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The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest

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In this final graphic novel adaptation of Stieg Larsson's international bestseller, Lisbeth Salander lies in critical condition, a bullet wound to her head, in the intensive care unit of a Swedish city hospital. She's fighting for her life in more ways than one: If and when she recovers, she'll be taken back to Stockholm to stand trial for three murders. With the help of j In this final graphic novel adaptation of Stieg Larsson's international bestseller, Lisbeth Salander lies in critical condition, a bullet wound to her head, in the intensive care unit of a Swedish city hospital. She's fighting for her life in more ways than one: If and when she recovers, she'll be taken back to Stockholm to stand trial for three murders. With the help of journalist Mikael Blomkvist, she will not only have to prove her innocence, but also identify and denounce those in authority who have allowed the vulnerable, like herself, to suffer abuse and violence. And, on her own, she will plot revenge - against the man who tried to kill her, and the corrupt government institutions that nearly destroyed her life. Written by novelist Denise Mina (The Field of Blood) and illustrated by Andrea Mutti and Antonio Fusso, this epic graphic novel concludes Vertigo's critically acclaimed adaptation of The Millenium Trilogy.


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In this final graphic novel adaptation of Stieg Larsson's international bestseller, Lisbeth Salander lies in critical condition, a bullet wound to her head, in the intensive care unit of a Swedish city hospital. She's fighting for her life in more ways than one: If and when she recovers, she'll be taken back to Stockholm to stand trial for three murders. With the help of j In this final graphic novel adaptation of Stieg Larsson's international bestseller, Lisbeth Salander lies in critical condition, a bullet wound to her head, in the intensive care unit of a Swedish city hospital. She's fighting for her life in more ways than one: If and when she recovers, she'll be taken back to Stockholm to stand trial for three murders. With the help of journalist Mikael Blomkvist, she will not only have to prove her innocence, but also identify and denounce those in authority who have allowed the vulnerable, like herself, to suffer abuse and violence. And, on her own, she will plot revenge - against the man who tried to kill her, and the corrupt government institutions that nearly destroyed her life. Written by novelist Denise Mina (The Field of Blood) and illustrated by Andrea Mutti and Antonio Fusso, this epic graphic novel concludes Vertigo's critically acclaimed adaptation of The Millenium Trilogy.

