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The New York Times bestselling author examines how our sense of touch and emotion are interconnected Johns Hopkins neuroscientist and bestselling author of The Compass of Pleasure David J. Linden presents an engaging and fascinating examination of how the interface between our sense of touch and our emotional responses affects our social interactions as well as our general The New York Times bestselling author examines how our sense of touch and emotion are interconnected Johns Hopkins neuroscientist and bestselling author of The Compass of Pleasure David J. Linden presents an engaging and fascinating examination of how the interface between our sense of touch and our emotional responses affects our social interactions as well as our general health and development. Accessible in its wit and clarity, Touch explores scientific advances in the understanding of touch that help explain our sense of self and our experience of the world. From skin to nerves to brain, the organization of the body’s touch circuits powerfully influences our lives—affecting everything from consumer choice to sexual intercourse, tool use to the origins of language, chronic pain to healing. Interpersonal touch is crucial to social bonding and individual development. Linden lucidly explains how sensory and emotional context work together to distinguish between perceptions of what feels good and what feels bad. Linking biology and behavioral science, Linden offers an entertaining and enlightening answer to how we feel in every sense of the word.


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The New York Times bestselling author examines how our sense of touch and emotion are interconnected Johns Hopkins neuroscientist and bestselling author of The Compass of Pleasure David J. Linden presents an engaging and fascinating examination of how the interface between our sense of touch and our emotional responses affects our social interactions as well as our general The New York Times bestselling author examines how our sense of touch and emotion are interconnected Johns Hopkins neuroscientist and bestselling author of The Compass of Pleasure David J. Linden presents an engaging and fascinating examination of how the interface between our sense of touch and our emotional responses affects our social interactions as well as our general health and development. Accessible in its wit and clarity, Touch explores scientific advances in the understanding of touch that help explain our sense of self and our experience of the world. From skin to nerves to brain, the organization of the body’s touch circuits powerfully influences our lives—affecting everything from consumer choice to sexual intercourse, tool use to the origins of language, chronic pain to healing. Interpersonal touch is crucial to social bonding and individual development. Linden lucidly explains how sensory and emotional context work together to distinguish between perceptions of what feels good and what feels bad. Linking biology and behavioral science, Linden offers an entertaining and enlightening answer to how we feel in every sense of the word.

30 review for Touch: The Science of Hand, Heart, and Mind

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Did you know our bodies have one set of nerve fibers that respond only to caresses? Or that the areas of our skin without hair are very limited -- lips, palms, parts of our sexual organs? Or that our brains can actually send signals to our spines that either exacerbate or alleviate the pain we feel? These and dozens of other fascinating insights are part of Linden's book, which takes you on a tour through the one of our five senses that often gets the least attention. The book delves into technical Did you know our bodies have one set of nerve fibers that respond only to caresses? Or that the areas of our skin without hair are very limited -- lips, palms, parts of our sexual organs? Or that our brains can actually send signals to our spines that either exacerbate or alleviate the pain we feel? These and dozens of other fascinating insights are part of Linden's book, which takes you on a tour through the one of our five senses that often gets the least attention. The book delves into technical territory at times, with its detailed descriptions of different sensory nerves and how they function, but it's written with clarity, wit and a pleasing diversity of subject matter. Here you learn not only about the basics of touch, but sexual touch, touch illusions, pain and pleasure, and a whole chapter on itching and scratching (a phenomenon that is still not completely understood, and which includes a shocking photo of a woman who had such an overpowering itch at the top of her forehead that she scratched through the skin and skull to exposure the surface of her brain!). I love stumbling across these well-done science books, which open up my world to new ideas, new ways of appreciating our biology, and a greater connection with the world around us.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    Touch is a pretty fascinating book, delving into the importance of the sense of touch for us and what it would mean to lose that sense. It’s not just losing the sensation of your skin touching something, after all: touch receptors also play a part in interpreting pain, heat, etc. In a way, the book as a whole tells you about more than just touch, since it also gives a solid background in the nervous system and the brain. It’s also pretty focused on stuff like orgasms and sensual touching, sometim Touch is a pretty fascinating book, delving into the importance of the sense of touch for us and what it would mean to lose that sense. It’s not just losing the sensation of your skin touching something, after all: touch receptors also play a part in interpreting pain, heat, etc. In a way, the book as a whole tells you about more than just touch, since it also gives a solid background in the nervous system and the brain. It’s also pretty focused on stuff like orgasms and sensual touching, sometimes with fairly explicit (and somewhat unnecessary) examples, e.g. a description of a couple having sex. You may or may not find that helps your understanding; I found it intrusive to be told to imagine these things in which I have no interest! Particularly as some of these descriptions are addressed to you, the reader. I felt that it got a bit scatterbrained at times — sometimes I felt that it wandered away from touch onto other aspects of our sensory experiences, though that’s almost to be expected. We divvy up our senses into some rather artificial boxes at times; just think of how linked scent and taste are. But mostly I found it interesting and easy to read. Originally reviewed for The Bibliophibian.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James

