authors also claim withholding can lead to projecting where you see the other person through your own judgement and believe the judgements are true (e.g. I think X person is disrespectful therefore any action they do is a disrespectful action). The alternative is to see judgements as just part of our mental process, but not to be fully believed or as true and are often more about yourself than the other person. You can own them and not need to act on all of them that arise inside you. When you judge someone else, you can ask how am I doing that same thing? Often that’s valuable. The authors encourage you to consider as you build this skill to start with committed relationships where there’s lots of trust and ideally both of you are interested in living this commitment and living with the commitments they outline in the book. They claim this is because you can get hurt easily practicing this in a one sided way at first, even if eventually you can do this with anyone. They also make a nice claim that this is extra powerful at a team level because any one individual will have a distorted view of reality. Finally, they talk about how deep listening is required to be someone others can speak candidly to. That involves listening not to jump in and fix a problem or with other filters, but as openly as possible. They list out several of these listening filters that can hurt your ability to listen openly: diagnosing, correcting, avoiding conflict, defending, personalizing. They also suggest to try and listen at 3 levels: listen to their logic, feelings and instincts. I enjoy how they call the commitment speaking candidly but have half of it being about listening too. So if you’re interested in making this commitment I’d encourage you to find others you trust who would be interested in trying this together and exploring how it goes with some level of regular reflection with the other person on it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Robert Guico

    One of the weirdest business books that I've ever read, 15 Commitments doesn't quite square the circle when it comes to "being a business" versus "being". Yet it offers practical (if short) lessons from so far afield that each commitment is worth thinking about, even if a broader incorporation of these lessons demands a full DNA transplant of an organization. The books starts by painting a picture of two corporate leaders, contrasting their approach to work and showing differing coping mechanisms One of the weirdest business books that I've ever read, 15 Commitments doesn't quite square the circle when it comes to "being a business" versus "being". Yet it offers practical (if short) lessons from so far afield that each commitment is worth thinking about, even if a broader incorporation of these lessons demands a full DNA transplant of an organization. The books starts by painting a picture of two corporate leaders, contrasting their approach to work and showing differing coping mechanisms. The goal is to be "conscious", aware of what is happening around us and within us--as opposed to being "unconscious", suppressing and mitigating our senses to get by. After the intro, the book does us a disservice and dumps all 15 (15!) commitments on us sequentially. To me the first three form the foundation of this philosophy, with the others building on these (and each other): 1. Take full responsibility; don't assign victims/villains/heroes 2. Be curious; don't be right 3. Feel and recognize your feelings; don't withhold them The text draws heavily from various philosophies without ever naming any particular branch, including stoicism (standing apart from our feelings, but fully experiencing them instead of repressing them), Taoism (emphasizing life energy, almost like the Chi, but without naming the Tao), and... modern psychology. Is this kind of new-agey? You bet! Does this mean the book is totally worthless? Not really! Take, for example, the very-good chapter on gossip. Normally the purview of firebrand evangelical pastors, this chapter dives into why gossip is a thing--instead of being an individual failing, it is better depicted as harmful energy that nonetheless has a purpose: controlling the conversation, withholding facts, avoiding conflict. It does a better-than-average job of addressing the need by emphasizing a strategy based on facts (not stories) and "clearing" their feelings until everything has been expressed. Or take "Experiencing the world as an ally", which, contrary to what I feared, wasn't about "the world is set up for your success"--it's that you can learn lessons from things that happen to you, if you choose. Which sounds a lot more like something that would pop up in a therapists' office. Talking about these later commitments in the language of energy and candor is a better fit than what has come before. That said, some of this language is more questionable than others. Limiting what feelings can be felt to 5 seems arbitrary. Deciding to expand the definition of "sexual feelings" to mean "excellent creative vibes as a team" is borderline "laughable" and "uncomfortable". When all is said and done, the book is meant to spur personal reflection, even if you reject some of its doctrines. In a company-wide setting, applying these lessons demands incredible amounts of trust; I'm less sure it can be done with hundreds of employees than, say, dozens. If it leaves coworkers a little more awake than before, though, that's still a step towards a better future.

  22. 5 out of 5

    L.A.

