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Infinite Science Fiction One

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From a sentient space ship lost in deep space to a man whose hatred of robots risks tearing his family apart, the characters in this collection of short stories will stay with you long after you’ve turned the last page. Discover the future face of human trafficking through the eyes of a little girl, follow an ancient tribe’s shaman as he embarks on a journey to save his pe From a sentient space ship lost in deep space to a man whose hatred of robots risks tearing his family apart, the characters in this collection of short stories will stay with you long after you’ve turned the last page. Discover the future face of human trafficking through the eyes of a little girl, follow an ancient tribe’s shaman as he embarks on a journey to save his people, or share in an astronaut’s final moments as an alien growth takes over his body; these are just some of the thrilling adventures packed into Infinite Science Fiction One. Infinite Science Fiction is intended to be a long-running series of anthologies. We aim to collect some of the best science fiction stories from all over the world. We will be back. # TABLE OF CONTENTS: Introduction by Dany G. Zuwen -- “REAL” by Janka Hobbs -- “BY THE NUMBERS” by Tim Major -- “TIN SOUL” by Elizabeth Bannon -- “SIX MINUTES” by P. Anthony Ramanauskas -- “MATCHMAKER” by John Walters -- “THE WEDDING” by Nick Hilbourn -- “SLOW” by Jay Wilburn “GOSPEL OF” by Rebecca Ann Jordan -- “THE SILENT DEAD” by Dan Devine -- “NOTHING BESIDE REMAINS” by Matthew S. Dent -- “THE NIGHT WITH STARS” by William Ledbetter -- “BUTTERFLIES” by Doug Tidwell -- “MESSAGE OF WAR” by Michaele Jordan -- “ROLLING BY IN THE MOONLIGHT” by Liam Nicholas Pezzano -- “INFINITY” by J.B. Rockwell


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From a sentient space ship lost in deep space to a man whose hatred of robots risks tearing his family apart, the characters in this collection of short stories will stay with you long after you’ve turned the last page. Discover the future face of human trafficking through the eyes of a little girl, follow an ancient tribe’s shaman as he embarks on a journey to save his pe From a sentient space ship lost in deep space to a man whose hatred of robots risks tearing his family apart, the characters in this collection of short stories will stay with you long after you’ve turned the last page. Discover the future face of human trafficking through the eyes of a little girl, follow an ancient tribe’s shaman as he embarks on a journey to save his people, or share in an astronaut’s final moments as an alien growth takes over his body; these are just some of the thrilling adventures packed into Infinite Science Fiction One. Infinite Science Fiction is intended to be a long-running series of anthologies. We aim to collect some of the best science fiction stories from all over the world. We will be back. # TABLE OF CONTENTS: Introduction by Dany G. Zuwen -- “REAL” by Janka Hobbs -- “BY THE NUMBERS” by Tim Major -- “TIN SOUL” by Elizabeth Bannon -- “SIX MINUTES” by P. Anthony Ramanauskas -- “MATCHMAKER” by John Walters -- “THE WEDDING” by Nick Hilbourn -- “SLOW” by Jay Wilburn “GOSPEL OF” by Rebecca Ann Jordan -- “THE SILENT DEAD” by Dan Devine -- “NOTHING BESIDE REMAINS” by Matthew S. Dent -- “THE NIGHT WITH STARS” by William Ledbetter -- “BUTTERFLIES” by Doug Tidwell -- “MESSAGE OF WAR” by Michaele Jordan -- “ROLLING BY IN THE MOONLIGHT” by Liam Nicholas Pezzano -- “INFINITY” by J.B. Rockwell

