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"An intriguing, sometimes florid, but fast-paced novelistic account of a European expedition into the wilds of Tibet by an accomplished thriller and historical adventure writer." Kirkus Reviews "Fans of Jules Verne’s travel adventures will find Schiller has done a solid job of transforming an obscure real-life Victorian expedition into a thrilling yarn." Publishers Weekly. "An intriguing, sometimes florid, but fast-paced novelistic account of a European expedition into the wilds of Tibet by an accomplished thriller and historical adventure writer." Kirkus Reviews "Fans of Jules Verne’s travel adventures will find Schiller has done a solid job of transforming an obscure real-life Victorian expedition into a thrilling yarn." Publishers Weekly. At a time when no Westerner has seen the holy city of Lhasa or met the Dalai Lama, French explorer Gabriel Bonvalot vows to do the impossible: he launches his own expedition to the Roof of the World with funding from the Duke of Chartres. The only caveat is that Bonvalot must bring along the Duke's wayward son, Prince Henri d'Orléans, a drinker, gambler, and womanizer whose reckless behavior threatens to derail the entire expedition. During the journey, the explorers encounter freezing temperatures, volatile winds, mountain sickness, bandits, duplicitous Chinese Ambans, and a beguiling Tibetan Buddhist princess with a deadly secret. Held as prisoners at 16,000 feet and surrounded by an army of Tibetan soldiers, the explorers find themselves in a desperate fight for survival. RACE TO TIBET is a thrilling tale of high-altitude adventure and survival set in the world's most forbidden country. Perfect for fans of Jules Verne, and H. Rider Haggard.


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"An intriguing, sometimes florid, but fast-paced novelistic account of a European expedition into the wilds of Tibet by an accomplished thriller and historical adventure writer." Kirkus Reviews "Fans of Jules Verne’s travel adventures will find Schiller has done a solid job of transforming an obscure real-life Victorian expedition into a thrilling yarn." Publishers Weekly. "An intriguing, sometimes florid, but fast-paced novelistic account of a European expedition into the wilds of Tibet by an accomplished thriller and historical adventure writer." Kirkus Reviews "Fans of Jules Verne’s travel adventures will find Schiller has done a solid job of transforming an obscure real-life Victorian expedition into a thrilling yarn." Publishers Weekly. At a time when no Westerner has seen the holy city of Lhasa or met the Dalai Lama, French explorer Gabriel Bonvalot vows to do the impossible: he launches his own expedition to the Roof of the World with funding from the Duke of Chartres. The only caveat is that Bonvalot must bring along the Duke's wayward son, Prince Henri d'Orléans, a drinker, gambler, and womanizer whose reckless behavior threatens to derail the entire expedition. During the journey, the explorers encounter freezing temperatures, volatile winds, mountain sickness, bandits, duplicitous Chinese Ambans, and a beguiling Tibetan Buddhist princess with a deadly secret. Held as prisoners at 16,000 feet and surrounded by an army of Tibetan soldiers, the explorers find themselves in a desperate fight for survival. RACE TO TIBET is a thrilling tale of high-altitude adventure and survival set in the world's most forbidden country. Perfect for fans of Jules Verne, and H. Rider Haggard.

