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The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, September/October 2014 Volume 127, No. 3&4, #715, September/October 2014 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Bryn Barnard CONTENT: Novelets "The Rider" by Jérôme Cigut "The Caravan To Nowhere" by Phyllis Eisenstein "The Wild Ones" by Albert E. Cowdrey "Avianca’s Bezel" by Matthew Hughes "The Thing In The Back Yard" by David Gerrold Shor The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, September/October 2014 Volume 127, No. 3&4, #715, September/October 2014 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Bryn Barnard CONTENT: Novelets "The Rider" by Jérôme Cigut "The Caravan To Nowhere" by Phyllis Eisenstein "The Wild Ones" by Albert E. Cowdrey "Avianca’s Bezel" by Matthew Hughes "The Thing In The Back Yard" by David Gerrold Short Stories "Marketing Strategies of The Apocalypse" by Oliver Buckram "Sir Pagan’s Gift" by Tom Underberg "Other People’s Things" by Jay O’Connell "The Culvert" by Dale Bailey "Embrace Of The Planets" by Brenda Carre "Will He?" by Robert Reed "The Way We Are" by Ray Vukcevich DEPARTMENTS Books to Look For by Charles de Lint Books by Elizabeth Hand Science: The Hole in Reality by Pat Murphy & Paul Doherty Films: Once Upon a Storyboard by David J. Skal


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The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, September/October 2014 Volume 127, No. 3&4, #715, September/October 2014 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Bryn Barnard CONTENT: Novelets "The Rider" by Jérôme Cigut "The Caravan To Nowhere" by Phyllis Eisenstein "The Wild Ones" by Albert E. Cowdrey "Avianca’s Bezel" by Matthew Hughes "The Thing In The Back Yard" by David Gerrold Shor The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, September/October 2014 Volume 127, No. 3&4, #715, September/October 2014 Edited by Gordon Van Gelder Cover art by Bryn Barnard CONTENT: Novelets "The Rider" by Jérôme Cigut "The Caravan To Nowhere" by Phyllis Eisenstein "The Wild Ones" by Albert E. Cowdrey "Avianca’s Bezel" by Matthew Hughes "The Thing In The Back Yard" by David Gerrold Short Stories "Marketing Strategies of The Apocalypse" by Oliver Buckram "Sir Pagan’s Gift" by Tom Underberg "Other People’s Things" by Jay O’Connell "The Culvert" by Dale Bailey "Embrace Of The Planets" by Brenda Carre "Will He?" by Robert Reed "The Way We Are" by Ray Vukcevich DEPARTMENTS Books to Look For by Charles de Lint Books by Elizabeth Hand Science: The Hole in Reality by Pat Murphy & Paul Doherty Films: Once Upon a Storyboard by David J. Skal

30 review for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, September/October 2014 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #715)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Beth Cato

    I received this print issue at convention in recent years. It was interesting to read an older issue, having read all of the recent ones edited by C.C. Finlay; I found Finlay's tastes align more closely with mine. The short stories here didn't resonate much with me, but several of the novelettes did: "The Caravan to Nowhere" by Phyllis Eisenstein, "Avianca's Bezel" by Matthew Hughes, and the quirky "The Thing in the Back Yard" by David Gerrold. I received this print issue at convention in recent years. It was interesting to read an older issue, having read all of the recent ones edited by C.C. Finlay; I found Finlay's tastes align more closely with mine. The short stories here didn't resonate much with me, but several of the novelettes did: "The Caravan to Nowhere" by Phyllis Eisenstein, "Avianca's Bezel" by Matthew Hughes, and the quirky "The Thing in the Back Yard" by David Gerrold.

