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Norse Goddess Magic: Trancework, Mythology, and Ritual

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A practical guide to the magic of the feminine side of the Norse pantheon • Provides invocations and rituals to call each goddess forth for personal and group spirit work • Details the author’s trancework to discover the personalities and powers of Frigg the Allmother, wife of Odin, and the 12 lesser-known Aesir goddesses associated with her • Offers a comprehensive gui A practical guide to the magic of the feminine side of the Norse pantheon • Provides invocations and rituals to call each goddess forth for personal and group spirit work • Details the author’s trancework to discover the personalities and powers of Frigg the Allmother, wife of Odin, and the 12 lesser-known Aesir goddesses associated with her • Offers a comprehensive guide to tranceworking to connect with the deities Combining traditional research on folklore and the Eddas with trancework and meditation techniques, Alice Karlsdóttir was able to rediscover the feminine side of the Norse pantheon and assemble working knowledge of 13 Norse goddesses for both group ritual and personal spirit work. Detailing her trancework journeys to connect with the goddesses, the author reveals the long-lost personalities and powers of each deity. She explores the Norse goddess Frigg the Allmother, wife of Odin, along with the 12 Asynjur, or Aesir goddesses, associated with her, such as Sjofn the peacemaker, Eir the Healer, and Vor the Wisewoman. She shares their appearances in the Eddas and Germanic mythology and explains the meanings of their names, their relationships to each other, and their connections to the roles of women in Old Norse society. She provides detailed instructions for invocations and rituals to call each goddess forth for personal and group spirit work. She also offers a comprehensive guide to ritual tranceworking to allow anyone to directly experience deities and spiritual beings and develop spirit-work relationships with them.


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A practical guide to the magic of the feminine side of the Norse pantheon • Provides invocations and rituals to call each goddess forth for personal and group spirit work • Details the author’s trancework to discover the personalities and powers of Frigg the Allmother, wife of Odin, and the 12 lesser-known Aesir goddesses associated with her • Offers a comprehensive gui A practical guide to the magic of the feminine side of the Norse pantheon • Provides invocations and rituals to call each goddess forth for personal and group spirit work • Details the author’s trancework to discover the personalities and powers of Frigg the Allmother, wife of Odin, and the 12 lesser-known Aesir goddesses associated with her • Offers a comprehensive guide to tranceworking to connect with the deities Combining traditional research on folklore and the Eddas with trancework and meditation techniques, Alice Karlsdóttir was able to rediscover the feminine side of the Norse pantheon and assemble working knowledge of 13 Norse goddesses for both group ritual and personal spirit work. Detailing her trancework journeys to connect with the goddesses, the author reveals the long-lost personalities and powers of each deity. She explores the Norse goddess Frigg the Allmother, wife of Odin, along with the 12 Asynjur, or Aesir goddesses, associated with her, such as Sjofn the peacemaker, Eir the Healer, and Vor the Wisewoman. She shares their appearances in the Eddas and Germanic mythology and explains the meanings of their names, their relationships to each other, and their connections to the roles of women in Old Norse society. She provides detailed instructions for invocations and rituals to call each goddess forth for personal and group spirit work. She also offers a comprehensive guide to ritual tranceworking to allow anyone to directly experience deities and spiritual beings and develop spirit-work relationships with them.

