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Mark and the Magic Apple Tree

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Mark was always hungry. No matter what he did or how much he ate, from morning to night, his stomach rumbled and grumbled and cried out “More!” One night he dreamt he was in an enchanted wood with a magic apple tree. After eating one of the apples, everything Mark touched with his tongue turned to food! At home, at school and in the neighborhood, Mark used his gift to make Mark was always hungry. No matter what he did or how much he ate, from morning to night, his stomach rumbled and grumbled and cried out “More!” One night he dreamt he was in an enchanted wood with a magic apple tree. After eating one of the apples, everything Mark touched with his tongue turned to food! At home, at school and in the neighborhood, Mark used his gift to make treats for everyone. But one morning something happened – something that Mark would deeply regret…


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Mark was always hungry. No matter what he did or how much he ate, from morning to night, his stomach rumbled and grumbled and cried out “More!” One night he dreamt he was in an enchanted wood with a magic apple tree. After eating one of the apples, everything Mark touched with his tongue turned to food! At home, at school and in the neighborhood, Mark used his gift to make Mark was always hungry. No matter what he did or how much he ate, from morning to night, his stomach rumbled and grumbled and cried out “More!” One night he dreamt he was in an enchanted wood with a magic apple tree. After eating one of the apples, everything Mark touched with his tongue turned to food! At home, at school and in the neighborhood, Mark used his gift to make treats for everyone. But one morning something happened – something that Mark would deeply regret…

30 review for Mark and the Magic Apple Tree

  1. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    This is in the tradition of Roald Dahl, a surreal be-careful-what-you-wish-for story that reminded me of The Chocolate Touch. A perpetually hungry little boy named Mark gains the ability to turn anything he touches with his mouth into food. What seems to be a blessing becomes a curse, as you would expect, and he must figure out how to reverse the consequences of what has happened. There's a bit in there about a school bully that resolves nicely, too. At first I wasn't sure how that fit into the This is in the tradition of Roald Dahl, a surreal be-careful-what-you-wish-for story that reminded me of The Chocolate Touch. A perpetually hungry little boy named Mark gains the ability to turn anything he touches with his mouth into food. What seems to be a blessing becomes a curse, as you would expect, and he must figure out how to reverse the consequences of what has happened. There's a bit in there about a school bully that resolves nicely, too. At first I wasn't sure how that fit into the overall story, but I think that's because I was still in the Midas mindset, thinking this was mainly a lesson about greed. It is truly as much about hunger and I like how the book could inspire discussions about that with young readers, too. The author sent me a copy of the book in exchange for a review. (Thank you!)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Fox

    What a delightful children's book! Mark is a hungry boy. A /very/ hungry boy. No matter what or how much he eats his stomach is still rumbling. His voracious appetite is making him eat his family out of house and home, but he's not to be deterred. What's a boy to do? Well, his dog certainly knows. When he dreams of venturing through a magical landscape with Rex he's lead to a tree that gives him the power to turn anything his tongue touches into food. Brilliant! Or is it? This is a very fun Midas What a delightful children's book! Mark is a hungry boy. A /very/ hungry boy. No matter what or how much he eats his stomach is still rumbling. His voracious appetite is making him eat his family out of house and home, but he's not to be deterred. What's a boy to do? Well, his dog certainly knows. When he dreams of venturing through a magical landscape with Rex he's lead to a tree that gives him the power to turn anything his tongue touches into food. Brilliant! Or is it? This is a very fun Midas Touch story where a kid gets more than he bargains for. The illustrations add to the playful nature of the story that's written with a definite lean towards being read aloud. It's a quick read, and definitely had me chuckling. The core message is sweet, and some little subplots offer more lessons to be learned that I wasn't really expecting out of the story. All in all I'd definitely recommend it to anyone with young children, and I can imagine poring over the illustrations when I was younger. :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jelinas

