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Copyright 1927 story of Genghis Khan. What is the mystery that surrounds Genghis Khan? More gigantic in historical literature than Alexander, the Caesars, Napoleon, or Hitler... 750 years ago, Genghis Khan, the great Mongolian war lord conquered half the world. A nomad, a hunter and herder of beasts, he outgeneraled the powers of three empires. He was a barbarian who had nev Copyright 1927 story of Genghis Khan. What is the mystery that surrounds Genghis Khan? More gigantic in historical literature than Alexander, the Caesars, Napoleon, or Hitler... 750 years ago, Genghis Khan, the great Mongolian war lord conquered half the world. A nomad, a hunter and herder of beasts, he outgeneraled the powers of three empires. He was a barbarian who had never seen a city and did not know the use of writing, yet drew up a code of laws for fifty nations which survived for centuries. This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.


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Copyright 1927 story of Genghis Khan. What is the mystery that surrounds Genghis Khan? More gigantic in historical literature than Alexander, the Caesars, Napoleon, or Hitler... 750 years ago, Genghis Khan, the great Mongolian war lord conquered half the world. A nomad, a hunter and herder of beasts, he outgeneraled the powers of three empires. He was a barbarian who had nev Copyright 1927 story of Genghis Khan. What is the mystery that surrounds Genghis Khan? More gigantic in historical literature than Alexander, the Caesars, Napoleon, or Hitler... 750 years ago, Genghis Khan, the great Mongolian war lord conquered half the world. A nomad, a hunter and herder of beasts, he outgeneraled the powers of three empires. He was a barbarian who had never seen a city and did not know the use of writing, yet drew up a code of laws for fifty nations which survived for centuries. This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

30 review for Genghis Khan: Emperor of All Men

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    4.0 stars. I got this book as part of my Easton Press "Library of Military History" and had only a general knowledge of who Genghis Khan was. I found this story fascinating and well-written and enjoyed the way the author gave a fairly complete, well-rounded description of Genghis from his early years through his creation of one of the most terrifying military forces of ancient history. When I finished the book, I felt I had a much better understanding of this famous military leader which is what 4.0 stars. I got this book as part of my Easton Press "Library of Military History" and had only a general knowledge of who Genghis Khan was. I found this story fascinating and well-written and enjoyed the way the author gave a fairly complete, well-rounded description of Genghis from his early years through his creation of one of the most terrifying military forces of ancient history. When I finished the book, I felt I had a much better understanding of this famous military leader which is what you hope for from a book like this. Recommended!!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ó Ruairc

    The best book written about Genghis Khan I've read thus far. The best book written about Genghis Khan I've read thus far.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    Harold Lamb was fascinated by the people and history of Asia which greatly influenced his fictional short stories, many featuring Cossacks or Mongols as heroes. His fascination just as greatly influenced his string of popular nonfiction histories, of which Genghis Khan was the first, written in 1927. Eventually his skill with nonfiction led to Cecil B. DeMille hiring him as technical advisor and screenwriters on several films. Lamb's style of writing is easy to read, probably because he began his Harold Lamb was fascinated by the people and history of Asia which greatly influenced his fictional short stories, many featuring Cossacks or Mongols as heroes. His fascination just as greatly influenced his string of popular nonfiction histories, of which Genghis Khan was the first, written in 1927. Eventually his skill with nonfiction led to Cecil B. DeMille hiring him as technical advisor and screenwriters on several films. Lamb's style of writing is easy to read, probably because he began his writing career with his exciting adventure stories. He paints a picture, in this novel at least, of Genghis Khan the man, rather than as simply a leader of Mongolian hordes. The introduction nicely sets him in the context of European history by showing the panic and terror expressed in historical documents of the time. Indeed, one of the chief features which impresses me thus far is that Lamb's sources go back to the very earliest Chinese documents mentioning this particular Khan. The resources list in the back is extremely impressive, as are Lamb's notes about them. Lamb expressed dismay that modern historians of his time tended to forget that all historical mentions of Genghis Kahn were written by his enemies. Therefore any actual facts had to be teased out of opinions rendered by those who left a written record, which was not a thing the Mongols valued or bothered with. It is also refreshing that Lamb doesn't interject his own opinion or agenda into any of the attitudes or actions of those I have thus read. He simply tells the story of Genghis Khan as best as it can be reconstructed. Would that more of our modern historians would follow this method. Thus far this is a fascinating book, made all the more so by the hardships and adventures of the great Khan's life and times. Also, of course, it is an easy way to absorb the history of a time and place that are very foreign to us. As I think of the terror of those in Genghis Khan's path, who found his actions and attitudes incomprehensible, it makes me think of the current problems our civilization faces with terrorist threats. History may not literally repeat itself but patterns of behavior do in such a way that we can see connections and this seems to be one of those times. FINAL This is a simply amazing history which lets you feel the character of Genghis Khan, the horror of the destruction left in his wake, and amazement at the loyal organization he built which lasted beyond the grave. That Lamb does it in a lean, succinct 220 pages is nothing short of miraculous in these days of thousand-page tomes to cover a president's life. I was left with a new hero, also, Ye Liu Chutsai. This young Cathayan was captured during a horde attack on China and Genghis Khan grew to trust his counsel. His innate integrity was so respected that he was often able to check the slaughter of untold innocents who fell in the Mongol path. I was also impressed by the two monks, Fra Carpini and Fra Rubruquis who were sent as peace envoys to Genghis Khan by Saint Louis of France. Their integrity helped them keep a whole skin. Their rare good sense and shrewd observations helped the Europeans, though nothing would have saved Europe from being overrun had not Orgotai's death necessitated them returning home (Orgotai was the ruling khan after his father's death). I encourage anyone reading this to be sure to read the notes which answered several burning questions I had such as who Fra Carpini was and more details about the invasion of Europe after Genghis Khan's death. They are highly illuminating and fascinating in their own right. Highly, highly recommended.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Aria von Dimple

