web site hit counter First Ladies: Presidential Historians on the Lives of 45 Iconic American Women - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

First Ladies: Presidential Historians on the Lives of 45 Iconic American Women

Availability: Ready to download

A look inside the personal life of every first lady in American history, based on original interviews with major historians C-SPAN's yearlong history series, First Ladies: Influence and Image, featured interviews with more than fifty preeminent historians and biographers. In this informative book, these experts paint intimate portraits of all forty-five first ladies -- the A look inside the personal life of every first lady in American history, based on original interviews with major historians C-SPAN's yearlong history series, First Ladies: Influence and Image, featured interviews with more than fifty preeminent historians and biographers. In this informative book, these experts paint intimate portraits of all forty-five first ladies -- their lives, ambitions, and unique partnerships with their presidential spouses. Susan Swain and the C-SPAN team elicit the details that made these women who they were: how Martha Washington intentionally set the standards followed by first ladies for the next century; how Edith Wilson was complicit in the cover-up when President Wilson became incapacitated after a stroke; and how Mamie Eisenhower used the new medium of television to reinforce her, and her husband's, positive public images. This book provides an up-close historical look at these fascinating women who survived the scrutiny of the White House, sometimes at great personal cost, while supporting their families and famous husbands -- and sometimes changing history. Complete with illustrations and essential biographical details, it is an illuminating, entertaining, and ultimately inspiring read.


Compare

A look inside the personal life of every first lady in American history, based on original interviews with major historians C-SPAN's yearlong history series, First Ladies: Influence and Image, featured interviews with more than fifty preeminent historians and biographers. In this informative book, these experts paint intimate portraits of all forty-five first ladies -- the A look inside the personal life of every first lady in American history, based on original interviews with major historians C-SPAN's yearlong history series, First Ladies: Influence and Image, featured interviews with more than fifty preeminent historians and biographers. In this informative book, these experts paint intimate portraits of all forty-five first ladies -- their lives, ambitions, and unique partnerships with their presidential spouses. Susan Swain and the C-SPAN team elicit the details that made these women who they were: how Martha Washington intentionally set the standards followed by first ladies for the next century; how Edith Wilson was complicit in the cover-up when President Wilson became incapacitated after a stroke; and how Mamie Eisenhower used the new medium of television to reinforce her, and her husband's, positive public images. This book provides an up-close historical look at these fascinating women who survived the scrutiny of the White House, sometimes at great personal cost, while supporting their families and famous husbands -- and sometimes changing history. Complete with illustrations and essential biographical details, it is an illuminating, entertaining, and ultimately inspiring read.

30 review for First Ladies: Presidential Historians on the Lives of 45 Iconic American Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fred Klein

    This is a great read if you want a book about history, but prefer to read it as a conversation between historians, rather than as a narrative or as a recitation of facts. This is the wrong book for you if you are looking for hard facts about the first ladies. Anything you get from this source should be verified.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marlena

    The biggest take away from this book: Most of the first ladies were even more impressive than their husbands and contributed a great deal to our country's history and trajectory. That being said, this book is just a primer for all the first ladies. Truly, not much information can be given about each first lady in such a short amount of space. However, I am ok with that and have since resolved to read more about the lives of many of the first ladies from autobiographies and biographies of them. T The biggest take away from this book: Most of the first ladies were even more impressive than their husbands and contributed a great deal to our country's history and trajectory. That being said, this book is just a primer for all the first ladies. Truly, not much information can be given about each first lady in such a short amount of space. However, I am ok with that and have since resolved to read more about the lives of many of the first ladies from autobiographies and biographies of them. There are many fascinating facts and many surprising ones too. This book is a bit difficult to get through and sometimes boring in the way that the first ladies are presented- through historians who seem to be speaking verbally to the reader. This style sometimes makes it difficult to read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sylvia Feicht

    This was a good condensation from the C-SPAN series on the first ladies.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    I loved this book, which is a compilation of excerpts from a CSPAN series on the first ladies. This was very informative and entertaining at the same time.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Arlene

    A quick overview of the first ladies of the land from Martha Washington to Michelle Obama. I always enjoy reading about the ladies behind the presidency!