    On the one hand, this was an interesting subject delivered in an accessible fashion by an enthusiastic author. On the other, it took me absolutely ages to get round to finishing it, and I really had to concentrate fully on it, something that I rarely have to do. As the title suggests, this book was all about the sensation of touch, particularly the science of how the physical touch sends signals to our brain, and how we interpret those signals. To start with, it is more academic, detailing the ma On the one hand, this was an interesting subject delivered in an accessible fashion by an enthusiastic author. On the other, it took me absolutely ages to get round to finishing it, and I really had to concentrate fully on it, something that I rarely have to do. As the title suggests, this book was all about the sensation of touch, particularly the science of how the physical touch sends signals to our brain, and how we interpret those signals. To start with, it is more academic, detailing the make-up of our skin and neural networks, then later discusses different types of touch, such as pain and itching, as well as affectionate touching. It's difficult to pinpoint exactly what was lacking in this, as the chapter structure of everyday scenario followed by explanation and exploration was a good formula. Some early chapters felt a little too technical to be understood in full by a casual reader like me, but I wasn't lost - I just couldn't remember what was being referred to when the same name was mentioned later on. The writing lacked some of the touches of better writers, but it wasn't noticeably bland, although there were a lot of breaks in some chapters that disrupted the flow slightly. But it did take me a long time to finish. There were interesting parts and intriguing tangents, but I just didn't engage with this in the same way I have with other popular science books. Perhaps I have a level of reading that is too academic for my taste, and this was above it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Islomjon