    First he [meaning Ghengis Khan] questioned them closely about their religion, and commented gravely that it was a mistake to make the pilgrimage to Mecca. "For the power of Heaven is not in one place alone, but in every corner of the earth." This is my first History Book That I've Read Voluntarily. I wouldn’t say that I don't like history nor that I don’t find it interesting but I've always been quite cautious with real history books. That's due to my high school history teacher who traumati First he [meaning Ghengis Khan] questioned them closely about their religion, and commented gravely that it was a mistake to make the pilgrimage to Mecca. "For the power of Heaven is not in one place alone, but in every corner of the earth." This is my first History Book That I've Read Voluntarily. I wouldn’t say that I don't like history nor that I don’t find it interesting but I've always been quite cautious with real history books. That's due to my high school history teacher who traumatized me with the subject – his pop quizzes and tests were one of the hardest I've ever encountered. Not because you had to write essays or think outside the box, oh no. You had to learn the whole textbook and every sentence in it by heart because the wrath of history was upon you if you dared to write one sentence differently. So history always seemed . . . a bit dull for me. Not something that's creative and exciting but something that's old and dusty and frankly, should be left there to rot. Sooner the better. But this year, I promised myself to read more books that are out of my comfort zone. Yes, I started "Genghis Khan. The Emperor of All Men" in October last year, so it doesn't really count, right? But I like that "Genghis Khan. The Emperor of All Men" was a book that showed me that history, too, can be more unconventional. I choose this particular book because I knew next to nothing about the guy himself. Yes, he was a Mongol and probably he went to war a lot because here's a saying that pretty big percentage of the world population is related to Genghis Khan in some way. So the guy must have spread his seed quite a bit. But the why and how were always mysterious for me. Did I like the book? Yes and no. Yes, it is a good book. It summarizes things and gives us a brief glimpse on universe of Genghis Khan. It's written pretty decently (at least, the translated edition that I read was) although, some sentences needed more historical background than I managed to look up. But I found myself yearning a bit more humanity. Because at times, it was like a history textbook, one date and battle following another. I understand that this was pretty much what Genghis Khan's life was. And I understand that there aren't any records written by Mongols that could give us additional perspectives and angles of 13th century Central Asia. It's probably just me, I'm not that technical person. I like a bit of personality, glimpses into human nature and all that. Not what he concurred but why and how. Also, I really missed maps that could show me when and how countries were concurred, where did the battles take place, how the battle formations succeeded. Yes, there are descriptions. But I think that some maps would've been nice to compliment the descriptions. Basically, I wished it was written bit more imaginatively. And I wished the edition that I read had footnotes instead of notes at the end of the book. I constantly had to flip back and forward pages because, as I said before, I really don't feel at home in history.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    This book is very interesting and entertaining. I like Lamb's style because the book reads more like a novel or chronicle than a biography. The accounts of the Mongols' battles are suspenseful and gripping. I mostly enjoyed this book, though, because I didn't know anything about the Mongols and their first leader, Genghis Khan. I enjoyed learning about the ancient Chinese and their great empire as well as the Persians and Turks and other "Eastern" ethnic groups. This short book gave me a general This book is very interesting and entertaining. I like Lamb's style because the book reads more like a novel or chronicle than a biography. The accounts of the Mongols' battles are suspenseful and gripping. I mostly enjoyed this book, though, because I didn't know anything about the Mongols and their first leader, Genghis Khan. I enjoyed learning about the ancient Chinese and their great empire as well as the Persians and Turks and other "Eastern" ethnic groups. This short book gave me a general idea of the lifestyle in the Gobi desert and defied my assumptions and expectations about Mongolian culture. I also like the fact that Lamb defends Genghis Khan's seemingly murderous personality by actually explaining it and rejecting the second and third hand accounts of the Khan's enemies. Overall, this is a fascinating read!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Zeke Chase

