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The Complete Works Of Mary Shelley: Frankenstein, The Last Man, Midas, Valerius: The Reanimated Roman and More

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This collection gathers together the works by Mary Shelley in a single, convenient, high quality, and extremely low priced Kindle volume! 39 Books and Short Stories The Complete Novels: Falkner Frankenstein (1818 Edition) Frankenstein (1831 Edition) Lodore (complete Vol.1-3) Mathilda Midas. A Mythological Verse Drama. Proserpine. A Mythological Verse Drama. The Fortunes This collection gathers together the works by Mary Shelley in a single, convenient, high quality, and extremely low priced Kindle volume! 39 Books and Short Stories The Complete Novels: Falkner Frankenstein (1818 Edition) Frankenstein (1831 Edition) Lodore (complete Vol.1-3) Mathilda Midas. A Mythological Verse Drama. Proserpine. A Mythological Verse Drama. The Fortunes Of Perkin Warbeck The Last Man Valperga; Or, The Life And Adventures Of Castruccio, Prince Of Lucca The Complete Short Stories: A Tale Of The Passions An Eighteenth-century Tale: A Fragment Euphrasia Ferninando Eboli: A Tale On Ghosts Recollections Of Italy Roger Dodsworth: The Reanimated Englishman The Bride Of Modern Italy The Brother And Sister: An Italian Story The Dream The Elder Son The Evil Eye The False Rhyme The Heir Of Mondolfo The Invisible Girl The Mortal Immortal The Mourner The Parvenue The Pilgrims The Pole The Sisters Of Albano The Smuggler And His Family The Swiss Peasant The Trial Of Love Transformation Valerius: The Reanimated Roman The Complete Poems The Complete Travel Writings: History Of Six Weeks' Tour Through A Part Of France, Switzerland, Germany, And Holland, With Letters Descriptive Of A Sail Round The Lake Of Geneva, And Of The Glaciers Of Chamouni Rambles In Germany And Italy, In 1840, 1842, And 1843


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This collection gathers together the works by Mary Shelley in a single, convenient, high quality, and extremely low priced Kindle volume! 39 Books and Short Stories The Complete Novels: Falkner Frankenstein (1818 Edition) Frankenstein (1831 Edition) Lodore (complete Vol.1-3) Mathilda Midas. A Mythological Verse Drama. Proserpine. A Mythological Verse Drama. The Fortunes This collection gathers together the works by Mary Shelley in a single, convenient, high quality, and extremely low priced Kindle volume! 39 Books and Short Stories The Complete Novels: Falkner Frankenstein (1818 Edition) Frankenstein (1831 Edition) Lodore (complete Vol.1-3) Mathilda Midas. A Mythological Verse Drama. Proserpine. A Mythological Verse Drama. The Fortunes Of Perkin Warbeck The Last Man Valperga; Or, The Life And Adventures Of Castruccio, Prince Of Lucca The Complete Short Stories: A Tale Of The Passions An Eighteenth-century Tale: A Fragment Euphrasia Ferninando Eboli: A Tale On Ghosts Recollections Of Italy Roger Dodsworth: The Reanimated Englishman The Bride Of Modern Italy The Brother And Sister: An Italian Story The Dream The Elder Son The Evil Eye The False Rhyme The Heir Of Mondolfo The Invisible Girl The Mortal Immortal The Mourner The Parvenue The Pilgrims The Pole The Sisters Of Albano The Smuggler And His Family The Swiss Peasant The Trial Of Love Transformation Valerius: The Reanimated Roman The Complete Poems The Complete Travel Writings: History Of Six Weeks' Tour Through A Part Of France, Switzerland, Germany, And Holland, With Letters Descriptive Of A Sail Round The Lake Of Geneva, And Of The Glaciers Of Chamouni Rambles In Germany And Italy, In 1840, 1842, And 1843

30 review for The Complete Works Of Mary Shelley: Frankenstein, The Last Man, Midas, Valerius: The Reanimated Roman and More