  6. 5 out of 5

    jackie

    More of a reference but good short biographies.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rev. Linda

    Sister bought me this when we toured the George W. Bush museum at SMU - fascinating details on the First Ladies from Martha Washington through Michelle Obama -- FROM THE PUBLISHER: C-SPAN's yearlong history series, First Ladies: Influence and Image, featured interviews with more than fifty preeminent historians and biographers. In this informative book, these experts paint intimate portraits of all forty-five first ladies—their lives, ambitions, and unique partnerships with their presidential sp Sister bought me this when we toured the George W. Bush museum at SMU - fascinating details on the First Ladies from Martha Washington through Michelle Obama -- FROM THE PUBLISHER: C-SPAN's yearlong history series, First Ladies: Influence and Image, featured interviews with more than fifty preeminent historians and biographers. In this informative book, these experts paint intimate portraits of all forty-five first ladies—their lives, ambitions, and unique partnerships with their presidential spouses. Susan Swain and the C-SPAN team elicit the details that made these women who they were: how Martha Washington intentionally set the standards followed by first ladies for the next century; how Edith Wilson was complicit in the cover-up when President Wilson became incapacitated after a stroke; and how Mamie Eisenhower used the new medium of television to reinforce her, and her husband's, positive public images. This book provides an up-close historical look at these fascinating women who survived the scrutiny of the White House, sometimes at great personal cost, while supporting their families and famous husbands—and sometimes changing history. Complete with illustrations and essential biographical details, it is an illuminating, entertaining, and ultimately inspiring read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This fascinating and complete look at First Ladies made me sorry I'm a cord cutter. I would have liked to see the C-Span series as it ran. I'm sure it was fascinating from what I understand it appealed to an audience that ran the gamut from grade schoolers to people who are likely contemporaries of the women profiled. I liked that this book profiled the women who didn't live long enough to see their husbands in the White House but impacted the men's lives none the less. I also liked that we got p This fascinating and complete look at First Ladies made me sorry I'm a cord cutter. I would have liked to see the C-Span series as it ran. I'm sure it was fascinating from what I understand it appealed to an audience that ran the gamut from grade schoolers to people who are likely contemporaries of the women profiled. I liked that this book profiled the women who didn't live long enough to see their husbands in the White House but impacted the men's lives none the less. I also liked that we got profiles of the women who did serve as the official White House if there was no First Lady. It was interesting to see that many of the wives were better educated than their husbands. I'm proud to say that many of the women from Ohio were among the best educated. So many things to make them interesting figures even today. Besides the obvious favorites I liked Lou Hoover and her business like approach to her partnership and marriage that she took all the way to the White House. And who knew Grace Coolidge was crazy about baseball just like so many of us today?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Flewts

    I was pleasantly surprised to discover that this is not in-depth biographical studies, but rather an overview of each first lady. For some of the early ones, or ones whose husband died early, there isn't a lot of information anyway. Rather, the emphasis is on what they contributed as first ladies, and how their earlier experiences informed them, and in some cases, what they went on to do after they left the White House. Even with more controversial figures, the historians did not show bias, but I was pleasantly surprised to discover that this is not in-depth biographical studies, but rather an overview of each first lady. For some of the early ones, or ones whose husband died early, there isn't a lot of information anyway. Rather, the emphasis is on what they contributed as first ladies, and how their earlier experiences informed them, and in some cases, what they went on to do after they left the White House. Even with more controversial figures, the historians did not show bias, but simply reported what happened. I was expecting to have to wade through long chapters on Eleanor Roosevelt, Jackie Kennedy, and the more recent first ladies, but all were given--as much as possible--equal time, about 9-12 pages each. Very interesting, very readable, and will give a sense of the history of each period without an intense history lesson.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Page

    Transcribed conversations from a C-SPAN series on first ladies (and other White House hostesses) and their social, political and historical contributions. A fun read in a light tone, very accessible and a good portal to further interest and research. However, it is a bit disjointed and reading an entire book formatted like an interview is a bit wearying. I wish it had Melania Trump in it, but given the acrimonious political and personal feelings against President Trump, maybe it's best that ther Transcribed conversations from a C-SPAN series on first ladies (and other White House hostesses) and their social, political and historical contributions. A fun read in a light tone, very accessible and a good portal to further interest and research. However, it is a bit disjointed and reading an entire book formatted like an interview is a bit wearying. I wish it had Melania Trump in it, but given the acrimonious political and personal feelings against President Trump, maybe it's best that there is some distance before she is added to a book. I'll tell you one thing, reading this book makes me feel a lot better about the rotten politics today! They mention how DC is a swamp, and how it had a rat problem (both in the very literal sense), and I just had to chuckle!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Siska

