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Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook: A Guide to Eating Well and Saving Money By Wasting Less Food

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Despite a growing awareness of food waste, many well-intentioned home cooks lack the tools to change their habits. This handbook—packed with engaging checklists, simple recipes, practical strategies, and educational infographics—is the ultimate tool for reducing food waste. From a scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council come these everyday techniques that call f Despite a growing awareness of food waste, many well-intentioned home cooks lack the tools to change their habits. This handbook—packed with engaging checklists, simple recipes, practical strategies, and educational infographics—is the ultimate tool for reducing food waste. From a scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council come these everyday techniques that call for minimal adjustments of habit, from shopping, portioning, and using a refrigerator properly to simple preservation methods including freezing, pickling, and cellaring. At once a good read and a go-to reference, this handy guide is chock-full of helpful facts and tips, including 20 "use-it-up" recipes and a substantial directory of common foods.


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Despite a growing awareness of food waste, many well-intentioned home cooks lack the tools to change their habits. This handbook—packed with engaging checklists, simple recipes, practical strategies, and educational infographics—is the ultimate tool for reducing food waste. From a scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council come these everyday techniques that call f Despite a growing awareness of food waste, many well-intentioned home cooks lack the tools to change their habits. This handbook—packed with engaging checklists, simple recipes, practical strategies, and educational infographics—is the ultimate tool for reducing food waste. From a scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council come these everyday techniques that call for minimal adjustments of habit, from shopping, portioning, and using a refrigerator properly to simple preservation methods including freezing, pickling, and cellaring. At once a good read and a go-to reference, this handy guide is chock-full of helpful facts and tips, including 20 "use-it-up" recipes and a substantial directory of common foods.

30 review for Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook: A Guide to Eating Well and Saving Money By Wasting Less Food

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kelli

    A beginner’s guide to reducing food waste that includes generic information on meal planning, sticking to a shopping list, freezing food, composting, and food storage tips, among others. I’m not looking to use food before composting it (polishing shoes with banana peels) nor do I subscribe to feeding my dog table scraps to reduce waste (?!). By definition, this is not a riveting topic, but there is probably something to be learned for everyone. I was surprised/horrified by the information on por A beginner’s guide to reducing food waste that includes generic information on meal planning, sticking to a shopping list, freezing food, composting, and food storage tips, among others. I’m not looking to use food before composting it (polishing shoes with banana peels) nor do I subscribe to feeding my dog table scraps to reduce waste (?!). By definition, this is not a riveting topic, but there is probably something to be learned for everyone. I was surprised/horrified by the information on portion size increases and I liked the information on how to store/freeze certain foods.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    I heard about this book on NPR (link), and it is totally amazing. Combined with the 99% invisible episode about best by dates (link) and the movie at last year's film festival about food waste (Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story), I've been spending a lot of time thinking about food waste (and waste in general). This handbook is a great starting place to help you store food better to minimize waste, what to do to revitalize something gone a bit bad, and some recipes for using foods you might otherw I heard about this book on NPR (link), and it is totally amazing. Combined with the 99% invisible episode about best by dates (link) and the movie at last year's film festival about food waste (Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story), I've been spending a lot of time thinking about food waste (and waste in general). This handbook is a great starting place to help you store food better to minimize waste, what to do to revitalize something gone a bit bad, and some recipes for using foods you might otherwise throw away. The goal for me is zero waste, but realistically I don't think I'll ever get there. This is definitely a good start.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Corey

