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Coal Wars: The Future of Energy and the Fate of the Planet

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Since the late 18th century, when it emerged as a source of heating and, later, steam power, coal has brought untold benefits to mankind. Even today, coal generates almost 45 percent of the world's power. Our modern technological society would be inconceivable without coal and the energy it provides. Unfortunately, that society will not survive unless we wean ourselves off Since the late 18th century, when it emerged as a source of heating and, later, steam power, coal has brought untold benefits to mankind. Even today, coal generates almost 45 percent of the world's power. Our modern technological society would be inconceivable without coal and the energy it provides. Unfortunately, that society will not survive unless we wean ourselves off coal. The largest single source of greenhouse gases, coal is responsible for 43 percent of the world's carbon emissions. Richard Martin, author of SuperFuel, argues that to limit catastrophic climate change, we must find a way to power our world with less polluting energy sources, and we must do it in the next couple of decades--or else it is game over. It won't be easy: as coal plants shut down across the United States, and much of Europe turns to natural gas, coal use is growing in the booming economies of Asia-- particularly China and India. Even in Germany, where nuclear power stations are being phased out in the wake of the Fukushima accident, coal use is growing. Led by the Sierra Club and its ambitious Beyond Coal campaign, environmentalists hope to drastically reduce our dependence on coal in the next decade. But doing so will require an unprecedented contraction of an established, lucrative, and politically influential worldwide industry. Big Coal will not go gently. And its decline will dramatically change lives everywhere--from Appalachian coal miners and coal company executives to activists in China's nascent environmental movement. Based on a series of journeys into the heart of coal land, from Wyoming to West Virginia to China's remote Shanxi Province, hundreds of interviews with people involved in, or affected by, the effort to shrink the industry, and deep research into the science, technology, and economics of the coal industry, Coal Wars chronicles the dramatic stories behind coal's big shutdown--and the industry's desperate attempts to remain a global behemoth. A tour de force of literary journalism, Coal Wars will be a milestone in the climate change battle.


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Since the late 18th century, when it emerged as a source of heating and, later, steam power, coal has brought untold benefits to mankind. Even today, coal generates almost 45 percent of the world's power. Our modern technological society would be inconceivable without coal and the energy it provides. Unfortunately, that society will not survive unless we wean ourselves off Since the late 18th century, when it emerged as a source of heating and, later, steam power, coal has brought untold benefits to mankind. Even today, coal generates almost 45 percent of the world's power. Our modern technological society would be inconceivable without coal and the energy it provides. Unfortunately, that society will not survive unless we wean ourselves off coal. The largest single source of greenhouse gases, coal is responsible for 43 percent of the world's carbon emissions. Richard Martin, author of SuperFuel, argues that to limit catastrophic climate change, we must find a way to power our world with less polluting energy sources, and we must do it in the next couple of decades--or else it is game over. It won't be easy: as coal plants shut down across the United States, and much of Europe turns to natural gas, coal use is growing in the booming economies of Asia-- particularly China and India. Even in Germany, where nuclear power stations are being phased out in the wake of the Fukushima accident, coal use is growing. Led by the Sierra Club and its ambitious Beyond Coal campaign, environmentalists hope to drastically reduce our dependence on coal in the next decade. But doing so will require an unprecedented contraction of an established, lucrative, and politically influential worldwide industry. Big Coal will not go gently. And its decline will dramatically change lives everywhere--from Appalachian coal miners and coal company executives to activists in China's nascent environmental movement. Based on a series of journeys into the heart of coal land, from Wyoming to West Virginia to China's remote Shanxi Province, hundreds of interviews with people involved in, or affected by, the effort to shrink the industry, and deep research into the science, technology, and economics of the coal industry, Coal Wars chronicles the dramatic stories behind coal's big shutdown--and the industry's desperate attempts to remain a global behemoth. A tour de force of literary journalism, Coal Wars will be a milestone in the climate change battle.