    "Touch" turned out to be a very interesting book in understanding the anatomy of how we feel touches. Author brilliantly describes the mechanism of sudden, special and painful touches, explains how pain and itching occur. Most notable part of the book is that it is not implicated with difficult information that you barely understand or after some minutes totally forget about; rather David Linden gives us overall information with vast number of images. However, there are some negative parts too th "Touch" turned out to be a very interesting book in understanding the anatomy of how we feel touches. Author brilliantly describes the mechanism of sudden, special and painful touches, explains how pain and itching occur. Most notable part of the book is that it is not implicated with difficult information that you barely understand or after some minutes totally forget about; rather David Linden gives us overall information with vast number of images. However, there are some negative parts too that I did not like about. For example, the first chapter was redundant due to there author had counted several experiments to prove that touch has an important factor in our life. I think it would be enough to include it in Introduction and contribute first chapter to some relevant information. Another example, yet very important, is irritating real life stories about particular problems related to touches was also redundant and we could without problem understand what he is going to tell about. Overall, I highly recommend to read this book to get basic information about important sense in our body and understand how it works. Personally, I eventually found an application of my knowledge about neuroscience in understanding how nerves and cells collaborate with spinal chord and brain.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    “Touch” is a neuroscientist’s perspective on the human sense of touch, and the profound impact it has on life in our species. It’s a short book, only about 200 pages of substantive text, arranged into eight chapters. The first chapter considers the role that our sense of touch plays in our lives as social animals. There are a number of studies described in this chapter, but I’ll cite only two that I think give an idea of what the chapter is all about. The first considers why a person holding a c “Touch” is a neuroscientist’s perspective on the human sense of touch, and the profound impact it has on life in our species. It’s a short book, only about 200 pages of substantive text, arranged into eight chapters. The first chapter considers the role that our sense of touch plays in our lives as social animals. There are a number of studies described in this chapter, but I’ll cite only two that I think give an idea of what the chapter is all about. The first considers why a person holding a cold coffee is likely to be viewed more negatively than if that same person was holding a hot coffee after a handshake. The second reports that survey takers in a mall were more likely to gain compliance if they engaged in gentle, casual, and non-creepy touch—e.g. fingers to forearm. The second chapter explores the combination of sensors we have in our skin—particularly in our fingers--that allow us to conduct feats of dexterity that (while we take them for granted) are phenomenally difficult. For all the billions put into robotics research, robots are nowhere close to being able to complete tasks that any five year old can do. The third chapter examines how humans are uniquely geared to be able to give and recognize a particular type of touch sensation, the caress. Throughout the book there are a number of interesting stories, some of them are scientific case studies and others… not so much. This chapter begins with the story of a man on trial for flying into a rage because his girlfriend couldn’t get the pressure right when engaging in manual stimulation. (The author was actually on the jury.) The fourth chapter delves more deeply and explicitly into sexual contact. Whereas chapter 3, dealt largely with hand against random skin, this chapter deals in genitals and erogenous zones more specifically. There are also a number of fascinating cases / stories herein. A lot of the chapter deals in how we experience and interpret pleasure. Chapter five explains a specific type of sensation, that of temperature. It considers why crushed chili feels hot but crushed mint feels cool to the skin. While the focus of the book is on human anatomy, physiology, and social interaction, there are many cases from other species throughout the book. This chapter offers a prime example. It explains how Vampire Bats have a unique ability to sense infrared. This is of benefit to them, since they only take blood meals and, therefore, need to be able to sense where the blood is flowing and has the least insulation (fur) over it. Continuing the examination of specific kinds of sensation, chapter six is about pain. This is where the neuroscientific perspective offers some interesting insight. In particular, because it considers why soldiers who had multiple gun wounds could do their job on the battlefield with nary a peep of complaint, but then would raise holy hell about a bad blood stick a few days later in the hospital. The case of a medic who was badly shot up but not cognizant of it until later is discussed in some detail. Chapter 7 deals in the itchy, and asks and answers the question of whether or not itchiness is a particular case of low-intensity pain. By low intensity, I’m not speaking of the compulsive behavior sometimes spurred by such sensations. Chapter 8 is also highly neuroscience influenced. It deals with various illusions of sensation, and how these illusions come about through the interaction of sense and the brain. While the most famous example of such an illusion is phantom limb pain experienced by amputees, Linden addresses less traumatic and more work-a-day tactile illusions for most of the chapter. (This may be because there are a number of popular works of neuroscience that deal in phantom limbs—most notably V.S. Ramachandran’s books.) I enjoyed this book. It conveys significant technical detail, but does so in a fashion that is easy for a non-expert to follow both because of readable writing and the use of stories. The author uses frequent graphics to help clarify points, and the graphics (mostly line drawings and graphs) do their job by being easy to follow and interpret. In short, the book was highly readable, concise, and informative. I’d recommend it for anyone interested in the sense of touch.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Marykatherine Anthony

    It's refreshing to read a book in science that is not only written with personality, but also whole heartedly a SCIENCE book. I find that many of these books end up being about the scientist's life and accomplishments. However, this one is different and I enjoyed it greatly. It's refreshing to read a book in science that is not only written with personality, but also whole heartedly a SCIENCE book. I find that many of these books end up being about the scientist's life and accomplishments. However, this one is different and I enjoyed it greatly.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    Update. Bailed. Maybe reading instead of listening would be better, so there could be skimming. Initial thoughts: Um. Every chapter there's something unrelated to the subject that annoys me. So far the author has unironically quoted Lolita, downplayed unwanted touch, and referred to a harem. I enjoyed the Pleasure book, so I'll try a little more, but I might not make it through. Update. Bailed. Maybe reading instead of listening would be better, so there could be skimming. Initial thoughts: Um. Every chapter there's something unrelated to the subject that annoys me. So far the author has unironically quoted Lolita, downplayed unwanted touch, and referred to a harem. I enjoyed the Pleasure book, so I'll try a little more, but I might not make it through.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ikmal Fitri (iikmalreads)

