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Professor Jeremy Logan (the quirky and charismatic “enigmalogist” who specializes in solving problems of the strange or seemingly supernatural variety) receives an urgent summons from the director of Lux, one of the oldest and most respected think tanks in America. An unexplainable tragedy has taken place in the sprawling compound located on the coastline of Newport, Rhode Professor Jeremy Logan (the quirky and charismatic “enigmalogist” who specializes in solving problems of the strange or seemingly supernatural variety) receives an urgent summons from the director of Lux, one of the oldest and most respected think tanks in America. An unexplainable tragedy has taken place in the sprawling compound located on the coastline of Newport, Rhode Island. One of Lux’s most distinguished doctors, overcome by erratic behavior, violently attacked his assistant before meeting with a gruesome self-inflicted end. Deeply shaken by the incident and the bizarre evidence left behind from the doctor’s final project—as well as recent troubling behavior among several of the think tank’s other scientists—Lux fears there is something more sinister occurring within its walls and looks to Jeremy Logan to investigate.      Logan quickly makes a surprising discovery. In a long-dormant wing of the estate, he uncovers an ingeniously hidden secret room, unknown and untouched for decades. The room is essentially a time capsule, filled with eerie machinery and obscure references to a top-secret experiment known as “Project S.” As Logan attempts to unravel its meaning, he begins to discern what transpired in that room—and why the frightening project was suddenly abandoned and sealed off many years before. As his work draws him ever deeper into harm’s way, Logan soon unleashes a series of catastrophic events upon the rest of Lux . . . and himself. One of Lincoln Child’s most thrilling novels to date, The Forgotten Room is replete with exhilarating action, veiled history, and mesmerizing science—making for a truly intelligent page-turner.


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Professor Jeremy Logan (the quirky and charismatic “enigmalogist” who specializes in solving problems of the strange or seemingly supernatural variety) receives an urgent summons from the director of Lux, one of the oldest and most respected think tanks in America. An unexplainable tragedy has taken place in the sprawling compound located on the coastline of Newport, Rhode Professor Jeremy Logan (the quirky and charismatic “enigmalogist” who specializes in solving problems of the strange or seemingly supernatural variety) receives an urgent summons from the director of Lux, one of the oldest and most respected think tanks in America. An unexplainable tragedy has taken place in the sprawling compound located on the coastline of Newport, Rhode Island. One of Lux’s most distinguished doctors, overcome by erratic behavior, violently attacked his assistant before meeting with a gruesome self-inflicted end. Deeply shaken by the incident and the bizarre evidence left behind from the doctor’s final project—as well as recent troubling behavior among several of the think tank’s other scientists—Lux fears there is something more sinister occurring within its walls and looks to Jeremy Logan to investigate.      Logan quickly makes a surprising discovery. In a long-dormant wing of the estate, he uncovers an ingeniously hidden secret room, unknown and untouched for decades. The room is essentially a time capsule, filled with eerie machinery and obscure references to a top-secret experiment known as “Project S.” As Logan attempts to unravel its meaning, he begins to discern what transpired in that room—and why the frightening project was suddenly abandoned and sealed off many years before. As his work draws him ever deeper into harm’s way, Logan soon unleashes a series of catastrophic events upon the rest of Lux . . . and himself. One of Lincoln Child’s most thrilling novels to date, The Forgotten Room is replete with exhilarating action, veiled history, and mesmerizing science—making for a truly intelligent page-turner.