    I read this as an audiobook since I’m a mother of a busy, little-sleep-required two-year-old with limited time. I will definitely be purchasing the book so I can reread, actually do the exercises included, and in so doing implement changes in my life. This is a book for everyday living, not just corporate leadership or work life. I personally have spent the last few years of my life trying to overcome difficult life circumstances and help a depressed spouse who has also had some tough life circu I read this as an audiobook since I’m a mother of a busy, little-sleep-required two-year-old with limited time. I will definitely be purchasing the book so I can reread, actually do the exercises included, and in so doing implement changes in my life. This is a book for everyday living, not just corporate leadership or work life. I personally have spent the last few years of my life trying to overcome difficult life circumstances and help a depressed spouse who has also had some tough life circumstances. I’ve focused my attention on 1) believing God has a plan for my life, 2) trying to help my husband feel better, and 3) hoping my husband will show me love in ways that are meaningful to me—or trying to forgive him for not showing love, because I know he’s struggling personally. This book addresses all those issues by pointing out ways that you can choose to view things differently and not wallow in frustration when things don’t go as planned, people let you down, etc. And the authors do it in a way that allows me to implement the biblical principles I believe in while practicing their 15 principles. If anything, the principles are a vehicle to help me put into practice biblical teachings I’ve been trying to live my whole life (reference the “by me,” “to me,” “through me,” etc. chapter at the beginning). Definitely in the top five books that have helped me grow personally.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sooraj

    A great book which turns over a new leaf of leadership behaviors. Unlike most of the other leadership books which are into extrinsic leadership behaviors i.e. how to communicate, how to manage etc., this book dwells into intrinsic leadership behaviors i.e. how to respond intrinsically to situations, choosing to be in control of the way we think, respond etc. For example: Am you right or do you want to be right? Being right is just knowing 2+3 = 5. Wanting to be right is acknowledgment and accepta A great book which turns over a new leaf of leadership behaviors. Unlike most of the other leadership books which are into extrinsic leadership behaviors i.e. how to communicate, how to manage etc., this book dwells into intrinsic leadership behaviors i.e. how to respond intrinsically to situations, choosing to be in control of the way we think, respond etc. For example: Am you right or do you want to be right? Being right is just knowing 2+3 = 5. Wanting to be right is acknowledgment and acceptance from others that you are right, which creates conflicts. So in that sense this book capitalizes on mindfulness. Mindfulness seeks to create awareness to increase the gap between stimulus and response. This book guides us on how to engage our thoughts during this gap. Similarly, do you choose - to take responsibility or to assign blame? - learn through curiosity or want to be right? - to speak candidly or to engage in gossips? - to feel appreciative or to feel entitled? -to experience sufficiency or to experience scarcity? -to compromise or to create win-win situations? ... and many more such behaviors which the authors refer to as commitments. Each chapter ends by providing real life examples of each commitment in action, detailed steps on practicing the commitment and a summary. Easy, simple and fun to read

  24. 4 out of 5

    Benedikt

    The title put me off a little bit as books with a fixed number of points can have an arbitrary combination of content that does not belong together and fail to hit home with its intended message. This book however resonated with me. I had heard of the book through listening to a podcast Dethmer was a guest on. I immediately took to his quick take on leadership and life itself. Consequently, I picked up the audio book and got reminded of so many important behaviours and characteristics that make a The title put me off a little bit as books with a fixed number of points can have an arbitrary combination of content that does not belong together and fail to hit home with its intended message. This book however resonated with me. I had heard of the book through listening to a podcast Dethmer was a guest on. I immediately took to his quick take on leadership and life itself. Consequently, I picked up the audio book and got reminded of so many important behaviours and characteristics that make a good leader and more importantly a good human. The book does not only apply to leaders but to me reads like a guide to being a better and more content person with a lot of techniques and philosophies of life espoused in every commitment. This book made me want to dig deeper and try to implement many of the commitments described herein. Most importantly I was triggered to question beliefs I had about my own progress and rethink my own behaviour in many areas.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jens

    It's a lot like 7 habits of highly effective people, but with a spiritual twist (commitment 14 "all-in solution", scarcity belief, we create stories about neutral facts, but also feelings are unarguable). Some practical commitments really struck a chord with me (everyone as An Ally for growth, nothing is lacking, maybe missing, the zones of incompetence to Genius, to play more in work mode), but others were too spiritual for me to believe them feasible in a real-world scenario (seeing someone in It's a lot like 7 habits of highly effective people, but with a spiritual twist (commitment 14 "all-in solution", scarcity belief, we create stories about neutral facts, but also feelings are unarguable). Some practical commitments really struck a chord with me (everyone as An Ally for growth, nothing is lacking, maybe missing, the zones of incompetence to Genius, to play more in work mode), but others were too spiritual for me to believe them feasible in a real-world scenario (seeing someone intimidating as merely atoms without boundary between matter and space or letting the bits of your body flow to express your emotion with a sound). Overall, radically different look on leadership that gives perspective on how to fit it in your life's purpose more broadly. It doesn't stop with the switch of a victim "To me" consciousness to a proactive "by me". You can add the divine/uniquely human manifestation "through me" and even "as me".