    I had really missed reading about history. This was the perfect dose. I had read a little of this last year when I was working on a research paper about the first ladies during the Cold War. So, I really wanted to read the rest of it. I would definitely recommend this if you just want a starting point for learning about the first ladies. There are not a lot of details in this book because they cover each woman, but it does tell the highlights to get you interested in learning more about some of I had really missed reading about history. This was the perfect dose. I had read a little of this last year when I was working on a research paper about the first ladies during the Cold War. So, I really wanted to read the rest of it. I would definitely recommend this if you just want a starting point for learning about the first ladies. There are not a lot of details in this book because they cover each woman, but it does tell the highlights to get you interested in learning more about some of them.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kshydog

    More tidbits of each ladies lives. Actually made some seem much nicer and better than I had learned. Forgot how long women were considered almost 2nd class by society but not by their husbands. Enjoyed getting info on them as a person with feelings. Not written in story form but liked having 2 views about the ladies. Amazing how many felt decorating was so important to the White House - in 4 yrs did so many trash it? Different perspective than I would have given for recent ladies.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    A good overview of "the women behind the man." One thing that struck me is that it appears that these marriages have been fairly strong, with a few exceptions. Interesting to think about how a strong couple can be greater than the sum of their parts. The peripheral history recounted was also interesting.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    Good historical reminder of the lives, ambitions, and work of American First Ladies. I noted especially the partnership many had with this husbands in the political careers. I had to skip reading about two recent women. Too painful to think about them and this destructive influence on the country.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Noffke

    Found most of it fascinating. Some First Ladies are a little dull. Many are very dynamic. Most are very supportive of their President husbands in their own way and in their culture, their own causes, and their families. Learned many things I didn't know. "Mark, listen to this! I didn't know that!"

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lily Li

    I enjoyed this book a lot simply because it is comprehensive and manageable. I know there were a lot with each president/ first last but it would be too much to differentiate the key points. So this is the key point summary of all the First Ladies.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Apryl McLean

    I liked this book because it was written with several historians and each historian had a first lady s/he was an expert on. This book gave me more details than many other books about the first ladies.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Lots of great information, very interesting. A bit hard to read with all the parentheses for assumed words. Even so, would definitely recommend.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Great resource to have in your library. Each First Lady's chapter was written by different people, but all very knowledgeable and interesting.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eliz

    Anytime a book is covering this many people you realize it's not going to be in depth but I really felt this was too much fluff.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Weikle

    This is just a transcript of the TV series on CSPAN...there are some good tid-bits but not the book to pick up if you want a real history of the First Ladies. Couldn’t get through it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    A good overview of all First Ladies. Even those that never made it to the White House . A good starting point for anyone interested in the First Ladies.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bethany Stewart

    If your looking for a short summary of each First Lady this is a great book to read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Based on the CSPAN series on First Ladies: http://firstladies.c-span.org/About.aspx. This book is a good jumping off point to do more in depth research on the lives of the First Ladies. Each vignette gives basic information about each of the wives and their contribution. I didn't know much about many of our First Ladies prior to reading this book. It has served to whet my appetite for more information. I highly recommend it. Based on the CSPAN series on First Ladies: http://firstladies.c-span.org/About.aspx. This book is a good jumping off point to do more in depth research on the lives of the First Ladies. Each vignette gives basic information about each of the wives and their contribution. I didn't know much about many of our First Ladies prior to reading this book. It has served to whet my appetite for more information. I highly recommend it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sheryl

    Short chapters outlining each of our nation's First Ladies. Read chronologically, it is also a history of the growth of women in politics and in society, as well. The most striking thing for me was how it took until the beginning of the 20th century before children were consistently outliving their mothers. I can't even imagine the heartbreak that most families experienced before that time.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Todd Schafer

    Rosalyn Smith Carter was instrumental in getting mental disorders classified as a disease. Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy and Pat Ryan Nixon were chainsmokers. Jane Appleton Pierce was probably the unhappiest First Lady constantly grieving over the loss of a son. Losing children seemed to happen to a lot of the First Families. Eleanor Roosevelt was the niece of Teddy Roosevelt. She was also the first FIrst Lady to develop a pet project. Lady Bird Johnson was behind beautifying the surrounding landscape Rosalyn Smith Carter was instrumental in getting mental disorders classified as a disease. Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy and Pat Ryan Nixon were chainsmokers. Jane Appleton Pierce was probably the unhappiest First Lady constantly grieving over the loss of a son. Losing children seemed to happen to a lot of the First Families. Eleanor Roosevelt was the niece of Teddy Roosevelt. She was also the first FIrst Lady to develop a pet project. Lady Bird Johnson was behind beautifying the surrounding landscape areas of the White House. Grover Cleveland married Francis Folsom while in office. Truman and Eisenhower did not get along although their respective spouses, Bess Wallace Truman and Mamie Dowd, did. Michelle Obama's maiden name was Robinson; which was something I don't think I'd ever heard before. Everyone has heard of Clinton's Rodham maiden name. . ...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christie

