web site hit counter Lucifer - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Lucifer

Availability: Ready to download

The angels at God’s office complex regularly turn out amazing projects. Lucifer happens to be working on the development of humans, within the larger Creation project. The other angels involved seem satisfied creating beings that aren’t living or feeling, a major problem, since Lucifer needs to create actual personalities before the fast approaching release date. To top it The angels at God’s office complex regularly turn out amazing projects. Lucifer happens to be working on the development of humans, within the larger Creation project. The other angels involved seem satisfied creating beings that aren’t living or feeling, a major problem, since Lucifer needs to create actual personalities before the fast approaching release date. To top it all off, he needs to fit rebelling against the Creator into his busy life if he ever wants to get a corporate promotion. Lucifer explores good and evil, fate and free will, and office politics in Heaven.


Compare

The angels at God’s office complex regularly turn out amazing projects. Lucifer happens to be working on the development of humans, within the larger Creation project. The other angels involved seem satisfied creating beings that aren’t living or feeling, a major problem, since Lucifer needs to create actual personalities before the fast approaching release date. To top it The angels at God’s office complex regularly turn out amazing projects. Lucifer happens to be working on the development of humans, within the larger Creation project. The other angels involved seem satisfied creating beings that aren’t living or feeling, a major problem, since Lucifer needs to create actual personalities before the fast approaching release date. To top it all off, he needs to fit rebelling against the Creator into his busy life if he ever wants to get a corporate promotion. Lucifer explores good and evil, fate and free will, and office politics in Heaven.

33 review for Lucifer

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Kosoris

    On the two-year anniversary of the publication of Lucifer, I thought it would be fun and at least a bit interesting to offer some thoughts on my book and attempt a hopefully impartial review at the same time. I suppose it can also be considered an informal foreword of sorts, one that will likely never be printed in another edition of Lucifer, as the dreadful sales of my book make the prospect of another printing unlikely. Off the hop, the synopsis on the back is something I’m not particularly fon On the two-year anniversary of the publication of Lucifer, I thought it would be fun and at least a bit interesting to offer some thoughts on my book and attempt a hopefully impartial review at the same time. I suppose it can also be considered an informal foreword of sorts, one that will likely never be printed in another edition of Lucifer, as the dreadful sales of my book make the prospect of another printing unlikely. Off the hop, the synopsis on the back is something I’m not particularly fond of. As strange as this sounds, I didn’t actually understand my story’s subject at the time of publication. I wrongly focused on the rebellion aspect; it’s important to the plot, yes, but it really takes a back seat to the central conflict surrounding Lucifer’s attempt to create life. While I don’t think I would greatly fault any other novice author for such an oversight, it, unfortunately, helps to set a reader up for incorrect expectations before even opening the book, one of at least a few mistakes I made that can be chalked up to lack of experience. (I realized the error of my ways and altered the synopsis on Goodreads and Amazon in such a way as I describe here. When people want to learn more about the book, I usually direct them there as a result.) Reading it now, certain phrases that seemed fine at the time grate on me a bit now, such as whenever I refer to someone “donning” a smile, or any of the numerous clichés, but this really isn’t a deal breaker. Two things stand out much more strongly on a read-through. Firstly, one of the more frequent bits of criticism that I had a hard time understanding around the time Lucifer came out had to do with its length, and I clearly see now that the issue at hand wasn’t simply that the book’s short, but that it feels short. Some aspects of the plot, especially closer to the end, move along too quickly, without good enough building and pacing, and other parts were ripe for expansion that never happened. Secondly, I’m a bit of a visual storyteller, and I think there are passages where this is a blessing and others where it acts as a hindrance. At times, the descriptive actions interspersed throughout the dialogue work effectively to improve the pacing or the gravitas of the speech, but such writing will sometimes trip up the flow of speech. Despite any negatives I mention, there’s still plenty about Lucifer that I like. I had a lot of fun describing the fantastical elementals of Heaven, usually involving the testing rooms––large, empty rooms that were completely white, in which angels would make humans and landscapes appear in order to test programs, utilizing voice commands––but also with regards to life outside the main office complex. Related to this, I still love the first human interaction, in the chapter with the same name; with the combination of outright silliness and tiny touches that show Lucifer to be a sarcastic––albeit polite, at this point––little bitch, reading this chapter still makes me chuckle. Another thing I’m quite happy about is the significant tonal shift that occurs as the story progresses. We get a taste of the darkness that lurks below the surface early on, but things lighten up until one character hints that things are about to change. As well, even with some things unfolding quicker than I would have liked, looking back, I’m quite happy with Lucifer’s clear evolution, showcased in how he interacts with God and the other angels. (My favourite moments with regards to this are probably the two main emotional speeches he delivers, which are, incidentally, very fun to read in front of audiences.) As much as it pains me to admit this, however, I think the success I see in the tone and the protagonist’s characterization throughout Lucifer was largely a matter of beginner’s luck rather than any specific writing strategy. Despite all the things that would likely be different if I were writing Lucifer now, I’m glad I published it when I did, for doing so thrust me into the local literary community where I’ve been lucky enough to meet so many bright and interesting people. As well, I started reading not only much more as a result, but also more thoughtfully, which I suspect will greatly help me improve my writing. With all the things I like and dislike coming together in the book, I feel like I would give it a rating somewhere between 3 and 4 stars, had it been written by another author, but I’ll lean toward 3 to try and offset my inherent bias.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joko