30 review for The Forgotten Room

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*

    I enjoyed The Forgotten Room (Jeremy Logan #4) although I had not read any of the previous books in the series. This works well as a stand-alone. The Forgotten Room had a little of everything.....mad scientists, unexplained deaths, strange goings-on, and a protagonist who is a 'sensitive'- Professor Jeremy Logan (the quirky and charismatic “enigmalogist” who specializes in solving problems of the strange or seemingly supernatural variety). An enjoyable and entertaining read/listen. I enjoyed The Forgotten Room (Jeremy Logan #4) although I had not read any of the previous books in the series. This works well as a stand-alone. The Forgotten Room had a little of everything.....mad scientists, unexplained deaths, strange goings-on, and a protagonist who is a 'sensitive'- Professor Jeremy Logan (the quirky and charismatic “enigmalogist” who specializes in solving problems of the strange or seemingly supernatural variety). An enjoyable and entertaining read/listen.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    3.5 stars, rounded up. I really wanted to LOVE this book. The beginning started out really strong; bringing us the main character of Jeremy Logan, enigmalogist ( who was reminiscent of a scaled down version of agent Pendergast). I immediately liked this character, and the mystery that he was summoned to solve captured my undivided attention. For at least half of the book, things were very fast paced, leading to new cryptic revelations around every corner. Unfortunately (for me), I figured out "pa 3.5 stars, rounded up. I really wanted to LOVE this book. The beginning started out really strong; bringing us the main character of Jeremy Logan, enigmalogist ( who was reminiscent of a scaled down version of agent Pendergast). I immediately liked this character, and the mystery that he was summoned to solve captured my undivided attention. For at least half of the book, things were very fast paced, leading to new cryptic revelations around every corner. Unfortunately (for me), I figured out "part" of the mystery almost immediately--which ruined some of the tension, obviously. Then the story takes a turn and becomes an almost outright mystery novel, with little of the conjectures that got me invested in the story to begin with. While still retaining it's fast-pacing, the story became "ordinary" to me about 2/3 of the way through. Originally, I would have gone with a 3 star rating, but am going with 3.5 on the basis of the fantastic beginning.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Raymond Just

    I'm not sure where to start with this. It's hard to believe TFG is written by part of the same team that brings us the ever-enjoyable Pendergast adventures. This is really an overwritten piece. Too much description and exposition in every single scene bleeds any tension from what should be a tense thriller, leaving the story feeling like a bad Scooby Doo episode without any of the fun spooks and scares. And TFG's protagonist, Jeremy Logan, is really the anti-Pendergast. The character is just too I'm not sure where to start with this. It's hard to believe TFG is written by part of the same team that brings us the ever-enjoyable Pendergast adventures. This is really an overwritten piece. Too much description and exposition in every single scene bleeds any tension from what should be a tense thriller, leaving the story feeling like a bad Scooby Doo episode without any of the fun spooks and scares. And TFG's protagonist, Jeremy Logan, is really the anti-Pendergast. The character is just too one-dimensional. With no apparent flaws, he clumps and plods through the story with his perfect moral center held high. Anyway, enough about this. Child has done much better work, and I'd recommend any of his other novels, so long as the cardboard creation of Logan is nowhere to be found on the flap.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    The Forgotten Room by Lincoln Child Published 2015, Doubleday Stars: ★★★★☆ Review also posted at: Slapdash & Sundry I really like Jeremy Logan. I'm hoping Lincoln Child decides to keep writing this character, and maybe to attempt to put out more books. He works hard with Douglas Preston to do a Pendergast every year, and they also put out Gideon Crew books, so I know he's busy. But I just can't help but wish Jeremy Logan would get more appearances. I love his job, "enigmologist," and I like his pers The Forgotten Room by Lincoln Child Published 2015, Doubleday Stars: ★★★★☆ Review also posted at: Slapdash & Sundry I really like Jeremy Logan. I'm hoping Lincoln Child decides to keep writing this character, and maybe to attempt to put out more books. He works hard with Douglas Preston to do a Pendergast every year, and they also put out Gideon Crew books, so I know he's busy. But I just can't help but wish Jeremy Logan would get more appearances. I love his job, "enigmologist," and I like his personality. This book was a lot of fun. I feel like I learned a little science along the way, but don't feel like it was overdone to the point where it felt like a lecture. The pacing was great, the action built well, and the denouement, while a little obvious, was still loads of fun to "live out" through the page.

  5. 4 out of 5

    John Matsui

    The Forgotten Room gives initial vibes that it's heading toward the supernatural, perhaps with a ghostly presence that's responsible for the gruesome suicide of a senior researcher at a stuffy think tank on the coastline of Newport, Rhode Island. The main character Jeremy Logan was a prof at the Lux research institute years earlier until a self-important professor rallied opposition, citing Logan's field of study, enigmatology was not up to the institute's scientific/academic standards. When one o The Forgotten Room gives initial vibes that it's heading toward the supernatural, perhaps with a ghostly presence that's responsible for the gruesome suicide of a senior researcher at a stuffy think tank on the coastline of Newport, Rhode Island. The main character Jeremy Logan was a prof at the Lux research institute years earlier until a self-important professor rallied opposition, citing Logan's field of study, enigmatology was not up to the institute's scientific/academic standards. When one of the profs dies under mysterious and ugly circumstances, Logan is called upon to use his investigative abilities and discretion to learn what happened. Logan conducts the usual winding course of interviews that turn up small bits of information and several dead ends. In the process, he learns the deceased, the level-headed Dr. Willard Strachey, had been in charge of a renovation project and after more probing discovers a forgotten room that the researcher had obviously discovered. The room does not give up its secrets because someone else has been in it and taken pertinent materials and documents. From here the plot shifts from supernatural forces to those of unknown black-hearted humans as the culprits as more deaths ensue. The plodding pace in the first three-quarter of the book shifts into second and then third gear as the pieces come together with a finish that comes close to but is not quite an action thriller. The end is the best part of the Forgotten Room both in terms of action and Logan's inspired solution to defeat overwhelming forces. I gave The Forgotten Room 3-1/2 stars because of its overly slow start but the ending and Logan's character are worth a solid four stars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jaksen