  26. 5 out of 5

    Greg Bae

    Jim Dethmer lays out a framework for leadership using principles grounded in mediation, growth mindset and community. The 15 Commitments: Taking radical responsibility Learning through curiosity Feeling all my feelings Speaking candidly Eliminating gossip Practicing integrity Generating appreciation Excelling in your zone of genius Loving a life of play and rest Exploring the opposite Sourcing approval, control and security Having enough of everything Experiencing the world as an ally Creating win fo Jim Dethmer lays out a framework for leadership using principles grounded in mediation, growth mindset and community. The 15 Commitments: Taking radical responsibility Learning through curiosity Feeling all my feelings Speaking candidly Eliminating gossip Practicing integrity Generating appreciation Excelling in your zone of genius Loving a life of play and rest Exploring the opposite Sourcing approval, control and security Having enough of everything Experiencing the world as an ally Creating win for all solutions Being the resolution that is needed Overall solid concepts as told as loosely connected parables using a “below the line and above the line” framework. Somewhat generic and not clear why 15 vs 5 vs 55 commitments as the narrative doesn’t draw a clear through line. Mediocre effort.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hank Pharis

    (NOTE: I'm stingy with stars. For me 2 stars means a good book or a B. 3 stars means a very good book or a B+. 4 stars means an outstanding book or an A {only about 5% of the books I read merit 4 stars}. 5 stars means an all time favorite or an A+ {Only one of 400 or 500 books rates this!).Having known Jim in seminary and having followed his ministry over the years I was very interested to learn about what he is doing these days. However merely listening to this book is not enough. Its too much (NOTE: I'm stingy with stars. For me 2 stars means a good book or a B. 3 stars means a very good book or a B+. 4 stars means an outstanding book or an A {only about 5% of the books I read merit 4 stars}. 5 stars means an all time favorite or an A+ {Only one of 400 or 500 books rates this!).Having known Jim in seminary and having followed his ministry over the years I was very interested to learn about what he is doing these days. However merely listening to this book is not enough. Its too much like drinking out of a firehose. I have to go back and read it to better comprehend it. Nevertheless there seems to be a lot of great wisdom here about leadership. There are also a few things I was uncertain about. But hopefully I'll have a better review after I read it. flag Like  · see review Jan 04, 2021 Sarah rated it really liked it I read this with colleagues over the course of a few months, discussing about a chapter or two a month. I almost rejected this book outright at the beginning because the introductory character sketch of a conscious leader seemed so far-fetched and privileged that I thought this book would be akin to advice from Sheryl Sandberg. I did end up finding the book useful and it provided some good discussion with colleagues. I particularly liked the chapter with the opposites exercise. I would have appr I read this with colleagues over the course of a few months, discussing about a chapter or two a month. I almost rejected this book outright at the beginning because the introductory character sketch of a conscious leader seemed so far-fetched and privileged that I thought this book would be akin to advice from Sheryl Sandberg. I did end up finding the book useful and it provided some good discussion with colleagues. I particularly liked the chapter with the opposites exercise. I would have appreciated more at the end for how to carry this further without having to go to the website to look at resources, but I have yet to do that so maybe that will be helpful. I will likely re-read this to keep some of these ideas in the forefront of my thoughts and actions. flag Like  · see review Aug 14, 2018 Marissa Crawford rated it really liked it This is an interesting book on leadership and I found it very useful. I read this book as part of a leadership course at work so we had sessions to practice our skills and discuss. Those sessions are where I really got the value from reading the book. I think it would be difficult to put some of the commitments into practice without having these sessions. There are also things that seem to contradict each other in the book but working through them in the sessions, I could pick up on the nuances. This is an interesting book on leadership and I found it very useful. I read this book as part of a leadership course at work so we had sessions to practice our skills and discuss. Those sessions are where I really got the value from reading the book. I think it would be difficult to put some of the commitments into practice without having these sessions. There are also things that seem to contradict each other in the book but working through them in the sessions, I could pick up on the nuances.At times, the book does get a little too spiritual/religious for my tastes but that's a personal preference. flag Like  · see review Sep 18, 2019 Kelly Walker rated it it was amazing “When we first meet leaders, almost all have a strong control plan, where their ego is invested in the appearance of control.” The practices outlined in this book seek to move a successful task manager into a holistically successful leader - one who adds value professionally, personally, and culturally. This book is jam packed with science, philosophy, and spiritual research to back already compelling arguments and case studies. This is the closest I’ve gotten to a “one stop shop” leadership pla “When we first meet leaders, almost all have a strong control plan, where their ego is invested in the appearance of control.” The practices outlined in this book seek to move a successful task manager into a holistically successful leader - one who adds value professionally, personally, and culturally. This book is jam packed with science, philosophy, and spiritual research to back already compelling arguments and case studies. This is the closest I’ve gotten to a “one stop shop” leadership playbook. flag Like  · see review « previous 1 2 3 4 next »

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