    I know enough about the Great Khan to write my own biography at this point, but as I'm in the process of working on a novel that plays into the Mongol history and ethos, I felt reading this extra biography – a short one I could blow through in no time – would be no extra burden. Also, I'd heard a rumour about the Mongols that I couldn't seem to verify on a quick Google search, one of those by-the-way massacres that's mindboggling in and of itself, but hardly noteworthy as one more massacre among I know enough about the Great Khan to write my own biography at this point, but as I'm in the process of working on a novel that plays into the Mongol history and ethos, I felt reading this extra biography – a short one I could blow through in no time – would be no extra burden. Also, I'd heard a rumour about the Mongols that I couldn't seem to verify on a quick Google search, one of those by-the-way massacres that's mindboggling in and of itself, but hardly noteworthy as one more massacre amongst the many campaigns, and I hoped that I might stumble across the truth of this particular siege in yet another biography. The story goes that a particular city (unnamed as the story was related to me) in the Islamic world was besieged by the Mongols, trounced, and every man, woman, child and beast within put to the sword. Moreover, every building was to be demolished, and, moreover still, the Mongols went north and damned and rerouted the river (also unnamed as the story was related to me) as to wipe the city from the face of the Earth forever. Given that this story was told without any sources or names, I found it dubious, but I (morbidly) hoped it were true, as I could definitely use that as lore in the fictional novel I'm working on. So, by sheer luck, Lamb, in his 1927 biography of the conqueror, does cover this episode and goes over the details (albeit in his standard bird's eye overview style). This city was Urgench, in modern Turkmenistan, and it was the Amu River. It wasn't for the purpose of eradicating the city off the face of the Earth, but instead as a final failsafe to ensure they'd killed everyone (nor did they demolish every building). It seems that such a small number of Mongols sometimes missed citizens being led to the slaughter when the task ahead of them was millions. Many of the victims would throw themselves down and lie with the dead in the hopes they'd be passed over. The Mongols experimented with countermeasures to this. One such plan was to behead the dead to ensure their deaths. But since Urgench had a death toll (as projected by Persian historian Juvayni) of 1.2 million, to be carried out by only 50,000 Mongols, they opted for a different tack. They damned the river to flood the suburbs of Urgench, drowning or sending fleeing any fakers. Astounding massacre. Standard Mongol campaign. So I enjoyed the book for that, but that was only one small section of one chapter of this book. The rest of it is a standard Genghis biography. Previous to this, I'd read Mr. Lamb's account of Tamerlane[1], which honestly I found to be better than this. Perhaps it's because I know Genghis' story all too well, and knew very little about Tamerlane. Perhaps it's that (as I believe) Lamb went into more detail with the Tartar than the Mongol. In either case, “Tamerlane” was a slightly more enjoyable read. For the most part, this was a good book, but I have a few nitpicks. First, Lamb completely glosses over the episode with Jamukha. He focuses more heavily on Toghrul (Prester John of Asia), and the split with him rather than his blood brother Jamukha, whose story of betrayal and the rise of meritocracy has always been paramount in Genghis' history. While I needn't another rendition of the Temujin-Jamukha split, I find it somewhat misleading that Lamb only mentions Jamukha as a sort of nefarious rival in the distance, and considering this was written in the '20s, it may have tainted this crucial element of the story in generations past. Second, Lamb makes numerous observations on Genghis' theology. He claims Genghis was a deist whom ignored the prophesies of his own soothsayers before a battle and strictly not a fatalist, forging his own path. This runs counter to everything else I've read on the conqueror's theology, which paints the man as a devoutly theistic Tengriist who numerous times retreated to the holy Burkhan Khaldun mountain to pray during hardships and took prophesies from shamans as reassurance he was acting in the right way by defying Mongol tradition (meritocracy). Moreover, Genghis – by his own quotations – was of the particularly more fatalistic ilk of Tengriist theology. I'm led to believe that Lamb was making his own inferences and that the ready accessibility of information on Tengriism was probably much more limited than it is today (I've had trouble finding works on it – and Mongolia was a full fledged communist state back then, sealed off religiously and to general Western enquiry). A good book, but it glosses over a lot. If you're looking for a fresher, more detailed account, see John Man's “Genghis Khan: Life Death and Resurrection” [2] [1] Review here – http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/... [2] Review here – http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    I give this book a 5 because it was the first bookI ever read about Genghis Khan and Central Asia when I was 11. It was written in 1927 and is a "Histography" book based on The Secret History. But, for me it is a great book. I give this book a 5 because it was the first bookI ever read about Genghis Khan and Central Asia when I was 11. It was written in 1927 and is a "Histography" book based on The Secret History. But, for me it is a great book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Walt