    Loved this book, read it in two days. I am a huge Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child fan. (They often write as a pair, and I've read a few done by Preston alone. This was my first Lincoln Child as a solo writer.) So when I saw this book available at my local library and read the title... I shall admit, the title grabbed me, then the author - I could not resist. I love books in which old, weird buildings play a great part, even to the extent the setting becomes almost another character. Give me castles, Loved this book, read it in two days. I am a huge Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child fan. (They often write as a pair, and I've read a few done by Preston alone. This was my first Lincoln Child as a solo writer.) So when I saw this book available at my local library and read the title... I shall admit, the title grabbed me, then the author - I could not resist. I love books in which old, weird buildings play a great part, even to the extent the setting becomes almost another character. Give me castles, decrepit mansions, underground catacombs, dilapidated farmhouses, abandoned factories, churches and schools and I am in reader's heaven. I was in heaven reading this book. Jeremy Logan, an enigmaologist - one who studies or investigates strange occurrences, including those which might include paranormal or preternatural events - is asked to look into the death of a distinguished scientist, or fellow, at a think tank in Newport, Rhode Island. Okay, Newport, oceanfront mansion meticulously described, a mysterious death, even more mysterious 'goings-on' in and around said mansion. Throw in a quiet, unassuming MC and a lot of creepy or weird side characters, and of course, the requisite attractive woman - well, you have to have a trope here or there - and you have a near-perfect and absolutely atmospheric suspense thriller. Or mystery, as I'm often not exactly sure how to classify the Preston/Child novels, whether done as a pair or as a solo work. I'll be honest. I sometimes hate to pick up a new Preston/Child or Preston (or now Child) book because anything else I have going - something literary or highbrow or supposedly so - gets tossed in a pile. (I am the same way about Ruth Rendell's Inspector Wexford series.) At any rate, from a Lincoln Child fan who must absolutely go get the first three books in the Jeremy Logan series, five stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    3.5 With a strong start, I thought that this was going to go in a more horror/supernatural direction, which I was kind of digging. But then it felt like the author reigned it in and changed direction to be a more straight-up mystery, which I was a little disappointed with. The main character had some elements of Pendergast and the house was a little Enoch Leng-ish, so it felt very familiar and comfortable. Definitely for those people who love the Pendergast books.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    It's not bad. It's not Child's best work, but it's a solid read and the 4th Jeremy Logan novel. It's not bad. It's not Child's best work, but it's a solid read and the 4th Jeremy Logan novel.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Liz Waters

    Lincoln Child is one scary writer who takes you for a harrowing trip through an upscale think tank housed in a creepy old New England mansion. Following enigmalogist Jeremy Logan through this maze of brilliant scientists and the sorts of horrors great brains can create is an adventure you won’t want to miss. Weaving carefully several fields of knowledge, Child will frighten even the boldest reader into turning page after page as Logan struggles to decipher the convoluted path of reason from deca Lincoln Child is one scary writer who takes you for a harrowing trip through an upscale think tank housed in a creepy old New England mansion. Following enigmalogist Jeremy Logan through this maze of brilliant scientists and the sorts of horrors great brains can create is an adventure you won’t want to miss. Weaving carefully several fields of knowledge, Child will frighten even the boldest reader into turning page after page as Logan struggles to decipher the convoluted path of reason from decades past, resurrected but still not fully understood. It will appeal to the techie in one as well as the detective, and is a very satisfactory read! Anyone who has toured Newport, Rhode Island and speculated about the mysteries of the great summer houses that dot its shore will enjoy exploring Dark Gables and the erudite collection of brillant scientists who populate the policy institute, Lux. The gothic structure is designed after an English manor house and Child’s detailed descriptions of it will fascinate those with an architectural bent. As the mystery unfolds, Child makes full use of this setting and one is caught up in its luxurious appointments as well as its sinister atmosphere. As with any quality mystery, a few red herrings show up to keep the reader considering the options of who or what is causing the odd schizophrenia that seems to slip into victim’s mind and forces suicidal behavior in even the most stable individual. Logan himself must fight to keep from following this frightening path. Although I am long familiar with Child’s collaborative work with Douglas Preston and the Pendergast series of stories featuring a quirky protagonist’s interaction with the world, I had not read any of the Jeremy Logan series that Child has created on his own until this one. You can bet I will be reading the others in this series right away!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura (Kyahgirl)