    (Disclosure: I received a complimentary e-copy of this book from the author.) When I was young, I was always hungry. This was mostly because no one had ever taught my parents about the nutritional needs of children, and they both worked all day; there was no one around to make sure we had enough to eat. They never had time to make breakfast, so we were usually famished by lunchtime. We bought school lunches, and then cajoled our friends for the bits of their lunches they didn't want to finish. Aft (Disclosure: I received a complimentary e-copy of this book from the author.) When I was young, I was always hungry. This was mostly because no one had ever taught my parents about the nutritional needs of children, and they both worked all day; there was no one around to make sure we had enough to eat. They never had time to make breakfast, so we were usually famished by lunchtime. We bought school lunches, and then cajoled our friends for the bits of their lunches they didn't want to finish. After school, we'd let ourselves in, and I'd usually heat up a can of soup for the three of us to share. By the time my parents returned home at around 10pm, we were starving AND sleepy (no one ever taught them about bedtimes, either). So I was totally able to identify with the main character of Roser Bosch's Mark and the Magic Apple Tree. Mark is always hungry; he lives at the beck and call of his appetite. When he dreams about a magic apple tree one night, he thinks all of his wishes have come true -- suddenly, everything he touches with his tongue turns into food! But his excitement quickly wanes as people come crowding round to ask for his help, and a tragic accident turns his gift into a curse. This modern-day retelling of the story of King Midas would totally have appealed to eight-year-old me. The idea of always being able to have food at the tip of your tongue would have had me reading this book over and over again. As a child, my favorite books all had glorious descriptions of food: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory , Fantastic Mr. Fox , Farmer Boy . This one would have been just as worn as those. The illustrations are adorable. The reading level doesn't quite fit the story for me; I think the story might appeal to younger children than are reasonably able to read at this level. But I was an advanced reader for my age, and I would have loved it. If your child loves a reading challenge, it just might suit. Bosch's book is fun and moves along at a nice pace. I'd love to see more Greek myths retold in his life.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is a first for me, in that I was asked to read and review a book on Goodreads and actually agreed to do so. So, it's a testament to the description and teaser that I wanted to delve into this book some more to see if it was a good fit. First off, I had a lot of fun reading this myself and then later to my kids who enjoyed it and didn't wriggle away to find a better offering on their shelves. Mark is likeable. While he definitely needs to learn a lesson, he isn't so awful that kids can't rel This is a first for me, in that I was asked to read and review a book on Goodreads and actually agreed to do so. So, it's a testament to the description and teaser that I wanted to delve into this book some more to see if it was a good fit. First off, I had a lot of fun reading this myself and then later to my kids who enjoyed it and didn't wriggle away to find a better offering on their shelves. Mark is likeable. While he definitely needs to learn a lesson, he isn't so awful that kids can't relate to his story. When it comes to children's books, I do judge a book by its illustrations and story. The illustrations here are lovely: bright, colourful, and fun; something that you could probably frame and put up on a wall when you get right down to it. Then comes the story: it's definitely a Midas Touch lesson, but the idea of a boy with a magic tongue plays to the fantasy kids have, especially with sweets and treats. There were a few story lines woven into this plot, making me wish for a bit more here and there to round out all of the characters. Especially the bully, Arnold, who didn't figure quite enough at the start and then was brought in so heavily towards the end. Arnold was by far my favourite character. I loved that he was stealing lunches not because he was hungry necessarily but because he was lonely, and it ended the book on a positive note that wasn't just a brother-sister appreication "thing." In fact, I think Arnold actually could merit his own story, a squel to Mark if you will. The way that Mark could only reach the tree/berries in his dreams was a nice touch and an interesting plot device, as was the idea of people using his tongue for their own means. I do agree with some of the other reviews about this being a bit long. My daughter, who sits at 11 years old, really did enjoy the book but found that it was a little too young for her, wherease my son, who is 6, found it got to be a bit long near the end. They both liked it - don't get me wrong - but they did give me some honest input when I asked for it. Overall, well worth a read. And well worth a read with or for the kidlets in your life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    Disclaimer: I received a free electronic copy of this book from the author in exchange for this review Always ravenous Mark is granted his ideal version of the Midas Touch by a magic apple tree: everything he licks turns to food! He quickly learns that all such gifts come with a price when he is descended upon by friends, neighbors, and even perfect strangers all wanting free food. And then, inevitably, he accidentally licks his sister. How far will he go to bring her back? I read the book myself Disclaimer: I received a free electronic copy of this book from the author in exchange for this review Always ravenous Mark is granted his ideal version of the Midas Touch by a magic apple tree: everything he licks turns to food! He quickly learns that all such gifts come with a price when he is descended upon by friends, neighbors, and even perfect strangers all wanting free food. And then, inevitably, he accidentally licks his sister. How far will he go to bring her back? I read the book myself, and then out loud to my five year old son in two sittings - not because it was too long for a single session but because I wanted him to think about the cliffhanger on his own for a while. He thoroughly enjoyed it, and it was clear that his imagination was engaged. Because my son enjoyed it, I am willingly granting three stars. There was, however, no particular verve, sparkle, or similarly indefinable Something in the prose or the story to raise the book above the run of the mill in my own estimation. What I liked * A reasonably entertaining story that is neither offensive nor terribly preachy * Pleasant illustrations * Some gentle humor as the adult characters react to children being turned into cake with comments like "her sugar levels are very high." * It was reasonably easy to read out loud, with exceptions as noted below What I didn't like * There were some technical / mechanical errors I found jarring. Foremost among them is that the main character's internal dialog is neither quoted nor italicized (as is standard.) (UPDATE: The author let me know that the paper copy of the book is properly italicized. It was lost in translation to Kindle format.) * American kids may require an occasional translation of the British terminology - "lifts," "trolleys," etc. * I feel the story went on a little too long, with at least one or two dream-sequences that would be better eliminated. My suspension of disbelief was beginning to suffer by the end. * I am always irritated by the "it was just a dream" resolution technique, which I consider one of the least allowable forms of "Deus Ex Machina." Here I feel like the author tried to pull one of these without owning up to it. But all of this can be forgiven when the kids enjoy it. I would certainly check out Ms. Bosch's books should I find them on my local library's shelves.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rosa Cline