    This is a very short and easy read on the warlord. It is not very scholarly and perhaps has some errors; but the basic storyline is accurate.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Truyen Nguyen

    There isn't much that is written about this man; a legend in his own right. This book expressed a pretty wealthy load of interesting information, for a short one, about The Great Khan and his legacy in the making; passing through his children and etc... There isn't much that is written about this man; a legend in his own right. This book expressed a pretty wealthy load of interesting information, for a short one, about The Great Khan and his legacy in the making; passing through his children and etc...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ubaid Talpur

    history in story, I like Lamb's well written and attractive style, Genghis Khan was soft for his people & rigid or we may say ruthless for other people, Lamb expressed his childhood habit to his old age actions and starting Mongol kingdom history in story, I like Lamb's well written and attractive style, Genghis Khan was soft for his people & rigid or we may say ruthless for other people, Lamb expressed his childhood habit to his old age actions and starting Mongol kingdom

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    I've been helping a friend, president of a condo association, clean out a five-car, two-storey garage recently obtained. Among the piles of stuff (inclusive of a 1908 edition of Chicago's Daily News headlined with the 'discovery' of the North Pole) were many books, mostly bestsellers of the past or self-help books--few of any interest to me. This, however, was an exception. I've never read of the Khan before, except from the perspective of those he fought. Written in the twenties by a novelist-hi I've been helping a friend, president of a condo association, clean out a five-car, two-storey garage recently obtained. Among the piles of stuff (inclusive of a 1908 edition of Chicago's Daily News headlined with the 'discovery' of the North Pole) were many books, mostly bestsellers of the past or self-help books--few of any interest to me. This, however, was an exception. I've never read of the Khan before, except from the perspective of those he fought. Written in the twenties by a novelist-historian, the style is a bit floridly reminiscent of Edgar Rice Burroughs. The Mongols, not known for their literacy, left no written materials, so author Lamb makes do with external sources, coming up with a plausible, but unconvincing, biography. Archaeological data apparently played no part in his research. Although only a 1927 copyright date is given, one reference to World War II within the text indicates that this edition was a revised text.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Uriha

    though no real written records of Genghis Khan was ever made, just notes from observors from foreign lands. the story of the khan is an amazing story of a man wanting to unify all his people. his compassion, insite, determination and fortitude is astounding and his short comings as well. this one is an amazing book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eugene Wainwright

    I did enjoy this book for its informative value. Though it was not as impartial as I would have preferred in a historical account it was worth the time if one cares to know more of this enigmatic figure...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Neale Aslett

    A fascinating read of a much maligned ruler, a man far superior to his European contemporaries, a man who shook the world in his passing and created a peoples hitherto fragmented into warring tribes. An easy read (for those with a grasp of history) and a fulfilling one to all others.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Karin

    Having so little knowledge of Genghis Khan I enjoyed learning about his life, society, and escapades. But I was somehow left wanting more, I think because the author freely admitted he glossed over or omitted details covered elsewhere.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Horus

    Although this edition is likely quite dated, it was extremely well written and enjoyable to read. It is not loaded with cumbersome details and makes for a good beginner book on the subject. More recent books, however, would likely give a better list of sources for those looking for more detail.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ben Tuthill

    A good historical story about Ghengis Khan without getting lost in the weeds. I had finished Dan Carlin's Hardcore History podcast about the Khan's (highly recommended if you like history BTW) which was more in depth and filled in some of the background goings on. I enjoyed this book. A good historical story about Ghengis Khan without getting lost in the weeds. I had finished Dan Carlin's Hardcore History podcast about the Khan's (highly recommended if you like history BTW) which was more in depth and filled in some of the background goings on. I enjoyed this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shauna

