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The dark side of love is no fairy tale.... And while we may like to believe that crimes of the heart only victimize those who aren't careful, this page-turning collection of must-read accounts will convince you otherwise. America's #1 true-crime writer, Ann Rule reveals how lovers become predators, how sex and lust can push ordinary people to desperate acts, and how inves The dark side of love is no fairy tale.... And while we may like to believe that crimes of the heart only victimize those who aren't careful, this page-turning collection of must-read accounts will convince you otherwise. America's #1 true-crime writer, Ann Rule reveals how lovers become predators, how sex and lust can push ordinary people to desperate acts, and how investigators and forensics experts work to unravel the most entangled crimes of passion. Extracting behind-the-scenes details, Rule makes these volatile relationships utterly real, and masterfully re-creates the ill-fated chains of events in such cases as the ex-Marine and martial arts master who seduced vulnerable women and then destroyed their lives...the killer whose calling card was a single bloodred rose...the faithless wife who manipulated and murdered without conscience...the blind date that set the stage for a killer's brutality...and more. In every case, the victim -- young and innocent or older and experienced -- unknowingly trusted a stranger with the sociopathic skill to hide their dark motives, until it was too late to escape a web of deadly lies, fatal promises, and homicidal possession.


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The dark side of love is no fairy tale.... And while we may like to believe that crimes of the heart only victimize those who aren't careful, this page-turning collection of must-read accounts will convince you otherwise. America's #1 true-crime writer, Ann Rule reveals how lovers become predators, how sex and lust can push ordinary people to desperate acts, and how inves The dark side of love is no fairy tale.... And while we may like to believe that crimes of the heart only victimize those who aren't careful, this page-turning collection of must-read accounts will convince you otherwise. America's #1 true-crime writer, Ann Rule reveals how lovers become predators, how sex and lust can push ordinary people to desperate acts, and how investigators and forensics experts work to unravel the most entangled crimes of passion. Extracting behind-the-scenes details, Rule makes these volatile relationships utterly real, and masterfully re-creates the ill-fated chains of events in such cases as the ex-Marine and martial arts master who seduced vulnerable women and then destroyed their lives...the killer whose calling card was a single bloodred rose...the faithless wife who manipulated and murdered without conscience...the blind date that set the stage for a killer's brutality...and more. In every case, the victim -- young and innocent or older and experienced -- unknowingly trusted a stranger with the sociopathic skill to hide their dark motives, until it was too late to escape a web of deadly lies, fatal promises, and homicidal possession.

30 review for Kiss Me, Kill Me and Other True Cases

  1. 5 out of 5

    Obsidian

    This was a great breakdown of a lot of cases and I think is a great showcase of Rule's writing style. The main reason why I gave this 4 stars though is that Rule at times does a bit of blaming for some of the victims that I don't think she meant to do, but it came across that way to me. The first case, the murder of Sandra Bowman I thought was really well done and the way that this case and others are eventually solved due to a Cold Case unit was great. Some of the victims that Rule brings up wer This was a great breakdown of a lot of cases and I think is a great showcase of Rule's writing style. The main reason why I gave this 4 stars though is that Rule at times does a bit of blaming for some of the victims that I don't think she meant to do, but it came across that way to me. The first case, the murder of Sandra Bowman I thought was really well done and the way that this case and others are eventually solved due to a Cold Case unit was great. Some of the victims that Rule brings up were thought to be murdered by Bundy, but instead we find out that another man was responsible. Some of the cases she brings up, I already heard about and knew who the murderer was due to either Forensic Files or other true crime shows. There was one case that was very gruesome and I think that it was hard to read about. I think the most interesting pieces for me was that some of the men who are shown in this book as being convicted murderers barely served any time it feels like and they went off to marry and have children with other women. Also, Rule brings up an investigator who was the first to start to use the word "serial" with regards to serial murders and was one of the people responsible for capturing Harvey Glatman. I honestly didn't know a lot about Glatman, but did look him up and his victims after this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Addison