30 review for Race to Tibet

  1. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    My earliest memory of Tibet is probably reading Tintin in Tibet and years later I saw Seven Years in Tibet. So when I saw this book I just knew that I had to read it. Tibet is a country that iI find fascinating and I would love to visit it someday. But for now, I will be content my reading books about it. The French explorer Gabriel Bonvalot sets as a goal in this book to be the first European person to visit Lhasa, the forbidden city in Tibet. Travelling with Bonvalot is also Prince Henri d'Orlé My earliest memory of Tibet is probably reading Tintin in Tibet and years later I saw Seven Years in Tibet. So when I saw this book I just knew that I had to read it. Tibet is a country that iI find fascinating and I would love to visit it someday. But for now, I will be content my reading books about it. The French explorer Gabriel Bonvalot sets as a goal in this book to be the first European person to visit Lhasa, the forbidden city in Tibet. Travelling with Bonvalot is also Prince Henri d'Orléans, whose father wants him gone from the country for a year since Henri has once again got his name in the newspaper, in a bad way. Along the way, Camille Dancourt joins the group. She is travelling to Tibet to search for her husband who went missing there. Bonvalot didn't want her to travel with them from the beginning, but she was quite determined to go there with or without him. So in the end, he yields. This will be an adventurous journey, filled with dangerous but also memorable encounters and experiences. One thing that I thought about reading this book that I really never thought so much about before (I think) is how obnoxious we Europeans are when it comes to other people that have a different culture than we have. I feel that Bonvalot journey is very much like a small invasion of Tibet. Bonvalot wants to be the first European to visit Lhasa no matter what the people in Tibet feel about it and he will do anything to get there, for instance bribing people. Also, no one was willing to sell a horse to them so they stole one. How wrong isn't that? But they were quite desperate, it's a hard country and no matter how prepared they were, it still didn't go so well. But I still felt quite often that forcing their way into the country was wrong. Sophie Schiller has written an interesting book. Even though I sometimes felt annoyance with the Europeans superior attitude I still wanted to know if they would get to Lhasa and would Camille find her husband? The only drawback for me was that even though the book was good it wasn't a great read. There was something missing for me. It can be that I really didn't connect with the characters. But I liked reading it and I would recommend it. Also, I wish there were maps in the book that showed the way they traveled. I received a copy from the publisher and france book tours in return for an honest review!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    The narrative is full of adventure and action. It’s adventures within adventures repeating as the team faces multiple precarious challenges. The plot has a rather intricate and complex feel without being cumbersome. As dilemma after dilemma strikes, tragedy hits and looms, dangerous issues arise, you travel along with all the excitement and suspense. Schiller’s interpretation and manipulation of historical events and fiction is genius, well executed. Schiller provides a diverse cast. You feel the The narrative is full of adventure and action. It’s adventures within adventures repeating as the team faces multiple precarious challenges. The plot has a rather intricate and complex feel without being cumbersome. As dilemma after dilemma strikes, tragedy hits and looms, dangerous issues arise, you travel along with all the excitement and suspense. Schiller’s interpretation and manipulation of historical events and fiction is genius, well executed. Schiller provides a diverse cast. You feel the trials and tribulations an adventure of this magnitude can wreck on varying personalities under challenging conditions. No doubt taking on a epic exploration such as this makes a person grow thus Schiller demonstrates, a life changing adventure as we read of our travelers growth. I liked the multitude of personalities, how they faced unbelievable conditions and scenarios. Colorful, frustrating and loathsome, lovable bunch, each one taking away something of importance as the action and adventure continues until the very end, they truly evolve. I loved the addition of a female, Camille Dancourt, being part of the team especially given the era and significance of this emprise. Schiller’s elaborate description of the harshness and dangerous elements along with various cultures and traditions faced was well done. I felt chilled as I read of the forty degree below zero temperatures, frostbite and the mortality of those through altitude sickness and freezing to death. You truly guess at the final outcome as the riveting story unfolds. I wasn’t sure how the ending would turn out based on the excruciating situations dealt over and over again. A wonderful historical fiction adventure, full of nonstop action I found fascinating. Thoroughly enjoyed my time in the grievous race to Tibet with my diverse travel mates.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sophie Schiller