30 review for Coal Wars: The Future of Energy and the Fate of the Planet

  1. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Any book that can make a scientific topic not only understandable, but truly *readable* to me is a good book. When it happens to be about coal, the world's dependence upon it, and those big players who insist that the reduction of our dependency is impossible...then that book must be partially magic, for this topic is not my typical bedtime reading. Richard Martin has written such a book, traveling from Kentucky to China and places in between to get the story on how and why coal is still as stron Any book that can make a scientific topic not only understandable, but truly *readable* to me is a good book. When it happens to be about coal, the world's dependence upon it, and those big players who insist that the reduction of our dependency is impossible...then that book must be partially magic, for this topic is not my typical bedtime reading. Richard Martin has written such a book, traveling from Kentucky to China and places in between to get the story on how and why coal is still as strong as it is. He effectively makes the argument that coal is facing a crisis from which it won't recover, though it's death knoll won't be rung any time soon. It's almost compulsively readable, and absolutely fascinating. And for those of you who are absolutely convinced that man-made global warming is a hoax, then be warned - Martin makes absolutely no bones about the fact that his belief in it is real, that it is now, and that it will soon become irreversible if something is not done. So read at the risk of learning something that flies in the face of your own beliefs. Frankly, this book should be required reading for most. It makes a compelling argument, and most importantly, he posits that the workers must be taken care of for our coal dependence to have a chance of waning. He throws out a suggestion of something similar to the GI Bill, which, personally, I find almost brilliant. Better to retrain the workforce than have them jobless - these are hardworking people who deserve to be successful in another field. So. Read the book. Weep over the monster we have created, or cheer over the steps that seem so incrementally positive. Maybe even both, sometimes together. Then decide to stay involved and educated - if not for YOUR future, then for the ones that follow.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cary Neeper

    This is the story of the demise of the coal industry, the history of coal and its use, and its effects on three or more generations in the U.S. south, Kentucky, West Virginia, Wyoming, Ohio and Colorado, some zones in China and in The Ruhr, Germany. The author notes that “…nostalgia for a vanishing way of life is leading to a form of cannibalism…kids can’t be fed and educated on rage…not all chance entails betrayal…natural gas has become cheaper and easier to use, as has robotics, so jobs are los This is the story of the demise of the coal industry, the history of coal and its use, and its effects on three or more generations in the U.S. south, Kentucky, West Virginia, Wyoming, Ohio and Colorado, some zones in China and in The Ruhr, Germany. The author notes that “…nostalgia for a vanishing way of life is leading to a form of cannibalism…kids can’t be fed and educated on rage…not all chance entails betrayal…natural gas has become cheaper and easier to use, as has robotics, so jobs are lost in coal country. Economics is changing” Coal has been used in China since the “Fourth Millennium B.C.” Now its industry is outdated and “inching toward absolute caps on both coal consumption and carbon emissions.” Taoism and Confusion values are both focused on protection of the natural world, so there is hope that China’s dependence on coal and the damage done to these values may end some day. In the U. S., the battle may center in Ohio, and in Europe on the Ruhr. In any case, the author argues that coal may be shut down in the end, but we must not “abandon the workers. Any solution must be global.” The final solution: “…a price on carbon.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Susan (aka Just My Op)

    This book is filled with facts and information about why coal is destroying the planet, and also why it is hurting us individuals who live on the planet. There is history, there is state-by-state and country-by-country analysis. And the part I liked best, there are lots of stories about the humans directly involved in coal production, those who profit, those who die, those who know no other way of life and are afraid of seeing that way of life end. "After years of crawling through dark tunnels to This book is filled with facts and information about why coal is destroying the planet, and also why it is hurting us individuals who live on the planet. There is history, there is state-by-state and country-by-country analysis. And the part I liked best, there are lots of stories about the humans directly involved in coal production, those who profit, those who die, those who know no other way of life and are afraid of seeing that way of life end. "After years of crawling through dark tunnels to scrape coal out of the earth, miners tend to have plenty of bodily complaints. Many wind up on disability payments, and the physicians of the region have not been stingy in prescribing Oxycodone, Methadone, and Xanax. Kentucky is the fourth-most-medicated state in the country, according to an analysis by Forbes magazine (coal mining states West Virginia and Tennessee are nos. 1 and 2, respectively)." Given all that, I almost gave up on the book early on. While it is obvious what the author thinks about "coal wars," the beginning was crammed with facts and a bit of histrionics, but not much true heart. Fortunately, that changed as the book went on, but it did not get off to a good start for me. Of course, there are still the deniers like Mitch McConnell, and the author pulls no punches. "Big Coal" is slowing down in many areas, but the author makes undeniable points about why slowing down is not enough, why the euphemistic Clean Coal is not the answer. Without truly clean and renewable energy replacing our traditional energy, we are poisoning the planet and ourselves. While the book is interesting and informative, a subject important to all of us whether we think about it or not, the slow start almost made me give up, and I would have missed some good information. For that reason, I'm giving it 3 stars. I was given an advance readers copy of the book for review, and the quote may have changed in the published edition.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    This was yet another title in my recent binge on environmental literature. I found Martin’s Coal Wars at the Montlake branch of the Seattle Public Library in the new books section. I’m about as much of a lay reader as they come but I found Coal Wars compelling and very accessible. This was a hugely worthwhile read for me. My favorite aspect of Coal Wars is how the author uses vignettes of different traditional coal-producing areas of the United States and China and illustrates the physical, socia This was yet another title in my recent binge on environmental literature. I found Martin’s Coal Wars at the Montlake branch of the Seattle Public Library in the new books section. I’m about as much of a lay reader as they come but I found Coal Wars compelling and very accessible. This was a hugely worthwhile read for me. My favorite aspect of Coal Wars is how the author uses vignettes of different traditional coal-producing areas of the United States and China and illustrates the physical, social and economic impacts of the coal industry within those communities and how they fit within the larger framework of energy issues facing the world. You get both a local and global look at energy issues, insomuch as the coal industry is concerned.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sierra Ortiz