30 review for Infinite Science Fiction One

  1. 5 out of 5

    Claudia {SparrowHawk}

    Originally posted @ My Soul Called Life SPARROW'S THOUGHTS: Just in time for the fall season, a collection of science fiction and science speculative short stories which tingled the spine and pumped the heart. Infinite Science Fiction One was a delightfully engaging harvest read for this delicate Sparrowhawk. Sprinkled with uncertain and intriguing situations, this assemblage of tales without fail, has something to engage any reader that relishes space travel, a future era where and Originally posted @ My Soul Called Life SPARROW'S THOUGHTS: Just in time for the fall season, a collection of science fiction and science speculative short stories which tingled the spine and pumped the heart. Infinite Science Fiction One was a delightfully engaging harvest read for this delicate Sparrowhawk. Sprinkled with uncertain and intriguing situations, this assemblage of tales without fail, has something to engage any reader that relishes space travel, a future era where androids are indistinguishable at their best, and deserts escapade seasoned with a tang of romance; to name a few. Why this book though since it is by definition, far from what I typically read? (sighs deeply) the book cover (double face palm). I have a serious condition huh? If you really must know, I am one who admittedly judges a book by its cover. redface But all jokes aside, the book cover had a video game cover appeal to it! And correct me if I’m wrong, but doesn’t the figure on the cover shadow Metal Gear’s Psycho Mantis!? ((Squee)) If you've ever played Metal Gear Solid, and have suffered through Psycho Manits' demented schemes, then: a. You are somewhat reckless and one of the rare human species categorized under "awesome" b. You understand the direction my thoughts lead me to when I decided on this book  Ultimately, Infinite Science Fiction One proved to be a good anthology of science and speculative fiction. I wasn't thoroughly engrossed with all the stories, but some were seriously really good. IN A NUTSHELL: // The collection is a terrific volume; I found the short stories to be well-defined and easy to read // As it is a collection of short stories, some stories will stand out against the others, but each story has a great quality of its own // You are bound to find more than a few stories that will appease to your liking; that's for sure! // Remember The Twilight Zone? Tales from the Crypt? Yeah, this is what the overall mood of the book feels like; it also reads like a comic book, but more than anything, the entire book is eerie and chilling as all science fiction tales should rightfully be ;) // All the authors hold great potential to release stand alone novels; good job team! // This is a good "buffet book" for science fiction fans; you get to choose and pick what you like // I enjoyed the book! It entertained; it may not have been my favorite, but I still think it's worth reading 3 Things I liked: + Real. Even though this short story encouraged what appears to be human trafficking, it tugged at the heart. For instance, how far are you willing to go in order to ensure a safe and secure future for your children? Also, Crystal, the spunky and optimistic little girl who was the lead protagonist in this short story, was super adorable. It literally felt as though I was there holding her hand, and I feared for her protection! The author easily connects the reader with the characters in this story <3 + Most interesting for me though, was the third story in the collection, Tin Soul, which makes the reader a participant in the story. The plot concerns a parent who is struggling to find resolve with living in a world shared with robots, but there is a most delicious interesting twist at the end, that not only left me begging for more, but allowed me to experience the story as if it was my own! And because the second person point of view is seldom used, it felt original and refreshing + The book cover. It's the first thing you see and an intriguing cover goes a long way don't you agree? ;) Personally, a book cover is a crucial element to the overall reading experience 3 Things I Did Not Like: - The introduction was a bit leery for me. I felt it carried a heavy agnostic tone and to be frank, I saw no real aim for it, other than the author found inspiration through Bible stories to write "extravagant" narratives? Yeeeaaah, it just rubbed off the wrong way and intentionally placed barbed wire around my approach towards the book, but my mileage will vary from yours, and we'll leave it at that ;) - Flow. I really wanted to like this short story as it reminded me so much of the video game Dead Space, but the unfolding of the story line felt scattered. The scenes were believable, yes, but it felt like the narrator was the only one who was able see what was happening! - There were a few short stories that I did loose interest with, and thus I found myself skimming through them. . .so, there's a possibility of gliding over quickly through some tales ;) Overall Rating: Storyline | 3/5 Sparrowhawks Characters | 2/5 Sparrowhawks Violence | Heavy Profanities | Heavy Sexual Content | Moderate Mature subjects/themes include, but are limited to: loss of a loved one, death, assault and battery, family strife, divorce, parent-teenage conflict, child abandonment, human trafficking, torture, kidnapping, lesbianism, drinking, under-aged drinking, abuse of alcohol and drugs, social conflicts, paranormal, idealisms that consistent with theism NOTE: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley for the purpose of this review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Veleda

    I received a free advanced reading copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. A solid, satisfying collection of stories that truly live up to the name of “speculative fiction.” An anthology is always a risk, but I don't think there's a truly bad story in the whole bunch, although some stand out more than others. A few felt limited by the short story format--”Rolling by in the Moonlight” seems to end just as it sets the scene, and likewise, “Real” feels a bit like a setup for a longer stor I received a free advanced reading copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. A solid, satisfying collection of stories that truly live up to the name of “speculative fiction.” An anthology is always a risk, but I don't think there's a truly bad story in the whole bunch, although some stand out more than others. A few felt limited by the short story format--”Rolling by in the Moonlight” seems to end just as it sets the scene, and likewise, “Real” feels a bit like a setup for a longer story. But plenty of others do wonderful things with the space they have, such as “Six Minutes” and “By the Numbers.” A vein of horror runs through the stories. Some are straight up horror like “The Wedding” and “Slow,” while others just have an eerie feel. I can absolutely see “By the Numbers” being the basis for an episode of the classic Twilight Zone. Favorites: “By the Numbers,” “Infinity,” “The Night With the Stars.” All in all, a really nice collection that gives the reader a taste of what speculative fiction can do.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kanta