30 review for The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest

  1. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    I was curious about this graphic novel since I loved the book trilogy. This is third and last graphic novel, but I have read the book so I didn't have any problem reading The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest. What I did have problem with was the art, it was really terrible. It's like who cares about the art, the story is good in itself. I would never ever buy this graphic novel despite how much I love the book. Not even the cover is any good. Also let's not forget that this is based on a 700 page I was curious about this graphic novel since I loved the book trilogy. This is third and last graphic novel, but I have read the book so I didn't have any problem reading The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest. What I did have problem with was the art, it was really terrible. It's like who cares about the art, the story is good in itself. I would never ever buy this graphic novel despite how much I love the book. Not even the cover is any good. Also let's not forget that this is based on a 700 pages long book and it's been a while since I read the book, but I bet that quite a lot of the books story had to be left out or simplified. Which is really bad, because the book is good. I gave it 3 stars because the story in itself is good even in this scaled down version. Would have given it an extra star if the art had been better. So read the trilogy before reading the graphic novels! I received this copy Vertigo through Edelweiss in return for an honest review! Thank you!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I never really understood the whole Stieg Larsson phenomenon. He wrote a trilogy of books that were bloated first drafts of some bad CSI episodes, threw in a ridiculous goth chick hacker character, and then died. Lisbeth Salander’s a sort-of interesting character (though that rests largely on her appearance in contrast to the staid looks of everyone else in the series) but the others? Not even slightly. Well good news because she’s barely in this final volume! After being admitted into the ICU a I never really understood the whole Stieg Larsson phenomenon. He wrote a trilogy of books that were bloated first drafts of some bad CSI episodes, threw in a ridiculous goth chick hacker character, and then died. Lisbeth Salander’s a sort-of interesting character (though that rests largely on her appearance in contrast to the staid looks of everyone else in the series) but the others? Not even slightly. Well good news because she’s barely in this final volume! After being admitted into the ICU after being shot in the head (because bullets in the head aren’t ever fatal in fiction), she spends most of the book in a hospital bed doing nothing! At one point she goes on the internet with her phone (her “superpower”). Later she’s in a boring courtroom telling us things we already know about her life! And then she’s done. That’s the most interesting character in this book. Mikael Blomkvist, the other main character, spends time retelling a convoluted plot to some faceless cops in an interrogation room. Then he goes to cafes and his office. His also goes to his flat. All the while, he doesn’t do or say anything worth reading. And then he goes to court to listen to Lisbeth’s testimony. That’s the second most interesting character in the book. There are meetings between lawyers and cops, cops and suspects, journalists and cops, all of them so utterly inane to read. There’s even a bafflingly large amount of space given over to Erika’s totally disposable subplot about becoming an editor at a larger magazine, not fitting in, and leaving. Oh, she got a threatening email from a co-worker. Riveting stuff… zzz… This is why this series needed serious editing before being published but Larsson was dead by then so we got all the drek as is. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest is an incredibly bland police procedural. I suppose I should be glad that the however-many-hundreds of pages that the Larsson novel had has been compressed to 250 in this graphic adaptation but Denise Mina’s script still feels rushed and unimpressive. It doesn’t help that the plot is dreary and all of the characters are despicable and/or drearier. Andrea Mutti and Antonio Fuso’s art is simply terrible. Blomkvist’s character design is used more than once for other characters so he’s there on one page doing something and on the next, he’s doing something else – but it’s not him. Character designs in general are forgettable at best and there are random streaks of black ink daubed in the background for some reason. Flat colours, dull layouts, this is the most workmanlike approach to adaptation. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest is laughably labelled a “thriller”. It was thrilling to finish it, I’ll give it that! The real mystery of why these books were ever popular at all remains unsolved.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    I received this from Edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Really liked this graphic adaptation of the book. It captures the gist of the story pretty well, not everything, of course, but enough to be able to follow the story. It helps to have read the book first, I'm sure. The artwork was okay, and it struck me that it was very dark when it appeared Lisbeth was in deep trouble, and brightened when she wasn't. Overall, this series of adaptations has been very satisfying. I received this from Edelweiss and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Really liked this graphic adaptation of the book. It captures the gist of the story pretty well, not everything, of course, but enough to be able to follow the story. It helps to have read the book first, I'm sure. The artwork was okay, and it struck me that it was very dark when it appeared Lisbeth was in deep trouble, and brightened when she wasn't. Overall, this series of adaptations has been very satisfying.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Beauparlant

