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Star Wars Omnibus: Tales of the Jedi, Volume 2

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Learn the fate of the ancient Jedi Order's most legendary heroes in this huge collection! In a time when Jedi were numerous and the Sith Empire but a bitter memory, an ancient evil rose again, corrupting one of the Jedi's finest and igniting a war that ravaged worlds. The Sith were reborn, ties of friendship and family were betrayed, and the lives of Jedi Nomi Sunrider and Learn the fate of the ancient Jedi Order's most legendary heroes in this huge collection! In a time when Jedi were numerous and the Sith Empire but a bitter memory, an ancient evil rose again, corrupting one of the Jedi's finest and igniting a war that ravaged worlds. The Sith were reborn, ties of friendship and family were betrayed, and the lives of Jedi Nomi Sunrider and Ulic QelDroma were changed forever. * This gargantuan omnibus completes the epic Tales of the Jedi saga with "The Freedon Nadd Uprising," "Dark Lords of the Sith," "The Sith War," and "Redemption."


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Learn the fate of the ancient Jedi Order's most legendary heroes in this huge collection! In a time when Jedi were numerous and the Sith Empire but a bitter memory, an ancient evil rose again, corrupting one of the Jedi's finest and igniting a war that ravaged worlds. The Sith were reborn, ties of friendship and family were betrayed, and the lives of Jedi Nomi Sunrider and Learn the fate of the ancient Jedi Order's most legendary heroes in this huge collection! In a time when Jedi were numerous and the Sith Empire but a bitter memory, an ancient evil rose again, corrupting one of the Jedi's finest and igniting a war that ravaged worlds. The Sith were reborn, ties of friendship and family were betrayed, and the lives of Jedi Nomi Sunrider and Ulic QelDroma were changed forever. * This gargantuan omnibus completes the epic Tales of the Jedi saga with "The Freedon Nadd Uprising," "Dark Lords of the Sith," "The Sith War," and "Redemption."

30 review for Star Wars Omnibus: Tales of the Jedi, Volume 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    Much better than volume 1. The characters are more fleshed out, the action is better (and there is more of it), and there plots are much tighter.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ivy

    5 stars Another good Star Wars comic. Very enjoyable. RIP Ulic, Cat, and the other Jedi who died. Hope Nomi and Vima Sunrider help bring lots of peace to the galaxy. Can't wait to read more Star Wars omnibus comics!!!! 5 stars Another good Star Wars comic. Very enjoyable. RIP Ulic, Cat, and the other Jedi who died. Hope Nomi and Vima Sunrider help bring lots of peace to the galaxy. Can't wait to read more Star Wars omnibus comics!!!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Iset

