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The Good That Men Do

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Pax Galactica. Enemies become allies. Old secrets are at last revealed. Long-held beliefs and widely accepted truths are challenged. Man turns to leisurely pursuits. In this golden age, two old friends are drawn together. They seek to understand, and wonder how what they have long believed, what they have been taught, was never so. Over two hundred years ago, the life of Pax Galactica. Enemies become allies. Old secrets are at last revealed. Long-held beliefs and widely accepted truths are challenged. Man turns to leisurely pursuits. In this golden age, two old friends are drawn together. They seek to understand, and wonder how what they have long believed, what they have been taught, was never so. Over two hundred years ago, the life of one of Starfleet's earliest pioneers came to a tragic end, and Captain Jonathan Archer, the legendary commander of Earth's first warp-five starship, lost a close friend. Or so it seemed for many years. But with the passage of time, and the declassification of certain crucial files, the truth about that fateful day -- the day that Commander Charles "Trip" Tucker III didn't die -- could finally be revealed. Why did Starfleet feel it was necessary to rewrite history? And why only now can the truth be told?


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Pax Galactica. Enemies become allies. Old secrets are at last revealed. Long-held beliefs and widely accepted truths are challenged. Man turns to leisurely pursuits. In this golden age, two old friends are drawn together. They seek to understand, and wonder how what they have long believed, what they have been taught, was never so. Over two hundred years ago, the life of Pax Galactica. Enemies become allies. Old secrets are at last revealed. Long-held beliefs and widely accepted truths are challenged. Man turns to leisurely pursuits. In this golden age, two old friends are drawn together. They seek to understand, and wonder how what they have long believed, what they have been taught, was never so. Over two hundred years ago, the life of one of Starfleet's earliest pioneers came to a tragic end, and Captain Jonathan Archer, the legendary commander of Earth's first warp-five starship, lost a close friend. Or so it seemed for many years. But with the passage of time, and the declassification of certain crucial files, the truth about that fateful day -- the day that Commander Charles "Trip" Tucker III didn't die -- could finally be revealed. Why did Starfleet feel it was necessary to rewrite history? And why only now can the truth be told?