    3.5/5; 4 stars; B+ I picked this up on a whim from the library and ended up really enjoying it. It has the vibe of a good thriller mixed in with the machinations of a nasty secret organization hellbent on world domination.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Dickison

    A nice spooky little book that does not deal with spooks, but with secret organizations trying to control a machine creating schizoid personality disorders. Naturally, this is not used for the betterment of mankind. A couple of plot twists that don't always end pleasantly also keep the plot moving along. Recommended if you like something a little different. A nice spooky little book that does not deal with spooks, but with secret organizations trying to control a machine creating schizoid personality disorders. Naturally, this is not used for the betterment of mankind. A couple of plot twists that don't always end pleasantly also keep the plot moving along. Recommended if you like something a little different.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    The Forgotten Room is the first time I've read Lincoln Child on his own. I have read some of the Pendergast novels. Linc certainly knows how to give the story atmosphere. An enigmalogist named Jeremy Logan is called in to a Rhode Island policy institute to investigate the death of a scientist. The think tank, a place named Lux, resides in an old mansion with many old rooms, as well as modern facilities. Logan is assigned to figure out the cause of odd behavior plaguing certain researchers at Lux The Forgotten Room is the first time I've read Lincoln Child on his own. I have read some of the Pendergast novels. Linc certainly knows how to give the story atmosphere. An enigmalogist named Jeremy Logan is called in to a Rhode Island policy institute to investigate the death of a scientist. The think tank, a place named Lux, resides in an old mansion with many old rooms, as well as modern facilities. Logan is assigned to figure out the cause of odd behavior plaguing certain researchers at Lux. After several days of investigation Logan is mystified by weird phenomena originating from the abandoned West Wing of the mansion. It is at this nexus point in time when Logan discovers the forgotten room, a room hidden with no means of entry or egress. But it's what's in the center of the secret room that Jeremy Logan is fixated on and has him at a loss for answers.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    A solo book from Lincoln Child and no co-writer this time. The story is about a scientist who kills himself in a most horrific way in an old mansion that is changed into the home of a think tank that is independent from any government involvement. The scandal drives the board to involve Jeremy Logan and he finds a hidden room in a wing of the mansion that was getting a remake to add to the capacity of the laboratoria of the organisation. It turns out that whatever was being done in this forgotte A solo book from Lincoln Child and no co-writer this time. The story is about a scientist who kills himself in a most horrific way in an old mansion that is changed into the home of a think tank that is independent from any government involvement. The scandal drives the board to involve Jeremy Logan and he finds a hidden room in a wing of the mansion that was getting a remake to add to the capacity of the laboratoria of the organisation. It turns out that whatever was being done in this forgotten room still claims victims so many years later and it will take Jeremy Logan all of his wits and luck to solve this mystery and get out alive. A fairly entertaining thriller with some interesting ideas that are well executed by the writer, it is not the greatest and most original story but like with the Pendergast stories Child adds some interesting ideas which he delivers in a forward way.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Albert