    Readers Favorite: Race to Tibet by Sophie Schiller is a thrilling adventure novel based on a factual expedition to Tibet. Race to Tibet is about an expedition launched by French explorer Gabriel Bonvalot into the heart of Tibet where few westerners had ventured before. Accompanying him is the young son of the Duke of Chartres, who is the sponsor and financial backer of the expedition. The story starts with an introduction to the Duke and the latest trouble that his son, Henri, has gotten himself Readers Favorite: Race to Tibet by Sophie Schiller is a thrilling adventure novel based on a factual expedition to Tibet. Race to Tibet is about an expedition launched by French explorer Gabriel Bonvalot into the heart of Tibet where few westerners had ventured before. Accompanying him is the young son of the Duke of Chartres, who is the sponsor and financial backer of the expedition. The story starts with an introduction to the Duke and the latest trouble that his son, Henri, has gotten himself into. Henri is the proverbial black sheep of the family and the Duke decides to send him far away from Paris to keep him out of trouble. What follows is an exciting expedition to the Roof of the World that takes us into the high plateau lands of Tibet, battling severe weather, encounters with bandits, being trapped in the midst of a battle, meeting a Tibetan princess, all set against the backdrop of the mysterious country of Tibet and some of its little known Buddhist practices. Race to Tibet by Sophie Schiller is a great travel book, especially for readers interested in the East and the spiritual and mystical aspect of countries such as Tibet set in the Himalayas. While reading this book, I found myself transported to the high altitude plains among the Lamas, which is a testament to Sophie’s skill as a writer to paint a vivid picture of the landscapes. I also enjoyed the fact that this story was inspired by real events and people and it certainly was an interesting period in history. The novel moves along at a good pace and the characters and events are well represented, making for an exciting read. This is a great adventure novel with elements of action and romance that I would recommend to all readers, and especially those interested in Tibet or travel books in general. https://readersfavorite.com/book-revi...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Philip

    Thanks to the author for an advance copy of this well-researched and charmingly-written adventure yarn from "the Golden Age" of Central Asian exploration. I've read a lot about the Great Game over the years, but as that focuses on the British-Russian conflict, I'd apparently remained largely ignorant of French efforts to penetrate Tibet - and Schiller's book has now gone a long way towards filling that gap. As with most good adventure/explorer tales, Race to Tibet is very cinematic in scope, and Thanks to the author for an advance copy of this well-researched and charmingly-written adventure yarn from "the Golden Age" of Central Asian exploration. I've read a lot about the Great Game over the years, but as that focuses on the British-Russian conflict, I'd apparently remained largely ignorant of French efforts to penetrate Tibet - and Schiller's book has now gone a long way towards filling that gap. As with most good adventure/explorer tales, Race to Tibet is very cinematic in scope, and I could easily imagine a film version, along the lines of Brendon Frasier's "The Mummy." What do you say, Sophie - ready to take this to Hollywood?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erin Al-Mehairi

    Publisher Weekly stole a little bit of my thunder yesterday for my review today of the historical fiction novel Race to Tibet, as they compared it as similar to reading a Jules Verne adventure. That’s what I was going to say! Great minds think alike. But that’s okay, I have more to say! It’s an endeavor so grand, you’d think it wasn’t based in real life Victorian era history, but rather more a screenplay for an epic drama or a classic novel from the golden age of world exploration. The characters Publisher Weekly stole a little bit of my thunder yesterday for my review today of the historical fiction novel Race to Tibet, as they compared it as similar to reading a Jules Verne adventure. That’s what I was going to say! Great minds think alike. But that’s okay, I have more to say! It’s an endeavor so grand, you’d think it wasn’t based in real life Victorian era history, but rather more a screenplay for an epic drama or a classic novel from the golden age of world exploration. The characters were larger than life, intricate and interesting, and the enterprise suspenseful, dramatic, and scenic. Schiller writes in a descriptive manner, with sentences that flow in a fluid and at a good pace. Not only did I enjoy myself upon reading this, but I learned quite a bit also about these true historical characters and the times and places. I had not known of the French interest in exploring Central Asia. I always find it interesting to learn about various types of explorers, so being introduced to a new authentic explorer in Gabriel Bonvalot perked my interest. In the time of the late 1800s, which is the setting of the book,Tibet has still been untraveled and Bonvalot wishes to “breach her walls of isolation.” Though at the time this kind of travel was expensive, dangerous, harsh, and risky, leaving Bonvalot in need of money. Luckily, the Duke of Chartres agrees to fund it if Bonvalot would take along his misbehaving son, Prince Henri d’Orléans. The two of them, along with the lovely Camille Dancourt of whom they’ve picked up along the way, revel in action and feats that would outweigh the performance of any explorer today! And all with such etiquette and class. These are characters that Agatha Christie might construct such as in the Murder of the Orient Express (though it’s not a murder mystery) or Stefan Zweig (The Grand Budapest Hotel was derived from his work). Maybe it would make a great movie in the vein of Lawrence of Arabia, yet with horrid weather, mountain climbing, and the risk of not surviving. I’m sure Brad Pitt would visit Tibet again to be in the starring role. It’s an entertaining book to read, yet has great depth and fortitude as the reader watches these characters grow, develop, struggle, and learn about themselves and their surroundings. I don’t want to give the ending away, but it was so shocking and thought-provoking. The historical notes on the authentic individuals were quite thrilling too, as well as the author’s note on how she came to write this particular novel! A historical account of survival and awakening of Victorian explorers who risk it all to venture into a country that’s veiled in secrets and spirituality. Race to Tibet is an epic historical adventure that’s highly recommended! I was given a copy of this book in exchange for honest review