    The first story in this collection is The Freedon Nadd Uprising with Tom Veitch at the helm of the script, and Tony Akins and Denis Rodier on the art. I have mixed feelings about this one. I wasn’t a fan of the art style, though neither did I dislike it. In places the colours were garish, even clashing. Although this does, as I mentioned in my review of the previous volume, evoke something of a sense of an earlier era, it’s not my preferred style in the Star Wars comics. The story also had its n The first story in this collection is The Freedon Nadd Uprising with Tom Veitch at the helm of the script, and Tony Akins and Denis Rodier on the art. I have mixed feelings about this one. I wasn’t a fan of the art style, though neither did I dislike it. In places the colours were garish, even clashing. Although this does, as I mentioned in my review of the previous volume, evoke something of a sense of an earlier era, it’s not my preferred style in the Star Wars comics. The story also had its negatives, coming across as quite rushed. One moment there’s a Naddist attack at the starport, the next the Jedi are visiting King Ommin, and as soon as they return they discover the palace has fallen to Naddist troops. Really? In such a short space of time? And they heard nothing about it? It’s just a little difficult to swallow. At other points time passes and the story jumps suddenly ahead without any real explanation of what occurred in the meantime, and it doesn’t really feel like time has passed. For example, Nomi and her fellow Jedi liberate Ulic Qel-Droma and his fellows under siege, and he says that with the reinforcements they’ll be able to turn back the tide on Onderon. In the very next scene the Jedi are storming King Ommin’s palace and defeating the uprising. Whaaaa?! It feels like a few weeks should’ve passed in between these events, or it should’ve been made more explicit that time had passed. On the other hand, there were things about this story I’ve always liked. The Naddist faction is pretty interesting, especially the history of Freedon Nadd himself and how his legacy came to breed a royal line on Onderon corrupted with the dark side. The problem is not enough time is spent on that. We know so little about Nadd, King Ommin, or Queen Amanoa. A few of the Naddists are clad in impressive armour and wield lightsabres, and one is even specifically named and drawn attention to in dialogue – Warb Null – only for Ulic Qel-Droma to cut him down immediately. Who are these people? I wanted to know more! What was the point of throwing a name out there if he was just a faceless kill? I feel a certain degree of frustration with this tale because it hooks my interest on certain elements but then doesn’t deliver. Equally, the Keto cousins drew me in from the first page they appeared. Although I disliked how they were drawn, I found myself easily imagining their KOTOR era data files featuring the pair glowering defiantly from some criminal records mugshot. Here they seem a little silly as errant and spoilt royalty with little conception of what they’re getting into, but their characters have great potential and I can definitely envision them with a mean streak that would make them way more compelling. Still, this story is just their introduction. The next story in the collection is Dark Lords of the Sith. Both Tom Veitch and Kevin J Anderson were on the script for this one, with Chris Gossett, Mike Barreiro, and Jordi Ensign on the art. This story by far dominates this second volume of the Tales of the Jedi, at over a third of its page count, and really forms the core of the plot. This is where we see the long prophesised and promised downfalls of Exar Kun and Ulic Qel-Droma, along with the rise of Nomi Sunrider in the background. I quite liked the art style in this one. I wouldn’t say it’s my favourite (truth be told that tip of the hat often goes to Jan Duursema in the Star Wars comics world), but the action scenes do a great job at conveying movement and chaos, the characters are nicely drawn, with expression well conveyed, despite the colours being a little basic. Plot-wise there’s a lot I like here, but also a few things I didn’t like. Let’s get the minor irritants out of the way first. There is a glaring continuity error here which I found simply too distracting to give a free pass to; in this story Naga Sadow is described as a pureblood Sith species, a member of the priesthood enacting a rebellion against the Dark Jedi that conquered the Sith race and set themselves up as their Dark Lords. The problem is that’s not what happens in Volume 1 at all. In Volume 1 Naga Sadow is of mixed race descent from both Sith and the Dark Jedi, and is himself a contender for the title of Dark Lord of the Sith. And, even stranger, despite being told that Sadow is a Sith priest here, he’s drawn as a Human. What gives? I also found Ulic Qel-Droma’s fall pretty difficult to understand, despite multiple re-reads I’ve never wrapped my head around it. The initial premise checks out; he decides to infiltrate the Krath in order to bring them down from within. Even when Nomi comes looking for him and he was probably stupid to stick to his plan, it had a certain logic. But by the time his brother and friends come to rescue him, it’s stopped making any sort of twisted sense whatsoever. Satal Keto is dead, and Aleema, whom Ulic is sleeping with, tells Ulic she knows exactly that his plan is to destroy her… except the time is not right because Sith teachings are out there in the galaxy, and Ulic waiting a bit longer will accomplish… what, exactly? Seriously, what is waiting supposed to do? Ulic’s cover is effectively non-existent since Aleema flat out tells him she knows his whole plan, and it’s never explained how waiting will somehow eradicate the Sith teachings instead of simply going ahead and destroying the Krath now. Ideas spread. There’s not much that can be done about that, and waiting isn’t going to achieve anything. It’s a bit of a mystery what Ulic hopes to accomplish here. In the end I simply have to put his fall down to the Sith poison he’s been infected with, because his motivations don’t make a lick of sense. Also, just a wishlist item really, I would’ve liked to have seen more page space devoted to Satal and Aleema’s takeover. I felt like not enough time was given to that, and as a result it seemed far too easy, as if I was asked to accept that it happened off-screen and that was that. On the plus side however, there’s a lot that I like about this story. Satal and Aleema are much more in the mould I envision them; rangy, glaring, demanding, egotistical, hostile without regard. I like their portrayals, although how Aleema thinks she can get away with her blatant, unsubtle attempts at manipulating Ulic I don’t know. Maybe she knows that Ulic has become so absurd that his denials of being affected by the dark side no longer even make sense. Exar Kun, was by far the more interesting of our two fallen characters, and his fall made a whole lot more sense than Ulic’s, and was even rather compelling. He sets out on the path himself, self-important and harbouring a sinister desire to study Sith artefacts, but the crucial moment comes when he’s left to die, unless he embraces the dark side. He concedes in order to spare his life, but after that finds the light side of the Force closed off to him. On the one hand, this makes for a pretty compelling fall; Exar is angry at being presented with something that is barely a choice at all and the consequences of that choice, and being forcibly unable to access the light side plays out like a tragedy, causing his desperation and frustration to skyrocket. It makes for a much better read than Ulic’s fall. On the other hand, having read an awful lot of Star Wars in my time, I have to wonder what is going on here. It’s difficult to make sense of storylines where a Force user is cut off from the Force. KOTOR 2 presents us with an individual who has subconsciously done it to themselves after trauma, which is a plausible rendering, but elsewhere in the literature we’re told that this is an ability that a few Jedi can inflict on another (see Jedi vs Sith), and the character of Callista presents a mysterious case of Force loss after body switch. Having just the light side forcibly cut off though? I don’t know. I can see how dark side mind set can have a subtle knock-on effect, bringing tragedy into characters’ lives and trapping them into a cycle, and that seems to me the most plausible and compelling way that falls play out. Whilst Exar’s reaction and the fallout out from him being denied access to the light side are plausible and compelling, the why and how behind him being denied that access is more questionable. I think fellow Star Wars fans would agree with my wry observation that sometimes the Force is just whatever the writers need it to be. Nevertheless, a fairly enjoyable story, and better than the first one, I felt. The next story in the volume is The Sith War, with Kevin Anderson alone on the script, and Dario Carrasco Jr, Jordi Ensign, Mark Heike, Bill Black, and David Beckett on the art. Here we see the climax of the story and the fallout from the paths that Exar Kun and Ulic Qel-Droma have taken. Exar Kun is at his evil best here, lording it up with not an ounce of regret, combining callousness, lies, and brute force in the classic model of many dark lords. I have to say I’ve really liked his character throughout; this is a character who’s unapologetically evil and doesn’t give a damn about it. He’s much better than Ulic Qel-Droma, who for some reason still avoids fighting his former friends and is still telling himself that he’s doing all this for the greater good… somehow. I really found it difficult to sympathise with Ulic at all because his levels of self-delusion were just so astronomically absurd. When it comes right down to it, he fights when pressed, but immediately regrets it. With Ulic I’ve just always felt like shaking my head and saying, “what are you doing?!” I have to admit I’ve always been slightly disappointed in the character of Nomi Sunrider. Along with Ulic and Exar she’s touted as one of the main characters of The Tales of the Jedi. The problem is she’s not, really. She’s often in the background, supposedly Ulic’s love interest, going on various missions but making little impact, and rarely showing any personality. The most significant action she takes here is to strip Ulic of access to the Force, and that seemed to me a stand out deviation from her usual background position in the story. I really hoped she would be more, but for me her most interesting story is the first one in which she appears, where her husband is killed and she chooses the path of a Jedi. She seemed to have far more personality and distinctiveness there than in any subsequent stories in which she appears. Aleema in this tale was strangely underpowered and naïve in comparison to her earlier incarnations, and it was difficult to believe she fell for Exar and Ulic’s deception. I think page space was a definite issue here. The plot advances fairly quickly, quite a lot has to happen off screen, battles sometimes feel abbreviated and certain events are mentioned but we never get to see them; overall I definitely got a sense of the story being bigger than the pages the creators had to work with. Nevertheless, I had to say I liked the ending. It was pretty dark, excusing the pun. The final story of the volume is called Redemption and is also written by Kevin Anderson, with Chris Gossett and Andrew Pepoy on the artwork. This is my favourite story of the whole two volumes by far. The art style is definitely much more my kind of speed, making use of a more subtle use of colour and shadow than the garish look of previous stories in this series, the scenery is gorgeous, the characters well drawn; in short I love the art style. The story is shorter than the main bulk of the volume, which is taken up by The Sith War and Dark Lords of the Sith, but for me it’s by far the best. Ulic Qel-Droma is at his best here; nuanced, sympathetic, and actually seeming like a real human being for the first time in the series. His motivations never made sense to me in the previous stories, but here he seems like a living, breathing person, and his motivations are understandable, I even find myself rooting for him. Likewise the other characters; all are driven by subtle motivations and none fall neatly into boxes of good or evil, more driven by personal goals and experiences. The plot is interesting, and the ending is unexpected, but good, in the way that’s both awful and tugs on the heartstrings. Ulic is drawn rather old here, considering his age in previous stories and the fact that ten years have passed, but I’ve got to put that down to the toll of the dark side and several years of regret; he looks more late forties than late thirties, but it’s understandable. Whilst the rest of the series was interesting, and enjoyable, none of them were as good as this entry, and I rather wish the whole series had art work, plot, and characters as interesting and nuanced as this. I rated the first story 6 out of 10, the next two both 7 out of 10, and the final story 9 out of ten, reaching a total of 29 out of 40. Expressed as an overall score out of ten, that’s 7.25 out of 10.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Keys