    Did you know that sour milk is safe to use? Or that potatoes that have gone a little soft are fine, but once they've started sprouting shoots, they are toxic? Or the right way to stock your fridge so as to maximize the freshness of the food contained therein? I did not, until I read Waste Free Kitchen Handbook: A Guide to Eating Well and Saving Money by Wasting Less Food. At the time this book was published (2015), 40% of the food that was produced in the United States was being thrown away. Tha Did you know that sour milk is safe to use? Or that potatoes that have gone a little soft are fine, but once they've started sprouting shoots, they are toxic? Or the right way to stock your fridge so as to maximize the freshness of the food contained therein? I did not, until I read Waste Free Kitchen Handbook: A Guide to Eating Well and Saving Money by Wasting Less Food. At the time this book was published (2015), 40% of the food that was produced in the United States was being thrown away. That's a terrible, tragic number. That's, on average, $120 per month for a family of four, thrown away. That's greenhouse gas emissions (according to author Dana Gunders, it's equivalent to the emissions of 33 million passenger vehicles), fertilizers, herbicides, pesticides, antibiotics, and hormones used - all for nothing. That's higher food prices through artificially inflated demand, which hurt all of us, but especially the most vulnerable. Look, I am a tree hugger, and the fact that my tiny little borough does not recycle has prompted me to look at other ways to be more environmentally conscious, including by cutting back on food waste, but I am not enough of an environmentalist that I bother with organic. I think the whole thing about GMOs has the same scientific basis as the antivax movement - that is to say, none. I even believe that, used VERY sparingly, herbicides, pesticides, fungicides, and fertilizers can actually be better for the environment by allowing for more intensive agriculture so we don't have to use as much water or cut down as many rainforests, plow under as many prairies, or convert as many wetlands to grow food (not antibiotics though, because I don't want to die of drug resistant salmonella, thankyouverymuch). But food waste? There's no good in food waste. No bright side. No other side of the coin. Plus, I am extremely frugal (my mother uses the word "miserly"), and money wasted in this manner makes me head-spinningly, green-pea-soup-hurlingly angry. So, Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook is right up my alley. It has helpful recipes to help you figure out how to use up leftovers or food you don't know how to use up, as well as a forty page directory on storing common food items. I am a big believer in leftovers, mostly because I find cooking and dishwashing to be the least rewarding things I can do, so I skipped right over the section with the portion control guides. The section on food safety was very useful. This book also has motivated me to make two grocery trips per week instead of one: one big one to coupon and buy all the nonperishable stuff (or stuff that will last for a month in the fridge) and a second, smaller trip to buy shorter-lived ingredients, closer to when I will be using them. One thing about this book that annoyed the crap out of me - the margins. Seriously, for a book dedicated to reducing waste, side margins of an inch, and top margins of two inches seem startlingly hypocritical, or at least just dumb. Maybe the added space is for margin notes? I have no idea. I didn't write any. But I did highlight and Post-It the crap out of this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

    An excellent, practical guide about reducing food waste. I'm now on a mission to learn more about food waste. It's the next stage in my journey to learn about food. This book is organized into little sections and has lots of tips and tricks about how to cut down on food waste in your kitchen. (North Americans waste about 1/4 of the food they purchase. That's a huge waste of both money and food!!) An excellent, practical guide about reducing food waste. I'm now on a mission to learn more about food waste. It's the next stage in my journey to learn about food. This book is organized into little sections and has lots of tips and tricks about how to cut down on food waste in your kitchen. (North Americans waste about 1/4 of the food they purchase. That's a huge waste of both money and food!!)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I'm giving this five stars, but not for me. For you. For everyone who doesn't know about the food waste problem, or for those that know about it but don't know what to do. For the people who throw out hundreds of dollars of food every year, some that much in a month! I'm a overly eager non food waster. I compost, but it takes me so long to fill my compost inside that it starts to rot, because I use so much of my scraps. In fact,, my 1 gallon compost bin is usually 90% coffee grounds. That's not I'm giving this five stars, but not for me. For you. For everyone who doesn't know about the food waste problem, or for those that know about it but don't know what to do. For the people who throw out hundreds of dollars of food every year, some that much in a month! I'm a overly eager non food waster. I compost, but it takes me so long to fill my compost inside that it starts to rot, because I use so much of my scraps. In fact,, my 1 gallon compost bin is usually 90% coffee grounds. That's not to say I didn't learn anything, but it was more of a reinforcement than anything. But the way it is written will appeal to all those types of people I mentioned. It's presented in a very approachable and readable way. There is meal planning, recipes, composting, gardening, even tips on things that can regrow on your windowsill from scraps. It's a great resource for people new to this problem.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ktmholm

    A very useful book to have on hand. Some parts were already known to me, such as planning menus to use up leftovers and avoid wasting food. Others were new, such as which vegetables and fruits do better in high- or low-humidity produce drawers, and the fact that some refrigerators allow you to adjust the settings of each drawer. Other useful material includes which food scraps are safe (or unsafe) to feed your pets; the difference between "sell by", "use by" and "best by"; and composting, as wel A very useful book to have on hand. Some parts were already known to me, such as planning menus to use up leftovers and avoid wasting food. Others were new, such as which vegetables and fruits do better in high- or low-humidity produce drawers, and the fact that some refrigerators allow you to adjust the settings of each drawer. Other useful material includes which food scraps are safe (or unsafe) to feed your pets; the difference between "sell by", "use by" and "best by"; and composting, as well as a few recipes that are especially good for using leftovers. Most helpful, however, is the section on storing fruits, vegetables, meat, seafood, dairy products, condiments, and all types of pantry staples: where and how long to store for optimum freshness, including refrigeration and/or freezing, and how to use if the item starts to get old. Take a look at the book; if you like to eat, I guarantee you'll find at least something of interest here.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Monger