    I had to pick a book to read and review for class. I'm very glad I chose this book. It was easy to read, interesting, and informational. The topic is very important and the book effectively relates the true message that coal is running out of time. I really enjoyed this book. I had to pick a book to read and review for class. I'm very glad I chose this book. It was easy to read, interesting, and informational. The topic is very important and the book effectively relates the true message that coal is running out of time. I really enjoyed this book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sajith Kumar

    Coal was used since ancient times for heating. But its true potential was realized only in the 18th century when it fueled the Industrial Revolution that proved to be a watershed moment in human history. The world we now live in owes its origin to the coal-fired boilers of that era, which led to the manufacture of steel. Industry and transportation was dominated by coal for nearly a century. With the discovery of oil, coal took a backseat in the transportation sector, but with cheap electrical e Coal was used since ancient times for heating. But its true potential was realized only in the 18th century when it fueled the Industrial Revolution that proved to be a watershed moment in human history. The world we now live in owes its origin to the coal-fired boilers of that era, which led to the manufacture of steel. Industry and transportation was dominated by coal for nearly a century. With the discovery of oil, coal took a backseat in the transportation sector, but with cheap electrical energy produced by burning coal, it again rose to prominence in national economies right up to the 1990s. Alternatives to coal came in the form of nuclear power and natural gas. Coal is cheap, but dirty. The noxious gases and toxic substances it releases into the atmosphere pose a serious threat to human health. Stringent air quality rules imposed after the Second World War cast a shadow on the coal industry. Massive investments and complicated technologies were required to retrofit the coal plants to make it compliant to the new environmental regulations. Added to this was the concern about excessive carbon dioxide emission due to coal burning and human-induced climate change. Richard Martin narrates the story of how and why the coal industry’s days came to be numbered, with examples from the U.S. and China, world’s leading consumers of coal. He is one of America’s foremost writers and analysts on energy, technology and foreign affairs. He is the editorial director at Navigant Research, the premier clean energy research and analysis firm. He is a regular contributor to major magazines and has authored a book on thorium power movement. Climate change is now an accepted scientific paradigm, but there are business executives still voicing dissent or doubts over it. They generally represent coal, oil and other conventional energy corporations, whose incentive to continue with the status quo can easily be discerned. Regulatory pressure on reduction of output from coal mines is building up in the U.S., but not in other countries, as narrated by Martin. However, the Green Lobby got a shot in the arm in the steep fall in natural gas prices around 2013, as a result of revolutionary growth in shale gas output in the U.S. Now, the society has a much cleaner alternate fuel at its disposal. Coal burning constitute 44% of carbon dioxide emissions, and almost half of world’s electricity is produced in coal-based power plants, which is expected to fall to 40% in a few years. As Martin observes, decline of coal industry in the U.S., and perhaps in the entire world, is irreversible. New, efficient natural gas power plants could be set up with the same amount of money required for setting up pollution control measures in a coal plant. Solar energy and other renewable sources like wind present other alternatives. Utility companies resist any change from established ways. Every rooftop solar array is another few dollars a month out of the pockets of power companies. In order to meet the rising costs, they’ll be forced to ramp up the energy rates, which will make more customers drop out of the grid and opt for distributed power generation. This will create a death spiral, ending up in the death of grid, as the book suggests just a bit too fancifully. Solar producers now export energy to the grid with net metering, and if the utilities’ lobbying is successful, they might be burdened with a solar surcharge to meet the spiraling costs of grid maintenance. The book presents an abstract estimate of the U.S. energy scenario. Out of 580 coal power plants there, more than 90% are greater than two decades old. Coal power plants are phased out gradually, as the cost to adhere to clean air laws make the activity unprofitable. By 2020, an expected 49,000 megawatt will be retired out of service from a total of 340,000 megawatt – more, if gas prices stay low. In America too, the impact on states which produce dirty coal like Kentucky and West Virginia is more, whereas in Wyoming, the production is still healthy but the future prospects are not rosy either. On the world stage, Germany and Japan is returning to coal as both have decided to shut down their nuclear stations for political reasons. European Union is committed to environmental norms, and they have a peculiar 20-20-20 rule in place. This means that, by 2020, Europe will cut greenhouse gas emissions by 20%, increase use of renewable sources to 20% of total energy consumption and improve energy efficiency by 20%. Coal corporations have not been alert to rise up to the challenge. They are harking on to arguments about energy poverty and TINA (There Is No Alternative) factors, where coal is touted as the only cheap option for power generation. Some regions have gone for