30 review for The Good That Men Do

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Rasnake

    I have to admit it... I liked Enterprise. The premise had promise, and the characters, when well-written, were engaging and enjoyable. Whole volumes could be written about just how much, and why, the show sucked so bad, and exactly who was responsible (Berman, Braga, I'm lookin' at you). When in the fourth season they brought on a new Exec and head writer, it really started to fulfill its potential. Then, of course, it was canceled and they ended with one of the single worst, most offensive and I have to admit it... I liked Enterprise. The premise had promise, and the characters, when well-written, were engaging and enjoyable. Whole volumes could be written about just how much, and why, the show sucked so bad, and exactly who was responsible (Berman, Braga, I'm lookin' at you). When in the fourth season they brought on a new Exec and head writer, it really started to fulfill its potential. Then, of course, it was canceled and they ended with one of the single worst, most offensive and disrespectful series finales I've ever witnessed. How the actors didn't raze Paramount's studios to the ground when they left, I'll never know. But anyway, we're talking about a book. Right out of the gate you must understand, this is pop-fiction (see my other Trek novel reviews for my feelings 'bout that). As a Star Trek novel, this is actually pretty good—I've read better, I've read worse. The plot is fairly well conceived and the story moves well and entertains. The really interesting, and frankly welcomed, thing about this particular novel—compared to most other such novels—is the complete circumvention of established canon. Not to spoil it for you (can you spoil something so terrible?) but in that travesty of a series finale, one of the main characters (arguably the best character) dies, in an incredibly lame way, for incredibly lame reasons. So, what this novel offers to the offended fans of the show, is a complete rewrite of some of the events in that finale, transforming the steaming piles of shit into something at least a bit more palatable. Not only does the character not die, he becomes a singularly important (if mostly unsung) hero in the Trek universe. I have to be honest though, the writing isn't all that hot. The story is good and compelling, but I often found myself cringing at awkward or redundant sentence structures. The writing was loose, and the editing seemed almost non-existent. But, we don't read Star Trek novels to be treated to shining examples of the English language. If you're a Trek fan, dig in. If you're a disappointed Enterprise fan, you need to read this. If you're neither of those, why the hell are you bothering with this review?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Okay, I need to state up front that I am not a nerd. I don't say this to disparage nerds in any way; rather, I don't know enough of the nerd cannon to ever be able to hold my own, and real nerds would laugh me right out of the nerd... room. (Holodeck!! It's probably a holodeck). Anyway, I believe I may have upped my nerd cred a fraction by reading a Star Trek novel. I watched Enterprise. It's the only Star Trek series that I have actually watched all the way through while it was airing (although Okay, I need to state up front that I am not a nerd. I don't say this to disparage nerds in any way; rather, I don't know enough of the nerd cannon to ever be able to hold my own, and real nerds would laugh me right out of the nerd... room. (Holodeck!! It's probably a holodeck). Anyway, I believe I may have upped my nerd cred a fraction by reading a Star Trek novel. I watched Enterprise. It's the only Star Trek series that I have actually watched all the way through while it was airing (although I did periodically dip into Next Generation when it was in reruns), and I enjoyed it. I loved the opening titles, and I liked how they all wore flight suits instead of funny stretchy pants, and that they were all afraid of the transporter. Then, like many others, I was appalled at the way they killed off Trip in the finale. I don't know what the producers had against the guy, because they tried to kill him a bunch of times throughout the series, and I guess they figured they had one last chance and they took it. I thought it sucked. So imagine my delight when I somehow stumbled across the existence of a book that rewrote that history, and posited that Trip actually faked his death so he could go undercover into the Romulan Empire! I had to read it. Plus, I do really enjoy Military Sci Fi. This is not great literature. And you pretty much have to be a fan of the show to get it, because there is no background on any of the characters. That's okay, though, because it is like a long episode and exposition about where all the characters came from would have been really annoying. I would imagine that it would have been helpful for me to have more background into the whole Trek universe, though, because a couple of times you could practically hear the "duh duh DUH!!!" and I sat there without understanding the significance of the event that just occurred. Even so, it was fun, and I am even planning to read the rest of the 4-book arc (I've already checked them out, even). So there, nerds. Now you have to let me play.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shadowdenizen

    3.5 stars. A solid start to the post-tv Enterprise "relaunch." While not the best-written Trek novel, it does undo much of the damage caused by the series finale, so we'll bump this up to 4 stars. 3.5 stars. A solid start to the post-tv Enterprise "relaunch." While not the best-written Trek novel, it does undo much of the damage caused by the series finale, so we'll bump this up to 4 stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jillian

    Gods, do I just appreciate having a real trajectory for this series post-cancellation.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Camille

