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Trouble On Titan (Lancer Sf, 72 159)

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Trouble on Titan (Lancer SF, 72-159)


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Trouble on Titan (Lancer SF, 72-159)

30 review for Trouble On Titan (Lancer Sf, 72 159)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    Originally published in 1954 as part of the Winston line of juvenile sf (what they call y.a. these days), I thought Trouble on Titan held up fairly well from a scientific viewpoint. Of course there was no such thing as diversity in 1954, and certainly no such thing as sex, at least in books for young people (the only mention of female characters is as Mrs. Someone or Mom), but it's not a bad science puzzle story. Nourse wrote a number of books for younger readers, as well as some good sf stories Originally published in 1954 as part of the Winston line of juvenile sf (what they call y.a. these days), I thought Trouble on Titan held up fairly well from a scientific viewpoint. Of course there was no such thing as diversity in 1954, and certainly no such thing as sex, at least in books for young people (the only mention of female characters is as Mrs. Someone or Mom), but it's not a bad science puzzle story. Nourse wrote a number of books for younger readers, as well as some good sf stories with a medical backdrop. (I've been told that his name should be pronounced "Nurse" rather than "Norse.") The plot has a couple of questionable coincidental twists, but it's a fun if predictable adventure. The book includes an entertaining introduction that explains what he was trying to accomplish and how he went about it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joe Santoro

    I've read a few other juvenile stories from this era, and this one certainly carries plenty of similarities to the ones Heinlein and others wrote... the kids in the story come together to figure out a problem the adults can't solve because they're too bound in their ways. It's a well executed verision of that plot, but it's pretty much the same one you can read lots of other places. This one also mixed in a fair bit of the older adventure/travelogue of the solar system type story... we find a set I've read a few other juvenile stories from this era, and this one certainly carries plenty of similarities to the ones Heinlein and others wrote... the kids in the story come together to figure out a problem the adults can't solve because they're too bound in their ways. It's a well executed verision of that plot, but it's pretty much the same one you can read lots of other places. This one also mixed in a fair bit of the older adventure/travelogue of the solar system type story... we find a settled universe, but one that's 'realistic' (for what was known in 1954, anyway). There are semi-sentient aliens on Titan, but nothing like Burroughs. (funnily enough, said aliens are mentioned only casually and are totally unimportant). It also has a much more realistic time line for space colonization than most... many 50s and 60s books had moon colonies by 1990.. this one imagines the first moon landing in 1976 and takes place 200 years later. There was also a nice shout out to Heinlein with 'Rolling Roads' as a key form of transport on Earth, which made me smile. The story was really just one big logic whole away from 5 stars... the premise is that the miners on Titan are unhappy because they mine the Macguffinium (sorry, it's too late for me to find the name of the pretend element) that makes the worlds energy go. But, how'd they get to Titan to discover it without the energy? They talk about atomics a bit, but it's clear that World Infrastructure can only support the mining colonies in space because of the mineral . I guess maybe there was a bit on Earth? Or they had nuclear plants that lasted long enough to get going? Anyway, I know that's totally not the point and has nothing to do with the plot, but it bugged me a bit. Otherwise, a great classic 'YA' sci fi.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Thom

    Likely compared to the Heinlein juveniles which were published around the same time, I found this story to be quite a bit better. Ten years later, RAH would dedicate his novel Farnham's Freehold to Alan E. Nourse, and Trouble on Titan was his first published full-length work. The descriptions of Titan are darn close to what probes found fifty years after this book was published, even though the silicon life forms are a bit fanciful. Women could have played a stronger role here, especially as the Likely compared to the Heinlein juveniles which were published around the same time, I found this story to be quite a bit better. Ten years later, RAH would dedicate his novel Farnham's Freehold to Alan E. Nourse, and Trouble on Titan was his first published full-length work. The descriptions of Titan are darn close to what probes found fifty years after this book was published, even though the silicon life forms are a bit fanciful. Women could have played a stronger role here, especially as the colony was described as balanced. The story works well, even though the villain is mostly a cliche. There is a good reason this novel was included in the Winston science fiction series (juvenile novels with a focus on science) and James Wallace Harris' "Defining Science Fiction Books of the 50s" list. Definitely looking forward to reading more from the late Alan Nourse in the near future!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eugene