    I started to read the books but I stopped pretty quickly because they were excruciatingly boring so I thought I would read the graphic novels to give it a bit of “oomph” as I heard they were great stories. I had to read all four just to feel like I accomplished something but these books were brutal. I could not differentiate any of the characters either than Lisbeth (obviously. She’s the only one that has any sort of personality, and her personality is that of a saltine cracker...) as they were I started to read the books but I stopped pretty quickly because they were excruciatingly boring so I thought I would read the graphic novels to give it a bit of “oomph” as I heard they were great stories. I had to read all four just to feel like I accomplished something but these books were brutal. I could not differentiate any of the characters either than Lisbeth (obviously. She’s the only one that has any sort of personality, and her personality is that of a saltine cracker...) as they were basically all blonde or bald. It was also hard for me to tell the emotion going on with the characters and I didn’t even know when a dramatic scene happened as it ended as abruptly as it began. Shitty.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is the final graphic novel in this Vertigo series. I absolutely loved the Millennium series that this graphic novels are based on. And I was looking forward to this conclusion. However, this was by far my least favorite of the three comics. There was just too much detail that was not interesting to me. The hospital scenes went on for so long. I did like everything to do with Lisbeth. And everything to do with Mikael. And the court case was interesting. But there was just so much stuff that w This is the final graphic novel in this Vertigo series. I absolutely loved the Millennium series that this graphic novels are based on. And I was looking forward to this conclusion. However, this was by far my least favorite of the three comics. There was just too much detail that was not interesting to me. The hospital scenes went on for so long. I did like everything to do with Lisbeth. And everything to do with Mikael. And the court case was interesting. But there was just so much stuff that was less interesting. So much about the police, about Lisbeth's father, about the Section ... those parts just went on and on. Overall this was a good read. But I enjoyed the Titan graphic novels by Sylvain Runberg a lot more.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    This graphic novelization does a great job at showcasing the interesting parts of this novel. I remember reading this book and it felt very long, just by how much it went over the laws of Sweden and such. Great crisp artwork on display here. If you're a fan of Lisbeth Salender, and the Millennium series, definitely check this out. You will enjoy it. I received an advanced copy of this from NetGalley.com and the publisher. This graphic novelization does a great job at showcasing the interesting parts of this novel. I remember reading this book and it felt very long, just by how much it went over the laws of Sweden and such. Great crisp artwork on display here. If you're a fan of Lisbeth Salender, and the Millennium series, definitely check this out. You will enjoy it. I received an advanced copy of this from NetGalley.com and the publisher.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    This was the most entertaining of the series for me. The trial alone gave me so much satisfaction that I pumped my fist into the air with triumph. Lisbeth doesn't really do much or say much or have a lot of time dedicated strictly to her since the story is so much bigger than her at this point. There are way too many subplots but the book does its best to tie up any loose ends. The ending was on course for both Lisbeth and Mikael. They were never quite friends but always looked out for each other This was the most entertaining of the series for me. The trial alone gave me so much satisfaction that I pumped my fist into the air with triumph. Lisbeth doesn't really do much or say much or have a lot of time dedicated strictly to her since the story is so much bigger than her at this point. There are way too many subplots but the book does its best to tie up any loose ends. The ending was on course for both Lisbeth and Mikael. They were never quite friends but always looked out for each other and just had this connection from the moment they met. I'm glad i stuck it out with the graphic novel series as I doubt I'll ever read the novels themselves. But I can still say I know what happened and be happy with the story I got.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jillyn

    Before I even talk about the actual book, let's take a moment to look at that cover. I know that's not how I'm supposed to judge a book but I mean look at it! It's gorgeous. I want a print of it for my wall. It's so eye-catching and is a good representative of the story. I'm a big fan of The Millennium Trilogy. Lisbeth Salander is one of my absolute favorite book characters. So, when I saw the graphic novel versions of this hit series, I knew I had to have them. I've reviewed a few in the past an Before I even talk about the actual book, let's take a moment to look at that cover. I know that's not how I'm supposed to judge a book but I mean look at it! It's gorgeous. I want a print of it for my wall. It's so eye-catching and is a good representative of the story. I'm a big fan of The Millennium Trilogy. Lisbeth Salander is one of my absolute favorite book characters. So, when I saw the graphic novel versions of this hit series, I knew I had to have them. I've reviewed a few in the past and really enjoyed them, and I'm happy to say that The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest is a great addition to the rest of the series. The illustrations are gorgeous. There's a really nice variety of bright colors and dark dreary panels, dependent on what the text is saying alongside it. They're gritty and super detailed. It honestly took me a while to get through this one. It wasn't complex or confusing to read, but I took forever to look at all the effort put into each drawing. I loved them. As I've mentioned in previous discussions about this book, I recommend this as a supplement to the novels, and not a replacement. If you've read the novels, you know the full story, so the comic text is easier to follow because you can fill in the blanks. If you haven't read the books, you can definitely still understand this book, but you're getting an (understandably) more watered down version of a great story. The text does a pretty good job of giving you the novel in a nutshell. It's well paced and easily understood. This particular book is an adaptation of the third and final book in this trilogy, so I'd recommend reading its predecessors, whether it is the full novels or the graphic novels. I think fans of the series will eat it up, and fans of good artwork will too. I received a copy in exchange for my honest review. This review can also be found on my blog, Bitches n Prose.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Sankey