    Lucas eat your heart out! This is how you REALLY do a pre-original Star Wars story. Instantly creating mystique by making "A long time ago in a galaxy far far away" a long LONG time ago, Tales of the Jedi's Sith Wars produce some of the most enigmatic characters and enduring story-lines that (I feel) the Star Wars Expanded Universe has to offer. Ulic Qel-Droma and Nomi Sunrider are easily my favorite characters aside from the original movie cast and their legacy set the stage for all following p Lucas eat your heart out! This is how you REALLY do a pre-original Star Wars story. Instantly creating mystique by making "A long time ago in a galaxy far far away" a long LONG time ago, Tales of the Jedi's Sith Wars produce some of the most enigmatic characters and enduring story-lines that (I feel) the Star Wars Expanded Universe has to offer. Ulic Qel-Droma and Nomi Sunrider are easily my favorite characters aside from the original movie cast and their legacy set the stage for all following pre-movie material including some amazing video games. You really a sense of history and that these Jedi are part of the order that Yoda and Obi-Wan lost, which The Emperor broke and which Luke founded once more. It retains a grittiness to the imagery of the universe that we see in the original films and adds its own flavor of archaism. These comics are why my love for Star Wars endures past the movies and why I delved deeper into the expanded universe.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tyson Adams

    Meh. Not as good as I remember from when I read it as a teenager.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    Tales of the Jedi was the first event depicted in the Essential Chronology, so I the outline of the plot many times as a kid. Like a lot of stuff in TEC, it felt weird, full of proper nouns that were similar to things I knew (Sith) but applied in slightly different ways (Sith Sorcery) that made them almost unrecognizable. My memory of my first read of TotJ is pretty foggy, but I had the idea that it was fairly weird compared to KotOR, which was much more closely matched to the OT. There are defi Tales of the Jedi was the first event depicted in the Essential Chronology, so I the outline of the plot many times as a kid. Like a lot of stuff in TEC, it felt weird, full of proper nouns that were similar to things I knew (Sith) but applied in slightly different ways (Sith Sorcery) that made them almost unrecognizable. My memory of my first read of TotJ is pretty foggy, but I had the idea that it was fairly weird compared to KotOR, which was much more closely matched to the OT. There are definitely ways that’s true, but coming back to it now, it’s less the case than I remembered. Even though the ship designs are weird and unique, and the Jedi are somewhat different than they’ve ever been presented otherwise, the universe feels more or less like the same kind of place it does in the OT and KotOR, the same scope and diversity and flickering sense of historicity. On one hand, Tales feels utterly antediluvian in its storytelling. I always expected that finally getting to TotJ itself, I’d learn what all these people and proper nouns and events were really like, discover the story behind the summary. But the summary is the story. It’s like the Manning comics, and the Goodwin comics, in that all the narrative is just explained in those little rectangles rather than being told as a story, in art, action, or dialogue. Which is a shame, because unlike the Manning or Goodwin comics, the plot here actually has something to it. There are a bunch of potentially meaningful character arcs and relationships here, interesting behaviors that imply interesting motivations, major plotlines with impactful choices. It’s a big epic Star Wars story, more ambitious in scope than the OT itself by far. The problem is, the storytelling for all of that really matters. Like, Ulic and Cay and Nomi and Exar Kun can’t be the lead characters in an epic, tragic drama unless they’re brought to life as real people with internal lives and emotions and comprehensible motivations. And the story never comes close. It rushes through everything, and the scenes that are here for character development are narrated over, a necessity since the scenes don’t establish character themselves. It’s very ineffectual. What comes in place of that character development and comprehensible dramatic motivation is simply The Force. This is where I want to argue that Tales of the Jedi is basically ground zero for an alternate Star Wars, a fork in the path that made Legends what it was, and not what the OT told us it might be. And until TROS, the new films had rejected that version of Star Wars and stuck with the OT. Now, I guess this is what Star Wars is again. A depressingly relevant piece of literary history. So instead of stories about people struggling with questions about identity and morality and what it means to responsibly wield power or whatever, we get characters who are destined to become evil because they show a whiff of interest in the Dark. The Dark Side is treated like Satan, a non-metaphorical supernatural entity that reaches out and controls evildoers through psychic fiat or magic extortion. Exar Kun comes in angry and goes straight for Dark Side artifacts for no established reason at all. Even then, when the time comes for him to fall, Freedon Nadd doesn’t seduce him or appeal to his character in any way. He just beats him nearly to death and forces him to sign over his soul to stay alive. It’s so boring! And Ulic is almost worse. He decides to go off and join the Dark Siders to understand them and destroy them from the inside, but immediately just plain joins them anyway for no reason we’re ever shown, with no internal struggle. It’s like that’s who he always was, no adjustments necessary. His only character trait throughout this process is that he’s always annoyed when his loved ones question him, though he’s given them no reason to trust him. Very weird. And Nomi develops a romance with him at literally the very last second before he embarks on this. At one point Anderson just gives the game away and makes falling to the Dark Side literally a matter of being cut by shards of a contaminated artifact. It’s . . . nothing. Utterly arbitrary. No story behind it at all. The light is no better—not a matter of character and principle but simply something that an arbitrarily chosen set of holy people can wield to ward off the Dark, like a priest holding up a cross. I was pretty hard on Kevin J Anderson last time I reviewed TotJ, and he’s not a good writer by any means, but it’s certainly unfair to compare him unfavorably to Veitch. There’s a noticeable change in quality when Anderson shows up, though it’s too little too late and the story still just plain doesn’t have time to cover the ground it covers. But Redemption, written many years later and with a new art team, takes so many steps forward dramatically that I can’t help but give Anderson props for it. It quite literally gives Ulic the Ahch-to Luke treatment, and sends Vima as Rey, and nothing happening in the galaxy otherwise. There is no big war here, only its legacy, worked out by a few key characters in very personal, emotional ways that seem utterly unearned by the previous content but nonetheless manage some decently touching moments. Ulic and Vima build snow sculptures! Having a rando cretin shoot the villain instead of making a character do it or letting him be redeemed is a kind of cheap ploy, though it works much better here than it did in Dark Empire.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Seana