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lona Manning

    For only $1.99 you can get just about everything Mary Shelley wrote, plus a biography of her. So despite what follows, I wouldn't want to discourage anyone from buying this book because you can't beat the value. There are some gaps and errors in the text, most notably in Lodore, the main character's name is missing and usually there is a gap or an 'L" where Lodore should be but he's a jerk so it doesn't matter. Well, I have read Mathilda, most of The Last Man, Lodore and Falkner, and I would say, For only $1.99 you can get just about everything Mary Shelley wrote, plus a biography of her. So despite what follows, I wouldn't want to discourage anyone from buying this book because you can't beat the value. There are some gaps and errors in the text, most notably in Lodore, the main character's name is missing and usually there is a gap or an 'L" where Lodore should be but he's a jerk so it doesn't matter. Well, I have read Mathilda, most of The Last Man, Lodore and Falkner, and I would say, unless you are crazy about morbid, maudlin, pre-Victorian dramatics, best stick to Frankenstein. In fairness, Shelley's post-Frankenstein novels were written to support herself, her father and her son, so perhaps their sensationalism is a nod to popular tastes, rather than artistic merit. These novels are all verbose and dramatic and the plots, particularly Falkner, rely on improbable coincidences. People run into friends and relatives in a manner reminiscent of Jane Austen's juvenile parody in Love and Freindship when Lord St. Clair encounters all of his long-lost grandchildren in an inn. Mary Shelley's heroes are often based on her late husband Percy Shelley and the poet Lord Byron, and in consequence, her male characters are highly irrational men who, although blessed with intelligence and wealth, squander their lives and the good they might do for their fellow-creatures through stupid decisions and ridiculous overwrought emotionalism. We are asked to admire and pity Falkner, for example, a man who kidnaps the woman he loves, terrifies her, buries her body on the beach after her accidental death, hides the fact of her death from her family, leaving her little son to grieve for years--we are asked to admire Falkner because he suffers guilty torments for what he did, although he never finds a moment to send the widower a note telling him where his wife is buried. There is much semi-autobiographical material in Mary Shelley's novels and I suspect that here she is working through the death of Shelley's first wife, Harriet, whom Shelley abandoned to elope with Mary. Yes, Harriet killed herself in despair, but Shelley didn't actually murder her, after all. The character Falkner seems also to draw from Mary Shelley's father, William Godwin, particularly in the prison scene where he passive-aggressively lays a guilt trip on his former servant to force him to testify at the murder trial. Throughout it all, Falkner's adopted daughter, the lachrymose Elizabeth, is completely loyal to him. Sure, he spent the first two volumes of the novel saying that he only wanted to die, and now that he's on trial for murder, he wants to stay alive, but whatever. If the men are contemptible, the heroines are tiresome--they cry buckets, almost constantly, and they unquestioningly devote their lives to the men. In Mathilda, the main character is excessively devoted to her father, because, hey, he showed up in her life after abandoning her and ignoring her completely for 16 years, what is not to adore about that? When he encounters his grown daughter, he falls in love with her--eeewww--and kills himself and Mathilda eventually succumbs to Wasting Victorian Heroine Disease. That's the entire plot, except that a poet called Woodville (Percy Shelley) shows up briefly and is angelic and delightful and wonderful but he can't lift Mathilda's grief. Mary was stricken with deep depression after the death of two of their children and felt alienated from her husband at that time; this aspect of the novel draws from those feelings. Clorinda, the Italian wife of another character in Lodore, is a thinly veiled portrait of Emilia Viviani, with whom Shelley was briefly infatuated. Mary put up with this and other indignities during their married life. She takes her revenge by allowing the Percy-based character to marry Clorinda, and it turns out the lady is a nightmare on wheels. Mary's half-sister Fanny, who also killed herself, appears in Lodore as well, but just as a plot device, a useful carrier of messages at crucial times, when the heroine and her lover are hiding from creditors. Again, we are expected to sympathize entirely with Edward, who lives beyond his means and won't pay his debts, not with the tradesmen and money-lenders who gave him the money. Alas, he explains to his weeping wife Ethel, "I should have hardened my hands with labour, and earned my daily bread; but I was trained to high-born necessities, and have all of the wide wants and narrow powers of the heir of wealth." (Shelley, for example, bought a carriage and a piano that he never paid for and had to hide out to avoid being arrested for debt.) The essence of tragedy is the fatal character flaw that brings down the hero, but Mary Shelley's heroes are, for me at any rate, more selfish than heroic. One longs in vain for a sensible fellow like Emma's Mr. Knightley to walk into the story and knock some heads together. The one aspect I do enjoy about these novels is the careful way characters are introduced with a sketch that describes their appearance and personality: here is an excerpt from a long description of the fair, doomed Alithea: "Her impulses were keen and imperative; her sensibility, true to the touch of nature, was tremblingly alive; but their more dangerous tendencies were guarded by excellent principles, and a truth never shadowed by a cloud." So I am not going to bother with Valperga, even though the heroine rejoices in the name of Euthanasia and the main character's name is Castruccio Castracani. Had enough.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James