    *"Kiss Me, Kill Me": this is a wide ranging piece, more of an essay about cold cases than Rule's usual detailed examination of a single crime. She starts and ends with Sandra Bowman, who was brutally murdered in her own apartment just before Christmas 1968, and whose murderer wasn't identified until 2004. Along the way she examines the 1966 murder of Lonnie Trumbull (who Rule is convinced was murdered by Ted Bundy, although so far as I know there's only circumstantial evidence against him); Mary *"Kiss Me, Kill Me": this is a wide ranging piece, more of an essay about cold cases than Rule's usual detailed examination of a single crime. She starts and ends with Sandra Bowman, who was brutally murdered in her own apartment just before Christmas 1968, and whose murderer wasn't identified until 2004. Along the way she examines the 1966 murder of Lonnie Trumbull (who Rule is convinced was murdered by Ted Bundy, although so far as I know there's only circumstantial evidence against him); Mary Annabelle Bjornson and Lynne Tuski (1969), murdered by John Canaday (who shares his name, ironically, with an art critic who wrote several crime novels); Eileen Condit (1970); Heidi Peterson (1974); Katherine Merry Devine (1973)--who Rule also thought had been killed by Bundy, but in 2002 DNA proved her killer was William E. Cosden, Jr., who was then already serving time for a 1976 rape (and had been found not guilty by reason of insanity in another rape/murder case in 1967); Hallie Ann Seaman (1975); Sylvia Durante (1979), murdered by William Bergen Greene, who claimed not guilty by reason of Disassociative Identity Disorder, although the evidence strongly suggests that he was a psychopath who happened to be a very talented actor--that was the jury's conclusion, anyway; Kristen Sumstad (1982), a thirteen-year-old raped and murdered by a fourteen-year-old, John Athan, who was convicted in 2004 because the police were able to get a saliva sample from a licked stamp; Mia Zapata (1993), murdered by Jesus Mezquia; and finally circles back to Sandy Bowman, who was murdered--DNA showed in 2004--by John Canaday. This is an excellent essay, maybe the best of Rule's shorter pieces that I've read. *"The Postman Only Killed Once": Walla Walla WA [she doesn't give a year and I can't find the case online]: man murders his 16 year old wife with a--fortunately poorly-thought-out and unconsummated--plan to stage more murders to make it look like there was a serial killer at work. He also made--poorly-thought-out and unconsummated--plans to bomb the lead detective's house when he realized police were getting close. *"What's Love Got to Do with It?": Seattle WA 1969: Audrey Ruud and Patrick Fullen lured Karsten Knutsen to their apartment, where they robbed and murdered him, then fled from Seattle to Sanibel Island, where they were caught. Fullen died in prison; Ruud was released after 22 years, *"Old Flames Can Burn": Seattle WA 1968: man strangles one of his female friends and almost stabs another to death because . . . ? *"The Lonely Hearts Killer": Los Angeles CA 1957: This essay is at least half a homage to Pierce Brooks, the detective who first put together the idea of a serial killer--a killer who targets strangers who (mostly) fit a certain profile. Brooks' archetype was Harvey Glatman, who posed as a photographer for true crime magazines in order to get his victims to willingly submit to being tied up. And he took pictures. Shirley Bridgeford, Judy Ann Dull, Ruth Mercado, and very nearly Lorraine Vigil are his known victims. (Dorothy Gay Howard , the Jane Doe of Someone's Daughter, may be another Glatman victim; she wasn't identified until 2009, five years after Kiss Me, Kill Me was published.) *"The Captive Bride": Seattle WA 1978: twenty-year-old woman murdered (shot nine times in the back) by the crazy abusive stalker husband she was trying to divorce; he served fourteen years, was paroled, and--hey--got married again, despite having insisted to the woman he murdered that he literally couldn't live without her. Rule ends this case with an impassioned plea to people trapped in abusive relationships to get out and get help. *"Bad Blind Date": Seattle 1970: Victoria Legg made a bad decision. She accepted a date with a man she didn't really know, because he looked like an ex-boyfriend whom she trusted. Turns out, her date was a guy out on the far end of the mentally disturbed spectrum--who may genuinely NOT have been able to tell right from wrong when he raped her and beat her to death. (M'Naughten is a lousy rubric for sanity, honestly.) *"The Highway Accident" (reprint from A Fever in the Heart and Other True Cases) *"You Kill Me---Or I'll Kill You": Silverton OR 1975: Rule is apologetic for including this case because it's both so gruesome and so grotesque. "Kent Whiteside" had a masochistic sexual fantasy about being gutted by a "naked beautiful slut." He picked a young woman (more or less at random as far as anyone can tell) and decided to force her to kill him by threatening to kill her. Problem was, as it turns out, he wasn't bluffing. He disemboweled her and a friend who had the bad luck to be sleeping on the couch. Almost unbelievably, the friend survived. Despite pleading guilty to murder, "Kent Whiteside" was pardoned a few years later. Rule suggests that there was bribery or undue influence involved, which seems like a not unreasonable conclusion. *"'Where Is Julie?'": Bonneville WA 1987: Julie Weflen's disappearance is still unsolved.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Terry Cornell