    Couldn't get through the story because I really didn't like the art, except for the final story arc - Redemption - which was both a good story and well drawn. Couldn't get through the story because I really didn't like the art, except for the final story arc - Redemption - which was both a good story and well drawn.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    Of the many Star Wars comics issued by Dark Horse, the Tales of the Jedi line was far and away my favorite. The series' setting (5000 years before A New Hope) let authors Kevin J. Anderson and Tom Veitch really go wild in creating the early tales of the Jedi Knights and their Sith adversaries, and resulted in the creation of some of the Star Wars Universe's most memorable characters. Since many of the original Tales of the Jedi trade paperbacks are out of print, Dark Horse has issued Omnibus coll Of the many Star Wars comics issued by Dark Horse, the Tales of the Jedi line was far and away my favorite. The series' setting (5000 years before A New Hope) let authors Kevin J. Anderson and Tom Veitch really go wild in creating the early tales of the Jedi Knights and their Sith adversaries, and resulted in the creation of some of the Star Wars Universe's most memorable characters. Since many of the original Tales of the Jedi trade paperbacks are out of print, Dark Horse has issued Omnibus collections of the Tales of the Jedi comics. This is the second volume, and it collects the following stories: Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - The Freedon Nadd Uprising This 2-issue series picked up where Ulic Qel Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon left off. Our young Jedi Knights are under assault from the ancient spirit of Sith Lord Freedon Nadd (no snickering please), and any victory they achieve may prove fleeting as secret Sith lore is brought back to the Republic by a pair of Dark Side wannabes. The artwork for this series was less than stellar. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - Dark Lords of the Sith Two powerful young Jedi come too close to the Dark Side of the Force. Exar Kun seeks forbidden knowledge, and Ulic Qel Droma attempts to defeat the dark from within. These Jedi's journeys towards the Dark Side will lead to massive galactic conflict and the return of the Sith Empire. The artwork in this series is better than the Freedon Nadd Uprising, but not by much. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - The Sith War Dark Lord of the Sith Exar Kun and his Sith disciples wage war on the Republic and their Jedi allies. The whole Tales of the Jedi saga has been leading up to this massive conflict. Dario Carasco brings some much needed detailed artwork to the series. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - Redemption This long out of print saga takes place years after the close of the Sith War. Nomi Sunrider's daughter Vima seeks a Jedi to tutor her in the ways of the force, and has decided on the one man universally reviled for his role in the Sith War - Ulic Qel Droma. This gorgeously illustrated series is the perfect epilogue to the massive Tales of the Jedi saga. I love the idea of these mid-priced Omnibus volumes, but am not crazy about their size. Compared to Marvel's larger Omnibus hardcovers, these smaller (they shaved roughly an inch from the height and width of the trade paperback size) paperback collections fall a bit short (no pun intended). Still, if you're new to the Tales of the Jedi series, or like me never got around to buying all of the trade paperbacks, they are an ideal way to get the most bang for your buck.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Volume 2 of Tales. The series definitely picked up and got more interesting around "Dark Lords of the Sith" and "The Sith War." All of this is significant background to the Knights of the Old Republic game, which I'm currently in the middle of playing. By far, my favorite arc in this collection is "Redemption." It made me burst into tears at the end, so I'd say I'd successfully gotten fairly attached to the characters. Honestly, I didn't like the artwork in that one as well, so it really was the Volume 2 of Tales. The series definitely picked up and got more interesting around "Dark Lords of the Sith" and "The Sith War." All of this is significant background to the Knights of the Old Republic game, which I'm currently in the middle of playing. By far, my favorite arc in this collection is "Redemption." It made me burst into tears at the end, so I'd say I'd successfully gotten fairly attached to the characters. Honestly, I didn't like the artwork in that one as well, so it really was the story that made me love it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rizzie

