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Darknet: Hollywood's War Against the Digital Generation

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An indispensable primer for those who want to protect their digital rights from the dark forces of big media. -Kara Swisher, author of aol.com The first general interest book by a blogger edited collaboratively by his readers, Darknet reveals how Hollywood's fear of digital piracy is leading to escalating clashes between copyright holders and their customers, who love their An indispensable primer for those who want to protect their digital rights from the dark forces of big media. -Kara Swisher, author of aol.com The first general interest book by a blogger edited collaboratively by his readers, Darknet reveals how Hollywood's fear of digital piracy is leading to escalating clashes between copyright holders and their customers, who love their TiVo digital video recorders, iPod music players, digital televisions, computers, and other cutting-edge devices. Drawing on unprecedented access to entertainment insiders, technology innovators, and digital provocateurs-including some who play on both sides of the war between digital pirates and entertainment conglomerates-the book shows how entertainment companies are threatening the fundamental freedoms of the digital age.


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An indispensable primer for those who want to protect their digital rights from the dark forces of big media. -Kara Swisher, author of aol.com The first general interest book by a blogger edited collaboratively by his readers, Darknet reveals how Hollywood's fear of digital piracy is leading to escalating clashes between copyright holders and their customers, who love their An indispensable primer for those who want to protect their digital rights from the dark forces of big media. -Kara Swisher, author of aol.com The first general interest book by a blogger edited collaboratively by his readers, Darknet reveals how Hollywood's fear of digital piracy is leading to escalating clashes between copyright holders and their customers, who love their TiVo digital video recorders, iPod music players, digital televisions, computers, and other cutting-edge devices. Drawing on unprecedented access to entertainment insiders, technology innovators, and digital provocateurs-including some who play on both sides of the war between digital pirates and entertainment conglomerates-the book shows how entertainment companies are threatening the fundamental freedoms of the digital age.

30 review for Darknet: Hollywood's War Against the Digital Generation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Desiree

    I really enjoyed this somewhat dated book about hollywood's fight against p2p networks. The second half of the book was definitely MUCH better. Soooo, if you can get through the 100+ pages, you are in for a decent read. After he tackles the movie industry, he goes on to explore the music and games industries as well. Basically, p2p networks have taken off as Hollywood has tried as hard as they could to influence legislation to prevent consumers from viewing movies how, when and where they please I really enjoyed this somewhat dated book about hollywood's fight against p2p networks. The second half of the book was definitely MUCH better. Soooo, if you can get through the 100+ pages, you are in for a decent read. After he tackles the movie industry, he goes on to explore the music and games industries as well. Basically, p2p networks have taken off as Hollywood has tried as hard as they could to influence legislation to prevent consumers from viewing movies how, when and where they please. If you buy a movie, shouldn't you have the right to watch it on a portable device? Not according to the DMCA (Digital Millenium Copyright Act). This has hampered a lot of creativity as pastors are breaking the law if they show a short clip of a copyrighted movie or tv show in church on Sunday! Wanna make a mash-up(two different songs mixed together)? Well, that is also breaking the law! Using a ten-second clip of a Disney movie in your home video would make you a felon! The author goes into how forward thinking business people from NYC are always trying to develop new business models, while Hollywood views this as a threat. It's only the newer companies like HBO, MTV, etc that are willing to listen. "As broadband succeeds, broadcasting will fail." "Our country has a choice of two visions of what our media culture might look like. One might be 500 channels (owned by 6 corporations) and nothing on. The other might allow consumers easy on-demand access to a world of unique artistry of such power and grace as would melt the heart." In the music world, the industry loves to blame the file sharing networks for their current woes, but many of their wounds have been self-inflicted. Artists receive less than 5 percent of CD sales! They average around 12 percent for online sales and 35-40 percent of concert proceeds. A new band gets an advance and after all is said and done, they usually end up OWING money to the label! They are not allowed to post any music online for their fans as it is prohibited. All the money is being made by only a few big artists, while all the other musicians are starving! "obscurity-not piracy-may be the greatest threat to the vast majority of creative artists." "Price it right and they will come." He ends with a 10 point digital culture road map! Interesting stuff! Would definitely recommend!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    Still reading this but I'm fining it to be pretty disappointing and may end up putting it down. The Chapter where he interviews the movie downloaders was great. But the chapter where he insists that just because there's cheaper camcorders and editing software that there will be a lot more Spielbergs and Coppolas out there is just bad. Yes there will be more film makers, and they will come from new places, but as much as I enjoy the "piano playing cat," I don't think it's really the same thing. T Still reading this but I'm fining it to be pretty disappointing and may end up putting it down. The Chapter where he interviews the movie downloaders was great. But the chapter where he insists that just because there's cheaper camcorders and editing software that there will be a lot more Spielbergs and Coppolas out there is just bad. Yes there will be more film makers, and they will come from new places, but as much as I enjoy the "piano playing cat," I don't think it's really the same thing. There's an education that goes along to making films wich is ignored in the book. After that he talks about how great the DVD technology that allows studios to put out DVDs that have multiple ratings, that chapter is just horrifying and unimaginable to defend. It's basically censorship not offering the fans a new product, but Lasica doesn't seem to see it that way. JD Lasica defends it but doesn't consider films and film making to be an art but more of a product. A fan or edit or cutting a few shots out to use in a presentation is not the same, that's great. That I would defend because it contributes to the culture. But a PG version of "The Hangover" is not the same as a Director's Cut, it's not even close. I have a 5 year old kid and I skip over Bambi's and Nemo's mother dieing every time, I still don't want a studio to do it for me. The parents who want to show their kids a PG version of Saving Privet Ryan are just nuts and I can't defend them. How about a G version of Schindler's List next? Ultimately the book is outdated. It spends a lot of time on DVDs and upcoming Blueray player. DVDs are on their way out. Studios are spending too much money on copy protection (8 billion was spent protecting Blueray and it was cracked in less then a week). It's not a question of if digital downloads will happen, it's already happening and will continue to get better. The question is will Hollywood be involved.