    "The astonishing secrets of our senses, and how to harness them to change your personal and professional life." - Touch, David J. Linden The synopsis and the blurbs of this book caught my attention, as i'm a person who really loves science But this book... Well... It is a super hard science. Idk, the information is too much and complicated for me to absorb and understand. And plus i don't have any basic knowledge in biology, this book surely made me feel super clueless with all the jargons Maybe if "The astonishing secrets of our senses, and how to harness them to change your personal and professional life." - Touch, David J. Linden The synopsis and the blurbs of this book caught my attention, as i'm a person who really loves science But this book... Well... It is a super hard science. Idk, the information is too much and complicated for me to absorb and understand. And plus i don't have any basic knowledge in biology, this book surely made me feel super clueless with all the jargons Maybe if you are into biology, and have basic in it, you could read this book. If you are clueless as me, i would not recommend this

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    This book was terrible. None of the narrative flair or accessibility of neuroscientists like Norman Doidge. Incredibly boring. It's one of those books that walks right up to the line of interesting...aaaand end chapter. Every time. And so many "we just don't know" cop outs. I've read a lot of science books about a lot of ambiguous subjects - the best ones at least offer informed hypotheses (even if more than one.) Throwing up your "we just don't know" hands is lazy. I think he was really only int This book was terrible. None of the narrative flair or accessibility of neuroscientists like Norman Doidge. Incredibly boring. It's one of those books that walks right up to the line of interesting...aaaand end chapter. Every time. And so many "we just don't know" cop outs. I've read a lot of science books about a lot of ambiguous subjects - the best ones at least offer informed hypotheses (even if more than one.) Throwing up your "we just don't know" hands is lazy. I think he was really only interested in writing the parts about intimacy and sexual touch and his editors made him expand it, because the rest of it felt pretty mailed in.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Viewpoints Radio

    The sense of touch is taken for granted. Most of us do not realize that the sense of touch conveys more emotion than any other sense because it has its own emotional wiring system. David J. Linden dives into this sense in this book and gives us all a new insight to our emotions. On Radio Health Journal, our weekly radio show, we had the chance to talk with Dr. Linden about the power of the sense of touch. If you would like to hear our radio show, please check out the link here! https://radioheal The sense of touch is taken for granted. Most of us do not realize that the sense of touch conveys more emotion than any other sense because it has its own emotional wiring system. David J. Linden dives into this sense in this book and gives us all a new insight to our emotions. On Radio Health Journal, our weekly radio show, we had the chance to talk with Dr. Linden about the power of the sense of touch. If you would like to hear our radio show, please check out the link here! https://radiohealthjournal.wordpress....

  11. 5 out of 5

    Arukiyomi

    This has the subtitle The Science of the Sense that Makes Us Human, but nowhere in it will you find an explanation as to why touch apparently makes us any more human than, say, salmon. Nevertheless, Touch has all you ever wanted to know about how we (humans) feel. This ranges from the physics of how it works to situations when there’s nothing more involved than our mental assumptions. This is an engaging read for the most part, and there’s lots here that I’ll remember. I’ll not forget the story of This has the subtitle The Science of the Sense that Makes Us Human, but nowhere in it will you find an explanation as to why touch apparently makes us any more human than, say, salmon. Nevertheless, Touch has all you ever wanted to know about how we (humans) feel. This ranges from the physics of how it works to situations when there’s nothing more involved than our mental assumptions. This is an engaging read for the most part, and there’s lots here that I’ll remember. I’ll not forget the story of M. the woman who lost feeling in her forehead but developed an itch there so bad that she literally scratched through her skull into her brain. I’ll not forget the cutaneous rabbit. I’ll not forget how horrific Onchocersiasis is, (although I might forget how to say it) and I’ll not forget that no other species has five-year-old offspring that cannot survive independently. Even salmon. However, I’ve already forgotten what TNF alpha signalling is, exactly what temperatures TRPV1 and TRPM8 are associated with and what the anterior cingulate cortex does. But it doesn’t matter. There’s an awful lot of interesting stuff here so that, if the technical explanations get the better of you, you can just gloss over that page or so and you’ll find yourself in something far more fascinating. Linden writes pretty well and keeps things bouncing along. However, while I don’t object to the use of footnotes, he can’t seem to make up his mind what they’re for. Because of that, you have to turn to every single one of them to see whether it’s a simple reference to an experiment or an entire page of information about what you’ve just read. And as his 210 pages have no fewer than 247 footnotes, this gets, shall we say, on one’s nerves. I think it’s safe to say that you can probably skip over them completely or, if that makes you feel guilty, gloss over them at the end of each chapter. You’ll not miss out a huge amount by omitting them. This is an interesting book which, probably due to the large number of popular science books out there, will hardly make any impression in the annals of popular science literature. It’s worth a read though if you feel inclined. For more reviews and the 1001 Books Spreadsheet, visit http://arukiyomi.com