    For someone very interested in the ancient lore of the Star Wars universe, these volumes are fairly interesting, but for anyone else, I can't imagine you'd enjoy them. They're very dry and slow, your mileage may vary. HOWEVER, the final story in the Tales series, "Redemption" is genuinely a great story that is totally different from the rest. Reading the rest of the stories are required to get there though, but man it's satisfying. I was really pleasantly surprised to see such a grounded, small, For someone very interested in the ancient lore of the Star Wars universe, these volumes are fairly interesting, but for anyone else, I can't imagine you'd enjoy them. They're very dry and slow, your mileage may vary. HOWEVER, the final story in the Tales series, "Redemption" is genuinely a great story that is totally different from the rest. Reading the rest of the stories are required to get there though, but man it's satisfying. I was really pleasantly surprised to see such a grounded, small, emotional story ending this series of grand, epic, emotionless space battles.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Haile

    I'll give this 2 stars for effort and a few things that I thought were pretty cool but overall I didn't really care for the characters, the stories were ok, and I didn't like the art. Some of the art was good, but the lightsabers were ugly and the ships looked terrible. Some of the story I could relate to KOTOR which was cool. But overall I'd recommend skipping this one. I'll give this 2 stars for effort and a few things that I thought were pretty cool but overall I didn't really care for the characters, the stories were ok, and I didn't like the art. Some of the art was good, but the lightsabers were ugly and the ships looked terrible. Some of the story I could relate to KOTOR which was cool. But overall I'd recommend skipping this one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    This Omnibus is only worth reading if you really enjoyed volume 1. Great 90s artwork continues here even as the run goes into the prequel era.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Audiobook - Good ending to the Tales of the Jedi

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Juffs

    Great, especially the last few issues.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Grant

    Top level artwork. Cool mythology.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    the writing was HORRID, written for a 4th grade reader level at best. seeing as how Star Wars was never a children's story I'm puzzled how this managed to get published in the current form. the writing was HORRID, written for a 4th grade reader level at best. seeing as how Star Wars was never a children's story I'm puzzled how this managed to get published in the current form.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pablo

    Nice story, but the art could have been a lot better in some parts...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dustin Merriman

    This surprised me towards the back. The beginning was not very great.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    The omnibus contained the comics Tales of the Jedi: The Freedon Nadd Uprising, Tales of the Jedi: Dark Lords of the Sith, Tales of the Jedi: The Sith War, and Tales of the Jedi Redemption. I posted my reviews for each of the following below. Overall, a great collection of Star Wars comics! Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi: The Freedon Nadd Uprising Tom Veitch Much better than the previous Tales of the Jedi story. In this story Nomi Sunrider goes to the planet Ossus to further her Jedi training before g The omnibus contained the comics Tales of the Jedi: The Freedon Nadd Uprising, Tales of the Jedi: Dark Lords of the Sith, Tales of the Jedi: The Sith War, and Tales of the Jedi Redemption. I posted my reviews for each of the following below. Overall, a great collection of Star Wars comics! Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi: The Freedon Nadd Uprising Tom Veitch Much better than the previous Tales of the Jedi story. In this story Nomi Sunrider goes to the planet Ossus to further her Jedi training before getting sent with other Jedi to Onderon to help end the Dark threat that still presides there. There she teams up with Ulic Qel-Droma and the other Jedi Knights apprenticed to Jedi Master Arca. In Tales of the Jedi: Ulic Qel-Droma and the Beast Wars of Onderon we learn more about the ancient Sith Lord Freedon Nadd. In this story we learn A LOT more which made for an interesting story. Also, we get to see the planet Ossus where the Great Library that was mentioned in Tales of the Jedi: The Fall of the Sith Empire by Odan-Urr. Later the planet is seen in the Legacy of the Force and the Fate of the Jedi series as a Jedi Temple for Luke Skywalker's Jedi Order. In addtion to cool information regarding the anicent Star Wars, there was much action involved and very cool plot ideas including the use of King Ommin. I great story. My only wish was that it was a little bit longer. The future works for the series look quite promising. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi: Dark Lords of the Sith Tom Veitch and Kevin J. Anderson Another great addition to the Tales of the Jedi series. In the story the Jedi are sent to stop Satal Keto and his cousin Aleema from spreading their Sith sorcery. In the meantime, a Jedi named Exar Kun sets off on a journey to learn more about Sith artifacts with the spirit of Exar Kun. I found the beginning to be a tad bit slow for my tastes, but the epic conclusion made up for it. In the story we learn more about the Massassi Temples on Yavin 4, the Jedi during this time, and, most importantly, Ulic Qel-Droma and Exar Kun. I was interesting to see the first story of Exar Kun who also plays a role in the Jedi Academy Trilogy. We also get to just how much of an effect Naga Sadow truly had on a Sith of the time as well as Freedon Nadd who plays a critical role in the story. An amazing story and one that I look forward to reading again in the future. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi: The Sith Wars Kevin J. Anderson Another great addition to the Tales of the Jedi series. The comic went into the rise and fall of the Sith Lords Ulic Qel-Droma and Exar Kun. Two of the more well known ancient Sith Lords. In addition to these two we see Mandalore and the Mandalorians come into the picture and play a part an influential part in the story as they ally themselves with the Krath and the Dark Lords of the Sith. This story tied up the lose ends of the past few Tales of the Jedi comics. All of that leading to this epic conclusion with surprising turn of events. Defiantly a must read. Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi: Redemption Kevin J. Anderson This was a very good addition and conclusion to the Tales of the Jedi series. It's the year 3986 BBY, 10 years after Tales of the Jedi: The Sith War, and Vima Sunrider seeks out the exiled Ulic Qel-Droma to be trained in the arts of the Jedi as her mother, Nomi Sunrider, can't seem to make time to train her. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the story. I thought that it was a great way to end the epic Tales of the Jedi Series. The choose of characters was perfect. There were to many, but there was too little either. And the characters chosen were the right ones for the story. We really get to see that even though some falls so far and has so many wrongs they, too, can still be redeemed. That message is why I found this story to be such a great one. A quick story with a powerful message. Don't really get many of those out of Star Wars literature.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jaime K