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    I went through a period of fascination with Tibet in my mid-teens, and read Seven Years in Tibet (by Heinrich Harrer). (I saw the film later, and I didn't think it was nearly as good as the book.) To come back to a book about Tibet, after so many years, reminded me of my earlier fascination. As this was fiction of real-life events, I'm now intrigued to perhaps read the accounts of Bonvalot, and Prince Henri, and particularly of the priest Father Dedeken, who knew Chinese (apparently quite unusual I went through a period of fascination with Tibet in my mid-teens, and read Seven Years in Tibet (by Heinrich Harrer). (I saw the film later, and I didn't think it was nearly as good as the book.) To come back to a book about Tibet, after so many years, reminded me of my earlier fascination. As this was fiction of real-life events, I'm now intrigued to perhaps read the accounts of Bonvalot, and Prince Henri, and particularly of the priest Father Dedeken, who knew Chinese (apparently quite unusual for the time). Perhaps my greatest fascination, likely because of the lack of story about her, was the character of Camille, who joins the expedition in order to find her husband (who had gone missing in Tibet some months prior). I would have liked to see more of Camille, as she rarely showed up in the narrative. In some sections, it's as if she didn't even exist with the caravan. Fortunately her plotline does not disappoint in the end. I think this book would be best for history buffs, or those interested in Tibet. At times it feels more a history lesson than fiction, which though in itself is not a bad thing, occasionally took me out of the story.

  7. 4 out of 5

    vvb

    3.5 rating For the most part, this story was a travelogue (without pictures). It went into the details and logistics of a caravan traveling to, in and around Tibet during the 1800s. Along with horrendous weather and terrain conditions to battle at times, local people and authorities in regards to paperwork, official documents and bribes created road blocks to contend with as well. Despite different personalities and reasons to travel, the key characters of this story shared the same one-track mind 3.5 rating For the most part, this story was a travelogue (without pictures). It went into the details and logistics of a caravan traveling to, in and around Tibet during the 1800s. Along with horrendous weather and terrain conditions to battle at times, local people and authorities in regards to paperwork, official documents and bribes created road blocks to contend with as well. Despite different personalities and reasons to travel, the key characters of this story shared the same one-track mind and determination to get through the journey. Although there was a woman in this expedition, not much of her experience is presented. I would have liked to read more about what she had to deal with during her travels. For instance, how did she deal with personal grooming i.e. the monthly periods? I was also curious to know more about the different cultures they encountered and wanted more colorful descriptions of the people and surroundings. There is also a side story of a missing person mystery that carries to the end. The author's notes revealed how the two explorers came to be the focus of this story which was a fun trivia bit to learn about.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Larry Launstein