    I don't know how many of Anne Rule's books I've read. They pretty much are of two formats--either covering a single true crime case, or as in this book a selection of several true crimes. Rule wrote from the perspective of not only a journalist but also as a person with a law enforcement background. She often had working relationships with detectives working the cases she covered. In this particular selection of cases, the first I found a little confusing and convoluted. What on the surface app I don't know how many of Anne Rule's books I've read. They pretty much are of two formats--either covering a single true crime case, or as in this book a selection of several true crimes. Rule wrote from the perspective of not only a journalist but also as a person with a law enforcement background. She often had working relationships with detectives working the cases she covered. In this particular selection of cases, the first I found a little confusing and convoluted. What on the surface appeared to be similar murders, with possibly the same killer ended up to be not related at all. But I suppose this shows how confusing crime investigation can be. A chapter on the killer Harvey Glatman I found interesting--I have read of his case before, but not from the perspective of the actual investigating detective. Partly due to his experiences trying to solve these murders over multiple jurisdictions Detective Pierce Brook was instrumental in helping to develop the nationwide Violent Criminal Apprehension Program. This program serves as a database for law enforcement seeking similar crimes that could potentially have the same perpetrator. The only criticism I have is her dramatized, somewhat goofy chapter titles. But, If you like the true crime genre, you usually can't go wrong with an Ann Rule book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Linds

    This is not one of Ann Rule’s better books. It covers ten murders and she reports the details of the cases.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mafalda Fernandes

    Listened to the audio version of the book. This book features 10 different essays. The first one, also called "Kiss Me, Kill Me" was very complex and sometimes I felt a little lost because the author mentioned so many cases and names, and was always jumping between different facts, that it made it a little hard to completely follow the narrative (especially because I was listening to the audio format instead of reading). Almost all of these essays talk about violence against women and in some ca Listened to the audio version of the book. This book features 10 different essays. The first one, also called "Kiss Me, Kill Me" was very complex and sometimes I felt a little lost because the author mentioned so many cases and names, and was always jumping between different facts, that it made it a little hard to completely follow the narrative (especially because I was listening to the audio format instead of reading). Almost all of these essays talk about violence against women and in some cases there is more information about the investigation, others about the trial and even others have more information about the victims or killers. I like Ann Rule's writing, and how vivid imagery she can create through her words. I wasn't excepting this book to have so many cases, maybe if I had known I would have read it in another format. 1) "Kiss Me, Kill Me" 2) "The Postman Only Killed Once" 3) "What's Love Got to Do with It?" 4) "Old Flames Can Burn" 5) "The Lonely Hearts Killer" 6) "The Captive Bride" 7) "Bad Blind Date" 8) "The Highway Accident" 9) "You Kill Me---Or I'll Kill You" 10) "Where Is Julie?"