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ella Cook

    Perhaps I should not judge a book by it's cover, but when said cover boasts a heat-reactive gimmick that leaves a colourful impression of your hand wherever you touch it I feel I can be forgiven for not expecting it's contents to read quite so much like a textbook. This books is jarring in in its ability to go from interesting studies and facts about touch (complete with the odd quip of dad humour and well detailed narrative to break up the info-dump), to mind numbing recitations of neuroscience Perhaps I should not judge a book by it's cover, but when said cover boasts a heat-reactive gimmick that leaves a colourful impression of your hand wherever you touch it I feel I can be forgiven for not expecting it's contents to read quite so much like a textbook. This books is jarring in in its ability to go from interesting studies and facts about touch (complete with the odd quip of dad humour and well detailed narrative to break up the info-dump), to mind numbing recitations of neuroscience with the repartee of a goldfish. It feels bipolar in its execution. Half feels too basic and general for those with a neuroscience background, the other half feel too detailed to keep the attention of a curious everyman. Perhaps my short attention span is to blame, but being a semi-frequent non-fiction reader I can't help but feel that other books have presented similar subjects in a much more consistent way. It gets three stars for its interesting revelations about touch, which as a subject matter is strong. But the narration lent it few favours.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Psychology nerds could like this book, but they may be disappointed with the general lack of any new insight. This book isn't really a pop psych book, but certainly lacks depth about any subject. Touch is basically a shallow survey of a variety of scientific literature regarding the modality of touch. Some of the studies are certainly interesting but presented in such an abbreviated overview that a person would need to look up the scientific papers themselves to really know about the material. M Psychology nerds could like this book, but they may be disappointed with the general lack of any new insight. This book isn't really a pop psych book, but certainly lacks depth about any subject. Touch is basically a shallow survey of a variety of scientific literature regarding the modality of touch. Some of the studies are certainly interesting but presented in such an abbreviated overview that a person would need to look up the scientific papers themselves to really know about the material. Many of the conclusions the author made I felt were "dumbed-down" to the point they could be misleading. Frequently, I found statements that were frustratingly trite, vague, or trivial. It makes me question whether the author really understands the material.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jason Ray Ray Carney

    Generally interesting. Provides lots of amazing information about the neurobiology of touch perception. Doesn't seem to be seriously written for a popular, though non-specialist audience and often becomes mired in fine details about neurons, genes, and the subtle biological minutiae of touch sensation. The science might too dense and inaccessible for a general yet educated audience. It will definately test the patience of some readers. If you have some prior knowledge about neuroscience, brain s Generally interesting. Provides lots of amazing information about the neurobiology of touch perception. Doesn't seem to be seriously written for a popular, though non-specialist audience and often becomes mired in fine details about neurons, genes, and the subtle biological minutiae of touch sensation. The science might too dense and inaccessible for a general yet educated audience. It will definately test the patience of some readers. If you have some prior knowledge about neuroscience, brain science, biology, etc., then you're probably fine. The writer has a great sense of humor. There are surprising moments of levity when the examples get strange and curious.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Rubenstein