alternate industries to accommodate the labour force that will be rendered jobless by the end of coal. Cultivation of hemp is one such option in some areas, where it can be blended with coal in power stations for burning in boilers. Being a mildly psychedelic substance, other legal issues also have to be taken into account. Martin makes a tour of China’s Shanxi and Hangzhou provinces to assess firsthand the future of coal industry in the world’s largest consumer of coal. In addition to vast, proven indigenous resources, the country has gone for imports on a large scale from the U.S, Australia and Indonesia. No industry is so dependent on what happens in China as the global mining sector. The author finds signals on the ground that China has woken up to the challenge, by closing down small-scale, inefficient mines and consolidate them into efficient, huge coal clusters. China’s coal peak is expected by 2020, but the author makes a guess that it is highly optimistic and 2030 may be a more realistic option. We find a curious fact on China in the book. Whereas in other countries, the environmental organizations are founded and run by individuals and concerned citizens, the government takes that role in China. Of course, these GOs (obviously, they can’t be called NGOs) have made some real effort on the ground and reaped major gains. Street protests over environmental concerns are eagerly taken up by Chinese society, which sometimes even turn violent. Is this a clever tactic of the regime to divert public attention from negation of civic rights to another issue where the government is perceived to be seriously concerned to curb air pollution? The autocratic regime has entered into a virtual contract with the people it governs – guaranteed growth of personal wealth and affluence to the citizens in return for unquestioned political obedience. This makes the uninterrupted operation of the nation’s factories an imperative for the rulers, who, like the proverbial man riding a tiger, is afraid to dismount. The environmental movement in China has succeeded in relocating a major proposed coal-fired power plant in Shenzhen, but couldn’t do anything about such a facility in environmentally fragile Hainan island, where the government ignored protests. However, Martin reposes optimism on China on account of three factors which he enunciates – dynamism of the people as compared to Americans, cooperation with the U.S, at least on matters related to climate change and its belief that every crisis equals risk plus opportunity for the country. The book is written mainly with an American audience in mind. Most of the chapters describe the American scenario. The chapter on China is really the result of an afterthought to make it appealing to international readers. The cases of Germany and Britain are confined to the epilogue and there’s no mention of India, whose burgeoning appetite for coal has the potential to upset the climate change apple cart. Barack Obama and his ambitious program of curtailing coal is given due prominence. In the first half of the text, the author’s sympathies appear to lie with the sad plight of coal workers when their livelihood is disintegrating moment by moment. But in the latter part, the hidden claws are revealed and Martin goes for the jugular of coal industry. At times, it may feel like irresponsible criticism of that industry, with no viable alternative to offer. This book promotes natural gas as the panacea for the ills of coal, but that also is not entirely devoid of threat to clean air. Pollution with burning gas is less, but still significant. Improved fracking methods resulted in gas prices plummeting in 2014, which had a knock-on effect on coal prices. Now, both fuels are uneconomically priced, as far as the producers are concerned. If coal could be taken off the stage now, it will present a windfall to gas companies. Martin’s feeble attempt to extol the virtues of solar and wind power doesn’t hold much water on an industrial scale, at least for the time being. Natural gas, especially U.S. shale gas producers stand to gain considerable benefit in case any influential political leader takes this book a little too seriously. Lack of a brief history of the development of coal over the ages is a serious drawback to the book. The book is recommended.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    A great primer on the future of coal, though quite US centric. Very well written, like Richard Martin's first book (SuperFuel, about Thorium power). I enjoyed the clarity in the prose. It is also incredibly well researched with extensive personal interviews and obvious offline desk research. The book has chapters with the essence of his trips to various US states (e.g Ohio, Colorado, Kentucky and Tennessee) and regions of China, and there is a short section about Germany. The China chapters are ve A great primer on the future of coal, though quite US centric. Very well written, like Richard Martin's first book (SuperFuel, about Thorium power). I enjoyed the clarity in the prose. It is also incredibly well researched with extensive personal interviews and obvious offline desk research. The book has chapters with the essence of his trips to various US states (e.g Ohio, Colorado, Kentucky and Tennessee) and regions of China, and there is a short section about Germany. The China chapters are very meaty and from that I learnt a lot of new stuff. The US chapters started to wear, though, as there was quite a heavy skew towards history and detailed personal stories and though admirable takes us away from the subtitle of "the future of energy". I have to admit to skipping a bit of those chapters. Overall, a great book, though it would have been better if Europe or maybe India or Australia had replaced one of the US states.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kin Paquibo