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    It was not my favorite book of her's, although I am a huge Ann Rule fan. I really felt like her age was showing, as she seems to use this book more to pay homage to good cops she has knows, than to tell a cohesive story. There was a general "theme", at least to the main story: dna has made it possible to solve cold cases. Problem is, this isnt new news, and it wasnt made very interesting by Rule. And, Rule failed to discuss the huge range in sentences given to the offenders- from months on proba It was not my favorite book of her's, although I am a huge Ann Rule fan. I really felt like her age was showing, as she seems to use this book more to pay homage to good cops she has knows, than to tell a cohesive story. There was a general "theme", at least to the main story: dna has made it possible to solve cold cases. Problem is, this isnt new news, and it wasnt made very interesting by Rule. And, Rule failed to discuss the huge range in sentences given to the offenders- from months on probation, to hundreds of years in jail, for similar crimes. I was left confused by the whole collection.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lorna

    Interesting and fairly creepy. I'm amazed by the number of men who violently murdered their wives/girlfriends/etc., got out of jail 10-15 years later, and then got married again. WHO WOULD MARRY A MURDERER????! The book mainly focused on the Pacific Northwest. I wish there had been more geographical diversity, although I understand that these are the cases Rule followed because that's where she's from. The serial killer from LA in the 1950's, Harvey Glatman, was really fascinating (and disturbing Interesting and fairly creepy. I'm amazed by the number of men who violently murdered their wives/girlfriends/etc., got out of jail 10-15 years later, and then got married again. WHO WOULD MARRY A MURDERER????! The book mainly focused on the Pacific Northwest. I wish there had been more geographical diversity, although I understand that these are the cases Rule followed because that's where she's from. The serial killer from LA in the 1950's, Harvey Glatman, was really fascinating (and disturbing). I would pick up another book by Rule.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Turner

    I didn't find any of these stories particularly interesting. Lots of typos. Dull and boring. I didn't find any of these stories particularly interesting. Lots of typos. Dull and boring.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    What stood out the most was the horrible men who killed their wife/lover/friend or acquaintance, who then pled guilty, and GOT OUT OF JAIL in 10-14 years. Two of them went on to MARRY, have kids and live their lives, while their victim never had that chance. This begs the question what moronic woman marries a convicted murderer? Absolutely mind boggling. But what’s really unbelievable is the number of men in the USA (usually unwhite) who are in jail for much much less a crime and for much much lon What stood out the most was the horrible men who killed their wife/lover/friend or acquaintance, who then pled guilty, and GOT OUT OF JAIL in 10-14 years. Two of them went on to MARRY, have kids and live their lives, while their victim never had that chance. This begs the question what moronic woman marries a convicted murderer? Absolutely mind boggling. But what’s really unbelievable is the number of men in the USA (usually unwhite) who are in jail for much much less a crime and for much much longer.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cara D'Angelo

    This is a great series for those who enjoy the topic of true crime and learning more about lower profile cases. The only thing I disliked about this book was that the cases seemed to be scattered without a smooth transition between each telling.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I liked how this was about multiple cases. Tad too long though. By the end they all seemed the same kind of story to me.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Great crime book, every woman should read this! I love that there is a multitude of different crimes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tabitha Michel

    A couple of the stories in here blew my mind. There are just some things you'll never be able to look at the same again A couple of the stories in here blew my mind. There are just some things you'll never be able to look at the same again

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Another Awesome Book By Ann Rule. love Her Books.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Debra Barstad

    Really 3.5 but I rounded down based on some of the information in the different cases seemed to be the authors personally opinions and not facts.

  16. 4 out of 5

    ErikaShmerika Wine

    I will always read Ann Rule; but the wider the variety of true-crime authors I read, the more I chuckle at her commentary.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I know Ann Rule is popular, and I have read some of her work before, but I was disappointed in the writing. It was repetitive and, at least in the first section, maddening. It seems as if she wanted to go off on tangents. She could have tightened up the prose considerably, or have used an editor with a firmer hand. I was reading it with a lady friend who agreed, and asked that we move on to a different book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bettye McKee