    This SF short story collection is the first in a series of speculative fiction collections, produced by the Belgium-based publishing house Infinite Acacia. The anthology presents fifteen largely new writers, whose stories, according to editor Dany G. Zuwen, have in common that their premise "as of today, is impossible". The stories range from the extremely short, readable while waiting in line at the supermarket (P. Anthony Ramanauskas's 'Six Minutes' takes you, well, exactly six minutes to read This SF short story collection is the first in a series of speculative fiction collections, produced by the Belgium-based publishing house Infinite Acacia. The anthology presents fifteen largely new writers, whose stories, according to editor Dany G. Zuwen, have in common that their premise "as of today, is impossible". The stories range from the extremely short, readable while waiting in line at the supermarket (P. Anthony Ramanauskas's 'Six Minutes' takes you, well, exactly six minutes to read) to the longer, though this in itself says nothing about their complexity. Janka Hobbs's story 'Real' opens the collection, but this perhaps was not the best choice. The story ends rather abruptly right at the moment where a more interesting development could have been introduced. There are better stories in this collection, such as the one that follows. This would be Tim Major's story 'By the Numbers', which deals with the current trend of the quantifiable self in an original and disturbing manner. Major pessimistically shows how addictive this practice is, as even the most rooted skeptic cannot help himself, joining in while ostensibly not even curious about the matter. One of the most compellingly written stories in the collection is Dan Devine's 'The Silent Dead', about a planet that has cut itself off from communication with other human-inhabited planets. It reads like a prequel of Alastair Reynold's Century Rain. 'Butterflies' by Doug Tidwell is an equally amazing story. It is unexpectedy sad and beautiful, even though the premise of the story is based on infinite stupidity and very dodgy astronaut training. J.B. Rockwell's 'Infinity' accomplishes what few writers have done before: the story makes the reader feel compassionate about an object. A spaceship, in this story. As in Wall-e, the spaceship and its maintenance robots draw more compassion from the reader than its human crew. All in all, this anthology is a worthwhile read. The editor has found a few excellent new authors of whom I am looking forward to read more.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Corinne

    This is a collection of science fiction stories by various authors. While I prefer to read short-story collections that have some sort of joining themes, the variety of science fiction and the quality of the stories makes up for this. There is a bit of something for everyone here - including time-travel, exploration, horror, romance, artificial intelligence and speculative science. Not all the stories were a hit with me, but none of them were complete misses, either. My three favorite stories wer This is a collection of science fiction stories by various authors. While I prefer to read short-story collections that have some sort of joining themes, the variety of science fiction and the quality of the stories makes up for this. There is a bit of something for everyone here - including time-travel, exploration, horror, romance, artificial intelligence and speculative science. Not all the stories were a hit with me, but none of them were complete misses, either. My three favorite stories were the first story, 'Real', another called 'The Silent Dead', and a story called 'Nothing Beside Remains'. Even the stories I didn't particularly care for were well written, and I simply didn't care for them because they aren't a story type I like. 'The Wedding', for example, is horror more than science fiction to me, but it was well done regardless. A few of the stories did feel clipped at the end, even for short-stories. Some felt unresolved. One of the hardest aspects about writing short fiction is the ending - leaving the reader appeased and not making the story feel like it's been abruptly cut off. Overall, this is a recommended read for science fiction fans. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher with a request for honest feedback.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Infinite Science Fiction One' is a pretty good collection of sf stories. I rather liked all of them, but I had favorites by the end. There are themes of robots, like a conman trying to pass a real child off to a family as a robot child, or the man who loathes robots and the reasons that he does. A captured shapeshifting alien gets a chance at escape. A time-traveler finds romance in catastrophe. An expedition tries to find out about a missing colony and finds terrifying results. A lonely rover s 'Infinite Science Fiction One' is a pretty good collection of sf stories. I rather liked all of them, but I had favorites by the end. There are themes of robots, like a conman trying to pass a real child off to a family as a robot child, or the man who loathes robots and the reasons that he does. A captured shapeshifting alien gets a chance at escape. A time-traveler finds romance in catastrophe. An expedition tries to find out about a missing colony and finds terrifying results. A lonely rover sends out a message without answer. A sentient shipwreck guards its precious cargo until it can be recovered. I really liked the stories in this collection. They are all interesting and unique. I liked the takes on stories about a child pretending to be a perfect robot child. I especially like the final story about a dying smartship protecting it's cargo with the help of a onboard robot. Every story has a short bio about the author. I don't know that I was familiar with any of the authors, but I still enjoyed the selection in this anthology. I received a review copy of this ebook from Infinite Acacia and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Linette

