web site hit counter Projecting 9/11: Race, Gender, and Citizenship in Recent Hollywood Films - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Projecting 9/11: Race, Gender, and Citizenship in Recent Hollywood Films

Availability: Ready to download

Projecting 9/11 examines sensibilities and ideologies that arose after September 11, 2001, and how these intersect with issues of race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship in contemporary mainstream films. The authors argue that the social and political project that is "9/11" can be found in most cultural artifacts produced after the date, including film. In essence, Hollyw Projecting 9/11 examines sensibilities and ideologies that arose after September 11, 2001, and how these intersect with issues of race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship in contemporary mainstream films. The authors argue that the social and political project that is "9/11" can be found in most cultural artifacts produced after the date, including film. In essence, Hollywood films project the 9/11 project. The book analyzes the specific ways in which recent Hollywood films have become both powerful forces of significance and also forceful representations of reality about post-9/11 life. From films that explicitly treat subjects related to 9/11, such as United 93 and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, to films that show post-9/11 themes in less-expected ways, such as Eat, Pray, Love and World War Z, the authors explore tensions around race, gender, and sexuality. The book examines our perceptions of reality after the events of September 11, 2001, as shown by one of the more influential means of cultural representation-Hollywood films.


Compare

Projecting 9/11 examines sensibilities and ideologies that arose after September 11, 2001, and how these intersect with issues of race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship in contemporary mainstream films. The authors argue that the social and political project that is "9/11" can be found in most cultural artifacts produced after the date, including film. In essence, Hollyw Projecting 9/11 examines sensibilities and ideologies that arose after September 11, 2001, and how these intersect with issues of race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship in contemporary mainstream films. The authors argue that the social and political project that is "9/11" can be found in most cultural artifacts produced after the date, including film. In essence, Hollywood films project the 9/11 project. The book analyzes the specific ways in which recent Hollywood films have become both powerful forces of significance and also forceful representations of reality about post-9/11 life. From films that explicitly treat subjects related to 9/11, such as United 93 and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, to films that show post-9/11 themes in less-expected ways, such as Eat, Pray, Love and World War Z, the authors explore tensions around race, gender, and sexuality. The book examines our perceptions of reality after the events of September 11, 2001, as shown by one of the more influential means of cultural representation-Hollywood films.

3 review for Projecting 9/11: Race, Gender, and Citizenship in Recent Hollywood Films

  1. 5 out of 5

    Petty Lisbon

    I wanted to like this book more than I did but something was missing. I enjoy reading essays (okay, Twitter threads) about how Marvel movies glamorize the military so I was eager to check this out. The introduction was a little too dry for me but things got better once the actual chapters started. I agree with most of what she said in the book, but I think the themes chosen and the specific movies for those chapters were maybe not what would come to my mind when I would think about 9/11 and Holl I wanted to like this book more than I did but something was missing. I enjoy reading essays (okay, Twitter threads) about how Marvel movies glamorize the military so I was eager to check this out. The introduction was a little too dry for me but things got better once the actual chapters started. I agree with most of what she said in the book, but I think the themes chosen and the specific movies for those chapters were maybe not what would come to my mind when I would think about 9/11 and Hollywood. Personally, my first thoughts would be the shows 24 and Smallville. I also would think about how POC lead programming began to drop off on television and all the diversity and representation related progress that was finally on screen reverted. So naturally I was looking more for that and why that happened. I thought movies would be hard to assess because people want to see something "exciting" in theaters, so violent action movies would be more popular by default instead of a reflection of what people are looking for (ie- how nobody sees romantic comedies in theaters anymore). I appreciate the variety of genres that were included in this book, but not all of them worked well. While the earlier chapters in the book discuss themes like white masculinity being threatened, unknown monsters that need to be united against, and gender and 9/11, the last few chapters kind of went all over the place. There was a chapter about animated movies and 9/11, which at first I was interested in reading about, but the movies that they picked seemed to be more about how America treats foreigners instead of 9/11. While I have no doubt that youth media has a lot of messaging, I think for a book about 9/11, that section was a little lacking. They chose Planet 51, a movie I never heard of, the Princess and the Frog, which I feel like the people who this book is trying to imply would fall victim to 9/11 messaging by Hollywood would probably fall on the other side of the culture war and not see it out of bigotry, and Rio, which didn't really fit in at all. I think the Rio and Planet 51 pieces were interesting and I feel like as a kid I used to accept every funny foreigner trope on children's media but this chapter helped explain why it's bad instead of just listing examples of it. I think the Princess and the Frog one needed to get stretched out more and I would like to see it in a collection about Disney movies. I'm really surprised Wall-e or The Incredibles or even Finding Nemo weren't mentioned. There was also a chapter about the recession and 9/11 movies. I know most people view them as the start and end of the decade but most of what was written about the recession movies just tied it to the recession instead of connecting that to 9/11. I guess I agree with what was written generally but I don't think the movies that she used help tie it back to 9/11 related trauma. The last chapter was about disaster movies which I liked. It was clear and relevant. Quite a few other books about the topic were referenced so I'll have to decide if I want to check those out. This book didn't really motivate me but I'd like to know what others have to say. I thought it was interesting seeing how some actors were featured in multiple movies, and even if someone has a cosmopolitan "woke" image, they can still make vaguely nationalistic movies.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karli

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jaquie

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.