  2. 5 out of 5

    John Loyd

    5 • The Rider • 27 pages by Jerome Cigut Excellent/VG. Luke has David, one of the few Tahara AI's. The AI is in a small box carried by Luke. Glasses allow the AI to see/hear what David does. Action scene, then a back story of how Luke acquired David (or vice versa), another action scene. A change in the dynamics requiring Luke & David to come up with a plan. 48 • The Caravan To Nowhere • 37 pages by Phyllis Eisenstein Excellent. Alaric is a minstrel and is ready to move on. He sees there is a 5 • The Rider • 27 pages by Jerome Cigut Excellent/VG. Luke has David, one of the few Tahara AI's. The AI is in a small box carried by Luke. Glasses allow the AI to see/hear what David does. Action scene, then a back story of how Luke acquired David (or vice versa), another action scene. A change in the dynamics requiring Luke & David to come up with a plan. 48 • The Caravan To Nowhere • 37 pages by Phyllis Eisenstein Excellent. Alaric is a minstrel and is ready to move on. He sees there is a caravan of traders ready to cross the desert and he asks Piros if he could join them. We find that Piros' son is addicted to some narcotic that is harvested in the desert. 85 • Marketing Strategies Of The Apocolypse • 3 pages by Oliver Buckram Fair. Very short. Attempt at humor. One smile, no real laughs. 88 • Sir Pagan's Gift • 15 pages by Tom Underberg Good. Sir Pagan is an alien that landed on a remote island and is now awaiting a death sentence. Long ago the fishermen made a deal with the fishmongers to sell fish they hadn't yet caught. The fishmongers have ever since made sure that the penalty clause in that contract ensures that the fishermen can't go anywhere else with their catch. Doing it by poisoning the water to drive the schools of fish away assuring a poor catch. 103 • Other People's Things • 13 pages by Jay O'Connell Excellent. Chris comes to Peebles because he can't get a date. In his role as attractiveness consultant Peebles helps Chris with his flaws. Good flow. Nice twist. 116 • The Culvert • 9 pages by Dale Bailey Fair/Good. Doug and Danny found a passage in the rocks that led to an open space. Taking any turn would eventually lead them back to the start. One day they got separated and Danny was lost forever. Throw in some identity crisis and stir. 125 • The Wild Ones • 21 pages by Albert E. Cowdrey Good/Fair. Humanity left Earth generations ago. Now some people want to risk going back. Kind of a bleak story, Earth is vacated due to war, etc. then people are leaving the new planet, the trip back to Earth is no joy ride, reaching Earth isn't the hoped for result, and the pay off to the reader of the story is pretty lame. 156 • Embrace Of The Planets • 12 pages by Brenda Carre Very Good/Excellent. Elanora sees that the Trove, an antique store, is finally open. She hobbles over and is amazed at the inventory. Really good twist to the story. 169 • Avianca's Bezel • 40 pages by Matthew Hughes Excellent. Raffalon is caught with his lock picks and such. The local police place fines on him and finding all the gold in his purse gone Raffalon is auctioned into indentured service. A geas is places upon him so he can't run away. The the real reason Vidlo wants Raffalon, it's to steal Avianca's Bezel. 215 • Will He? • 13 pages by Robert Reed Fair/Poor. Adleman idolized his hard drinking academic father. He wanted to follow in his footsteps but could never achieve fame. Reed creates a dislikable character who would like nothing better than to rid the world of several billion people. Adleman creates a norovirus and a vaccine for himself and possibly a few others of his choosing. 228 • The Way We Are • 4 pages by Ray Vukcevich Fair/Good. A guy is on a date with a girl and there are a lot of passwords, and he has forgotten one. 232 • The Thing In The Back Yard • 24 pages by David Gerrold Good/VG. The main character mentions a theft problem to that pesky Dan Goodman, and the next day Dan shows up and shackles him with a half troll which our protaganist can't get rid of. The troll gets bigger, the dog won't go into the back yard, and pesky is no where to be found. Really good resolution to the story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt Bradley

    Lots of good stories here for everyone to enjoy. More humor than I'm accustomed to seeing in one issue, but no complaints. "The Rider" is an interesting twist on the normal human/computer relationship. Rather than humans using computers as tools, or humans finding themselves subjugated by computers, here we see humans working almost like employees for artificially intelligent computers. Meanwhile, these computers have developed their own culture and hierarchy, practically invisible to humans. A f Lots of good stories here for everyone to enjoy. More humor than I'm accustomed to seeing in one issue, but no complaints. "The Rider" is an interesting twist on the normal human/computer relationship. Rather than humans using computers as tools, or humans finding themselves subjugated by computers, here we see humans working almost like employees for artificially intelligent computers. Meanwhile, these computers have developed their own culture and hierarchy, practically invisible to humans. A fun read. "Avianca's Bezel" is perhaps my favorite of this issue. Also the longest, if memory serves right. A neat fantasy piece with a rich world of characters and lore, but not so much that I felt overwhelmed with insignificant minutia. "The Thing in the Back Yard" is a great piece of fantasy/humor. If you want a short story that doesn't take itself too seriously, you'll enjoy it. "Embrace of the Planets" reminds me of classic episodes of the Twilight Zone. If you like that type of reality-bending fiction, you'll enjoy "Embrace..." Simply put, it's about a woman who meets the owner of an antiques store. Unbeknownst to the woman, the store actually shifts through time. "The Wild Ones" was interesting, but a little predictable. And the preachiness at the end left a bad taste in my mouth. If Cowdrey would have cut off the last few pages, the story would have been much better. "Will He?" kind of stretches the definition of science fiction. But an interesting story told from the perspective of a narcissistic sociopath. If you've ever wondered even for a fleeting second about the possibility of destroying the world and killing everybody around you (and let's be honest... who hasn't?), then you'll enjoy this short story. "Marketing Strategies of the Apocalypse" is a very short piece of meta-humor. Some of the other stories didn't appeal to me so much. "Sir Pagan's Gift" seemed somewhat over-done. Too much style, with not enough actual story. "The Culvert" was decent, but the constant switching between characters was disorienting. Maybe that was intentional, but I found it off-putting. All things considered, a good issue.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    Lots of fun, enjoyable stories!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Meran