    The Forgotten Room by Lincoln Child is a throwback to the tales of Poe, with a dash of modern day science fiction run loose tossed in for good measure. "...It was a Friday. I'd missed the place. And this time...this time...' He swallowed. 'It happened again. Only it was worse. Much worse. I didn't just want to stare at the ocean. I wanted to walk down to it. Walk down to the sea, walk into the sea, and keep on walking...I stood up. It was a terrible feeling. I knew what I was doing, I didn't wan The Forgotten Room by Lincoln Child is a throwback to the tales of Poe, with a dash of modern day science fiction run loose tossed in for good measure. "...It was a Friday. I'd missed the place. And this time...this time...' He swallowed. 'It happened again. Only it was worse. Much worse. I didn't just want to stare at the ocean. I wanted to walk down to it. Walk down to the sea, walk into the sea, and keep on walking...I stood up. It was a terrible feeling. I knew what I was doing, I didn't want to do it, but I could not help myself. It was like a strange compulsion.' Beads of sweat were springing up on McCarty's forehead, and he brushed them away with the back of a hand. 'And there was a voice, too. A voice in my head-that was not my own..." Jeremy Logan is an enigmalogist, an investigator who specializes in the unknown. Phenomena that cannot be readily explained by science. What some would call a ghost hunter of sorts. Logan receives a message from a prestigious think tank along the coast of Rhode Island called the Lux. A place he had been run out of years before, his studies ridiculed by the scientists and scholars of the Lux. Logan is being asked to return. Frightening events are taking place on the grounds of the Lux, erratic behavior and a incredibly brutal act of suicide by one of its more learned scholars. Madness seems to be descending on the Lux. A madness that defies rational explanation. Logan's investigation leads him to find a long lost room in one of the unused wings of the estate. In this Forgotten room is a machine and an abandoned project from decades before. A project that has seemed to have begun anew. "...the apparition, which had been summoned by a complex set of rituals which I will not describe here, was undoubtedly malignant. Those who had been present (I was not among them) spoke of a terrible stench that assaulted the nostrils; an odd thickening of the atmosphere, as if one was within a compression chamber; and, most noticeably, the sense of a malefic presence-a hostile entity, angered at having been disturbed..." Logan must solved the riddle of the forgotten room, because whatever had been awaken in the room, now has its sights set on him. Lincoln Child writes smart, fast paced, intelligent fiction along the lines of Michael Crichton and James Rollins. Normally tag teaming with Douglas Preston, who together, are probably best known for their Agent Pendergast series. But every so often Child will step out on his own and when he does the result is a very intelligent mystery/adventure novel. Child's domain is the science run amok and into the realm of the supernatural. He dances in this domain very well. One of the things that Lincoln Child does so well in his writing is that he doesn't dumb it down for the reader. He assumes we are intelligent enough to understand what he is talking about and because he does, he is able to take us deeper into these adventures without sacrificing pace and tempo. Some readers may find this intimidating but there are so many more who are appreciative of a writer who does not sacrifice story to simplify the novel. This is and isn't a ghost story. It is a science fiction adventure mystery novel but the ghost story is still there. Breathing softly underneath the layers upon layers of mystery and suspense. The estate the story takes place in is a classic haunted house theme. You will expect Vincent Price to step out of a hidden shadowy doorway at any time. And if you don't know who Vincent Price is...seriously just turn off the E channel already and grow a brain and a literary culture! The Forgotten Room is good, better than most of the offerings out there right now and a breath of fresh air that has been missing for some time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christi M

    I’ve often suspected that I tend to enjoy books even more when I hear them on audio. Something about them being acted out and hearing distinct voices makes them become more interesting to me. Mediocre books become Good. Good books become Great. Great books become Exceptional. Take Harry Potter – Most everyone loves Harry Potter, but when you add Jim Dale (U.S. version) to the mix with his 5 gazillion voices and well…his work on Harry Potter was nothing short of fantastic. There’s a reason he ear I’ve often suspected that I tend to enjoy books even more when I hear them on audio. Something about them being acted out and hearing distinct voices makes them become more interesting to me. Mediocre books become Good. Good books become Great. Great books become Exceptional. Take Harry Potter – Most everyone loves Harry Potter, but when you add Jim Dale (U.S. version) to the mix with his 5 gazillion voices and well…his work on Harry Potter was nothing short of fantastic. There’s a reason he earned a Grammy for it. So, as I was listening to The Forgotten Room and realizing I wasn’t “loving it” like I usually do, I had to think on why that may be. Thoughts: In general, this book description sounds like it would be just up my alley. There’s an unusual death, an old compound with a hidden room, secret experiments, eerie machines. It is my first book in this series, but I often jump into the middle of a series with no problem and love them. But, as I listened to the story I found myself not as engaged as I usually am. It was obviously plotted out well with no huge blunders in the writing or dialogue. But as I continued listening, I realized the characters and the story itself just weren’t grabbing me in the right way. I wasn’t finding myself caring about where the story was going nor any of the characters, with the exception of one – a 98 year old man Jeremy Logan talks to in the course of the story. I think this is due to two reasons: 1) I didn’t find the story very compelling. After they discover the forgotten room, it just became uninteresting to me. So, at the end when the heart-racing part is occurring, I’ll be honest – I didn’t care. I was just ready to finish. 2) I didn’t really get to know the characters. For example, in the story one woman wasn’t a big fan of another woman. The story does go on to explain it a little, but even then it was really only explained at surface level. We weren’t given too many explanations as to what may have occurred in the past or possible thoughts to ponder on and nothing really occurred afterwards. So that it was just ‘there’ and then it was over. I do want to mention how much I appreciated the science research that went into the story. I learned quite a few things and had fun looking them up outside of the book. Audio Review: Overall, I felt the production and quality were good, but it just wasn’t a home run. Different accents and voices were used and I would definitely listen to this voice actor again. The only thing to note is that when a Scottish accent was used at the beginning of the book, I could detect an American accent within it, but that is very minor point to bring up.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rajan