    I continue to be fascinated by graphic novels--what can illustration show you better than words on the page? To test this, I have been reading graphic adaptations of novels I already know well. In this case, working from Larsson's trilogy, two women (this is important to me with this particular material, and they avoid an exploitative gaze extremely well), render the complex story in a compelling way, although my familiarity with the source makes it hard for me to know how comprehensible it woul I continue to be fascinated by graphic novels--what can illustration show you better than words on the page? To test this, I have been reading graphic adaptations of novels I already know well. In this case, working from Larsson's trilogy, two women (this is important to me with this particular material, and they avoid an exploitative gaze extremely well), render the complex story in a compelling way, although my familiarity with the source makes it hard for me to know how comprehensible it would be to someone coming to it completely new. The one drawback, especially with a work containing such graphic scenes of violence, is that words allow you to modulate your imagination within what you want in your head, while graphic illustration is....graphic without your own filters.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Kinda of a slow start but the ending was decent. Not as good as the other two books but a good conclusion. However, this book suffers from bad, horrible artwork from two artists. Now these artists are good in their own right and if the editors had had a better plan this art could have been great. But instead of each artist having one or two issues the art would literally switch page to page, making it nearly impossible to have flow between the pages. Which character is which? The perspective cha Kinda of a slow start but the ending was decent. Not as good as the other two books but a good conclusion. However, this book suffers from bad, horrible artwork from two artists. Now these artists are good in their own right and if the editors had had a better plan this art could have been great. But instead of each artist having one or two issues the art would literally switch page to page, making it nearly impossible to have flow between the pages. Which character is which? The perspective changes, what the heck am I looking at? Who is this guy? All things I said and things making it difficult to follow

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    Denise Mina's excellent adaptation ends here. Great art and deft dialogue adapted from the prose make TGWKTHN an excellent read. Denise Mina's excellent adaptation ends here. Great art and deft dialogue adapted from the prose make TGWKTHN an excellent read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Shit! No more? C'mon Sony, get your act together, and make these movies already. Shit! No more? C'mon Sony, get your act together, and make these movies already.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    The story was as compelling as the previous two novels, with tight, gripping action. I felt drawn in, connected to Lisbeth and Mikael. It was as good as the printed novel. How I dreaded the coming end of the novel...knowing a good story was coming to end. My only complaint is with the drawing, the rendering, of the characters. The drawn characters seemed cartoonish at times.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cristina Hutchinson

    I liked the first two in this series, but by this one I found that the drawings had degraded some what. It became very difficult for me to tell which character was which - that doesn't make it easy to follow along with the story. I liked the first two in this series, but by this one I found that the drawings had degraded some what. It became very difficult for me to tell which character was which - that doesn't make it easy to follow along with the story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lorry Rule

    Did not finish. Found this very difficult to navigate and the character names impossible to remember. I had to keep reading back to find out who was in the story. Had potential but I have too many other books to read to persevere.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kereesa

    Book was better, but this is still a good adaptation.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christina Drust

    I really loved that graphic novel, it's awesome I really loved that graphic novel, it's awesome

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maja

    the court case was rather disappointing compared to the movie, I don't usually say that. the court case was rather disappointing compared to the movie, I don't usually say that.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Will Carr

    Of the 3 novels this is the least interesting as the story line starts to get a little tired but still a great book and an amazing author

  20. 4 out of 5

    Margarete Emery

    Satisfying ending to the Millenium Trilogy. Would love to see more about Lisbeth but as we all know, poor Stieg Larsson has passed. Maybe another author will take up the story line.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    I love the Steig Larsson books but these were pretty good.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Satyajeet