    Like with many people, I read Frankenstein first, before ploughing into other works of Mary Shelley. I work on the theory of reading the well-known work(s) by an author first, if I like their style, then, I plough into the rest of their works. This was true with Mary Shelley, and, well, what a great surprise this was. There were some works that were in part tough to get through, some of her short stories were wonderfully well written and superbly visual in their descriptions. Then, we come to ‘T Like with many people, I read Frankenstein first, before ploughing into other works of Mary Shelley. I work on the theory of reading the well-known work(s) by an author first, if I like their style, then, I plough into the rest of their works. This was true with Mary Shelley, and, well, what a great surprise this was. There were some works that were in part tough to get through, some of her short stories were wonderfully well written and superbly visual in their descriptions. Then, we come to ‘The Last Man’. At the time of reading, in parts, I did feel it was tough going, a very hard read, however, stick with this book and you won’t be disappointed. The visual descriptions that the story evokes is purely stunning, you follow the trail of mankind’s downfall and trying to deal with their potential demise. For me, this book truly stands the test of time, it stays with you and you look back and think, yes, that was truly a great work to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Micah Lewter

    Worth the time I’ve owned this collection for a few years, but I finally got around to reading it over the past few weeks. (Thank you Covid.) I enjoyed the novels, and even the introductions by Mary to her husband’s poems. She was very open and raw about them.  However, there are a few issues with this collection. First, in “Lodore” and “Valperga,” proper nouns are often missing. In both cases, it is the use of the title noun that fails to appear. This is especially confusing in Valperga, because m Worth the time I’ve owned this collection for a few years, but I finally got around to reading it over the past few weeks. (Thank you Covid.) I enjoyed the novels, and even the introductions by Mary to her husband’s poems. She was very open and raw about them.  However, there are a few issues with this collection. First, in “Lodore” and “Valperga,” proper nouns are often missing. In both cases, it is the use of the title noun that fails to appear. This is especially confusing in Valperga, because most of the time, the name of the title castle is missing. Since it does appear at times, the reader is left to think that the unnamed castle is a different one that Valperga. Lodore is afflicted by a similar issue, but there it is easier to follow and figure out which character is supposed to be represented. One highlight is the notes available for “Mathilda,” a novel not published until close to 100 years after it was written. The novel was pieced together from several different manuscripts in several different places, so it’s interesting to see how those who assembled the novel did so, and what choices they made on disagreeing manuscripts, etc. I wish the other novels had been noted, because some allusions are lost to time. It would also be helpful to translate the Latin or Italian in some of the novels, because not everyone can read all the Romance languages.  Still, it’s a valuable collection. Everyone is familiar with Frankenstein, and it’s still her best work. But the others deserve mention as well. Valperga is solid; Lodore may be my favorite non-Frankenstein novel. The Last Man is over-written and depressing, but coming off the loss of three children and her beloved husband, such a story wouldn’t be her best work. Falkner has a lot of autobiography in it, as do most of the novels.  The collection also includes her unpublished plays. They’re short, and explore classical Greek myths. Also the short stories are there, and they seem more in line with Romantic thought that some of the later novels.  The biography is disappointing, but I understand you can’t get a recent biography for a collection like this and still keep it at the same price. Overall it’s a valuable collection. I’m thankful to have read it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Bird

    I have only read Frankenstein as part of my 2018 book challenge covering: * A banned book * A classic * A book that takes you out of your comfort zone I really did find this hard going and struggled with the language. Victor was a horid person, to take all that time over creating the monster and then just discarding him to survive all by himself there was no wonder it turned into the wretched creature it did.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Xyzel

    Not to be overreacting but you're book is totally awesome. You're innate writing skill is what the world should witness. Try joining NovelStar's writing competition because why not? Here's the link if you want to. https://author.starlight.ink/essay/in... (PC) http://app.novelstar.top/index/index/... (APP) you wish to join. Not to be overreacting but you're book is totally awesome. You're innate writing skill is what the world should witness. Try joining NovelStar's writing competition because why not? Here's the link if you want to. https://author.starlight.ink/essay/in... (PC) http://app.novelstar.top/index/index/... (APP) you wish to join.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Samarth Bachkheti

    I have always enjoyed reading Shelley's works. His writing is so crisp and vivid that every time I read his works, I enjoy it thoroughly. I have always enjoyed reading Shelley's works. His writing is so crisp and vivid that every time I read his works, I enjoy it thoroughly.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    sweet stories. good semicolon use. but somewhat ugly typesetting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Fabrice Ziolkowski

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dale E. Klein

  10. 5 out of 5

    Diane

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Hansen

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rob DeMillo

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Harker

  15. 5 out of 5

    R. R. Brown

  16. 4 out of 5

    Verdandi

  17. 4 out of 5

    Govella Family

  18. 5 out of 5

    James Simpson

  19. 5 out of 5

    JosemaLopez

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nutmegger Linda

  21. 5 out of 5

    KristopherGrows

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dawna Flowers

  24. 5 out of 5

    Scott Thoms

  25. 4 out of 5

    milla.l

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Leigh

  27. 4 out of 5

    Muhemed Masika

  28. 5 out of 5

    Al Knight Templar

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marko Byrne

  30. 4 out of 5

    Annni

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