    It is a nice book. A one time read. It is neither boring nor unputdownable. It has some interesting ideas as given below in excerpts. But author failed to build on that. Some excerpts : “Yes. That’s especially interesting, isn’t it? ‘Ectenic force,’ otherwise known as ectoplasm, was the substance believed to be emitted by spiritual mediums during séances, for purposes such as telekinesis or communicating with the dead. It was studied rather intensively in the late nineteenth century, but interest It is a nice book. A one time read. It is neither boring nor unputdownable. It has some interesting ideas as given below in excerpts. But author failed to build on that. Some excerpts : “Yes. That’s especially interesting, isn’t it? ‘Ectenic force,’ otherwise known as ectoplasm, was the substance believed to be emitted by spiritual mediums during séances, for purposes such as telekinesis or communicating with the dead. It was studied rather intensively in the late nineteenth century, but interest waned after that.” He paused. “Why would scientists at Lux have revived such a study?” ----- “The problem with history, Ms. Flood, is that it keeps on happening whether you want it to or not. At least a Shakespeare scholar, say, can go about his or her work fairly confident that new plays aren’t going to turn up.” ------ This device of yours is…unthinkable. To drive somebody, perhaps an entire army, insane…There are reasons chemical weapons were outlawed. Just how long do you think it will take for the technology to be leaked—and the same diabolical ordnance used against our own men and women? ------

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alison Sumprer

    I was eagerly awaiting this as a fan of Lincoln Child and was not dissapointed. A strange suicide of a researcher leads to a murder mystery revolving around a hidden room and a secret project that was abandoned in the 1930s. Taut plot, lots of action, and believable characters round out this fantastic thriller.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Toby Tate

    Not the page-turner that most of the Pendergast books are, but a great mystery/supernatural horror that really pulls you in. Lots of creepy atmospherics, mainly centered around an old New England mansion that houses a scientific organization called Lux. The story reminded me a little of Cabinet of Curiosities. Great read!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Julie Carter

    I really enjoyed this book and finished it quickly. Once I started the story I could not put it down. I liked the mystery aspect of it and found the subject matter intriguing, yet terrifying. I hope Jeremy Logan will be around for a while!

  20. 4 out of 5

    itchy

    boy, was i expecting ghosts or something supernatural p127: "...and i think mt stands for microtesla." p240: activating it again meant using the toggle switch. boy, was i expecting ghosts or something supernatural p127: "...and i think mt stands for microtesla." p240: activating it again meant using the toggle switch.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    What I was expecting and what I got was two entirely different things. I expected an old fashioned ghost story set in an old haunted mansion, massive in size, with creepy rooms and dark furnishings, populated with shifting shadows and whispers in the dark. It appeared obvious that “evil” had taken up residence here. What I got instead was quite a different story of mystery and madness based on something unexpected and unusual. An intricate story on its own merits, but deviating substantially fro What I was expecting and what I got was two entirely different things. I expected an old fashioned ghost story set in an old haunted mansion, massive in size, with creepy rooms and dark furnishings, populated with shifting shadows and whispers in the dark. It appeared obvious that “evil” had taken up residence here. What I got instead was quite a different story of mystery and madness based on something unexpected and unusual. An intricate story on its own merits, but deviating substantially from what I had hoped for. Perhaps my expectations were too high based on the author's previous works... but I believe the "teaser" promised something else. I didn't dislike the story by any means...but was just disappointed in the content. In all fairness there were parts that were exciting and goose bump producing...but there just wasn't enough of those. The writing style...as always with Lincoln Child...remains clear and concise but this particular story isn't as engaging as those in his prior novels. I think the Agent Pendergast series has spoiled me somewhat.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Libby