  3. 4 out of 5

    John

    The book has aged better than expected. I was prepared to skip though story after story on the RIAA and MPAA suing college students and housewives or installing rootkits. Thinking back to 2004-2005, the idea of DVDs and Netflix were still new technologies for most of America (Google had yet to release their beta of Google books when this was being written). So it's pretty amazing how relevant parts of this book still are. What I enjoyed was that Lasica let hits interviewees speak without too muc The book has aged better than expected. I was prepared to skip though story after story on the RIAA and MPAA suing college students and housewives or installing rootkits. Thinking back to 2004-2005, the idea of DVDs and Netflix were still new technologies for most of America (Google had yet to release their beta of Google books when this was being written). So it's pretty amazing how relevant parts of this book still are. What I enjoyed was that Lasica let hits interviewees speak without too much criticism. From Christians who see nothing wrong with "editing" movies to remove swears, violence and sex to the point of censorship to a preacher who downloads tv shows before they air, the book is filled with people who either aren't aware or don't care about the stringent copyright laws that have been passed since the 70s. This is still worth reading as it gives the reader a view into what media conglomerates were thinking 5 years ago and are starting to put into action only now.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul Paradise

    A great book. The Darknet made national headlines after the police busted a Darknet site called The Silk Road. Rolling Stone Magazine published an article on the Darknet shortly afterwards. Anonymity on the Internet is of concern to everyone. I predict that the Darknet will eventually become as popular as the world wide web.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Clive Young

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

  7. 4 out of 5

    Zachary Lockwood

  8. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ali

  10. 5 out of 5

    Josh Fatzick

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  12. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

  13. 4 out of 5

    Roland

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ken Camp

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo Huamolle

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sudipta Rudra

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  19. 4 out of 5

    Devin

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Lodi

  21. 4 out of 5

    Roberto Giannotti

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kirill Martynov

  23. 4 out of 5

    Toph

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alfredo

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sheryl Camp

  27. 5 out of 5

    Caco Ishak

  28. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  30. 5 out of 5

    William Blair

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