    HB

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    With a journalist's passion for accuracy, a lover's ardor for the earth, Richard Martin has written a book I needed to read. My late grandfather was a Pennsylvania coal miner, and despite my own currents being worlds removed from that one, I try to stay current on the industry. From page 7: "This is not a book of policy ... nor a polemic on the evils of coal. It's a narrative of the front lines. Crafted as a series of journeys..." The author then explains war metaphors typically are overstatemen With a journalist's passion for accuracy, a lover's ardor for the earth, Richard Martin has written a book I needed to read. My late grandfather was a Pennsylvania coal miner, and despite my own currents being worlds removed from that one, I try to stay current on the industry. From page 7: "This is not a book of policy ... nor a polemic on the evils of coal. It's a narrative of the front lines. Crafted as a series of journeys..." The author then explains war metaphors typically are overstatements and "detract from the horrors of real war," but clearly he considers the global situation regarding coal an exception, and a horror unto itself. "The Future of Energy and the Fate of the Planet" also acknowledges coal has fueled countless true global advances over the centuries. Wars are about empire, land, violence, lots of losers, immeasurable loss that often can't be reclaimed, and sometimes even a distinctive true winner. We've been hearing a lot about environmental stewardship and about climate change. Coal reserves are not sustainable at the current level of extraction, and this fragile planet will not survive the death-dealing excesses of Big Coal and Big Consumption. First section, "The Death Spiral" provides an overview of the Tennessee Valley Authority's history, along with information about the rise and decline of coal-driven industry, culture, and lifestyle in the Appalachian states of Kentucky and West Virginia. Part II, "The Surge" portrays mining's success in the western states of Wyoming and Colorado. Absolutely everyone knows about the lack of environmental controls that have led to inordinate levels of toxic pollution in China—Part III, "The Great Migration" tells fascinating stories about some of the industrial players and their human reps, about a few of the "regular people" who've literally donated their lives to big coal in China. Vignettes about Ohio and an epilogue about the Ruhr comprise the final "Dinosaurs" portion of Coal Wars. Not surprisingly, Peabody Energy pervades the pages of Coal Wars, but I felt I had to mention it. Amazon Vine sent me an unfinished Advance Reader's Edition. Richard Martin paints many pictures with his words, though I don't know if the final edition will include charts, drawings, sketches, and photographs that with the surge of online resources probably are not very necessary these days, but my copy does include helpful endnotes, and apparently the final edition will have an index.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Having read Martin's previous book, 'Superfuel', I was looking forward to also reading 'Coal Wars'. Although I'd been hoping for a slightly more technical book, 'Coal Wars' is an excellent read on an extremely important topic. The structure of the book is geographical in nature and driven by human stories. After a brief prologue, Martin presents us with a history of the Tennessee Valley Authority, with its past triumphs and modern challenges. From there we are taken to mining country, Kentucky a Having read Martin's previous book, 'Superfuel', I was looking forward to also reading 'Coal Wars'. Although I'd been hoping for a slightly more technical book, 'Coal Wars' is an excellent read on an extremely important topic. The structure of the book is geographical in nature and driven by human stories. After a brief prologue, Martin presents us with a history of the Tennessee Valley Authority, with its past triumphs and modern challenges. From there we are taken to mining country, Kentucky and West Virginia. Then we head west to Wyoming and Colorado. From there, we head across the Pacific to take a tour of China's provinces and its massive coal industry. We finish the global tour with stops in Germany and Ohio. Along the way, we meet the major players in coal's story--the mining operators, the