    'The Forgotten Room,' by Lincoln Child is a thrilling page turner that envelopes the reader in a world of mystery. Director of think tank, Lux, Director Gregory Olafson, employs enigmatologist Jeremy Logan to solve the riddle of the apparent suicide of one of its finest scientists. Willard Strachey had everything to live for and was beloved by all his colleagues. Why does his behavior suddenly become irrational? When he commits suicide his colleagues are certain the man they knew and loved would 'The Forgotten Room,' by Lincoln Child is a thrilling page turner that envelopes the reader in a world of mystery. Director of think tank, Lux, Director Gregory Olafson, employs enigmatologist Jeremy Logan to solve the riddle of the apparent suicide of one of its finest scientists. Willard Strachey had everything to live for and was beloved by all his colleagues. Why does his behavior suddenly become irrational? When he commits suicide his colleagues are certain the man they knew and loved would never do that, particularly in the grotesque manner that Strachey uses. Logan, a sensitive and an empath, as well as a man of science delves into Strachey's life. When a forgotten room is found in the West Wing of Lux, which Strachey was working on as a renovation project, more questions ensue. About the room and why it was abandoned, why a scientific project from the 1930's is mothballed, and what is all the strange equipment in the room. Secondary characters are well drawn, providing a much needed contrast from Logan's dogged pursuit of the mystery. Child's descriptive narrative paints pictures that are rich and easy to visualize. For me this is escapist fiction. I enjoyed it very much.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tanja Berg

    Rating 3* out of 5, since I quite enjoyed some parts of it. The book certainly delivered on my expectations - an easily-read mystery thriller. Quick to read, quicker to forget, but entertaining enough. I prefer the Preston-Child combination to their single endeavours, but nevermind. Jeremy Logan is called to Lux, a scientific "think tank" that has just been through the horrific suicide of one of its researchers. Since the self murder was quite out of character, the chair of the organization wants Rating 3* out of 5, since I quite enjoyed some parts of it. The book certainly delivered on my expectations - an easily-read mystery thriller. Quick to read, quicker to forget, but entertaining enough. I prefer the Preston-Child combination to their single endeavours, but nevermind. Jeremy Logan is called to Lux, a scientific "think tank" that has just been through the horrific suicide of one of its researchers. Since the self murder was quite out of character, the chair of the organization wants to discover what drove the researcher to such a tragic and violent end. Additionally, other people have also been experiencing strange sensations. Logan quickly discovers a hidden room. It is, however, quite empty. Eventually a machine of sorts is discovered, and the true entrance. The purpose of the research is revealed little by little. As I had hoped for all the paranormal aspects were explained away. This isn't exactly high-flying literature, but it's not the type of book you expect any depth from anyway. Just what I wanted when I picked it up.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Doubleday Books

    Child's masterful use of vivid descriptions makes The Forgotten Room come alive in your hands. An intriguing story about "enigmalogist" Jeremy Logan digging up the secrets and abandoned projects of his past employer: a prestigious think tank. Revealing the crazy that lies behind innovation and intelligence, I was left grappling for the end; there was a reason Project S was hidden for years. Regardless of whether you have read the first two books, this is a must read for those interested in myste Child's masterful use of vivid descriptions makes The Forgotten Room come alive in your hands. An intriguing story about "enigmalogist" Jeremy Logan digging up the secrets and abandoned projects of his past employer: a prestigious think tank. Revealing the crazy that lies behind innovation and intelligence, I was left grappling for the end; there was a reason Project S was hidden for years. Regardless of whether you have read the first two books, this is a must read for those interested in mystery and thriller. - Samantha L., Doubleday Marketing Intern

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    3.5 stars Enigmaologist Jeremy Logan is called to an exclusive think tank to investigate strange behaviors and the death of one of the researchers. Fun, but I like Agent Pendergast better!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jessie Seymour

    My first audio book! Overall, I think I enjoyed this new-to-me realm of book reading. But I do think it will take some getting used to. My mind tends to wander, so there were times throughout the story that I zoned out and wasn't totally paying attention. I also listened at work as I've seen where a lot of people like listening to audios when they're doing something else, but again, I lost concentration. This led me to missing out on information of the story, which is what kept me from really lo My first audio book! Overall, I think I enjoyed this new-to-me realm of book reading. But I do think it will take some getting used to. My mind tends to wander, so there were times throughout the story that I zoned out and wasn't totally paying attention. I also listened at work as I've seen where a lot of people like listening to audios when they're doing something else, but again, I lost concentration. This led me to missing out on information of the story, which is what kept me from really loving this book. I've still given 4 stars because I did like the story, and I'm open to reading the rest of the books in the series. But I can't say I really loved it or anything - nothing I can give 5 stars to even though there's nothing in particular that I didn't like. Bottom line: I don't have too much to comment on the story itself. The plot and concept was interesting. A good change-up from what I've been reading lately. I enjoyed it. My rating comes mainly from the way I read the story - audio instead of an actual book. It's definitely different from what I'm used to. I'll have to better train my mind to stay focused on the story for future audios so I don't miss out on anything important.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Fast and undemanding thriller, with a promising supernatural feel to it. The potential of the first half is, however, let down by the second.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