    I think we are all looking for ways to be more efficient and less wasteful, and this book gives many ideas on how to achieve this. The author talks about planning better before grocery shopping since many of us end up having to clean out and throw away fresh items that did not get used in time. She also talks about "best before" dates and how to store items so that they have a greater shelf life. At the end are recipes designed to utilize such things as wilted lettuce, soft vegetables and dated I think we are all looking for ways to be more efficient and less wasteful, and this book gives many ideas on how to achieve this. The author talks about planning better before grocery shopping since many of us end up having to clean out and throw away fresh items that did not get used in time. She also talks about "best before" dates and how to store items so that they have a greater shelf life. At the end are recipes designed to utilize such things as wilted lettuce, soft vegetables and dated yogurt.Not only do these strategies save money, but they also put less stress on landfill sites.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Penny Ramirez

    This was a good collection of information - none of it was new to me, but it was nice to have it all in one place. I struggle with food wastage, having been raised by Depression-era women. I hate to see how much I and my family throw away, and to read the stats on how much we waste as a nation is appalling. However, the methods outlined in this book will be difficult to enact, particularly for the fussy eaters in my family. Perhaps if it were framed as a "how to survive the zombie apocalypse" meth This was a good collection of information - none of it was new to me, but it was nice to have it all in one place. I struggle with food wastage, having been raised by Depression-era women. I hate to see how much I and my family throw away, and to read the stats on how much we waste as a nation is appalling. However, the methods outlined in this book will be difficult to enact, particularly for the fussy eaters in my family. Perhaps if it were framed as a "how to survive the zombie apocalypse" method, I could sell it better!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This is a very basic book. If you are new to cooking - or have been born yesterday in general - you may find tons of useful information here. Otherwise, it's full of well known facts and just some little bits of creative ideas or suggestions on how to use your scraps (you may love them, you may laught at them, but at least they are new). So. It's ok. Nothing wrong with it. Just very basic. This is a very basic book. If you are new to cooking - or have been born yesterday in general - you may find tons of useful information here. Otherwise, it's full of well known facts and just some little bits of creative ideas or suggestions on how to use your scraps (you may love them, you may laught at them, but at least they are new). So. It's ok. Nothing wrong with it. Just very basic.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brianna

    "Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook" has a lot of really solid tips on how to avoid throwing your food in the garbage. Some of the tips I was already familiar with (like saving your scraps to make your own veggie broth), but some of them were so clever, I was astounded that this isn't common practice in every home (like freezing your leftover pasta sauce or soup in muffin tins, so it's easier to grab however many servings you want from the freezer). Some tips were so obvious that I felt like a bonehead "Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook" has a lot of really solid tips on how to avoid throwing your food in the garbage. Some of the tips I was already familiar with (like saving your scraps to make your own veggie broth), but some of them were so clever, I was astounded that this isn't common practice in every home (like freezing your leftover pasta sauce or soup in muffin tins, so it's easier to grab however many servings you want from the freezer). Some tips were so obvious that I felt like a bonehead for not doing them more often. My only regret reading this book was that I had to return it to the library before I really got a chance to try out the recipes at the back.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Salvato

    I thought the book had great information and visuals. I don't think I'm the right audience - I already compost and am very conscious about my food consumption. I hope it reaches those that could change their habits and make a larger lifestyle change. I thought the book had great information and visuals. I don't think I'm the right audience - I already compost and am very conscious about my food consumption. I hope it reaches those that could change their habits and make a larger lifestyle change.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I really liked the way this book asks you to look at how you are using food, storing food, and eating food and see how you can do it better. I've already rearranged the fridge and now have the book in the pantry so it is easy to reference when I need to check the best way to store something. I really liked the way this book asks you to look at how you are using food, storing food, and eating food and see how you can do it better. I've already rearranged the fridge and now have the book in the pantry so it is easy to reference when I need to check the best way to store something.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Vlasenko