    The artwork is very good and detailed throughout. The inks and colours enhanced the story, making me pay more attention to the scenes and people than I usually do. Too, the paneling was never the same between two consecutive two-page spreads, which made it more unique. We also see how blurred the lines between light and dark can be, depending on the situation. What happens when a being willingly lets evil in? What are the consequences? The morality of this volume is deep , permeating every subplot The artwork is very good and detailed throughout. The inks and colours enhanced the story, making me pay more attention to the scenes and people than I usually do. Too, the paneling was never the same between two consecutive two-page spreads, which made it more unique. We also see how blurred the lines between light and dark can be, depending on the situation. What happens when a being willingly lets evil in? What are the consequences? The morality of this volume is deep , permeating every subplot . What I didn't like though is that, as with the first volume, each TPB had a different artist/colorist. The inconsistencies are annoying. This volume in particular houses the comics that seem to have greatly influenced the KOTOR video games and the understanding of Force powers, Onderon, Exar Kun, and battle meditation--among others. Kevin J Anderson writing in multiple forms of media helps with a lot of it. The Freedon Nadd Uprising (3998 BBY) -Nadd's remains are on Onderon...and he has some followers. The spirit doesn't only guide, but can hurt. - Cay and Ulic Qel-Droma, Master Arca, and Nomi Sunrider are the initial Jedi. I love how Nomi is drawn - muscular and strong. Nomi and a few other apprentices are sent to stop a new Sith uprising. - Cousins Aleema and Satal find a Sith book and dabble in the dark arts. - When Ulic hopes that Arca isn't dead, I have to wonder why he can't feel it. Dark Lords of the Sith (3997 BBY) - Through Naga Sadow and Freedon Nadd, Exar Kun, Aleema and Satar are opened to the dangers of the Dark Side. Actually, Freedon Nadd's spirit affects everyone. - The carbonite annoyed me. It's just too far in the past for it to be believable. - The Jedi on Onderon enlist help to face the dark energies. Despite all that they do, they can't be everywhere at once. - Nadd temps Ulic to allow the Sith to rise. Exar Kun tries to deceive the Jedi and heads to Yavin Four and the Massassi to reveal Sadow's past. Kun and Ulic are tempted by dark energies and poisons, catalysts for their joining as a Sith pair. - The "break" on page 109 was spectacular and beautiful. - The ending was just very sad. I'm heartbroken for Nomi...and a little sad for Aleema. The Sith War (3996 BBY) -Mandalore attacks the Tetan worlds and allies himself with Ulic. I couldn't believe Aleema was still with Ulic, but their double-crossing each other wasn't a surprise. - Ulic plans on attacking Corsucant against Kun's wishes. The latter man goes to Yavin Four and turns some of the Jedi apprentices. - The Jedi go after Ulic, and Mandalore goes to save him. Events snowball into each other as the Sith slowly seem to overpower the Jedi in horrific ways. - What Ulic does to Cay...what Nomi does to Ulic...it's such a depressing ordeal. Him protesting everything though is HIGHLY annoying. It's all his fault and yet he says that it "can't" be happening? He can't lose his powers? Dude, it's less than you deserve. - Kun uses the Massassai to help him flood the light side with the power of the Sith, but the Jedi have powers too. The clash is devastating and enflames Yavin Four. The end was terribly chilling and powerful. Redemption (3986 BBY) - 10 years after The Sith War, Nomi Sunrider calls a Jedi convocation. Her daughter, Vima, wants to train as a Jedi but Nomi rarely 'has time.' - Others, especially Sylvar, want Ulic to pay for his crimes. He wants self-imposed exile and death. Sylvar lives in vengeance for anyone who feels oppressed, and is dangerously close to the Dark Side. Her home planet is beautiful. - Sylvar saying that Ulic is unpunished shows me that she does not understand at all what Nomi did to him. - Vima goes to Ulic for training. She is stubborn but helps him through his mental pain and darkness. - I didn't expect that ending.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Killer of Dreams