    "[Thank you to] the legions of Trip fans out there who were happy to see us reinterpret canon, spit in the grim reaper's eye, and seek out and exploit every available loophole on Trip's behalf." - Acknowledgements Note that while this review may seem spoiler-y, it doesn't contain anything you won't find in season 4 of Enterprise, the first few chapters of the book, or the publisher's summary. Ah, The Good that Men Do. To say that I simply enjoyed this novel would be a gross understatement; I adore "[Thank you to] the legions of Trip fans out there who were happy to see us reinterpret canon, spit in the grim reaper's eye, and seek out and exploit every available loophole on Trip's behalf." - Acknowledgements Note that while this review may seem spoiler-y, it doesn't contain anything you won't find in season 4 of Enterprise, the first few chapters of the book, or the publisher's summary. Ah, The Good that Men Do. To say that I simply enjoyed this novel would be a gross understatement; I adored this book and what it did for my favourite Enterprise character, Charles "Trip" Tucker III. I'll cut to the chase on this one. As the first book set after the conclusion of the series, it starts out by doing what the final episode of Enterprise should have done; two days after the Terra Prime crisis, the five planets involved in Coalition negotiations are desperately trying to salvage the beginnings of their alliance, while Trip and T'Pol are on Vulcan mourning the death of their child. The deeply emotional scenarios perfectly frame the peultimate episode of the series, and gives fans the sense of closure they deserve. But then it goes a step further; it deconstructs the entire series finale, and more-or-less throws it out the window. The book becomes the story of Trip Tucker's heroic sacrifice for his planet, and the suffering of those he left behind. But don't let that sentence fool you. The story has it's ups and downs, and definitely isn't perfect. But it had me on the edge of my seat, and although I was seriously worried that ending would be disappointing, it definitely came through for me. The best parts by far were T'Pol dealing with the loss of her daughter - and Trip - and the emotional repercussions that accompanied it. Somewhat uniquely, the book has a few solid prerequisites in order to truly appreciate what the authors are doing. For a start, make sure the final episode of Enterprise ("These are the Voyages...") is fresh in your mind. The book also relies heavily on the respective plots from the season one episode "Shadows of P'Jem" and the season four trilogy "Babel One"/"United"/"The Aenar". After that, the more your know about Star Trek the better, but don't sweat it; it helps if you understand who Nog and Jake Brisko are or the significance of the Andorian marriage arrangement to the expanded canon, for example, but at the end of the day it doesn't really matter. If you adore Enterprise, you should consider reading this book. If you adore Trip, you have to read this book. If you adore Trip and T'Pol as a couple, you really need to read this book. And finally, if you were appalled at the mess Brannon and Braga created at the end of the TV series, I don't know why you still haven't read it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Holly (2 Kids and Tired)

    I love Star Trek. I grew up watching the Original Series and have watched all the other incarnations of the show. Star Trek Enterprise is my favorite and Commander Trip Tucker is one of my favorite Star Trek characters. The Enterprise series finale These are the Voyages was a travesty as far as Trip's story was concerned. I didn't necessarily mind the inclusion of Riker and Troi and the holodeck recreation, but I refuse to believe the end of Trip's story as Star Trek canon. When I discovered a bo I love Star Trek. I grew up watching the Original Series and have watched all the other incarnations of the show. Star Trek Enterprise is my favorite and Commander Trip Tucker is one of my favorite Star Trek characters. The Enterprise series finale These are the Voyages was a travesty as far as Trip's story was concerned. I didn't necessarily mind the inclusion of Riker and Troi and the holodeck recreation, but I refuse to believe the end of Trip's story as Star Trek canon. When I discovered a book that rewrote Trip's history, I jumped at reading it and I wasn't disappointed. The book picks up after the events of Terra Prime and the death of Trip and T'Pol's cloned daughter, Elizabeth. Overcome with grief, Trip finds it hard to move on and accepts a deep cover assignment as a spy sent deep into Romulan space. Captain Archer, Lieutenant Reed and Dr. Phlox are the only ones to know and they help Trip stage his death. The story follows Trip as he is undercover on Romulus and the crew of the Enterprise and the Coalition of Planets as they face a threat from an as yet unknown enemy. The story has some plot holes and continuity issues and in all honesty I think there are fan fictions that capture Enterprise better, but this continues the story of Commander Tucker and for that reason, I enjoyed it. Fans of Enterprise will like it and a general knowledge of Star Trek history is helpful.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    A tightly-plotted, well-written story that leaves us in a much better place than the awful final episode of Enterprise. The characters all felt real, and the motivations for their actions felt surprisingly genuine. With the exception of Star Trek: Destiny, The Good That Men Do is probably the novel I recommend the most to my friends to get them hooked on Trek books. This is the height of Mangels and Martin's Trek work, in my opinion. A fun novel from start to finish that rights a few of the wron A tightly-plotted, well-written story that leaves us in a much better place than the awful final episode of Enterprise. The characters all felt real, and the motivations for their actions felt surprisingly genuine. With the exception of Star Trek: Destiny, The Good That Men Do is probably the novel I recommend the most to my friends to get them hooked on Trek books. This is the height of Mangels and Martin's Trek work, in my opinion. A fun novel from start to finish that rights a few of the wrongs visited upon us by "These Are the Voyages." Full review: http://treklit.blogspot.com/2016/01/T...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark Horner

    I am a Trekker through & through so I really enjoyed this story & its sequels. I really wish the actual series had taken this route