    a fantastic read.....The illustrations are really good

  23. 5 out of 5

    Fredrik Strömberg

    This is the American comics version of the third volume of Stieg Larsson's world famous, bestselling Millenium trilogy, and sadly it's a rather bad adaption. Story/content: The story is based on the high intensity, pulse pounding finale to Larsson's trilogy, where Lisbeth Salander is being prosecuted, almost everyone in the system bought by the Swedish secret service and told to to nail her, and only the journalist Mikael Blomqvist and his friends trying to stop this from happening. You've already This is the American comics version of the third volume of Stieg Larsson's world famous, bestselling Millenium trilogy, and sadly it's a rather bad adaption. Story/content: The story is based on the high intensity, pulse pounding finale to Larsson's trilogy, where Lisbeth Salander is being prosecuted, almost everyone in the system bought by the Swedish secret service and told to to nail her, and only the journalist Mikael Blomqvist and his friends trying to stop this from happening. You've already read the original book, or seen any one of the movie adaptions, so I'm not going to bore you with more details than that. Art: The art was done by two artists, alternating throughout the book, which is rather confusing as their styles don't really mix well. Andre Amutti was one of the artists of the two preceding volumes, and he draws in a traditional American realistic action style, even though it looks like he was i a real hurry to get things done. Leonardo Manco has been exchanged for Antonio Fuso, another Italian artist, and this just doesn't work at all. I'm guessing this has to do with the publisher wanting these books to be finished quick, but the style of Manco's is just to far removed from Amutti's, making it hard to tell who's who, and even harder to keep up the suspense when the the way the world within the story is presented shifts so drastically back and forth. Critique: Crime novelist Denise Mina does an OK job of condensing the whole of the original novel into a little less than 300 comics pages. A lot of information and nuances are lost, but the overall story is still intact and sort of understandable, even if you haven't read the original book. This doesn't matter, though, as the art is so bad that it totally distracts from the story. Go back and re-read the original novels instead, this is not worth your while. Or better yet, try the competing comics version, done in France by Sylvain Runberg and José Homs. It's everything that this version is not: carefully crafted, visually stunning and done with artistic integrity.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    In this graphic novel adaptation of The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, the third book in Stieg Larsson’s Millennium series, Lisbeth Salander is in the hospital in critical condition after being shot in the head. Now, with the help of Mikael Blomkvist, she is not only fighting to recover, she must prove her innocence for the murders which she has been accused, and fight against the system which allowed her to be abused for so many years. Lisbeth also plots revenge against those who have wrong In this graphic novel adaptation of The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, the third book in Stieg Larsson’s Millennium series, Lisbeth Salander is in the hospital in critical condition after being shot in the head. Now, with the help of Mikael Blomkvist, she is not only fighting to recover, she must prove her innocence for the murders which she has been accused, and fight against the system which allowed her to be abused for so many years. Lisbeth also plots revenge against those who have wronged her. It has been a couple of years since I have read The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, so this was a good, quick refresher for the book and the series since the controversial fourth book coming out in the next few weeks. This is especially good if one doesn’t want to re-read the whole 536-page book . The graphic novel followed the story line very well, and the text and artwork was excellent adapted. There is a caveat however, since the books are graphic, thus some of the scenes in the graphic novel can be graphic—so it’s not for the faint of heart. I haven’t read the other two books in graphic novel format, but I may have to now. Disclaimer: I won a copy of this book from Goodreads Giveaways.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Soobie's scared

    And this series is finally over. As far as adaptations go, this one is really good. I mean, most of the events of the book are represented here and the plot is almost comprehensible. But... yeah, also the original novel was so intricate with all its cover-ups and everything. Denise Mina did a bang-up job on this. Unfortunately, Mutti's and Fuso's art didn't. I didn't like the art. As usual, it's very dark and I have the feeling that it changes throughout the graphic novel. At some point, one woul And this series is finally over. As far as adaptations go, this one is really good. I mean, most of the events of the book are represented here and the plot is almost comprehensible. But... yeah, also the original novel was so intricate with all its cover-ups and everything. Denise Mina did a bang-up job on this. Unfortunately, Mutti's and Fuso's art didn't. I didn't like the art. As usual, it's very dark and I have the feeling that it changes throughout the graphic novel. At some point, one would turn the page and different lines and drawings would appear. I found that a bit confusing. In addition, I had more troubles than usual telling one character from the other. And there are tons of characters here to deal with. I enjoyed reading the graphic novel adaptations but I was glad I read the novels first. By the way, what a horrible cover!!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Akshara