    I believe Sophie Schiller’s book “Race To Tibet" is a very enjoyable reading experience. It has the elements of intrigue, exploration adventure, and tension between the principal characters, and the people who try to turn the explorers back from their goal. I love the settings in the book. I strongly recommend everyone read the book, and when I read it, I just couldn’t put it down! I believe Sophie Schiller’s book “Race To Tibet" is a very enjoyable reading experience. It has the elements of intrigue, exploration adventure, and tension between the principal characters, and the people who try to turn the explorers back from their goal. I love the settings in the book. I strongly recommend everyone read the book, and when I read it, I just couldn’t put it down!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Babette Ettridge

    A wonderful quest of a Victorian expedition to see the holy city of Lhasa and met the Dalai Lama, something that no Westerner has ever done, but the obstacles are so great, that the reader wants into the forbidden country as much as the explorers do. Beautifully rich and vivid - a delight to read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heather C

    Race to Tibet is a true adventure story – the characters traverse some of the most dangerous locations of their time (and probably still today). The author makes it clear to the reader just how terrible the circumstances were of their expedition – the cold, the mountain elevation illness, predators, bandits, severe storms, etc. No one seemed to want the travelers to make it to Tibet. It had to be almost an art-form attempting to get there. I know that I would never have survived that expedition Race to Tibet is a true adventure story – the characters traverse some of the most dangerous locations of their time (and probably still today). The author makes it clear to the reader just how terrible the circumstances were of their expedition – the cold, the mountain elevation illness, predators, bandits, severe storms, etc. No one seemed to want the travelers to make it to Tibet. It had to be almost an art-form attempting to get there. I know that I would never have survived that expedition if I was a part of it! At times the story becomes bogged down in the monotony of the misery of the cold, mountain sickness, and the question of if they will ever actually make it to Tibet. They could never catch a break and I wanted them to just reach Tibet or not. One of the strangest elements of the book so far is the seemingly “is he real or isn’t he real” character of Przewalski. Even after having finished the book I still haven’t been able to determine if he is just a very vivid manifestation of Bonvalot’s mind or if he is actually still alive (since he is supposed to be dead at the start of the novel). I don’t know if I am supposed to question Bonvalot’s sanity or if it is some mystery element. Unlike many historical fiction novels, 98% of the characters in this book are male – there are two female characters, although only one of them do we really get to know well. It is a much needed element, to break up all of that testosterone on this expedition – even though it would have been very odd for a female to be on an expedition of this sort. Camille Dancort helps to make life more difficult for Bonvalot as he now has to keep his eye on a woman as well as leading the expedition. I actually enjoy this male lead, action adventure. For the most part the narrative flowed well. We see the world through the various viewpoints of the explorers mixed throughout in no defined structure. The only point where this did not work well was at one point when we abruptly switch to the viewpoint of a native Tibetan (for the length of a paragraph). This abrupt shift in perspective pulled me out of the narrative. I think it would have been more effective to leave this part out. This review was previously posted at The Maiden's Court blog.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lynne Hinkey