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    Does a good job of reworking (while mocking) the abominable Berman/Braga finale to Enterprise. But as with many Star Trek books, the story itself isn't really compelling, with the typical lack of tension (gee, I wonder if the away team couldn't transport out because the Enterprise had been destroyed) and one gets the sense that the 'Star Trek' on the cover is the only reason it was published. That said, pick this up if your eyes bled during the series finale, as it'll make you feel a lot better. Does a good job of reworking (while mocking) the abominable Berman/Braga finale to Enterprise. But as with many Star Trek books, the story itself isn't really compelling, with the typical lack of tension (gee, I wonder if the away team couldn't transport out because the Enterprise had been destroyed) and one gets the sense that the 'Star Trek' on the cover is the only reason it was published. That said, pick this up if your eyes bled during the series finale, as it'll make you feel a lot better.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    "The Good That Men Do" is the first post-Enterprise book, sort of. Most people familiar with the Star Trek canon know that Earth and Romulus had a war around this time, most also know that the founding members of the Federation are Terrans, Vulcans, Andorians, and Tellarites. What this book tries to do is tie the founding in with the war at the end of Enterprise. To understand where this book is coming from, you need to watch the series finale of Enterprise. If you somewhat liked Enterprise, you "The Good That Men Do" is the first post-Enterprise book, sort of. Most people familiar with the Star Trek canon know that Earth and Romulus had a war around this time, most also know that the founding members of the Federation are Terrans, Vulcans, Andorians, and Tellarites. What this book tries to do is tie the founding in with the war at the end of Enterprise. To understand where this book is coming from, you need to watch the series finale of Enterprise. If you somewhat liked Enterprise, you will know that the finale wasn't very good, it left a number of holes and plot lines unresolved, to say nothing about how disrespectful it was to the cast and crew. "The Good that Men Do" fills in some of the holes, and frankly, should have been part of the fourth season story arc covering a few episodes leading up to the foundation of the pre-Federation coalition. Although this book does fill in many of the glaring holes in Enterprise's series finale, it clearly starts off down its own narrative after a short time. The premise of the novel is also rather good, it involves Section 31, and the history of Charles "Trip" Tucker III, or, at least the whitewashed version of it that Federation citizens are led to believe. Jake Sisko and Nog come across computer files detailing the real history of what happened to Trip and the Romulans while showing the early first steps of what would become the Federation. This is a pretty good book, as far as Star Trek fiction is concerned. The story is compelling and reasonably well written. Moreover, it rewrites the series finale for Enterprise by fixing one of the major problems that made fans so upset. In retrospect, going back to the television series, it is unfortunate that the last few episodes didn't delve into the formation of the Federation very much, nor did they show more of the situation with the Romulans or Section 31. This would have provided even deeper context for the "The Good That Men Do."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Adam Walker