    "tactile sensation must be combined with the imprints of our life experience...to ultimately produce our highly nuanced perception of social touch. This combination of the past with the present has to take place within about a tenth of a second." Well shit, if tactile touching is a factor in being successful in whatever goal you're pursuing (which is my general takeaway from this book...too much a stretch?), then ain't nobody got time to cognitively make decisions within a tenth of a second, so I "tactile sensation must be combined with the imprints of our life experience...to ultimately produce our highly nuanced perception of social touch. This combination of the past with the present has to take place within about a tenth of a second." Well shit, if tactile touching is a factor in being successful in whatever goal you're pursuing (which is my general takeaway from this book...too much a stretch?), then ain't nobody got time to cognitively make decisions within a tenth of a second, so I guess I'll just have to go about touching everyone like I'm on auto-pilot. And, it's only creepy if the imprints of your life experience tell you it is creepy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    I learnt too little from this book. By taking scientific papers and wrapping them in a book cover, one can just obtain a journal (or conference proceedings) but not really a book. I would have been captivated, if there were a story to get me through all of this information. The examples were present but didn't feel on spot most of the times. And what's up with all these diagrams? More of a storyline and less graphs could have done miracles. Just take the story of two lab rats and tell us what th I learnt too little from this book. By taking scientific papers and wrapping them in a book cover, one can just obtain a journal (or conference proceedings) but not really a book. I would have been captivated, if there were a story to get me through all of this information. The examples were present but didn't feel on spot most of the times. And what's up with all these diagrams? More of a storyline and less graphs could have done miracles. Just take the story of two lab rats and tell us what they are going through... Yet, the topic is interesting :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Naj

    I have a new personal policy: if you take the time to describe violent and repeated rape, and it seems to be an attempt to "liven it up" or "add interest" rather than directly necessary to your explanation of the topic at hand, then I stop reading your book. A moment's thought would tell you that some readers will be unable to read this anecdote without pain, and although I'm not among them, I'm not inclined to read pop science written by thoughtless people. I have a new personal policy: if you take the time to describe violent and repeated rape, and it seems to be an attempt to "liven it up" or "add interest" rather than directly necessary to your explanation of the topic at hand, then I stop reading your book. A moment's thought would tell you that some readers will be unable to read this anecdote without pain, and although I'm not among them, I'm not inclined to read pop science written by thoughtless people.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gustave Blåbær

    Some good chapters, and really interesting infos about how touch works in the body from a neurological perspective. The author got me lost at some point though. There were too many small technical stories, a bit too advanced for my palate. I missed a red thread, some words about a bigger story about touch, and not so much a bunch of anecdotes i started to loose interest for at some point.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jasmin

    I'm conflicted by this book. Some of this is filled with fantastic information but some of the personal stories are /too/ personal. I don't ever need sexual stories from Someone in a book. Especially in the detail he gives. I'm conflicted by this book. Some of this is filled with fantastic information but some of the personal stories are /too/ personal. I don't ever need sexual stories from Someone in a book. Especially in the detail he gives.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aija

    It was ok. Lot's of science stuff (ah, I wanted more social science perspective but there was more about how touch process happens in cells, nerves and what not), the most simplest touch is so complicated! Good fill-in read or if you are really interested in the matter. It was ok. Lot's of science stuff (ah, I wanted more social science perspective but there was more about how touch process happens in cells, nerves and what not), the most simplest touch is so complicated! Good fill-in read or if you are really interested in the matter.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    This is one of my favorite non-fiction books. This is my second time reading it, and this time, I read it slowly and took notes. Linden is a talented writer and I use some of his phrasing when I teach my anatomy class.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    It took me something like 2+ years to read this book, but I would pick it up and put it down between chapters which were disparate enough for this to be an okay strategy. I feel more informed and got some cool insights but it was a little too science-talk for the average reader.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Israel

    Took me forever to read. Had some interesting and crazy content but need a fundamental understanding of everything first to enjoy it...

  24. 5 out of 5

    samantha

    maybe i just wanted this to be something else? but there was too much (filler-seeming) 'science,' and too little social context and analysis for my liking. maybe i just wanted this to be something else? but there was too much (filler-seeming) 'science,' and too little social context and analysis for my liking.

  25. 5 out of 5

    lluke

    Some interesting content, and a lot of scientific background made accessible. Frustrating that all temperatures were in F.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Linden combines science and the human experience in a fascinating narrative about how we feel. I was surprised by this book and how well the latest science was explained and the how personal Linden was. Highly recommend.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Diane

    A neurobiologist`s analysis of touch and other details sprinkled with sniggering sarcasm. Fine, just not what I hoped. A neurobiologist`s analysis of touch and other details sprinkled with sniggering sarcasm. Fine, just not what I hoped.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Roman

    Interesting information, but at times difficult to read. Not a usual non-fiction book with lots of funny moments. Read slowly and digest.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Martin Willoughby

    Heavy on the science, but still fascinating.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    Astonishing. From importance of touch as the most important thing for an infant, mental and physical life to the wired brain system that controls every step we make

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