    (I received this book for free through the Goodreads First Reads program.) The collection opens with Real, by Janka Hobbs. It's the story of Crystal, a little girl in an indeterminate, but perhaps not too distant, future, whose caregivers abandon her in a mundane fashion to a fate rather less mundane ("as of today", at least, to echo Dany G. Zuwen's words in the Introduction to the anthology [p. 2]). The sense of dread stemming from this abandonment mounts. The reader is privy from the beginning (I received this book for free through the Goodreads First Reads program.) The collection opens with Real, by Janka Hobbs. It's the story of Crystal, a little girl in an indeterminate, but perhaps not too distant, future, whose caregivers abandon her in a mundane fashion to a fate rather less mundane ("as of today", at least, to echo Dany G. Zuwen's words in the Introduction to the anthology [p. 2]). The sense of dread stemming from this abandonment mounts. The reader is privy from the beginning to what Crystal does not quite grasp. Crystal becomes more real as a character during the course of the story, in bitter counterpoint to the events recounted. However, the same can't be said of the other characters. They never progress beyond clichés and caricature. It detracts from the denouement since they aren't believable as real people, villains, or, indeed, models of dehumanization. By the Numbers by Tim Major takes place in an airport terminal. Here, Henry Polter is approached by Giles Freeman, an old schoolmate. During their conversation, by turns ominous and obnoxious, it is revealed that Giles has been "using the power of statistical data" [p. 46] (Henry's words) to improve his life. Or maybe the data has been using him. Tin Soul by Elizabeth Bannon presents a character whose nostalgia hides fear and anger, and who ultimately seems to create his own torment. The backdrop is a future where robots are common. Six Minutes by P. Anthony Ramanauskas is an action-filled (and action-driven) prison break with a twist. The story follows the escape from hellish imprisonment of a being who can take over the minds of others. A whole world is hinted at while all this takes place. Matchmaker by John Walters is the story of a time-travelling researcher. He has travelled to Salonika (Thessaloniki) just before the Great Fire of 1917 to study traditional matchmakers. An off-hand paragraph provides the explanation. Apparently, less than half a century in our future, humans will be so well-off, we'll all be uninterested in bonding with each other and having children. The target of this time-travelling bid to save the essential "family unit" [p. 85] is the legendary matchmaker Kyría Katerina, who may hold the secrets of successful marriages. The point of the story, the moral, if you will, should not be spoiled, but it is heavy-handed and uninspiring. Although, perhaps, this is what passes as a profound look at humanity in that off-hand future. The Wedding by Nick Hilbourn continues the theme of marriage. It opens in medias res, after Elliot's wedding ceremony has been interrupted. Short, but not quite sweet, the story is unsatisfying, lush language notwithstanding. In Slow by Jay Wilburn, an alien growth takes over an explorer's body, keeping him alive even as it rips him apart. Slowly. A body horror story that turns out to have the most generous worldview of any story in the collection yet. Gospel Of by Rebecca Ann Jordan opens in an unnamed desert--caravans and lonely apparitions. A tragic love story, some unbeaten destiny, and a bit of doublespeak later, the story ends with either a beginning or a continuation. The Silent Dead by Daniel Devine, one of the better stories in the collection, offers a solid mystery in a future where human outposts on alien worlds seem common. Nothing Beside Remains by Matthew S. Dent is a study in loneliness through the eyes-or cameras-of a Mars rover [p. 166]. Already facing competition from China's lunar rover, Jade Rabbit, the story offers a voice that is both reflective and innocent, but fails to truly sell its premise. The Night with Stars by William Ledbetter captures the moment magic goes out of the world. After a botched mammoth hunt, Enroe, "keeper of the magic" [p. 174] for his tribe, sets off in search of answers. He finds a solution. Like a paradoxically claustrophobic dream of flying, Butterflies by Doug Tidwell soars to the conclusion that also acts as a release. Message of War by Michaele Jordan presents a society as seen by an outsider. It deals with the ethics of war, and the price and meaning of peace. Rolling by in the Moonlight by Liam Nicholas Pezzano is a snippet of a journey that seems to go nowhere. Infinity by J.B. Rockwell, the last story the collection offers a moving account of a sentient spaceship faced with its decay, but perhaps sentient machines are not my cup of tea since I was left skeptical regarding the extent to which the character(s) are anthropomorphized. Overall, a nice collection of stories, definitely more hit than miss.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marcel