    As a million others have said already, this book does extreme justice to the travesty of the last episode of Enterprise. Trip Tucker in fact, does NOT die and instead becomes a secret agent of sorts meant to throw a monkey wrench into the impending war with the Romulans. All the favorite characters from the show are back, Including Shran! overall the book does a good job of laying the foundation for whats to come. the looming Romulan war, the founding of the Federation and Trips (hopefull) return As a million others have said already, this book does extreme justice to the travesty of the last episode of Enterprise. Trip Tucker in fact, does NOT die and instead becomes a secret agent of sorts meant to throw a monkey wrench into the impending war with the Romulans. All the favorite characters from the show are back, Including Shran! overall the book does a good job of laying the foundation for whats to come. the looming Romulan war, the founding of the Federation and Trips (hopefull) return to the arms of his true love. As far as writing goes i have to say i was pleasantly surprised. aside from the overuse of a few phrases i felt the author really nailed the characters. especially Trip and Shran. the "love" story, if you would even call it that was very well done and i look forward to hopefully seeing it continue. the only downside i could find were the parts dealing with Jake Sisko and Nog from Deep Space Nine. the story is told as they are uncovering the "alternate" history of the Romulan war. while it was fun to see these guys again, they dont really contribute much to the overall story. but its still a fine book and a great entry into the continuing story of the Enterprise crew. if your looking for more adventures from Archer, T'pol and Trip after the dismal final episode, start here!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    2.5 stars As a huge fan of Enterprise, I felt insulted by the last episode that didn't only kill off my favourite character in a way that nearly made me cry; it also focused on two characters from another Star Trek series, Riker and Troi from TNG, assuming everyone knows them. That's just disrespectful to both the fans of Enterprise as well as the characters and their respective actors. Guess what? The authors of The Good That Men Do did exactly the same thing with Jake Sisko and Nog from DS9, for 2.5 stars As a huge fan of Enterprise, I felt insulted by the last episode that didn't only kill off my favourite character in a way that nearly made me cry; it also focused on two characters from another Star Trek series, Riker and Troi from TNG, assuming everyone knows them. That's just disrespectful to both the fans of Enterprise as well as the characters and their respective actors. Guess what? The authors of The Good That Men Do did exactly the same thing with Jake Sisko and Nog from DS9, fortunately to a much lesser extent, but enough to make me groan. While I appreciate the basic notion behind the story, its execution was rather poor. The characters felt wrong, the plot contrived, often unnecessarily melodramatic and ultimately dissatisfying (if we can milk the cow any further, why give it a proper ending?), and the writing style was mediocre at best. I don't regret having read it, but it could have been done so much better, with more respect for the characters and the fans' desire for closure.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Yes, yes, yes! I've read some really awesome reviews of this book so I will keep mine short and on point. I'd only just watched the end of this series and went back to the beginning and online to find answers. This book gives me some of the biggest I'd been missing. I'm not going to argue the canon/non-Canon issue, I'm just going to say that I like how these writers have given Enterprise the story it deserves and I look forward to reading the rest of the books in the series. Yes, yes, yes! I've read some really awesome reviews of this book so I will keep mine short and on point. I'd only just watched the end of this series and went back to the beginning and online to find answers. This book gives me some of the biggest I'd been missing. I'm not going to argue the canon/non-Canon issue, I'm just going to say that I like how these writers have given Enterprise the story it deserves and I look forward to reading the rest of the books in the series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ek

    Trip lives! It's not the best written book in the world, but it's entertaining, and for anyone who was unhappy with Trip's death in the finale of Enterprise, you should definitely read this book. Trip lives! It's not the best written book in the world, but it's entertaining, and for anyone who was unhappy with Trip's death in the finale of Enterprise, you should definitely read this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Bensley

    Decent start to the Enterprise relaunch!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jen Grogan

    After my husband and I finished watching Star Trek: Enterprise and I'd seen the abysmal travesty of its finale for the second time (I watched some of the series without my husband a year or so ago), I had to read this to see how the authors altered the finale. I liked a lot of what they came up with in theory - the various conceits involved in turning the canonical finale into historical fakery make a hell of a lot more sense than the idea of the episode being the truth does, for sure, and I enj After my husband and I finished watching Star Trek: Enterprise and I'd seen the abysmal travesty of its finale for the second time (I watched some of the series without my husband a year or so ago), I had to read this to see how the authors altered the finale. I liked a lot of what they came up with in theory - the various conceits involved in turning the canonical finale into historical fakery make a hell of a lot more sense than the idea of the episode being the truth does, for sure, and I enjoyed the way they folded in a lot of details and even partial scenes from the finale into the "real" story in a way that seemed plausibly like the connection between reality and the story that history passes down. What I didn't like was the writing, which was frankly pretty lazy, repetitive, and given to over-explaining in ways that was dull and often didn't make the tiniest bit of sense. Why the hell would T'Pol think of her mother as "T'Les, her mother?" And that's just one of the most recent, and egregious, examples that I can come up with off the top of my head. It probably didn't help that I read this in the middle of reading a book on self-editing (a book that the authors of this book really should check out), or that I'm the kind of pedantic, detail-oriented person (and professional editor...) who gets annoyed by things like saying that manta rays have poisonous spines in their tails (they don't) or that Shran has ice-blue blue eyes (guys, if you're going to pin a third of your book on the most popular recurring guest character from a series, you ought to at least pull up a picture of the character once or twice). Or the time Jake's dialogue for three paragraphs in a row falls into "Blah blah blah, Nog," "Blah blah blah, Nog," "Blah blah blah, Nog." There's no one else in the room, Jake. Who the hell else would you be talking to? And let's not even talk about the section where a blind character was concerned he would be able to see things that he didn't want to with the night-vision goggles he'd been fitted with. He's blind. He doesn't need to worry about that. I know the TV series had some obvious difficulty remembering that the Aenar are blind sometimes, too (why did their underground cities have lights?), but... seriously. Night vision goggles on a blind man. I swear, I don't actually enjoy ripping these things to shreds, but... try harder, guys. Put in a little more effort. Or at least hire a competent freelance editor. I'd be happy to help clean things up a bit. Long story short, it was moderately entertaining junk fiction that turned a terrible 45 minutes of TV into a more respectable ending for the series. And at least this time the framing device of characters from yet another Star Trek series was actually necessary rather than being a total insult.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bruce MacLean