    The second book is left off at a crucial part which I won’t talk about because I detest spoilers. The third one picks up from there but settles in at a sedate pace which slowly but surely becomes slower and slower. I’d say the author has dragged the first few chapters but it was all setting the background ready for the grand finale. If one soldiers on and does his/her best to remember the details, the story soon begins to get interesting. It picks up the pace about halfway through and becomes ex The second book is left off at a crucial part which I won’t talk about because I detest spoilers. The third one picks up from there but settles in at a sedate pace which slowly but surely becomes slower and slower. I’d say the author has dragged the first few chapters but it was all setting the background ready for the grand finale. If one soldiers on and does his/her best to remember the details, the story soon begins to get interesting. It picks up the pace about halfway through and becomes exceedingly addictive. A good ending to a good series. I recommend this book. In fact, I recommend the entire series!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Alder

    This book is not for everyone, that's a given. And that's absolutely fine, the artwork possess an equal status to other graphic novels, some might think its sub par but it's not terrible. Let's meet in the middle and call it fair. Were expectations met? From a narrative perspective, I would say yes. I had a lot of preconceived notions going into this novel, but it's not half bad. I would however not recommend this to someone as their first graphic novel experience, especially if you are not accu This book is not for everyone, that's a given. And that's absolutely fine, the artwork possess an equal status to other graphic novels, some might think its sub par but it's not terrible. Let's meet in the middle and call it fair. Were expectations met? From a narrative perspective, I would say yes. I had a lot of preconceived notions going into this novel, but it's not half bad. I would however not recommend this to someone as their first graphic novel experience, especially if you are not accustom to the style. If you are a fan of Lisabeth as a character and are up for the challenge, then by all means have at it!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Krystl Louwagie

    I didn't expect to like this all that much, and then I remembered, again, how much I love Lisbeth, and how much I love Blomkvist caring about her. Still, it got a little more muddled in the last 4th, like usual for me-felt a little anticlimactic-here, I'd say the movie interpretation had a better way of translating the impact of the trial. Still, nothing can diminish that Lisbeth is one of my favorite characters of all time, no matter how she's interpreted, and I missed her-this was a nice visit I didn't expect to like this all that much, and then I remembered, again, how much I love Lisbeth, and how much I love Blomkvist caring about her. Still, it got a little more muddled in the last 4th, like usual for me-felt a little anticlimactic-here, I'd say the movie interpretation had a better way of translating the impact of the trial. Still, nothing can diminish that Lisbeth is one of my favorite characters of all time, no matter how she's interpreted, and I missed her-this was a nice visit back (she wasn't actually even in it that much, but, still). I ordered the 2nd book, because I couldn't resist after reading (and watching) everything else in the series.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    If you like your Swedish fiction in graphic form rather than prose, dive right in to Denise Mina and company's version of The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest. Here you will find all the thrills of the original, but with pictures. And as the phrase goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. So sit back, prop up your feet, and immerse your self in the further exploration of the intersection of Salander and Blomkvist. Do enjoy the carnage. If you like your Swedish fiction in graphic form rather than prose, dive right in to Denise Mina and company's version of The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest. Here you will find all the thrills of the original, but with pictures. And as the phrase goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. So sit back, prop up your feet, and immerse your self in the further exploration of the intersection of Salander and Blomkvist. Do enjoy the carnage.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dina

    I won this in a Goodreads giveaway for a honest review I am so happy I won this, reading this took me back to when I read the last book in the trilogy. I am a big fan of the Millennium trilogy. So it's no surprise that I really liked this graphic novel. I liked how this picks up where it had left off and just dives into the story. I won this in a Goodreads giveaway for a honest review I am so happy I won this, reading this took me back to when I read the last book in the trilogy. I am a big fan of the Millennium trilogy. So it's no surprise that I really liked this graphic novel. I liked how this picks up where it had left off and just dives into the story.

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