    Could be forty years since I read this as a lad. At first I struggled to suspend my disbelief at the rather unbelievable plot (e.g. senior Earth diplomat/troubleshooter takes son with him on extremely dangerous mission!) but by the end I had really enjoyed the story and was reminded of why I'd loved it all those years ago. Distant mining colonies, rocket ships, tunnels, strange alien creatures, rebellious miners, etc. Oh yeah. :-) Could be forty years since I read this as a lad. At first I struggled to suspend my disbelief at the rather unbelievable plot (e.g. senior Earth diplomat/troubleshooter takes son with him on extremely dangerous mission!) but by the end I had really enjoyed the story and was reminded of why I'd loved it all those years ago. Distant mining colonies, rocket ships, tunnels, strange alien creatures, rebellious miners, etc. Oh yeah. :-)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    Trouble on Titan is just the kind of science fiction I like, with things like spaceship building and planet exploration. However, it didn't grip me; it was a little too predictable, a little repetitive and drawn out. There were one or two ideas of interest, like a jet designed to fly in a methane atmosphere using oxygen for it's fuel. Trouble on Titan is just the kind of science fiction I like, with things like spaceship building and planet exploration. However, it didn't grip me; it was a little too predictable, a little repetitive and drawn out. There were one or two ideas of interest, like a jet designed to fly in a methane atmosphere using oxygen for it's fuel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael Ritchie

    Thin plotting and pulp science fiction of its time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    Trouble on Titan was the 2nd "real" Sci-Fi I'd ever read... back in 5th grade (with some difficulty), yet it isn't a "juvie" book. It's plot was the basis for years of space dreams and books I thought I'd write. By no coincidence, my fave computer game is Sid's "Alpha Centauri", an extension -in a way- of the story in my mind. I first read it so long ago that only recently did I rediscover that Alan E. Nourse, now one of my top 10 authors, penned Trouble on Titan (such nice surprises are stock a Trouble on Titan was the 2nd "real" Sci-Fi I'd ever read... back in 5th grade (with some difficulty), yet it isn't a "juvie" book. It's plot was the basis for years of space dreams and books I thought I'd write. By no coincidence, my fave computer game is Sid's "Alpha Centauri", an extension -in a way- of the story in my mind. I first read it so long ago that only recently did I rediscover that Alan E. Nourse, now one of my top 10 authors, penned Trouble on Titan (such nice surprises are stock and trade in Sci-Fi). Nourse has always been good with tight plots and well thought-out scientific and insightful psychic extrapolations (His "The Universe Between" is in my 10 best... because I'd personally experienced something very like it). He also seems to me somewhat less stilted and 50's "aw-shucks" than many of his contemporaries with personal interactions. So as not to kill the plot, I'll state ToT is the story of the Earth colony on Saturn's huge moon Titan and it's inhabitant's struggle for self rule and their novel solution. Titan's atmosphere and cold temps give interesting options for scientific advances and living. Nourse takes some advantage of that to the advantage of many authors afterwards. One of my fave concepts was the methane breathing jet engines that used oxygen for fuel. Today it may be somewhat dated but for the those who enjoy the wide-eyed 50's way of Sci-Fi prose, and to a ready mind, ToT is still a very good book with many valid concepts and emotions to convey.

  8. 4 out of 5

    SciFiOne

    1984 grade C+ Juvenile

  9. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    One of the Winston juvenile sci-fi series. Read back in 1998.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  12. 5 out of 5

    James Elliott

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lrwhalin

  16. 4 out of 5

    Douglas

  17. 4 out of 5

    John Worpenberg

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Speelman

  19. 5 out of 5

    Samfish9999

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ken

  21. 4 out of 5

    Isidore

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  23. 5 out of 5

    Donald Franck

  24. 4 out of 5

    B.B.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    Pretty good s-f novel of my youth.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daryl

  27. 5 out of 5

    Florian Jonas

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vera

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robert P. Williams

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michael

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