    If, like me, you watched the finale Of Star Trek: Enterprise, with a sense of bewilderment and betrayal at the way a beloved character was so callously discarded, then this book will help ease those pains as it turns out it was all just a bloody ruse! While not perfect by any means, there's a good enough story here to keep you entertained. What is slightly weird is the framing device; I personally didn't mind Riker's appearance in ST:E, but here, using Jake and Nog, falls completely flat, serving If, like me, you watched the finale Of Star Trek: Enterprise, with a sense of bewilderment and betrayal at the way a beloved character was so callously discarded, then this book will help ease those pains as it turns out it was all just a bloody ruse! While not perfect by any means, there's a good enough story here to keep you entertained. What is slightly weird is the framing device; I personally didn't mind Riker's appearance in ST:E, but here, using Jake and Nog, falls completely flat, serving no purpose that I can tell, other than breaking the flow of the story. Very self-serving and unsatisfactory.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Piper Harris

    didn't blow my mind, and i want everyone to shut up about section 31 already because it's already pretty much ruined by overuse. let ds9 have this! but it's hard to ruin a story that resurrects trip tucker and completely negates everything that happened in the terrible series finale. this book gave me all the emotions. and i adore our florida king. didn't blow my mind, and i want everyone to shut up about section 31 already because it's already pretty much ruined by overuse. let ds9 have this! but it's hard to ruin a story that resurrects trip tucker and completely negates everything that happened in the terrible series finale. this book gave me all the emotions. and i adore our florida king.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    A rather excellent read. Anything that can wash out the taste of the worst true finale in Star Trek history. The cast and crew of the NX-01 Enterprise deserved a much better finale than they received on television, and this book supplied it in spades.

  20. 4 out of 5

    James

    A decent start to a new series, but honestly I could've done with more Trip/T'Pol shipping. A decent start to a new series, but honestly I could've done with more Trip/T'Pol shipping.