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. To rate the entire volume, I've decided to explain my thoughts on each of the sub-series involved in this entire volume. The Freedon Nadd Uprising, acting as a bridge to connect the previous Knights of the Old Republic sub-series, provides little enjoyement other than acting as the foundation for the following subsequent series. Its sole purpose is to introduce Ulic and Nomi, as well as the supporting caste for the second half of the Tales of the Jedi. For that reason and little new plot ideas pr To rate the entire volume, I've decided to explain my thoughts on each of the sub-series involved in this entire volume. The Freedon Nadd Uprising, acting as a bridge to connect the previous Knights of the Old Republic sub-series, provides little enjoyement other than acting as the foundation for the following subsequent series. Its sole purpose is to introduce Ulic and Nomi, as well as the supporting caste for the second half of the Tales of the Jedi. For that reason and little new plot ideas provide this sub-series with 2 stars. Dark Lords of the Sith provide the emergence into the entire plot of the Tales of the Jedi. Exar Kun is introduced, his plotline is dull compared to that of Ulic's. The climax and culmination of this entire sub-series is Ulic's decline into the Dark side which propel this series. This sub-series earned 3 stars. It would have earned 4 if it wasn't for Kun's plot and that of Ulic's friends who attempt to rescue him several times. The Sith War sub-series introduces the Mandalorians, and their design in the comics is amazing. The design of the ships in this sub-series is really heightened as a result of the space combat. Although the war is rather fast paced in terms of explanation throughout the issues, the issues contain a solid plotline earning the sub-series 4 stars. The betrayel by Aleema and the ultimate culmination of the sub-series resulting in Clay's death, Ulic losing his touch with the force, and Kun's death serve as a befitting and dark ending. Redemption is one of the weakest sub-series in the volume. It takes a long time for the plot to advance and the plot is mainly saved by Ulic's exile and his ongoing monologues and self-conflicts. Nomi's daughter's training felt rather fast paced. Ulic's final death serve as sealing the sub-series with 3 stars. The only purpose of this small sub-series is to complete Ulic's arc and finish Tales of the Jedi. His death is befitting to the entire series and thus the arc is closed. Overall, this volume earns 3 1/2 stars but after rounding and considering the chunk of the volume lies in the Great Sith War and Dark Lords of the Sith, this volume earns 4 stars. Both of those sub-series is very enjoyable to read. Rating Update 3/14/2019 - 4 to 3 stars. Having placed my ratings with the percentage of the volume, I find that this volume receives a 3.24 star rating ~= 3 stars. 5 - 53 2 48 11% = .22 57 - 200 3 143 33% = .99 204 - 341 4 137 32% = 1.28 343 - 449 3 106 25% = 0.75 434 3.24 Update 14 June 2019 With the adoption of my new rating system, a three star rating is befitting. The original rating, review, and especially the March 14, 2019, rating update conform to the new rating system. September 5, 2019 Update It was not mentioned that the appearance of the comics help maintain the volume at a three star rating. The dull colors and the mechanized gladiator look of the Old Republic wars and its combatants is nice. Visually appealing at times. I also wanted to digress on my liking of the Old Sith Wars, especially the content on the Mandalorians, lifts this volume to a three star-rating. If the plot were replaced with the same boring plot style in the previous volume, this would have earned two stars. January 25, 2020 Update This is a book whose contents I cannot remember entirely. I must rely on the original review's praise of this volume, and the update on June 14, 2019, that stamped this book as fit for a three star rating. The apex in the original review was this sentence: "Both of those sub-series is very enjoyable to read". I felt this sentence resonate after I skimmed through the volume just now. Also, I believe this book cannot go lower than a 2.5 star-rating.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    Honestly, the best part about this is the last chapter, Redemption, but I guess you need all the other chapters for it to make any sense. That being said, it is kind of worth it. Anderson and crew introduce a bunch of cool new characters that are memorable in the vast pantheon of Jedi in the EU. This collection follows the exploits of two really interesting characters: Ulic Qel Droma and Nomi Sunrider interweaving stories of their humble origins and building up to the moments where their lives c Honestly, the best part about this is the last chapter, Redemption, but I guess you need all the other chapters for it to make any sense. That being said, it is kind of worth it. Anderson and crew introduce a bunch of cool new characters that are memorable in the vast pantheon of Jedi in the EU. This collection follows the exploits of two really interesting characters: Ulic Qel Droma and Nomi Sunrider interweaving stories of their humble origins and building up to the moments where their lives cross paths agains the backdrop of a resurgent Sith. Anderson and crew do an excellent job creating compelling characters, but the plot is relatively simple and straightforward and the foreshadowing is pretty blatant and obvious. "I sense you will be a great Jedi," says Master Thon. And then, by the end, Master Thon again, "See, I told you you would be a great Jedi." I kind of expected twists in the prophecies and that they wouldn't be quite so literal, and in that I was disappointed, with the exception of Qel Droma. I liked that the focus of this series was on internal struggles and how often times a desire to do good at all costs ends up leading people astray more than purposeless lust for power or pointless ambition, which seems to be the motivation of most of the rogues in the EU. It's fun to see the familiar backdrops of Yavin IV and Ossus expanded upon - their mythologies and histories fleshed out. It's kind of like being able to go back in time after seeing a crumbling ruin to see it when it was brand new and glorious, which was of course the purpose of this series. In that, it succeeds and it creates iconic figures worthy of repeat mention in other subsequent volumes of lore. The Old Republic has me on a serious EU binge. On to the next one...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Edward Cheer

    For what it's worth, I did enjoy this more than the last. For many others, they might agree it's definitely an improvement but not as much as I saw it. For the longest time, I heard all about Exar Kun and Ulic Qel-Dromo, and all other names of this period of time I had no idea of. But if it was anything like the story of Naga Sadow, I wouldn't have it. Veitch is still Veitch, and hasn't improved as a writer. But Anderson has very obviously grown, with how much better he writes Exar and Ulic than For what it's worth, I did enjoy this more than the last. For many others, they might agree it's definitely an improvement but not as much as I saw it. For the longest time, I heard all about Exar Kun and Ulic Qel-Dromo, and all other names of this period of time I had no idea of. But if it was anything like the story of Naga Sadow, I wouldn't have it. Veitch is still Veitch, and hasn't improved as a writer. But Anderson has very obviously grown, with how much better he writes Exar and Ulic than the blocks of wood from the Naga Sadow arc. And to be quite honest, I was invested, the more Anderson piloted the story. The final pages of the Exar Kun arc were haunting, and even though I thought the comics afterwards would be unnecessary they actually managed to tie all the loose ends quickly. It got clunky moments, odd moments in plot and characters, but I could believe much easier that this was a labor of love than the previous Omnibus.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    Most of the writing was squarely in the grade-school by-the-numbers comic book plotting. the author padded the word count with repeated overuse of the words "Sith", "magic", "power", and "Jedi" to the point where I could predict conversations. Character motives and development were uneven, with some characters little more than cardboard cutouts. Perhaps I am jaded since I just finished reading The Sandman. The final story was a great payoff for the plot arc that came before. It also featured a ne Most of the writing was squarely in the grade-school by-the-numbers comic book plotting. the author padded the word count with repeated overuse of the words "Sith", "magic", "power", and "Jedi" to the point where I could predict conversations. Character motives and development were uneven, with some characters little more than cardboard cutouts. Perhaps I am jaded since I just finished reading The Sandman. The final story was a great payoff for the plot arc that came before. It also featured a new artist who took a couple of liberties with established character design but brought a solid, realistic feeling to the universe. The writing strove to match this new tone, and mostly succeeded. It could have done with a few more pages to flesh out a new character and a few of the returning ones, but despite its shortcomings it was the highlight of the volume.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael Alexander