    Even though I usually do not read this genre, I'm glad I made an exception. It was a unique concept; a new spin on a familiar story. I loved that you don't have to be religious to enjoy this book. Even though I usually do not read this genre, I'm glad I made an exception. It was a unique concept; a new spin on a familiar story. I loved that you don't have to be religious to enjoy this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shauna

    I fell in love with Alexander Kosoris' Lucifer years ago, when I first heard the concept for the book. I've always loved the idea that God is running an office building where the angels are creating the world for Him. But more than that, I love the idea that Lucifer is told by God to rebel in order to gain a job promotion. How do you go about rebelling against the all-knowing and all-seeing creator? I was lucky enough to read a few of the Lucifer early drafts back when Alexander was writing the b I fell in love with Alexander Kosoris' Lucifer years ago, when I first heard the concept for the book. I've always loved the idea that God is running an office building where the angels are creating the world for Him. But more than that, I love the idea that Lucifer is told by God to rebel in order to gain a job promotion. How do you go about rebelling against the all-knowing and all-seeing creator? I was lucky enough to read a few of the Lucifer early drafts back when Alexander was writing the book. Being able to reread it now, several drafts later and published, has been a great experience. I've seen how the story has changed, always for the better. This was especially true of the ending, which is now much tighter. The book has a wonderful and strong voice, with great little descriptions like "Two ferns graced His office with their presence". I ended up giving Lucifer 4/5 stars because I had a hard time picturing the action in scenes where people were moving their hands all over the place (characters are often moving their hands while they talk, like when Lucifer was "bringing his hand forward with his index finger up"). I also ran into some trouble because there are two characters named Isaac (Zack the cashier and Isaac from Manufacturing). I'm sure this won't bother everyone, but I found it knocked me out of the narrative when the second Isaac showed up. But that being said, this is the fall of Lucifer as you've never seen it: fought across God's office complex in Heaven.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Why was Lucifer cast out from Heaven? What caused the rift between him and the bigwigs in upper management? Did Lucifer fall, or was he pushed? Anyone who has ever worked in an office cubicle will appreciate the version of Lucifer who inhabits this tale. When we first meet him, he isn’t quite the vision of Hell that most are familiar with, far from it in fact. This isn’t anything close to the Father of Lies at all. He is a company man who relishes his work and likes nothing better than puzzling t Why was Lucifer cast out from Heaven? What caused the rift between him and the bigwigs in upper management? Did Lucifer fall, or was he pushed? Anyone who has ever worked in an office cubicle will appreciate the version of Lucifer who inhabits this tale. When we first meet him, he isn’t quite the vision of Hell that most are familiar with, far from it in fact. This isn’t anything close to the Father of Lies at all. He is a company man who relishes his work and likes nothing better than puzzling things out. The change that slowly starts to occur within our lead is born of frustration, not anger or hate. Lucifer realises that evolution, development, free will, call it whatever you want, has to happen. If the humanity project is going to be a success, then human beings needs to be flawed, to be fragile and most importantly, they need to be able to find their own way. Ironically, the only person he can turn to is his ultimate boss, God. The rest of his colleagues can’t, or won’t, even attempt to understand the thoughts that are rumbling around in Lucifer’s head. He is exploring new ground and “the big guy” is the only other being who can appreciate that this needs to happen. God is of course omniscient so it makes their conversations a bit one sided, think omnipresent sounding board and you are about half way there. This is a rebellion of office politics, of middle managers and TPS reports. Lucifer’s annoyance at boundaries he is forced to endure, make him realise that he needs to find his own way as well. He needs to learn how to forge his own path. Needless to say, that does not go down well with the rest of the Heavenly horde. If anything, I do think this novel suffers a little because of its length. I rattled through it relatively quickly and just at the point where things were starting to get interesting, they were done. Don’t get me wrong, I was entertained by what was there, it just felt a little like a prequel to a much larger story. I guess thinking about it though, this is kind of the point. Overall I enjoyed Lucifer. It’s a modern take on the creation myth with some nice ideas, well executed. Most importantly it showcases an author with bucket loads of potential. I’ll be keeping an eye out for more from Alexander Kosoris in future.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Aliya

    I read this book in an hour and a half. Definitely one of my new all time favs.

  6. 5 out of 5

    nks

    No.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  8. 5 out of 5

    VS Drakkan

  9. 4 out of 5

    Fiona Kroll

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Smith

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rianna Hampton

  13. 4 out of 5

    Daryl

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lorna

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrei Diaczun

  18. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Madeleine

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mandiann

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sheepcoate

  23. 4 out of 5

    Catey

  24. 4 out of 5

    John Van der vuurst

  25. 4 out of 5

    Monika

  26. 4 out of 5

    Breanne Mosher-rae

  27. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

  28. 5 out of 5

    Trixie Fontaine

  29. 4 out of 5

    David

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scott Summerton

  31. 5 out of 5

    Mira

  32. 4 out of 5

    Gulbeniz

  33. 5 out of 5

    Breanne MR

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.