    It turned out that thanks to lockdown I already knew most of the tips recommended in this book. Most of them are simply common sense. Yet if you are looking to upgrade your kitchen even more the book might be useful to peek into

  14. 5 out of 5

    Fullfaun Faun

    Diagrams on What should go on which shelf of the fridge, Recipes, how to can and preserve food. Freshness dates, etc.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Little

    There are a couple of big take-aways from this book. One is that the biggest way to avoid throwing food in the trash is to only buy the food you're going to eat. Gunders recommends a ruthless audit, making note of every piece of food pitched in the trash for two weeks, with explicit reasons why those food items got pitched. Not "it was too old," but "I didn't feel like eating it the night I was supposed to cook it." And based on the results of said audit, Gunders recommends either religiously me There are a couple of big take-aways from this book. One is that the biggest way to avoid throwing food in the trash is to only buy the food you're going to eat. Gunders recommends a ruthless audit, making note of every piece of food pitched in the trash for two weeks, with explicit reasons why those food items got pitched. Not "it was too old," but "I didn't feel like eating it the night I was supposed to cook it." And based on the results of said audit, Gunders recommends either religiously meal planning at the time of your weekly shopping trip, or eschewing the weekly trip for shopping trip in favor of buying just what you want to eat today and tomorrow. There's also a really long and fairly comprehensive index on how to store various items and how to use them up when they're a little past their prime. Honestly, the audit is a good idea for most homes. The food storage stuff might be helpful for some people. But the other thoughts on making bits and bobs of food items into something delightful are better covered in An Everlasting Meal: Cooking with Economy and Grace. So if you're going to read a book on reducing kitchen waste, that's the one I'd recommend.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Skunk

    I think that this book is more between a 3-4 star. I agree with some of the information that was in the book and some it was super helpful. One part that I didn't agree with was where it it said to cook less from scratch. I disagree, but the book was enjoyable as a whole. I think that this book is more between a 3-4 star. I agree with some of the information that was in the book and some it was super helpful. One part that I didn't agree with was where it it said to cook less from scratch. I disagree, but the book was enjoyable as a whole.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Judi Serrato

    I read about half of this book and realized that very little of this information is new to me. However, it still contains good and useful info and if this topic is new to you I would recommend it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Petruzzi

    Excellent. Truly helpful.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

    Super handy tips for how best to buy, store, preserve and prepare food to avoid spoilage and waste.

  20. 4 out of 5

    NK92

    I first saw this at the library, read some, and decided to buy it. I love this book, as well as "My Zero Waste Kitchen" but after reading both I was a little confused, as they had some information in one that was contradictory to the other book. For composting, each book had different ratios (green to brown) & recommendations. I was left uncertain and "winging it." I will need to buy a book on composting to compensate. I will say though that although I initially did not love composting in the sum I first saw this at the library, read some, and decided to buy it. I love this book, as well as "My Zero Waste Kitchen" but after reading both I was a little confused, as they had some information in one that was contradictory to the other book. For composting, each book had different ratios (green to brown) & recommendations. I was left uncertain and "winging it." I will need to buy a book on composting to compensate. I will say though that although I initially did not love composting in the summer (SO HOT here!), I feel it is so much more sanitary and less stressful to have an open-heap compost bin that you turn occasionally than it is to have produce that gets moldy/bugs in your trash before it is even full enough to throw away (especially when the bag breaks)! The only bugs in my compost (with frozen produce*) were worms (I did not add them, they just wiggled in themselves from the yard). Also, one of my favorite parts of this book (the specific reference for how to store food items) was sadly lacking. I wanted more information because I have purchased food not listed in the back, particularly produce. But for the produce listed, it is a wonderful reference. I whip it out all the time after a food shopping trip. It would be 5 stars if it was not for this and the confusing compost information I received collectively. I do love this book though! I like both (this & "My Zero Waste Kitchen) books about the same, and you kind of get different things out of both. This one does not talk about plastics leaching into food, whereas My Zero Waste Kitchen does. Although both have recipes to reduce food waste & use up foods, My Zero Waste Kitchen is more adaptable to vegetarian/vegan/"Meatless Monday" dishes. My Zero Waste Kitchen is also very visual, less wordy than this. It has tons of pictures and may be better for children & visual learners. This one is more adult, with more charts & paragraphs. I highly recommend this to anyone who does not like food waste, wants to save money, or be more environmentally conscious.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Kinda hard to rate this one because I didn't exactly read this for a riveting read. I guess I'll say it's more of a 2.5 star because there is some really good info in here. It's worth getting alone for the directory in the back that tells you how to store fruits, vegetables, meat and dairy products to get the most out of them (including tips on freezing which is really invaluable). Otherwise it's pretty standard information that I think most of us know (or at least, we should)--food waste is terr Kinda hard to rate this one because I didn't exactly read this for a riveting read. I guess I'll say it's more of a 2.5 star because there is some really good info in here. It's worth getting alone for the directory in the back that tells you how to store fruits, vegetables, meat and dairy products to get the most out of them (including tips on freezing which is really invaluable). Otherwise it's pretty standard information that I think most of us know (or at least, we should)--food waste is terrible for the environment, grocery store "sell-by"/"use by" dates don't really mean anything (although I was surprised by how arbitrary these dates really are), composting is a great idea to use up food scraps. I was a little less convinced by stuff like, "use a banana peel to polish your shoes!" but I appreciate the intent. I also liked that the author emphasized that no one is perfect about food waste all the time, so don't hold yourself to unrealistic standards. Getting it right half of the time is better than never getting it right, after all. I think when you decide you want to start living a bit more consciously, you get overwhelmed with all of these things you feel you have to do--it's great that the message is always there that these things happen gradually and to give it some time.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Violet Laflamme