    From Martha Washington to Michelle Obama, most of the forty-five women you will read about in this book are famous because of the men they married. Forty-five women in our nation's history have called the White House home. Though they were not the ones elected, most of them wielded influence over their husband's presidency and each left their own legacy on the office of President. This book not only touches on their national importance, but the personal triumphs and tragedies that many experi From Martha Washington to Michelle Obama, most of the forty-five women you will read about in this book are famous because of the men they married. Forty-five women in our nation's history have called the White House home. Though they were not the ones elected, most of them wielded influence over their husband's presidency and each left their own legacy on the office of President. This book not only touches on their national importance, but the personal triumphs and tragedies that many experienced on the road to the White House and everything that came after. I have been fascinated by the First Ladies of the United States since visiting the Smithsonian's First Ladies exhibit as a child. This book was a great look into these women as people beyond their husbands' presidencies. Unlike their husbands, they for the most part didn't ask to be in the limelight and the ways they handled their lives on the national stage while balancing family life and their own personal ambitions are definitely interesting to read about. The format of the book takes some getting used to. The book is made up of transcripts from interviews with historians that C-SPAN conducted from February 2014-February 2015. As such there is not a lot of cohesion between the chapters. Each first lady's life is told from the perspective of two historians with very little overlap among the chapters, giving very uneven coverage. Also, for whatever reason the questions asked of the historians are not included in the book, so occasionally it feels like things are being brought up out of thin air breaking up the narrative. If you are looking for a straight biographical, unbiased source on the first ladies you will probably want to look elsewhere. But if you are looking for a more personal look at these 45 women then this may be the book for you. Regardless of your politics, this book is an engrossing women's history book and definitely worth a read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chuck

    Some interesting insights but hard to follow in places. I guess it's supposed to be transcriptions of conversations between experts but it's often disjunctive. One expert has a paragraph about Ida McKinley's health, and the other launches into what feels like a non sequitur about Leon Czolgosz.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    This is not a straight narrative book, it is an interviewed written. She has transcribed the interviews of pertinent historians on the first ladies. So if you are hoping for capsule biographies of all the first ladies (which the introduction tells you it is not), embellished by biographical observations by historians. There's plenty of embellishment, but not much in the way of personal history. These are kind of rambling conversations. The author and the historians are all well known and experts This is not a straight narrative book, it is an interviewed written. She has transcribed the interviews of pertinent historians on the first ladies. So if you are hoping for capsule biographies of all the first ladies (which the introduction tells you it is not), embellished by biographical observations by historians. There's plenty of embellishment, but not much in the way of personal history. These are kind of rambling conversations. The author and the historians are all well known and experts on the first ladies. They are knowledgeable and fascinated by their subjects, which I always find contagious. However, the lay out could of been a bit more organized on each first lady and less rambling. It is also very abbreviated on each first lady not much depth. So I have to say I was a bit disappointed.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    This book resulted from a video series by CSPAN (which I haven’t seen). The format consists of a very brief chapter about each FLOTUS (or in some cases, the women who acted as hostess for the president), with a couple of historians basically chatting back and forth about her. These could not be considered biographies by any stretch, providing somewhat anecdotal information and subjective interpretation. I’m not sure if this is a transcript (or more likely, excerpts from the transcript) of the sh This book resulted from a video series by CSPAN (which I haven’t seen). The format consists of a very brief chapter about each FLOTUS (or in some cases, the women who acted as hostess for the president), with a couple of historians basically chatting back and forth about her. These could not be considered biographies by any stretch, providing somewhat anecdotal information and subjective interpretation. I’m not sure if this is a transcript (or more likely, excerpts from the transcript) of the show. It took awhile to get used to this method of presentation, but I enjoyed it. I’ve read full biographies of many of the first ladies, and this book is a good way for individual readers to get a sense of which ones they might like to learn more about.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.