web site hit counter Painting Beyond Pollock - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Painting Beyond Pollock

Availability: Ready to download

Painting Beyond Pollock is a captivating account of the history of European and American painting from the mid‐20th century onwards. Art historian and critic Morgan Falconer presents an extensively researched piece of writing that explains why painting has surged in popularity since Jackson Pollock and the Abstract Expressionists began painting in the late 1940s–earl Painting Beyond Pollock is a captivating account of the history of European and American painting from the mid‐20th century onwards. Art historian and critic Morgan Falconer presents an extensively researched piece of writing that explains why painting has surged in popularity since Jackson Pollock and the Abstract Expressionists began painting in the late 1940s–early 1950s. Drawing on both original sources and contemporary scholarship, this bold and richly designed book lavishly illustrates the most important works made beginning in the Post War era. In addition to well‐known artists such as Willem de Kooning, Agnes Martin, Alex Katz, Ellsworth Kelly, Marlene Dumas, Gerhard Richter and Brice Marden, Falconer explores the work of contemporary stars such as Cecily Brown, Mark Grotjahn, Elizabeth Peyton, John Currin, Neo Rauch and Mark Bradford as well as up‐and‐coming artists such as Blink Palermo and Sigmar Polke. Topics include: Things must be pulverized – Abstract Expressionism Wounded Painting – Informel in Europe and Beyond Against Gesture – Geometric Abstraction Witnesses – Post‐war Figurative Painting Anti&hyephn;Tradition – Pop PaintingPost&hypen;Painting Part I – After Pollock A transcendental, high art – Neo‐Expressionism and its Discontents Post‐Painting Part II – After Pop New Figuration – Pop Romantics


Compare

Painting Beyond Pollock is a captivating account of the history of European and American painting from the mid‐20th century onwards. Art historian and critic Morgan Falconer presents an extensively researched piece of writing that explains why painting has surged in popularity since Jackson Pollock and the Abstract Expressionists began painting in the late 1940s–earl Painting Beyond Pollock is a captivating account of the history of European and American painting from the mid‐20th century onwards. Art historian and critic Morgan Falconer presents an extensively researched piece of writing that explains why painting has surged in popularity since Jackson Pollock and the Abstract Expressionists began painting in the late 1940s–early 1950s. Drawing on both original sources and contemporary scholarship, this bold and richly designed book lavishly illustrates the most important works made beginning in the Post War era. In addition to well‐known artists such as Willem de Kooning, Agnes Martin, Alex Katz, Ellsworth Kelly, Marlene Dumas, Gerhard Richter and Brice Marden, Falconer explores the work of contemporary stars such as Cecily Brown, Mark Grotjahn, Elizabeth Peyton, John Currin, Neo Rauch and Mark Bradford as well as up‐and‐coming artists such as Blink Palermo and Sigmar Polke. Topics include: Things must be pulverized – Abstract Expressionism Wounded Painting – Informel in Europe and Beyond Against Gesture – Geometric Abstraction Witnesses – Post‐war Figurative Painting Anti&hyephn;Tradition – Pop PaintingPost&hypen;Painting Part I – After Pollock A transcendental, high art – Neo‐Expressionism and its Discontents Post‐Painting Part II – After Pop New Figuration – Pop Romantics

34 review for Painting Beyond Pollock

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    I picked up Painting Beyond Pollock, a recent Phaidon publication, because I was intrigued by the book’s organizing principle. What happened to painting after Pollock “obliterated" the genre? There has been much ado about the status of painting lately. Critics have lamented the rise of “zombie formalism,” stale abstraction whose only novelty is the wacky method used to produce it. MoMA’s recent painting show, “The Forever Now,” was universally panned for its lackluster theme and market-tested cu I picked up Painting Beyond Pollock, a recent Phaidon publication, because I was intrigued by the book’s organizing principle. What happened to painting after Pollock “obliterated" the genre? There has been much ado about the status of painting lately. Critics have lamented the rise of “zombie formalism,” stale abstraction whose only novelty is the wacky method used to produce it. MoMA’s recent painting show, “The Forever Now,” was universally panned for its lackluster theme and market-tested curation. I thought this would be a good time to hear the other side of the story. Also, I’m always looking for well written, well illustrated histories of modern and contemporary art. You’d be surprised at how hard these texts are to find. Many art books are simply laundry lists of movements, artists, and works. Others deify a few “greats” and overlook a broad brush of noteworthy makers. Somewhat surprisingly, Painting Beyond Pollock falls into the latter camp. The author, Morgan Falconer, begins by announcing his objective: writing yet another faithful account of the Western art historical canon. (Yay?) Doing so, he concedes, necessitates a “narrow racial and ethnic profile.” This is a somewhat lazy admission. Perhaps Japanese Gutai painting has not yet secured a spot in this lineage, but what of the numerous American female artists and artists of color that he ignores until discussing the “Global Contemporary?” Did they magically appear in the 1980s, as if by spontaneous generation? Despite Falconer’s claim, many non-white, non-male painters have been vetted by the art establishment. You know them, you’ve seen them installed at your city’s major museum: Sam Gilliam, Grace Hartigan, Yayoi Kusama, and others. While many spent the 1970s reveling in new media and performance pieces, Howardena Pindell was using painting to develop a distinct, visual language of warped, Funfetti canvases. In the 1960s, Alice Neel forwent social realism’s turgid, nationalistic tropes for affirmative portraits of brazen female sitters. Throughout this era, Beauford Delaney compiled an oeuvre that serves as a bridge between early European modernism and the figurative, documentary works of Jacob Lawrence and Romare Bearden. Including these makers would not be tokenism or revisionism. They are not secondary characters in the major narrative of art history. They are key players in that story, drivers of its acts. Yes, this is a more complicated narrative to tell, but the alternative is far less rewarding. Narrow-mindedness, even when apologetic, reminds me of the anachronistic bitterness of Hilton Kramer. It’s backwards and it’s boring. Nevertheless, I thoroughly enjoyed Painting Beyond Pollock. Falconer’s writing is quick, yet cogent and comprehensive. He meets painting's every development with optimism, one that I share. He gives the included artists their due, overviewing art history’s tectonic shifts with a careful, analytical eye. His book is well worth your time--I gave it such as workout that its canvas cover began to pill--but do not mistake it for a comprehensive account of painting’s past. There’s certainly more to see.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

  3. 4 out of 5

    Armando Rabadán

  4. 4 out of 5

    MR C J T MAHONEY

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jon

  6. 4 out of 5

    Trevor

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tiger

  8. 4 out of 5

    Skybones

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

  10. 5 out of 5

    John Turley

  11. 5 out of 5

    Iwona Kumpin

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brenton

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  14. 5 out of 5

    Fuzer48

  15. 4 out of 5

    William Crump

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eve

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mary Louise Schumacher

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sevgicatkin

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karen A.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tristy

  21. 4 out of 5

    J.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Louannesmolin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hanseong Kim

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alex Day

  25. 4 out of 5

    VCUQ Library

  26. 5 out of 5

    BespectacledBookGirl

  27. 5 out of 5

    felipe

  28. 5 out of 5

    Krissy

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Smith

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pelle

  31. 4 out of 5

    Randy Rambo

  32. 4 out of 5

    Terry Kuny

  33. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

  34. 4 out of 5

    Marco Siegel-Acevedo

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.