    "Race to Tibet" is an exciting Victorian-era trek to the "roof of the world," Tibet, a land that at the time, had yet to be explored by westerners. Set during the "Great Game" (late-1800s), the struggle between the Russian and British Empires for supremacy in Central Asia provides an ever-present background tension for Schiller's team of intrepid explorers. Facing obstacle after obstacle, from the weather, to geography, to political machinations, they continue to advance toward their goal of the "Race to Tibet" is an exciting Victorian-era trek to the "roof of the world," Tibet, a land that at the time, had yet to be explored by westerners. Set during the "Great Game" (late-1800s), the struggle between the Russian and British Empires for supremacy in Central Asia provides an ever-present background tension for Schiller's team of intrepid explorers. Facing obstacle after obstacle, from the weather, to geography, to political machinations, they continue to advance toward their goal of the mysterious land of Tibet. With external threats mounting, as well as a slow unraveling of their own party's tenuous relationships and trust, the expedition leader, Gabriel Bonvalot, must both protect his team and work to maintain their group cohesion as at every turn, the obstacles mount. Schiller does a great job of transporting the reader back in time to the Victorian era with prose strongly evocative of the expository narrative-style of the time. No bodice--ripper this, Schiller sticks to the conventions of the era she's writing about, when discretion and subtle hint suffice to clue the reader in to the depths of emotion, and suggest romance without resorting to graphic detail to fill in for readers lacking imagination. I found myself thinking about "Race to Tibet"--the characters and the setting, which plays as prominent a role as any character--long after closing the book. Schiller piqued my interest to find more of that time, and the real-life players introduced in the story, a testament to the lure of the book and Schiller's storytelling. There were a few times I felt conflicts resolved too quickly, more to move the story forward than to settle what were clearly strong emotions and animosities, but overall, the story drew me right into the time, place, and events depicted. I can guarantee you won't always like the characters, but you will want to know what happens next, right up to the end.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shoshanah

    This book was unlike anything I've ever read before. I've read book that take place in the late 1800s before. I've even read books that take place in Tibet before, but really, nothing could have prepared me for what I was getting into here. And I truly do mean that in the best way possible. This book tells the adventure of a group of explorers, including a Prince and a woman looking for her lost husband, who travel from France to Tibet in the late 1800s in a quest to be the first Europeans to mak This book was unlike anything I've ever read before. I've read book that take place in the late 1800s before. I've even read books that take place in Tibet before, but really, nothing could have prepared me for what I was getting into here. And I truly do mean that in the best way possible. This book tells the adventure of a group of explorers, including a Prince and a woman looking for her lost husband, who travel from France to Tibet in the late 1800s in a quest to be the first Europeans to make it to Lhasa. It's a risky and pretty miserable journey traveling in freezing cold temperatures over mountains. Not only are the elements standing in the way of their trip, but there are the Tibetans who don't want anyone to have access to their holy city. This book had so much potential, and in a lot of ways it was met. You really did feel yourself in the barren lands with the travelers. And like the freezing cold days must have dragged on for them, unfortunately much of the book did as well. There just seemed to be so many scenes that repeated themselves, that I think if the book was a little more concise it would have packed a more meaningful tale. Still I don't think this is one I'm going to forget, and I'd love to hear more about Tibet during this time period. I would have expected that 150 years ago Tibet wasn't such a secret to Westerners, and I'd love to read more about how that slowly changed. 3.5/5 Disclosure: I was provided this book through France Book Tours. All opinions expressed are my own.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kristy McCaffrey

    In 1889, French explorer Gabriel Bonvalot set out to reach Tibet. At that time, no European had ever set foot in Lhasa, and he was determined to enter the well-guarded city and meet the Dalai Lama himself. To gain the funds to go, he’s forced to bring along Prince Henri d’Orléans, a pretender to the French throne and a scandalous playboy. Joining them in a large caravan is Camille Dancourt, a young French woman searching for her husband who disappeared in Tibet and was never heard from again. Ms. In 1889, French explorer Gabriel Bonvalot set out to reach Tibet. At that time, no European had ever set foot in Lhasa, and he was determined to enter the well-guarded city and meet the Dalai Lama himself. To gain the funds to go, he’s forced to bring along Prince Henri d’Orléans, a pretender to the French throne and a scandalous playboy. Joining them in a large caravan is Camille Dancourt, a young French woman searching for her husband who disappeared in Tibet and was never heard from again. Ms. Schiller has taken historical fact and woven an exciting adventure story around it. Traversing through Russia and the Tian Shan and Atlyn Tagh Mountains, the expedition is plagued by harsh weather, altitude sickness, hostile Tibetans and Chinese Mandarins who control all travel within the region. While Bonvalot’s ideals are lofty, he’s forced into thievery and violence to survive. It’s a harrowing journey, and there’s no doubt these early explorers were hardy souls. Prince Henri and Camille are not, but watching them grow and adapt throughout the trek adds a counterpoint to Bonvalot. There is also a side story involving a Buddhist princess that offers insight into the culture of Tibet. Today, we take for granted that westerners enter the Himalaya region easily, but without men like Bonvalot this might never have come to be. It’s a fascinating tale of determination chasing after mythology. I won’t spoil the story by telling you whether Bonvalot reaches his destination or not, but rather I encourage you to immerse yourself in this thrilling adventure into another land and time.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dianna Rostad