miners, politicians, university professors, and environmentalists. Where 'Superfuel' was largely a story of energy's possible future, 'Coal Wars' is more rooted in the past, and coal has a deep history. Generations of families have made their livings off of coal; entire towns have sprung up around the mines and still depend on them for employing significant numbers of people. Martin lets us get to know some of these people letting us hear their hopes and fears for the future. While he does a good job of showing the coal story from various angles, Martin still makes it clear that he sees coal as a dinosaur, a relic of the past that needs to be replaced soon with a far cleaner technology. Perhaps because of this, Martin doesn't seem to spend as much time explaining the technology of using coal as fuel. I was hoping to learn more about 'scrubbing' and gasification, and left a little disappointed at the relative absence of such technicalities, but I can imagine other readers who will breathe a sigh of relief. What should replace coal? Martin does not delve deeply into this topic. His book 'Superfuel' presents one possible answer, but there are many other possibilities that need to be looked at and implemented if we are ever to replace coal. 'Coal Wars' is an interesting and informative look at an extremely important topic, and I highly recommend it to anyone interested in the topic. I received both 'Coal Wars' and 'Superfuel' at no cost through the Goodreads First Reads program.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Will we burn black rock until we choke on its fumes? Of course not. In “Coal Wars”, Richard Martin leaves the friendly confines of the Peoples Republic of Boulder Colorado and travels to Coal country in the States and in China, unfortunately he brings along a fair amount of climate change baggage. I enjoyed the travel log aspect of the book, the stories from Appalachia, Wyoming and China were fantastic! Meeting fascinating people along the way; coal workers, engineers and folks affected by coal Will we burn black rock until we choke on its fumes? Of course not. In “Coal Wars”, Richard Martin leaves the friendly confines of the Peoples Republic of Boulder Colorado and travels to Coal country in the States and in China, unfortunately he brings along a fair amount of climate change baggage. I enjoyed the travel log aspect of the book, the stories from Appalachia, Wyoming and China were fantastic! Meeting fascinating people along the way; coal workers, engineers and folks affected by coal use and powerplant disasters, poor souls with coal related diseases, etc. Martin even laments the rebirth of the old Battersea Power Station in London (the same one that appeared on the cover of Pink Floyd’s 1977 album “Animals”). Seems we all want cheap electricity, smart utilization of our natural resources, balanced economic rewards, resource sustainability and jobs. Yet Martins biggest mistake is forsaking any mention or bothering to detail scientifically how coal burning leads to green house gasses and climate change. Instead Martin is inclined to gleam perspective from coal thru century old literature such as “King Coal” by Sinclair.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erin Sherrill

    The voice was overpowering in its opinions, despite promises for objectivity; couldn't finish. The voice was overpowering in its opinions, despite promises for objectivity; couldn't finish.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Doug Gordon

  14. 4 out of 5

    Silea

  15. 4 out of 5

    Susan Paxton

  16. 4 out of 5

    Neil Vandenberge

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  18. 5 out of 5

    Palgrave Macmillan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Genevieve

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jill Miller

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarah King

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Dilorenzo

  23. 4 out of 5

    Randy

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ashish

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cara

  26. 4 out of 5

    Will

  27. 5 out of 5

    Malissa Edwards

  28. 5 out of 5

    Richard Severs

  29. 5 out of 5

    Olivia treloar

  30. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

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