    A lot of good info but this really read like a 101 in a lot of ways. I guess it is so I can't dock too many points for it. Recipes follow in the same vein, basically the same ideas you'll find in anything about using up leftovers. Having said that, where this book earns some points back is the detailed guides it gives on how to store most common fruits and veggies, a guide on how to control portions at parties, and more than the standard one or two ideas about compost. I have to review this book A lot of good info but this really read like a 101 in a lot of ways. I guess it is so I can't dock too many points for it. Recipes follow in the same vein, basically the same ideas you'll find in anything about using up leftovers. Having said that, where this book earns some points back is the detailed guides it gives on how to store most common fruits and veggies, a guide on how to control portions at parties, and more than the standard one or two ideas about compost. I have to review this book for what it is, which is a book for American omnivores, and not as how useful it was to me personally, a European vegan. Having said that, the book referenced at every point how much you should use your freezer, and in my small German apartment, I just haven't got the space for it. Worse than that, the very first thing the book talks about is how you need to think beyond the food in your kitchen, and literally says in terms of water consumption, meat is the worst offender followed by dairy. I didn't expect the book to go on to advocate for a vegan lifestyle, but I did expect some tips on cutting back consumption of these items. Unfortunately, I didn't find them.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Liz VanDerwerken

    As if I haven’t evangelized this book enough... this is a practical and useful guide to home cooking with more efficiency and precision to best utilize your monetary and food resources to best effect. I’ve noticed some small but significant shifts in my habits with food shopping and preparing since reading this book and implementing its ideas. It was an approachable resource and I enjoyed reading it cover-to-cover, but it is also organized such that it is easy to reference a specific topic or se As if I haven’t evangelized this book enough... this is a practical and useful guide to home cooking with more efficiency and precision to best utilize your monetary and food resources to best effect. I’ve noticed some small but significant shifts in my habits with food shopping and preparing since reading this book and implementing its ideas. It was an approachable resource and I enjoyed reading it cover-to-cover, but it is also organized such that it is easy to reference a specific topic or section without having to read the entire book. I also loved the recipes section, which gave helpful tips and ideas for how to use up odds and ends in your fridge or pantry. I think everyone should read this book—our food habits have significant ecological impacts and implications and I think a better consciousness and awareness of what those are is essential to making positive change.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Juli Anna

    I've read a number of books about reducing kitchen waste and this was by far the most thorough and practical one I've found. If you are looking for a cookbook full of trendy recipes for things like carrot-top pesto, you won't find them here. There are only a handful of practical "use-it-up" recipes and very few pictures. But there is so much useful information on cutting down food waste that I've never seen consolidated in one place before: things like what human foods are safe to feed to pets o I've read a number of books about reducing kitchen waste and this was by far the most thorough and practical one I've found. If you are looking for a cookbook full of trendy recipes for things like carrot-top pesto, you won't find them here. There are only a handful of practical "use-it-up" recipes and very few pictures. But there is so much useful information on cutting down food waste that I've never seen consolidated in one place before: things like what human foods are safe to feed to pets or poultry, how do determine whether an old/slimy/moldy food item is going to make you sick, and how to meal plan and shop with zero waste in mind. Even old hats at waste-free kitchen practices will discover some new ideas here.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Barb