    I was asked to read this to give an honest review. I read it then read it to my special needs teen age son and my 2 year old granddaughter. On Amazon it puts this book for an age level of 5-8 and grades preK - 2nd grade. That is one reason I took a star away... This is to long and had do much description for a young listener and a young reader couldn't start to try to read this on their own. So it is for an older 'reader', now with that being said a young 'listener' that is advanced for their ag I was asked to read this to give an honest review. I read it then read it to my special needs teen age son and my 2 year old granddaughter. On Amazon it puts this book for an age level of 5-8 and grades preK - 2nd grade. That is one reason I took a star away... This is to long and had do much description for a young listener and a young reader couldn't start to try to read this on their own. So it is for an older 'reader', now with that being said a young 'listener' that is advanced for their age (such as my granddaughter) it would be alright for. Right now it was too long for her she was interested in it and enjoyed the parts that she stood beside me and looked at the illustrations but then about half way through she went and started playing in the floor. She did continue to 'listen' but not like she normally would with a book I read to her. So the age-grade level I disagree with. Now, this is a very creative very charming book! And Ms Bosch left 'room' to expand on her characters. She could branch off and make more Mark books and even make some where his sister and even his dog could be main characters! Loveable characters! AND what I LOVED was she wrote life lessons within the story... several like be "careful what you wish for" and 'no room for bullies' and at the end why was the 'bully' the bully? Mark did something that not many children do and went to him to find out why he was always alone and became his friend! So many, many lessons within this story written in a fun 'not in your face' way! My son enjoyed listening to this story as I read it to him...he smiled and giggled throughout the story. So this story is sure to please any child and adults that read it!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Thank you to the author who provided a review copy in exchange for an honest review. This was an interesting take on a child version of the Midas touch. Mark can't seem to ever get enough to eat, always feels hungry, and is eating his family out of house and home. When a dream gives him the ability to change anything into food it seems all his hunger problems are over, but as is often the case with wishes, things start to go sideways for Mark. The biggest turning point is when he accidentally tur Thank you to the author who provided a review copy in exchange for an honest review. This was an interesting take on a child version of the Midas touch. Mark can't seem to ever get enough to eat, always feels hungry, and is eating his family out of house and home. When a dream gives him the ability to change anything into food it seems all his hunger problems are over, but as is often the case with wishes, things start to go sideways for Mark. The biggest turning point is when he accidentally turns his sister into food and considers munching on her. He realizes just how far he will go to fix her, even if it means going hungry again. There is also a little side story discussing bullying. I enjoyed the uniquely styled pictures and some of the humorous moments that Mark had. And I liked the message about valuing your sibling. What didn't work so well for me was the length. It was a tad on the long side, and some of the dream sequences dragged a little. I tend to be squeamish and the fact that Mark even considered snacking on his candied sister grossed me out. I'm not sure how sensitive kids will react to that or if it will go over their heads.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Reid

