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After Snowden: Privacy, Secrecy, and Security in the Information Age

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Was Edward Snowden a patriot or a traitor? Just how far do American privacy rights extend? And how far is too far when it comes to government secrecy in the name of security? These are just a few of the questions that have dominated American consciousness since Edward Snowden exposed the breath of the NSA’s domestic surveillance program. In these seven previously unpublishe Was Edward Snowden a patriot or a traitor? Just how far do American privacy rights extend? And how far is too far when it comes to government secrecy in the name of security? These are just a few of the questions that have dominated American consciousness since Edward Snowden exposed the breath of the NSA’s domestic surveillance program. In these seven previously unpublished essays, a group of prominent legal and political experts delve in to life After Snowden, examining the ramifications of the infamous leak from multiple angles: • Washington lawyer and literary agent RONALD GOLDFARB acts as the book's editor and provides an introduction outlining the many debates sparked by the Snowden leaks. • Pulitzer Prize winning journalist BARRY SIEGEL analyses the role of the state secrets provision in the judicial system. • Former Assistant Secretary of State HODDING CARTER explores whether the press is justified in unearthing and publishing classified information. • Ethics expert and dean of the UC Berkley School of Journalism EDWARD WASSERMAN discusses the uneven relationship between journalists and whistleblowers. • Georgetown Law Professor DAVID COLE addresses the motives and complicated legacy of Snowden and other leakers. • Director of the National Security Archive THOMAS BLANTON looks at the impact of the Snowden leaks on the classification of government documents. • Dean of the University of Florida Law School JON MILLS addresses the constitutional right to privacy and the difficulties of applying it in the digital age.


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Was Edward Snowden a patriot or a traitor? Just how far do American privacy rights extend? And how far is too far when it comes to government secrecy in the name of security? These are just a few of the questions that have dominated American consciousness since Edward Snowden exposed the breath of the NSA’s domestic surveillance program. In these seven previously unpublishe Was Edward Snowden a patriot or a traitor? Just how far do American privacy rights extend? And how far is too far when it comes to government secrecy in the name of security? These are just a few of the questions that have dominated American consciousness since Edward Snowden exposed the breath of the NSA’s domestic surveillance program. In these seven previously unpublished essays, a group of prominent legal and political experts delve in to life After Snowden, examining the ramifications of the infamous leak from multiple angles: • Washington lawyer and literary agent RONALD GOLDFARB acts as the book's editor and provides an introduction outlining the many debates sparked by the Snowden leaks. • Pulitzer Prize winning journalist BARRY SIEGEL analyses the role of the state secrets provision in the judicial system. • Former Assistant Secretary of State HODDING CARTER explores whether the press is justified in unearthing and publishing classified information. • Ethics expert and dean of the UC Berkley School of Journalism EDWARD WASSERMAN discusses the uneven relationship between journalists and whistleblowers. • Georgetown Law Professor DAVID COLE addresses the motives and complicated legacy of Snowden and other leakers. • Director of the National Security Archive THOMAS BLANTON looks at the impact of the Snowden leaks on the classification of government documents. • Dean of the University of Florida Law School JON MILLS addresses the constitutional right to privacy and the difficulties of applying it in the digital age.

30 review for After Snowden: Privacy, Secrecy, and Security in the Information Age

  1. 5 out of 5

    June

    I really enjoyed how the writer layered this book in such a way that the reader could really make up their own minds about how they felt about the information given. It was a slow starter for me, but got more interesting in the meat of the book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Scott Haraburda

    Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Book. ------------------------------------ After Snowden: Privacy, Secrecy, and Security in the Information Age is a collection of seven well-crafted essays involving issues related to privacy, security and mass surveillance following Edward Snowden’s release of classified documents about top-secret government surveillance programs. Is the former intelligence contractor a traitor to his country or a hero who exposed a government security state run amok? Clearly, he b Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Book. ------------------------------------ After Snowden: Privacy, Secrecy, and Security in the Information Age is a collection of seven well-crafted essays involving issues related to privacy, security and mass surveillance following Edward Snowden’s release of classified documents about top-secret government surveillance programs. Is the former intelligence contractor a traitor to his country or a hero who exposed a government security state run amok? Clearly, he broke the law, but the manner in which he did so, using journalists to help him handle the information responsibly to avoid injury to covert agents cannot be ignored. The editor of this book, Ronald Godfarb , a lawyer ,provided the introduction that outlined the issues resulting from Snowden’s leaks. Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Barry Siegel narrated a story of three widows who sued the US Air Force for the deaths of their husbands to highlight how the legal system permits the US Government to determine what can be kept secret from the public without judicial review. Former Assistant Secretary of State Hodding Carter III explored whether the press could be justified in receiving and publishing classified information. Dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley, Edward Wasserman , explored the media’s position towards new media source typified by WikiLeaks and whistleblowers. Georgetown law professor David Cole discussed when, if ever, leaks of classified government secrets could be justified, while examining the fallacies in the extreme positions that either all disclosure of classified government information is good or that any unauthorized disclosure of classified information is bad. Thomas Blanton , Director of the National Security Archive at George Washington University, discussed US history regarding security versus privacy. Dean of the University of Florida Law School, Jon L. Mills ,discussed the country’s struggle between the desire for privacy rights and security. Although these essays don’t provide simple answers to pertinent key questions, they provide excellent thoughts into understanding the complex system today. Some of the key questions include: Was Snowden a patriot or a traitor? Where do American privacy rights end? How much control should the Government have in refusing to release information? What is the proper trade-off between protecting civil liberties, privacy, and the people? This book suggest that we need to establish real standards, tests, and consequences involving secrecy to reward proper disclosures and to deter improper ones. After Snowden is an excellent primer for anyone wanting to understand the different perspectives behind privacy and secrecy within the United States. It’s a collection of essays by prominent legal and political experts that examines the boundaries of privacy in America, and the future of its secrecy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Robert Davidson

    Having read George Orwell's 1984 in high school many years ago i have always been interested in "double speak" and the truth. This book provides many insights into Media, Law, whistleblowers and secrecy. Each chapter is written by an expert in their field who lay out the information as they see it which enables the reader to make their own judgement on the pros and cons of Government spying on their citizens. Very good read. Having read George Orwell's 1984 in high school many years ago i have always been interested in "double speak" and the truth. This book provides many insights into Media, Law, whistleblowers and secrecy. Each chapter is written by an expert in their field who lay out the information as they see it which enables the reader to make their own judgement on the pros and cons of Government spying on their citizens. Very good read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Delores Kestler

    The intro was a little long and tended to summarize the other chapters. The centralize point of the book was the United States has too much information that it feels should be secret. The feeling I received from most of the authors that contributed to the book, was that it was ok for people like Snowden to steal and have released classified information if they are doing it for the “greater” good. The chapter I founded most interesting dealt with the media’s role.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Prasanna

    After Snowden peeps into the history of state's position on secrecy and privacy rights. It also evaluates the effect of Snowden leaks on present way of working. ~ http://bookreviews.infoversant.com/af... After Snowden peeps into the history of state's position on secrecy and privacy rights. It also evaluates the effect of Snowden leaks on present way of working. ~ http://bookreviews.infoversant.com/af...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    How and where do we draw the line between secrecy and privacy. That's the question this book asks of five individuals who in one way or another have been a part of the discussion inspired by the Snowden disclosures.. Well worth the read. Really puts the questions in context. How and where do we draw the line between secrecy and privacy. That's the question this book asks of five individuals who in one way or another have been a part of the discussion inspired by the Snowden disclosures.. Well worth the read. Really puts the questions in context.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leolle

    What to do with snowden and Jillian ? Who should judge them? There are questions for laywer, government, journalists, whistle blower and citizens.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Stuckey

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ronda Boccio

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ashraf

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kait

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sdg

  13. 5 out of 5

    Giancarlo Pichardo

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  15. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

  16. 4 out of 5

    Martha

  17. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nik

  19. 5 out of 5

    C.J. Ruby

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carlisle Willard

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eti

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  24. 4 out of 5

    Efil

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kirkebys Kommunikation

  27. 5 out of 5

    Diana

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gareth Kay

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adam Bartley

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amy

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