    * disclosure: I got this as free copy for review on NetGalley.com * First of all: this is an excellent read. Even if I usually find it hard to review an anthology and normally I don’t like them: too many different things under on cover :) BUT this one is excellent. I was seriously annoyed when I had reached the last page and found there was not more :) This is proper SciFi, not pulp Space Opera or Alien Invasion, this is the raw deal: bodies and minds invaded by technology, culture fucked up by new p * disclosure: I got this as free copy for review on NetGalley.com * First of all: this is an excellent read. Even if I usually find it hard to review an anthology and normally I don’t like them: too many different things under on cover :) BUT this one is excellent. I was seriously annoyed when I had reached the last page and found there was not more :) This is proper SciFi, not pulp Space Opera or Alien Invasion, this is the raw deal: bodies and minds invaded by technology, culture fucked up by new paradigms, humans challenged by their own inventions, it’s dark and gritty, future noir and cyberpunk, but it’s also the strange sweetness of the bizarre. Highly recommended for the discerning SciFi lover.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Carey

    I received a copy of this book from Netgally for review. Overall a good anthology of science fiction and speculative fiction. I didn't get into all the stories included (a little too much of the desert setting in a number of the stories for my liking), but some were really good. There were a few editing/proofreading/grammatical errors, but not many. The stories were thought-provoking and were interesting takes on the future/past. I would recommend to others to read, but only if they've already re I received a copy of this book from Netgally for review. Overall a good anthology of science fiction and speculative fiction. I didn't get into all the stories included (a little too much of the desert setting in a number of the stories for my liking), but some were really good. There were a few editing/proofreading/grammatical errors, but not many. The stories were thought-provoking and were interesting takes on the future/past. I would recommend to others to read, but only if they've already read my favorites that I've recommend to them, as this isn't a favorite, but it's still good.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michaele Jordan

    Okay, I'm biased. I have a story in this book, 'Message of War'. So of course I think it's good. But I'm also proud to be in such excellent company. All these stories were good. All of them! Other reviews have mentioned the opening story, 'Real', for good reason. Many stories were touching--of them, I most liked, 'The Matchmaker'. Other tales were dark or scary. 'By the Numbers,' left me chilled. But you can pick this book up and start anywhere, with whatever title catches your eye, and find som Okay, I'm biased. I have a story in this book, 'Message of War'. So of course I think it's good. But I'm also proud to be in such excellent company. All these stories were good. All of them! Other reviews have mentioned the opening story, 'Real', for good reason. Many stories were touching--of them, I most liked, 'The Matchmaker'. Other tales were dark or scary. 'By the Numbers,' left me chilled. But you can pick this book up and start anywhere, with whatever title catches your eye, and find something interesting and unexpected.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Very nice collection of mostly new speculative fiction writers. Great to get some new blood in the genre! The stories range from fantasy to hard sci-fi with a number in between. Most of them are short and a few need more satisfying endings. An overall good and entertaining read!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paperback

    If you like science fiction/fantasy like me, the stories are amazing. What lets it down is that they are all short stories and so once you get into them they end. And pretty abruptly in some cases. I would've loved to have read an actual conclusion with the stories. Such a let down. If you like science fiction/fantasy like me, the stories are amazing. What lets it down is that they are all short stories and so once you get into them they end. And pretty abruptly in some cases. I would've loved to have read an actual conclusion with the stories. Such a let down.

  12. 5 out of 5

    L.

    Enjoyable stories from newcomers to the genre. We'll be hearing more from some of these people... Enjoyable stories from newcomers to the genre. We'll be hearing more from some of these people...

  13. 4 out of 5

    amomentsilence

  14. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Davison

  15. 5 out of 5

    Khang

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jesevel

  17. 4 out of 5

    Seung Chul Hong

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ana

  19. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  20. 4 out of 5

    Constructionv4

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Jordan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Roman S

  23. 4 out of 5

    emely

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alexis

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

  26. 4 out of 5

    Berenice

  27. 4 out of 5

    Janka

  28. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lafourche Parish Library

  30. 4 out of 5

    James Lynam

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