    Ann Rule has never failed to provide me with absorbing reading material. This book is no exception. Sometimes the distance between the kiss and the kill becomes indistinct. Predators don't wear signs and we never know what is going through the minds of those with whom we come in contact. "In every case, the victim . . . unknowingly trusted a stranger with the sociopathic skill to hide their dark motives, until it was too late to escape . . . ." Ann Rule has never failed to provide me with absorbing reading material. This book is no exception. Sometimes the distance between the kiss and the kill becomes indistinct. Predators don't wear signs and we never know what is going through the minds of those with whom we come in contact. "In every case, the victim . . . unknowingly trusted a stranger with the sociopathic skill to hide their dark motives, until it was too late to escape . . . ."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    Ann Rule's number one rule ; never miss a deadline, even if you have to publish your first draft while giving your editor the day off, never miss a deadline. The original title of this book while searching for a murder entendre song title that had not yet been taken was "Contractually Obligated #9". This volume in particular is rife with a distracting misuse and misunderstanding of colloquialisms and very common figures of speech, not normal for experienced writers of the English language. Ann Rule's number one rule ; never miss a deadline, even if you have to publish your first draft while giving your editor the day off, never miss a deadline. The original title of this book while searching for a murder entendre song title that had not yet been taken was "Contractually Obligated #9". This volume in particular is rife with a distracting misuse and misunderstanding of colloquialisms and very common figures of speech, not normal for experienced writers of the English language.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I enjoyed this compilation of true crime stories as I have all the others of hers that I've read. To me, she is one of the best true crime writers around. I don't know why but I do enjoy reading true crime as much if not more than fiction mysteries or police dramas, maybe I'm just weird! If you like true crime as I do you will enjoy this book. I enjoyed this compilation of true crime stories as I have all the others of hers that I've read. To me, she is one of the best true crime writers around. I don't know why but I do enjoy reading true crime as much if not more than fiction mysteries or police dramas, maybe I'm just weird! If you like true crime as I do you will enjoy this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    I'm really not sure which one of her books I read. I read a few in college but I had to stop because I started to get convinced that everyone's husband/boyfriend was out to kill them. These books totally terrify me. I'm really not sure which one of her books I read. I read a few in college but I had to stop because I started to get convinced that everyone's husband/boyfriend was out to kill them. These books totally terrify me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Fluff. It was alright. I like Ann Rule though.

  23. 5 out of 5

    A.r.

    Not one of Rule's best. I was bored. Not one of Rule's best. I was bored.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Awesome Book By Ann Rule. She Never Fails With Her Books. 💙

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

    These are the lessons the cases in this book taught me: 1. Don't get married at the age of 16 2. Don't get involved with men 10+ years older than you that you meet at bars 3. Don't agree to pose for a detective magazine when strange men give you the opportunity 4. And maybe just to be generally thankful that I live in a time where forensic science is what it is. A lot of the cases here were unsolved for a long time because the science just simply didn't exist in the 60s to be able to solve them. I ca These are the lessons the cases in this book taught me: 1. Don't get married at the age of 16 2. Don't get involved with men 10+ years older than you that you meet at bars 3. Don't agree to pose for a detective magazine when strange men give you the opportunity 4. And maybe just to be generally thankful that I live in a time where forensic science is what it is. A lot of the cases here were unsolved for a long time because the science just simply didn't exist in the 60s to be able to solve them. I can joke about those above lessons all I want, but the real take away I got from these cases (other than the fact that some people are just truly awful human beings) is how amazing and important forensic science truly is. I think I like Anne Rule's writing better like this, where there's multiple cases to get through. The only other book of hers I read was If You Really Loved Me which was like 600 pages about one single case. I remember feeling dragged down by the amount of detail that felt unnecessary to the central story. But here, there's so many cases in one little bind up that every detail was important to the overall understanding of how the cases ended.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