    Mark is constantly eating and can never seem to get full. Then one day something amazing happens in a dream- he eats an apple from a magic tree, and after that everything that Mark's tongue touches turns to food! It sounds totally cool, until Mark accidentally turns something very important to food and has to find a way to undo what he's done. This book has a lot of decision making on Mark's part. An idea for an activity to go along with this book is to pause during times that Mark has to make a Mark is constantly eating and can never seem to get full. Then one day something amazing happens in a dream- he eats an apple from a magic tree, and after that everything that Mark's tongue touches turns to food! It sounds totally cool, until Mark accidentally turns something very important to food and has to find a way to undo what he's done. This book has a lot of decision making on Mark's part. An idea for an activity to go along with this book is to pause during times that Mark has to make an important decision and have the students write down and share what they think Mark should do and why. At the end of the book discuss whether Mark solved his problem or not and how things could've gone differently if he had done the alternatives. Bosch, R. (2014). Mark and the Magic Apple Tree. Calilogia.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    Mark and the Magic Apple Tree by Roser Bosch Mark is always hungry no matter how much he eats. One day he eats a magic apple and everything he touches with his tongue turns into food. At first he thinks this is great, he is making treats for his friends and family. Then one day something horrible happens, and he doesn't know how to fix it. A very good story, with nice illustrations. Mark is a likable boy, and there is a moral to this story. Be careful what you wish for. I feel Mark and the Magic A Mark and the Magic Apple Tree by Roser Bosch Mark is always hungry no matter how much he eats. One day he eats a magic apple and everything he touches with his tongue turns into food. At first he thinks this is great, he is making treats for his friends and family. Then one day something horrible happens, and he doesn't know how to fix it. A very good story, with nice illustrations. Mark is a likable boy, and there is a moral to this story. Be careful what you wish for. I feel Mark and the Magic Apple Tree is great for early school readers (and adults to read to young and beginner readers).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Iesha (In east shade house at...)

    ~I received Mark and the Magic Apple Tree free in exchange for an honest review~ Mark and the Magic Apple Tree was an fun story about an small hungry boy staving to fulfill his large appetite by using the mystery powers given to him from an special tree. However, with great powers come greater consequences. In this simple tale, an story unfolds that is filled with magic, family, friendship, and an lot of talk about food. The illustrations were entertaining to look at. However I wish there were mo ~I received Mark and the Magic Apple Tree free in exchange for an honest review~ Mark and the Magic Apple Tree was an fun story about an small hungry boy staving to fulfill his large appetite by using the mystery powers given to him from an special tree. However, with great powers come greater consequences. In this simple tale, an story unfolds that is filled with magic, family, friendship, and an lot of talk about food. The illustrations were entertaining to look at. However I wish there were more of them. The words were simple and easy to read. Overall, this is a good book for children in the third grade and up can read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Daleine

    Mark and the Magic Apple Tree is a cute chapter book in which a boy who eats from a magic Apple Tree and everything he tastes turns to food. Everyone wants Mark to change things into food and his family no longer has to buy food. Everything is wonderful until Mark turns his sister into a cake. Now he must find a way to get her back to normal. This is a very enjoyable book for younger elementary graders who can read chapter books.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Dietr

    An adorable lesson book about excess and making good choices. The characters were engaging and the story applicable to many lessons in life that children face on a daily basis. A great not-in-your-face morality book. Loved it!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Bosch has created a modern day King Midas! Mark learns to solve problems by dealing with bullies and resolving a problem he caused. A fun read aloud for students in K-3rd grades!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul Cude

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christoph Fischer

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bridgitte Lesley

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  18. 5 out of 5

    Simon Okill

  19. 4 out of 5

    P.J. Fiala

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anna Othitis

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andy Custodio

  22. 4 out of 5

    Blakely Bennett

  23. 4 out of 5

    C.B. Blaha

  24. 4 out of 5

    Scott Roberts

  25. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Dougherty

  26. 4 out of 5

    H.A. Dawson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jami Brumfield

  29. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Fulks

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hunter Jones

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