    Very informative book about trying to be more aware of your own food waste. I got it from the library, right after cleaning out my refrigerator and threw out way too much food. This book is helpful for people new to this idea and for those who want to go hard core. I liked the recipes at the end. The best I do to reduce waste is when we move and I am very conscious of the food I need to get rid of and not waste...I don't plan on moving any time soon, but that attitude may help a bit. The only co Very informative book about trying to be more aware of your own food waste. I got it from the library, right after cleaning out my refrigerator and threw out way too much food. This book is helpful for people new to this idea and for those who want to go hard core. I liked the recipes at the end. The best I do to reduce waste is when we move and I am very conscious of the food I need to get rid of and not waste...I don't plan on moving any time soon, but that attitude may help a bit. The only complaint about this book is the ridiculously small print size! Quarter of the page is blank and then text is so small; seems ironicly wasteful.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rachel B

    A great, thorough book for beginners - people who realize they're throwing away a lot of the food they buy and want to change, but don't know where to begin. Gunders covers accurate meal planning, how to use leftovers, non-food uses for foods, how to keep foods fresh for longer, and more. There are 20 recipes here, most of them fairly basic in the use-it-up world, like soup, but a few looked good. (Also, the book isn't primarily a cookbook, so I'm not rating it on that alone.) There is a bit of re A great, thorough book for beginners - people who realize they're throwing away a lot of the food they buy and want to change, but don't know where to begin. Gunders covers accurate meal planning, how to use leftovers, non-food uses for foods, how to keep foods fresh for longer, and more. There are 20 recipes here, most of them fairly basic in the use-it-up world, like soup, but a few looked good. (Also, the book isn't primarily a cookbook, so I'm not rating it on that alone.) There is a bit of repetition that got old to me, since much of the information isn't new to me, but for beginners, this repetition might actually be helpful in reinforcing new ideas.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    The tips in the bulk of the book are pretty simplistic and useful only if you need something very introductory. If you're already doing basic things like freezing leftovers and know you can eat most things past their "best by" date, you're not going to get much new information. The directory section, however, is very useful since it's food-specific instead of general tips. I also cringed at the times the author looped in weight with food waste to point out cutting down portion sizes is good for The tips in the bulk of the book are pretty simplistic and useful only if you need something very introductory. If you're already doing basic things like freezing leftovers and know you can eat most things past their "best by" date, you're not going to get much new information. The directory section, however, is very useful since it's food-specific instead of general tips. I also cringed at the times the author looped in weight with food waste to point out cutting down portion sizes is good for "food waste and your waist." (Gross)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Krista D.

    This was a really solid beginner book, as well as a decent reminder and brush up (especially for reminding you which produce goes into which crisper, and which fruit gets stored in paper vs plastic). It covers a lot of topics in a basic way - how to freeze, what to freeze, canning, a handful of recipes, how to meal plan (incl lazy days). I found the main text font difficult to read (I borrowed a print copy from the library), but the diagrams were much easier to read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Merrill Medansky

    Easy to read, easy to follow. If you've ever felt guilty about throwing away that lettuce or the rest of the lunch meat, this book is for you. It will guide you to behavior changes that will minimize your waste and coach you on plant-friendly ways to dispose of food past its prime. I think I may actually buy this one. Easy to read, easy to follow. If you've ever felt guilty about throwing away that lettuce or the rest of the lunch meat, this book is for you. It will guide you to behavior changes that will minimize your waste and coach you on plant-friendly ways to dispose of food past its prime. I think I may actually buy this one.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mercer County Library System

    A great kitchen resource for those learning or brushing up on how to buy, store and eat food properly with as little waste as possible. The book contains information about various ingredients from the main food groups: vegetables, fruit, meat, dairy, etc. and how to make the best use of them. There's even recipes for using up scraps! (Reviewed by Julia, Lawrence branch) A great kitchen resource for those learning or brushing up on how to buy, store and eat food properly with as little waste as possible. The book contains information about various ingredients from the main food groups: vegetables, fruit, meat, dairy, etc. and how to make the best use of them. There's even recipes for using up scraps! (Reviewed by Julia, Lawrence branch)

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