  21. 5 out of 5

    David King

    The main reason I couldn't wait to get reading this book was that the plot was centred on re-writing the travesty that was the Enterprise series finale and undoing the death of Commander Tucker. I don't normally support such blatant circumvention of established canon but I was more than happy to see Mangels and Martin try to undo the mess I had seen on television. The novel is based around the premise that Commander Tucker has been growing increasingly worried about the threat posed by the Romula The main reason I couldn't wait to get reading this book was that the plot was centred on re-writing the travesty that was the Enterprise series finale and undoing the death of Commander Tucker. I don't normally support such blatant circumvention of established canon but I was more than happy to see Mangels and Martin try to undo the mess I had seen on television. The novel is based around the premise that Commander Tucker has been growing increasingly worried about the threat posed by the Romulans. However, Starfleet is more interested in getting the coalition of planets up and running without incident and therefore don't take either his or Captain Archer's warnings seriously. However, through his friend Lieutenant Reed, Tucker contacts a secret organization within Starfleet known as Section 31 that does take him seriously. This sets in motion a series of events that result in Tucker's death being faked so that he can carry out a clandestine mission in Romulan space. I actually found this to be a rather enjoyable novel, with a fairly well conceived plot when you consider what it was trying to undo. Whilst it did become a little bit melodramatic at times it still did a good a job in keeping me entertained from start to finish. It was also probably one of the most action packed Star Trek novels that I have read recently which helped to create a rather fast pace. However, as with most Star Trek novels it struggled to create any real feeling of tension as the reader knows that there is no real risk to the main characters or the Enterprise itself. A minor issue I did have with the novel is to do with the framing story, the very same issue that many people had with the Enterprise series finale. This time the framing story follows Nog and Jake Sisko from DS9 fame looking over some newly uncovered history records that imply the events people believed had occurred are possibly a lie. It is a bit less in your face as what was seen on the TV show but I still groaned a little bit as it just felt all very irrelevant and I just wish Enterprise could .be allowed to be itself without feeling the need to link it constantly with other Star Trek franchises. However, the biggest problem I saw with this framing story is that it isn't actually confirmed anywhere that the records Nog and Jake were reviewing are true. Any author in the future could potentially just reset this and say the records were false which I felt undermined the credibility of the story a little bit. Overall, I found "The Good That Men Do" to be an entertaining read that does a good job in trying to alter the events seen in the series finale. To be honest, I got the feeling that the authors were at times even mocking the episode which did bring a smile to my face. As with most Trek literature I doubt anyone who isn't a fan already is going to find any reason to read this book. However, if you are an Enterprise fan then this book should be a definite read, especially for those of you that hated the finale.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    I'd never read a Star Trek novel before this (that is, if you don't count the Star Trek Online book) and I'm glad I chose this one for my first taste. I quite liked Enterprise, even though by the time I actually got to watching the series it had already been canceled for several years. That might have affected the way I viewed the events in the series finale, in the cool manner with which one accepts anything that happens on a doomed show. However, I knew a lot of other people were upset with th I'd never read a Star Trek novel before this (that is, if you don't count the Star Trek Online book) and I'm glad I chose this one for my first taste. I quite liked Enterprise, even though by the time I actually got to watching the series it had already been canceled for several years. That might have affected the way I viewed the events in the series finale, in the cool manner with which one accepts anything that happens on a doomed show. However, I knew a lot of other people were upset with the way things ended, and I didn't have to read long to realize that this book is here to right those wrongs. In other words, it's pretty much a big eff you to the series finale. I'm glad for the new direction, even though I'm not sure I felt too strongly about what had happened to Trip on the show in the first place. I can't say he was my favorite character, but call me a hopeless romantic, I never got enough of his relationship with T'Pol. This book was okay, but I think my favorite part about it was the closure it brought to the love between those two.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Srinivas

    Finally...we have a good explanation about what "really" happened with Commander Tucker. The way his character was just killed off in the final episodes of the Enterprise would have left much more than a few fans (like me) fuming. I mean..seriously...a simple pirate ship invading NX01 at a whim and killing off Trip...that just had to be one of the most absurd stories ever. Needless to say that it made the security and preparedness of one of our most loved crews look laughable. Am so relieved to k Finally...we have a good explanation about what "really" happened with Commander Tucker. The way his character was just killed off in the final episodes of the Enterprise would have left much more than a few fans (like me) fuming. I mean..seriously...a simple pirate ship invading NX01 at a whim and killing off Trip...that just had to be one of the most absurd stories ever. Needless to say that it made the security and preparedness of one of our most loved crews look laughable. Am so relieved to know that it was all a cover and that Trip has had a much much bigger role to play in the early Coalition days. The book is well written... has a lot of action... and keeps you at the edge of your seat. A definite must read for fans of the Enterprise series....especially for the ones that absolutely hated the series finale.