    So much nostalgia for me. When I was younger I was absolutely starved for Star Wars stuff. I wanted to know everything and read everything I could get my hands on. There were so many unanswered questions. We knew that Darth Vader was a Dark Lord of the Sith, but there was never any mention of what the Sith was, or what being a Dark Lord meant. Lo and Behold along comes the Tales of the Jedi series. Set 4000 years before the movies, we learn the history of the Jedi, what the Sith are, their histor So much nostalgia for me. When I was younger I was absolutely starved for Star Wars stuff. I wanted to know everything and read everything I could get my hands on. There were so many unanswered questions. We knew that Darth Vader was a Dark Lord of the Sith, but there was never any mention of what the Sith was, or what being a Dark Lord meant. Lo and Behold along comes the Tales of the Jedi series. Set 4000 years before the movies, we learn the history of the Jedi, what the Sith are, their history, how they came to power. The comics tell of famous Jedi like Exar Kun, Nomi Sunrider, and Uliq Qel-Droma, all characters that would appear again in other novels, games, and comics. Reading it again, everything holds up for me. The story is still entertaining and the art is great too. Happy to have it all in one convenient location.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Bray

    It was decent, The story telling was pretty bad, as random sequences were thrown together and the plot was never totally clear. I enjoyed the interactions of Nomi Sunrider and Ulic Qel-Droma as they had their own separate stories but were finally brought together through conflict. The emotions of the Jedi were not at all as they should have been according said Jedi code and what not (Blood lust, seeking revenge. It did not convince me of Ulic's reasoning to go to the darkside, and the actions tha It was decent, The story telling was pretty bad, as random sequences were thrown together and the plot was never totally clear. I enjoyed the interactions of Nomi Sunrider and Ulic Qel-Droma as they had their own separate stories but were finally brought together through conflict. The emotions of the Jedi were not at all as they should have been according said Jedi code and what not (Blood lust, seeking revenge. It did not convince me of Ulic's reasoning to go to the darkside, and the actions that took place afterward just seemed dull and kinda lame. I really enjoyed the ending though, where Ulic finds redemption and purpose through training Nomi's daughter. The lesson to take away is that every action will have it's consequences, especially when one tries to fight fire with fire.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm torn by this. On one hand, there's an absolutely epic plot that definitely lives up to the Star Wars name, and some great individual moments (especially seeing the rise of Reluctant Jedi Nomi Sunrider). On the other hand, the story at times felt like it lacked a lot of emotional/character depth. With the fall to the dark side of Qel-Droma and Exar Kun, especially, it felt like it was happening because the plot demanded it rather than it being a logical step for the characters to take. Maybe I'm torn by this. On one hand, there's an absolutely epic plot that definitely lives up to the Star Wars name, and some great individual moments (especially seeing the rise of Reluctant Jedi Nomi Sunrider). On the other hand, the story at times felt like it lacked a lot of emotional/character depth. With the fall to the dark side of Qel-Droma and Exar Kun, especially, it felt like it was happening because the plot demanded it rather than it being a logical step for the characters to take. Maybe I've been spoiled by other versions of that story, like the novel Traitor from the NJO era, but it really kept me from enjoying the story as much as I'd hoped to. Still, if you're a fan of Star Wars, I'd definitely recommend reading the TOTJ omnibi, out of historical interest if nothing more.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chris Cook

    A great book. Five stars is reserved for the utmost classics, three stars for books I love. So four stars is in that sweet spot of books I love that I would definitely recommend to anyone. This series is the first comic books I've read since a child, and I have no qualms recommending this comic book to anyone. The only problem with this book is you should read volume 1 before hand. Volume 1 is not nearly as good, but it heats up in the end to set you up for this one. I read this all in about 4 hou A great book. Five stars is reserved for the utmost classics, three stars for books I love. So four stars is in that sweet spot of books I love that I would definitely recommend to anyone. This series is the first comic books I've read since a child, and I have no qualms recommending this comic book to anyone. The only problem with this book is you should read volume 1 before hand. Volume 1 is not nearly as good, but it heats up in the end to set you up for this one. I read this all in about 4 hours spread over two nights. I could not put it down. It's an easy read, the price of a cinema movie, and leaves you satisfied in the end.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Victor Orozco

    Magnificent! The Great Sith War. In most of the Star Wars stories its said that this took four years, but in this case we view it more or less in a few months but the chaos that resulted from the war was far more terrible than I had imagined it would be. A tragic, yet moving story of redemption and sacrifice is also told. Without a doubt Uliq Qel-Droma is just as much like Anakin Skywalker. No surprise they would sort of meet in the video game Clone Wars. Wonderful! B+

  30. 4 out of 5

    The Fizza

    Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - The Freedon Nadd Uprising Rating 4 STARS Read in February, 1996 Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - Dark Lords of the Sith Rating 4 STARS Read in April, 1996 Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - The Sith War Rating 2 1/2 STARS Read in December, 1997 Star Wars: Tales of the Jedi - Redemption Rating 1 STAR Read in December, 2011 AVERAGED OUT TO 3 STARS FOR THIS VOLUME!

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