    12 stories The Rider by Jerome Cigut - An AI, "living" in a small black box, finds a Rider it likes, goes on sprees with the Rider Lake, and plans for a better life for them both. - 3 stars The Caravan To Nowhere by Phyllis Eisenstein - A story of the mysteries of the desert, those drawn to the mysteries of a minstrel. Well written. - 4 stars Marketing Strategies of the Apocalypse by Oliver Buckram - Short, cutesy, won't last the test of time. - 2 stars Sir Pagan's Gift by Tom Underberg - Well and c 12 stories The Rider by Jerome Cigut - An AI, "living" in a small black box, finds a Rider it likes, goes on sprees with the Rider Lake, and plans for a better life for them both. - 3 stars The Caravan To Nowhere by Phyllis Eisenstein - A story of the mysteries of the desert, those drawn to the mysteries of a minstrel. Well written. - 4 stars Marketing Strategies of the Apocalypse by Oliver Buckram - Short, cutesy, won't last the test of time. - 2 stars Sir Pagan's Gift by Tom Underberg - Well and clearly written, by a new writer. Though the story has an alien (non-human) named Sir Pagan, the tale is Christian. Yet not repulsive; there are lessons to be learned about Change & Life. - 5 stars Other People's Things by Jay O'Connell - VERY funny! Excellent tale on the State of Being (Human). Recommended. - 5 stars The Culvert by Dale Bailey -After that last story, the change in mood is palpable and very well handled by Bailey. The loss of a child is always in the news, but how much harder would life be after the loss of that child to his twin? What would be the psychological tally? - 5 stars The Wild Ones by Albert E. Cowdrey - I kept expecting to be bored with this recolonization of Earth story, but I was not. Unexpected biology, with a rational premise and two young Wild Ones kept it fresh. - 4 stars Embrace of the Planets by Brenda Carre - A special store, named Trove, and a special storekeeper is well met by a special woman, who loves such things as are kept in it. - 3 stars Avianca's Bezel by Matthew Hughes - We never find out WHY the bezel was wanted/needed It's always the journey that matters, and, for a thief, a full purse in the end. Interesting story to add to the legend of Raffalon. - 4 stars Will He? by Robert Reed - Great writing!! A story of a man, never happy, wanting others to be as miserable as he is, plans… to give everyone what they deserve. - 5 stars

  6. 5 out of 5

    Benn Allen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction" is an anthology publication with pedigree and a great deal of respect among fantasy/sf fans. This is the first time I've ever read an issue of it and frankly, I found it to be mediocre, uneven. Part of the problem may be that I'm not really much of a fantasy fan, which is what most of the stories in this issue are. The highlights, for me, were "The Caravan to Nowhere" by Phyllis Eisenstein, "Avianca's Bezel" by Matthew Hughes, "The Rider" by Jerome C "The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction" is an anthology publication with pedigree and a great deal of respect among fantasy/sf fans. This is the first time I've ever read an issue of it and frankly, I found it to be mediocre, uneven. Part of the problem may be that I'm not really much of a fantasy fan, which is what most of the stories in this issue are. The highlights, for me, were "The Caravan to Nowhere" by Phyllis Eisenstein, "Avianca's Bezel" by Matthew Hughes, "The Rider" by Jerome Cigut (one of the only true science fiction tale in the magazine) and David Gerrold's "The Thing In the Backyard". (Gerrold's entry in this issue is the only reason I even bought the magazine and as it turns out, it was the best story in it.) Albert E. Crowdy's "The Wild Ones" was almost a decent, nothing spectacular science fiction yarn, but it's ruined by the twist in it. Werewolves?!? Seriously? That came so far out of left field, it was it wasn't even in the stadium to start with. Bottom line is, I can't see myself buying "The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction" on a regular basis. But when a writer like David Gerrold or Alan Dean Foster (who is supposed to have a selection in the next issue), somebody whose work I'm a fan of, then I will pick up the issue. And who knows, maybe with more exposure to FaSF, I might become a regular reader. At this point, it's doubtful, though.