  24. 4 out of 5

    John (JP)

    This book is the 1st of 4 books that reveal how Enterprise the TV series should have ended. The other books in the series ae Star Trek Enterprise (STE) Kobayashi Maru, STE The Romulan War Beneath the Rapots Wing, and STE The Roomulan War To Brave the Storm. These books tell the story Captian Archer's crew from the end of Xindi War to the beginning of the Federation of Planets. The writer does not cheat his readers with time travel or magic aliens but tells a great tale. The Good that men do focu This book is the 1st of 4 books that reveal how Enterprise the TV series should have ended. The other books in the series ae Star Trek Enterprise (STE) Kobayashi Maru, STE The Romulan War Beneath the Rapots Wing, and STE The Roomulan War To Brave the Storm. These books tell the story Captian Archer's crew from the end of Xindi War to the beginning of the Federation of Planets. The writer does not cheat his readers with time travel or magic aliens but tells a great tale. The Good that men do focuses on the early adventures of Charles Trip Tucker. His story will be woven through the fabric of the next three books. This book looks at his recruitment into Section 31 and his infiltration into the Romulan Star Empire. The book is a great read and by the end of it you will want to read the next 3 books.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alli

    I liked this book a lot more than I have liked previous Star Trek: Enterprise books, in part because it is a CANON fix to the god-awful wreck that was "These Are the Voyages..." I'm one of those Enterprise fans who considers "Terra Prime" to be the series finale, because the actual one was such a complete waste of space, waste of characters, and a poorly done attempt to tie ST:E together with ST:TNG, which it had spent too many episodes already doing in the final season. I liked this book a lot more than I have liked previous Star Trek: Enterprise books, in part because it is a CANON fix to the god-awful wreck that was "These Are the Voyages..." I'm one of those Enterprise fans who considers "Terra Prime" to be the series finale, because the actual one was such a complete waste of space, waste of characters, and a poorly done attempt to tie ST:E together with ST:TNG, which it had spent too many episodes already doing in the final season.

  26. 4 out of 5

    James Aled

    I have to admit that although I am a big Star Trek fan I've never felt drawn to reading one of the books. That was until the disappointing ending of Enterprise. Without *spoilers* the ending leaves a lot to be desired. This book takes a few steps towards repairing dryer damage and explaining some of the discrepancies of the series. An entertaining mix of space opera and galactic espionage. Well worth a read if that is your thing. I have to admit that although I am a big Star Trek fan I've never felt drawn to reading one of the books. That was until the disappointing ending of Enterprise. Without *spoilers* the ending leaves a lot to be desired. This book takes a few steps towards repairing dryer damage and explaining some of the discrepancies of the series. An entertaining mix of space opera and galactic espionage. Well worth a read if that is your thing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Nog finds some declassified information about the original Enterprise. History has not recorded the real story. If you read only one Enterprise book, then read this one. It completely changes the last episode in a plausible way. This is the way Enterprise should have ended, and thanks to the holodeck aspect of the episode, it means this can be the real story. Trip features heavily and so does Shran. A really good read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    David A

    Trip didn't die in the finale of "Star Trek: Enterprise"! This story tells what really happened, and sets the stage for the Earth-Romulan War as Section 31 recruits trip to investigate mysterious attacks on the Coalition of Planets. Important info on Captain Archer and the Trip-T'Pol relationship. I enjoyed the book, and it made me ready to read the upcoming "Kobyashi Maru" novel. Trip didn't die in the finale of "Star Trek: Enterprise"! This story tells what really happened, and sets the stage for the Earth-Romulan War as Section 31 recruits trip to investigate mysterious attacks on the Coalition of Planets. Important info on Captain Archer and the Trip-T'Pol relationship. I enjoyed the book, and it made me ready to read the upcoming "Kobyashi Maru" novel.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    In the last episode of "Enterprise" Trip died a meaningless death. This novel quite successfully sets it right: he staged his death, telling only the captain, Reed and Pholx so he could join Section 31 to fight the unseen, at this point, Romulans. In this book Section 31 comes off much better than in other books. In the last episode of "Enterprise" Trip died a meaningless death. This novel quite successfully sets it right: he staged his death, telling only the captain, Reed and Pholx so he could join Section 31 to fight the unseen, at this point, Romulans. In this book Section 31 comes off much better than in other books.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gwen

    Way better way of explaining of what happened to Trip than what the show Enterprise did. As always well written by Mangles and Martin who seemed to grasp the best loved characters from the series well.

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