30 review for Norse Goddess Magic: Trancework, Mythology, and Ritual

  1. 5 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    I read Norse Goddess Magic not for the details about the Norse pantheon (which admittedly I know very little about, so it was very interesting and educational) but mainly for the author's experience in trancework. To my disappointment, she spends pages and pages explaining what going into trance is, how she does it, and then only a few paragraphs in each chapter detailing an actual trance. I wanted the book to be mainly trancework. That is what made it unique and original- her personal sojourns I read Norse Goddess Magic not for the details about the Norse pantheon (which admittedly I know very little about, so it was very interesting and educational) but mainly for the author's experience in trancework. To my disappointment, she spends pages and pages explaining what going into trance is, how she does it, and then only a few paragraphs in each chapter detailing an actual trance. I wanted the book to be mainly trancework. That is what made it unique and original- her personal sojourns into "another world" and what she brought back. The rehashing of all of the old mythologies were, as I said, interesting, but if I wanted to read them, I could have picked up any book about Norse mythology. I also felt like Alice spent a lot of time explaining why trancework is a valid method of information gathering and defending her opinion on why she believes that. I agreed with her completely so I just read through the pages thinking- preaching to choir, get to the trances! So, that was a frustration. Another part of the book that I disagreed with was Alice's assertion that it is "difficult" to go into trance. In my experience, if you believe something is difficult to do be that hypnosis, meditation, whatever- you're putting stumbling blocks on your path that don't need to be there. Going into trance is as simple as watching your breath flow in and out. If you breathe, you can go into trance. I felt like she did a disservice to beginners with that particular teaching. I felt like Alice's trances were so closely focused on one goddess or aspect of the goddess, that she didn't really get all that she could out of her trancework or interactions in the other worlds. She read all of this information to prime her subconscious mind and then... it felt like not much happened. To be fair, she did see the person she was looking for, describe their physical characteristics, express the emotion that they evoked in her, and then, maybe, have a brief interlude with them. In my pathwalks, there's more interaction in the world itself but that could be the difference of our focus. Alice said from the start that she wanted to know more about these different goddesses and form a working relationship with them whereas I'm just curious to see what's out there. I've run into Roman gods and goddesses, Native American figures, Tibetian locations, some Egyptian and Hindu gods... but again, I'm not focused on one or another of the world religions. With an open mind, it's incredible the types of things that you see. So, I guess I'm saying that I don't believe in priming your mind with symbols before you do your work. Pick where you're going or who you want to see, I use the symbols on the Tree of Life or tarot cards, and just go. Believe that you can. Figure out what works for you. Do it. Then write it down so that I can read it. :) Because I totally will. If you enjoyed the trancework portions of Norse Goddess Magic, I'd recommend the second part of Israel Regardie's A Garden of Pomegranates where he recorded some extraordinary personal trancework or Paths of Wisdom by John Michael Greer (this is the author that I used to develop my own pathwalks/trances).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    This book was okay, but the title is misleading since it is only about Frigga and her maidens. If you are looking for information on Goddesses from Norse mythology/pantheon you will be very disappointed. Other than Freya, who the author likes to slut shame it seems there is nothing on other goddesses. Alice Karlsdottir should have done more research before sending this book off to be published. Perhaps she would know that Holda is another name for Hel, not Frigga. Karlsdottir does not know the r This book was okay, but the title is misleading since it is only about Frigga and her maidens. If you are looking for information on Goddesses from Norse mythology/pantheon you will be very disappointed. Other than Freya, who the author likes to slut shame it seems there is nothing on other goddesses. Alice Karlsdottir should have done more research before sending this book off to be published. Perhaps she would know that Holda is another name for Hel, not Frigga. Karlsdottir does not know the runes as well as she think she does. Giving raido to Frigga seems odd since it's Thor's rune. Karlsdottir says that Freya is only the goddess of lust and seduction and that Frigga is the goddess of marriage. But then assigns kenaz (wildfire) to Frigga. Not Fehu which means abundance, controlled fire, or fertility. But the one rune that represents crazy, unbridled, lustful passion. That makes so much sense. Hagalaz is also Hel's rune, but the author continues to claim that Holda is Frigga's crone aspect. What I did like was the information on Frigga's handmaidens since I did not know what their names were or even what they were Goddesses of. For less than 300 pages this book was pretty slow to read. It was quite boring.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Pagano

    A book full of feminine energy but limited to Frigg and the goddesses falling under her. If you were looking for more information on a wider variety of goddesses in Norse mythos then this is not the book for you. However, Frigg and her maidens are pretty interesting in their own right and it’s worth the read to gain more insight on these goddesses. This book goes beyond the mythology of these Norse women by delving into trancework and ritual. Once again this book is not for you if you’re strictl A book full of feminine energy but limited to Frigg and the goddesses falling under her. If you were looking for more information on a wider variety of goddesses in Norse mythos then this is not the book for you. However, Frigg and her maidens are pretty interesting in their own right and it’s worth the read to gain more insight on these goddesses. This book goes beyond the mythology of these Norse women by delving into trancework and ritual. Once again this book is not for you if you’re strictly looking to read on the mythos of these goddesses. While there’s quite a good bit of information and research done on the goddesses the book contains an equal amount of pages dedicated to the trances and rituals one can do along with each goddess. I’m glad I read this book as it helped point me in the right direction of where and how to find more information on Norse goddesses. But, it also provided a new way to look at things and a solution for how to fill in the blanks.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marci

    I just failed to be impressed by this book. I felt like the scholarship wasn't deep and that kept the rest of it from being better. I just failed to be impressed by this book. I felt like the scholarship wasn't deep and that kept the rest of it from being better.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Allyson Shaw

    I enjoyed this book and respect the important work the author has undertaken completing it. I found the title and blurbs somewhat misleading as it is not a comprehensive look at Northern goddesses- so many of them lost or simply mentioned in passing in Christian or Roman sources. The book focuses on Frigg and her attendant goddesses, mentioning Freya, and Nerthus only for contrast. (The Norns, Gulveig, Sif, Idun, Ran are not even mentioned.) This seems a glaring omission as Freya is the goddesse I enjoyed this book and respect the important work the author has undertaken completing it. I found the title and blurbs somewhat misleading as it is not a comprehensive look at Northern goddesses- so many of them lost or simply mentioned in passing in Christian or Roman sources. The book focuses on Frigg and her attendant goddesses, mentioning Freya, and Nerthus only for contrast. (The Norns, Gulveig, Sif, Idun, Ran are not even mentioned.) This seems a glaring omission as Freya is the goddesses of trance work, the premise of this book. We know that she taught these workings to Odin. Surely she should be included in a text on tranceworking? I was hoping for something to delve deeper into this radical act of reclaiming the goddesses of our birthright but instead found an incomplete exploration, like a table with two legs.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Trey Moonwood