    Freeztastic book!! If you’ve ever wanted to know what happens to people when they push themselves to the absolute limits at the highest place on earth, then this book will satisfy your curiosity utterly and completely. Bodner’s book is based on Gabriel Bonvalot’s expedition into the mountains of Tibet to see the forbidden city of Lhasa. You feel as if you’re up on that high mountain with them, thin air, icicles for hands, and as they kept going and found themselves trapped on so many levels you Freeztastic book!! If you’ve ever wanted to know what happens to people when they push themselves to the absolute limits at the highest place on earth, then this book will satisfy your curiosity utterly and completely. Bodner’s book is based on Gabriel Bonvalot’s expedition into the mountains of Tibet to see the forbidden city of Lhasa. You feel as if you’re up on that high mountain with them, thin air, icicles for hands, and as they kept going and found themselves trapped on so many levels you wonder why—why, don’t’ they just turn around? A real nailbiter. The other thing you get from this story, is an understanding of all the indigenous people who helped Bonvalot on his expedition, the politics of traveling in an area controlled by China at the time, and the strange customs that Bonvalot had to sort through, not so much to keep traveling, but to keep his crew alive. The research that must have gone into this story had to have been tremendous. A great read for the curious and adventurous.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    I liked it! This was nice piece of historical fiction set during the last decade of the 1800s in central Asia and Tibet. Gabriel Bonvalot is a French explore who wants the claim/fame of being the first explorer inside the forbidden city of Lhasa, home of the Dalai Lama. In order to conduct this trip Bonvalot must acquire the funds and that is where Prince Henri d'Orléans comes in. Much of the story is in the mountains and what the party had to endure in such an environment. I am interested in bo I liked it! This was nice piece of historical fiction set during the last decade of the 1800s in central Asia and Tibet. Gabriel Bonvalot is a French explore who wants the claim/fame of being the first explorer inside the forbidden city of Lhasa, home of the Dalai Lama. In order to conduct this trip Bonvalot must acquire the funds and that is where Prince Henri d'Orléans comes in. Much of the story is in the mountains and what the party had to endure in such an environment. I am interested in both these individuals and because of this story I am now seeking non-fiction work about these two men. I won this book through the goodreads giveaway program. What a program and I thank all parties involved that made it possible for me to receive this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brian Southworth

    What a fun adventure! This wonderful piece tells the story of a group of explorers who go through treacherous terrain in attempt to reach the forbidden city of Lhasa in Tibet.This group battles overwhelming odds, freezing temperatures, raging winds, sickness and a host of other obstacles.Sophie Schiller has done a beautiful job giving adventure fans a story that is part history lesson and a page turner worthy of a summer read!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Toby

    Nonstop excitement from beginning to end.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    This book is brilliant! Derring do in the high mountains. A well written account of true events in the late 19th century. French explorers head to Tibet. Well worth a read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Debra Schoenberger

    Great story - I froze the whole way through! A few typos but entertaining.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aurora

    http://sveta-randomblog.blogspot.com/... http://sveta-randomblog.blogspot.com/...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Keith Becker

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steen Alexander

  24. 5 out of 5

    Juan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

  26. 4 out of 5

    James Lynam

  27. 5 out of 5

    Terry Black

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marie-Annick Glon

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