    I didn't know these were short blips of stories that would all tie together in the end so that was my mistake. I found most of the events she told interesting but all together they just sort of started to blur together. Do I prefer when she sticks to one murderer? Probably, I find the psychology of a killer more interesting than just listing all the horrible shit they did to innocent people who get shafted in every book, TV episode, and conversation that takes place about the crimes. I like lear I didn't know these were short blips of stories that would all tie together in the end so that was my mistake. I found most of the events she told interesting but all together they just sort of started to blur together. Do I prefer when she sticks to one murderer? Probably, I find the psychology of a killer more interesting than just listing all the horrible shit they did to innocent people who get shafted in every book, TV episode, and conversation that takes place about the crimes. I like learning about the people who can't talk for themselves anymore, the lives they had been living until someone came and took it just for their own amusement. Wow! Now that I've gone on that tangent here's my review. Interesting read, not my favorite Ann Rule book, but a good one none the less. Books like this eventually burn you out just because with one murderer you get the sense of their rampage on a singular level while multiple killers just makes you feel like their are no good people on Earth anymore unless they're the ones getting murdered. Read this when you're in a good mindset perhaps, I went in already kind of burnt out and didn't enjoy it as much as I could have.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    Well, this isn't my normal type of read - but damn if this book wasn't so compelling I read it all in one day. This author used to be a police detective, then had a career as a crime journalist, later turning into a full-time writer of non-fiction, true crime stories. She writes very well, obviously very well researched, she presents her facts in a beautifully organised way; in a very easy to read style. This volume was all about the crimes that were to do with love, lust...and murder. These page Well, this isn't my normal type of read - but damn if this book wasn't so compelling I read it all in one day. This author used to be a police detective, then had a career as a crime journalist, later turning into a full-time writer of non-fiction, true crime stories. She writes very well, obviously very well researched, she presents her facts in a beautifully organised way; in a very easy to read style. This volume was all about the crimes that were to do with love, lust...and murder. These pages were filled with all the bad things that can go wrong when a person loses their shit with someone they profess to love. Lots of the cases were back in the 1960s, 1970's - a few were crimes that took decades to solved. I would definitely read more of her books ...in fact, I am about to start reading her book called, "The Stranger Beside Me" (about her time working with Ted Bundy, while at the same time, she was part of the hunt to find the crazy serial killer - who turned out to be her 'Ted'. Looking forward to that one). Totally recommend.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Stephan

    I'm glad I started reading Ann Rule. With a whole series of true crime stories I am sure to always have something interesting to check out from the local library. This collection focuses on obsessed lovers, sadist sociopaths and those who felt rejected by those they wanted to be with. The clueless believe helping those in need at odd hours of the night is just "a neighborly thing to do", while those in the know will never open the door. If you're a true crime follower, and don't read Ann Rule, w I'm glad I started reading Ann Rule. With a whole series of true crime stories I am sure to always have something interesting to check out from the local library. This collection focuses on obsessed lovers, sadist sociopaths and those who felt rejected by those they wanted to be with. The clueless believe helping those in need at odd hours of the night is just "a neighborly thing to do", while those in the know will never open the door. If you're a true crime follower, and don't read Ann Rule, what are you doing with your life?

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Well this one wasn’t my favorite, It had some really fascinating cases in it. The most disturbing one was certainly not what she said for last. The two completely different people that are the same man is conceptually terrifying. The story is so far-fetched,, that had you seen it in a movie, you would have dismissed it as way too needlessly gory and far-fetched ever to be plausible:..and yet, it happened. And the guy has done time and is free. Also the abduction on Julie was incredibly awful but Well this one wasn’t my favorite, It had some really fascinating cases in it. The most disturbing one was certainly not what she said for last. The two completely different people that are the same man is conceptually terrifying. The story is so far-fetched,, that had you seen it in a movie, you would have dismissed it as way too needlessly gory and far-fetched ever to be plausible:..and yet, it happened. And the guy has done time and is free. Also the abduction on Julie was incredibly awful but for different reasons.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Linda Sliz

    Ok...going down a somewhat dark path these days. I liked the book...it reminds one to trust your gut and do not be afraid to say "No". Also you don't always have to be nice, especially if you feel the situation is wrong. The Author reminds women that they need to trust their instincts. It's a fine line from being self aware to paranoid...but in some cases it's better to be on the side of paranoia. Sad but true. Ok...going down a somewhat dark path these days. I liked the book...it reminds one to trust your gut and do not be afraid to say "No". Also you don't always have to be nice, especially if you feel the situation is wrong. The Author reminds women that they need to trust their instincts. It's a fine line from being self aware to paranoid...but in some cases it's better to be on the side of paranoia. Sad but true.

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