  7. 4 out of 5

    G33z3r

    "The Rider" is a buddy story of a man and his AI companion. Moderately entertaining, if a bit familiar. *** "The Wild Ones" is sort of a sci-fi generation ship story in praise of troublemakers or something. ** "Avianca's Bezel" was a light sword and sorcery story of the thief engaged by a wizard to steal the titular magic item... Or maybe not. A bit overlong. *** "The Thing in the Backyard" - I never liked horror. "Marketing Strategies of the Apocalypse" was a one and a half joke story of only a cou "The Rider" is a buddy story of a man and his AI companion. Moderately entertaining, if a bit familiar. *** "The Wild Ones" is sort of a sci-fi generation ship story in praise of troublemakers or something. ** "Avianca's Bezel" was a light sword and sorcery story of the thief engaged by a wizard to steal the titular magic item... Or maybe not. A bit overlong. *** "The Thing in the Backyard" - I never liked horror. "Marketing Strategies of the Apocalypse" was a one and a half joke story of only a couple of pages, and funny enough. *** "Sir Pagan's Gift" simple story, overly complicated writing. ** "Other People's Things" is a comedy about a relationship advisor and his newest client. In some ways reminded me of the movie Hitch. Not sure if this was supposed to be sci-fi or fantasy, but light and readable. I'd have to say this was my favorite of the collection. *** "The Way We Are" is mildly amusing (and mercifully short) imagining a world where passwords are needed for everything from the coffee pot to the zipper on your pants. *** There were a distressing number of short stories in this edition that seem to have at most a tenuous relationship to either science fiction or fantasy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Krista Wallace

    "Embrace of the Planets" - Brenda Carre Embrace of the Planets is a nifty result of a story challenge undertaken by author Brenda Carre. Protagonist Eleanora is thrilled to finally be in the right place at the right time: the junk store, Trove, has fascinated her for ages, and yet its bizarre, unpredictable hours of operation mean she has never been inside. But today is different. Her interest in the shop's intriguing contents results in tea and scones (complete with clotted cream) with the warm "Embrace of the Planets" - Brenda Carre Embrace of the Planets is a nifty result of a story challenge undertaken by author Brenda Carre. Protagonist Eleanora is thrilled to finally be in the right place at the right time: the junk store, Trove, has fascinated her for ages, and yet its bizarre, unpredictable hours of operation mean she has never been inside. But today is different. Her interest in the shop's intriguing contents results in tea and scones (complete with clotted cream) with the warm and kind old proprietor. Little does Eleanora know that he has an agenda. Oh, and he also has a gun. Will Eleanora regret seeing that sign reading, "Open by Inter-Planetary Agreement"? Embrace of the Planets is an engaging and amusing story. Carre's vivid description will come back to me every time I step into a junk shop from now on. It's a taste of Doctor Who, with a soupçon of Steven Brust's Cowbow Feng's Space Bar & Grille. Loved it!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Benito Jr.

    Highlights: Buckram's "Marketing Strategies of the Apocalypse," Hughes's "Avianca's Bezel," Gerrold's humorous "The Thing in the Back Yard" (probably my second-favorite piece), Bailey's "The Culvert." Best of all: Tom Underberg's "Sir Pagan's Gift," which in a mere 15 pages creates a new world, with a new belief system (though not, sadly, a new economic system). Highlights: Buckram's "Marketing Strategies of the Apocalypse," Hughes's "Avianca's Bezel," Gerrold's humorous "The Thing in the Back Yard" (probably my second-favorite piece), Bailey's "The Culvert." Best of all: Tom Underberg's "Sir Pagan's Gift," which in a mere 15 pages creates a new world, with a new belief system (though not, sadly, a new economic system).

  10. 4 out of 5

    George Heintzelman

    A solid issue. Plenty of good to very good stories, although no real standouts. My favorites from the lot were "The Rider", by Jérôme Cigut, and "Sir Pagan's Gift", by Tom Underberg. A solid issue. Plenty of good to very good stories, although no real standouts. My favorites from the lot were "The Rider", by Jérôme Cigut, and "Sir Pagan's Gift", by Tom Underberg.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Frankie

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Blomqvist

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ray

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rob Port

  15. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  16. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Replogle

  17. 4 out of 5

    Eco Imp

  18. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Hurley

  19. 5 out of 5

    Adriel Moonshadow

  20. 5 out of 5

    Zardoz

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

  23. 4 out of 5

    Robert Arl

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adriel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark Catalfano

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Sipila

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ken Mixon

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ashby Albright

  29. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Clardy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jay O'Connell

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