    This is an excellent look at the Heathen goddess Frigg, along with the twelve other goddesses that modern Heathens see as her handmaids. I've been looking for information on this goddess - the Queen of Heaven, and ostensibly the most powerful and most important of the Norse Goddesses - for a while. In this day and age, however, Freyja seems to have overtaken Frigg as the most beloved of our female deities. This book reminds me in some ways of Diana Paxson's Taking Up the Runes - Alice Karlsdottir This is an excellent look at the Heathen goddess Frigg, along with the twelve other goddesses that modern Heathens see as her handmaids. I've been looking for information on this goddess - the Queen of Heaven, and ostensibly the most powerful and most important of the Norse Goddesses - for a while. In this day and age, however, Freyja seems to have overtaken Frigg as the most beloved of our female deities. This book reminds me in some ways of Diana Paxson's Taking Up the Runes - Alice Karlsdottir not only goes over the basic information about these goddesses, but delves deeper in the the social and cultural context of each of the aspects she discusses. She doesn't simply say "Syn is also associated with courts of law," she instead gives descriptions of the ancient Germanic systems of law, how people brought their grievances before them, and how judgements were made. This kind of thoroughness brings to light so many unexpected connections, illustrating not just generally how these goddesses were viewed in the past, but suggesting strongly how they might be viewed today. I also really enjoyed reading another book that uses the format: Here are the methods I used to gain this information, followed by Here is the story of the information gained this way. I'm really appreciating the number of books I've found recently that teach a method for using trance, meditation, magic, shapeshifting, or another technique, and then follow it up with a recounting of the author's personal experiences while using it. Not only does this format convey a lot of interesting information, but it also puts the tools in the hands of the reader, and encourages people to uncover their own perspective on the subject matter. Overall, there is no doubt in my mind that this book gets 5/5 stars - and I plan on recommending it to people who ask me for a good source on the goddess Frigg, on the roles of women in ancient Heathenry, and who are looking for more in-depth books about Heathenry in general.

  7. 4 out of 5

    SamTheOwl

    Overall I really did enjoy this book. It helped me to better understand Frigg and Her related Asynjur. Alice begins by explaining what trance work is and how she uses it to supplement her historical research. Multiple times throughout the work, Alice makes clear trance work is not to replace research and research should always be first and foremost. I really appreciate her efforts to make this clear. Through the rest of the book as she goes through Frigg and the Goddesses, the historical researc Overall I really did enjoy this book. It helped me to better understand Frigg and Her related Asynjur. Alice begins by explaining what trance work is and how she uses it to supplement her historical research. Multiple times throughout the work, Alice makes clear trance work is not to replace research and research should always be first and foremost. I really appreciate her efforts to make this clear. Through the rest of the book as she goes through Frigg and the Goddesses, the historical research is clearly marked apart from the trance work and each section ends with a ritual for that Goddess. I personally skipped the trance work portions as that is not for me. I took 1 star off because in the Frigg chapters, it's very difficult to tell what is fact and what is Alice's own UPG. I cannot tell if that is due to my lack of experience with texts such as this, or if it's due in part to her formating of the footnotes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mathew Collins

    Highly recommended for anyone considering meditation. Unlike myself, the author didn't have trancework/meditation come easily for her, so I find it exhilarating the step-by-step explanations she gives, which really helped me increase my meditation to another level. Plus, the writing flows very well, tidbits of information you can't find elsewhere, coupled with very personal stories that makes it very easy to relate to. I couldn't more highly recommend this book, and I constantly go back to it for a piec Highly recommended for anyone considering meditation. Unlike myself, the author didn't have trancework/meditation come easily for her, so I find it exhilarating the step-by-step explanations she gives, which really helped me increase my meditation to another level. Plus, the writing flows very well, tidbits of information you can't find elsewhere, coupled with very personal stories that makes it very easy to relate to. I couldn't more highly recommend this book, and I constantly go back to it for a piece of advice here and there, and once I finish reading some other books on my shelf that deserve to be read, I will most definitely read this again, and again. Not a book you will part with! One that will find its way on your bookshelf to display for years to come!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Skorum Music

    A practical guide to the Aesir Goddesses via Unverified Personal Gnosis. The only slight niggle is that there is very little on the Vanir and Freyja

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carol Palmer

    I don’t see myself doing trance work, but the chapters on Frigg and her twelve attendants was interesting and informative

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gemma Innes

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kala Séraphin

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Kelley

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mokosh

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vella

  18. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Areland

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ghanima

  21. 4 out of 5

    The_alienist

  22. 5 out of 5

    Allison

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

  24. 5 out of 5

    Faith Cantrell

  25. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cortney Mihulka

  27. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joy Auciello

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rain

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