    I got this book out of a swap box because I needed something lighter to read between non-fiction books and because the title intrigued me. The main character, Jeremy Logan, who has appeared in earlier books by Lincoln Child (which I have not read), is a history professor and enigmalogist (someone who looks into inexplicable phenomena). The book opens with Logan lying about the existence of the Loch Ness Monster. Right there, we're kind of on the edge of the (un)believable. Logan is called to inv I got this book out of a swap box because I needed something lighter to read between non-fiction books and because the title intrigued me. The main character, Jeremy Logan, who has appeared in earlier books by Lincoln Child (which I have not read), is a history professor and enigmalogist (someone who looks into inexplicable phenomena). The book opens with Logan lying about the existence of the Loch Ness Monster. Right there, we're kind of on the edge of the (un)believable. Logan is called to investigate something at a huge institution called Lux. "Lux had its roots in a private club, founded in the early 1800s by six Harvard professors to debate issues of art and philosophy. Over the years it expanded in both ambition and scope, its mission broadening, until finally in 1892, it was organized into Lux, with a formal charter and an impressive endowment. This made it the country's oldest policy Institute--"think tank" to the unwashed--antedating the Brookings Institution by more than two decades." The unwashed? How pretentious is that? And then he calls Lux a think tank for the rest of the book! The author also treats us to a detailed description (on p. 34) of how to clean up an audio file to make it easier to hear. We didn't need the play by play, but the author apparently has mad computer skills and likes to show them off. We also get a lot of descriptions of landscape and architecture (I got tired of the crashing sea). I was intrigued by the hidden room and how to get into it, but disappointed by what was inside. I also found the great secret of the room rather unbelievable. Perhaps most people would not find this book as lacking in credibility and style as I did (it was marked New York Times Bestseller). Maybe this kind of story is just not my cup of tea.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Terri ♥ (aka Mrs. Christian Grey)

    Though this could have been interesting, for me it wasn’t. I found my mind drifting while listening with no real desperation to rewind to catch what I missed. It was an okay mystery but sonoutlandish it was predictable. Some that were killed felt for shock value and didn’t make sense for killer(s). I might have missed something but when they found the forgotten room and the elevator disappeared, how did they get out of the room? They were in there and then they weren’t with explanation unless I m Though this could have been interesting, for me it wasn’t. I found my mind drifting while listening with no real desperation to rewind to catch what I missed. It was an okay mystery but sonoutlandish it was predictable. Some that were killed felt for shock value and didn’t make sense for killer(s). I might have missed something but when they found the forgotten room and the elevator disappeared, how did they get out of the room? They were in there and then they weren’t with explanation unless I missed it. Anyway, okay but not that great. Narrator is good but maybe it’s the material he’s working with or it’s the other way around. I’m undecided.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zulfiya

    Typical middle-of-the road thriller - nether bad nor good. It kept me involved and was moving with the steady pace and not an extra word to distract our attention from the main plot line. The wording is nothing to write home about because it is not literary fiction, and the imagery has never been and will never be the goal of that kind of fiction. Characters are flat and do what they ate told to do by the author, and each serves the purpose: to introduce, to confuse, to add a twist, to reveal, t Typical middle-of-the road thriller - nether bad nor good. It kept me involved and was moving with the steady pace and not an extra word to distract our attention from the main plot line. The wording is nothing to write home about because it is not literary fiction, and the imagery has never been and will never be the goal of that kind of fiction. Characters are flat and do what they ate told to do by the author, and each serves the purpose: to introduce, to confuse, to add a twist, to reveal, to cooperate. Odd people do not exist in novels like that. It is a perfect novel to write a literary algorithm. There are no loopholes, no detours, no missteps, no faux pas, no musings, no deviations. It was a very economical novel. To be completely fair, there is a little bit of ambiguity in the novel ... enough to get the novel a credit.

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