    Kai and I are read this in homeschool, Genghis gets a bad rap in history, but he really was an amazing leader. His story teaches how to be a great leader.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ed Dodson

    I listened to the audio book and think I would have liked to read this instead. The names of Gehghis' sub-chiefs were hard to follow (Subutai, Chipenoian - ?spelling) I listened to the audio book and think I would have liked to read this instead. The names of Gehghis' sub-chiefs were hard to follow (Subutai, Chipenoian - ?spelling)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Fahd

    Pulled this one out of my dad's library, and once I started reading, I couldn't put it down. It describes details of Genghis Khan unlikely to be found elsewhere. Pulled this one out of my dad's library, and once I started reading, I couldn't put it down. It describes details of Genghis Khan unlikely to be found elsewhere.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Noreen

    First published in 1927. I probably read in 1950's. This book made me a lifelong fan of Genghis Khan. First published in 1927. I probably read in 1950's. This book made me a lifelong fan of Genghis Khan.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sophie T.

    Simply written but a great historical read. It is full of facts but it is put in a story context so that it is easy to understand. He really follows what actually happened. Very interesting!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Irfan

    A must read for anyone interested in the great khan...

  24. 5 out of 5

    mnxzaya

    Harold A.Lamb was (born in 1892) American historian and novelist. He spoke several languages French, Latin, Arabic and Persian. Genghis Khan: The Emperor of All Men was his first non-fiction and historical biography. Tamerlane was published the next year. As a Mongolian myself, I have sufficient amount of knowledge about upbringing and background of Chinggis Khaan, thus I am always reluctant to read books written by foreign authors. Because I know that some books just blindly depict him as a bloo Harold A.Lamb was (born in 1892) American historian and novelist. He spoke several languages French, Latin, Arabic and Persian. Genghis Khan: The Emperor of All Men was his first non-fiction and historical biography. Tamerlane was published the next year. As a Mongolian myself, I have sufficient amount of knowledge about upbringing and background of Chinggis Khaan, thus I am always reluctant to read books written by foreign authors. Because I know that some books just blindly depict him as a blood thirsty monster who don’t know anything but a war. These books are more like fiction than history. However, this book was a gift and I found out it was first published in 1927 in America. So I wanted to give it a try and finished it in one day. There were things I wished that writer included in the book: 1. When Temüjin and his father Yesuhei arrived in Khongirad tribe, they meet tribe chief Dei Setsen, Börte’s father. This tribe was infamous for the beauty and intelligence of their women, so usually nomadic noble men had tradition of choosing women to marry from this tribe. Yesuhei wanted to follow this tradition and choose a bride for his son. It was not Temüjin who suggested a girl to marry as written on this book and most importantly he was 9 and Börte was 10. In the book it was implied that Temüjin was 13 and Börte was only 9. Writer made as if young Temüjin was lusting over a 9 year old girl. This was distirbing that I almost stopped reading. 2. Friendship between Jamukha and Temujin. Jamukha was only briefly mentioned but he had a major role in Temujin’s life as he was the friend, ally and later turned against Temujin. 3. The writer got some of the year name wrong. Also he mixed some people’s names (For example Menlig Etseg and Dair Usun who is Borte’s father). 4. It would be great if he included some sort of map in the book. 5. He admitted he used the sources written by defeated enemies of Chinggis Khaan. So I believe it is natural that some incidents and description were not accurate and do not match with the books I read with Mongolian sources. Overall I gave this book 3 stars. I would recommend this book to someone who is already familiar with Mongolian history.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alizah Memon

    Although I've always been quite fond of reading, two years ago, I tried to finish as many books as possible before my summer break. I had heard about Genghis Khan from quite a few of my teachers, so when I found a book about him, I didn't want to miss the opportunity to find out who he was, and how his name survived the tides of time. Coming to the book itself, I'm glad I found it. Written by Harold Lamb, the book explains Genghis's journey from being a young villager who was suddenly given the r Although I've always been quite fond of reading, two years ago, I tried to finish as many books as possible before my summer break. I had heard about Genghis Khan from quite a few of my teachers, so when I found a book about him, I didn't want to miss the opportunity to find out who he was, and how his name survived the tides of time. Coming to the book itself, I'm glad I found it. Written by Harold Lamb, the book explains Genghis's journey from being a young villager who was suddenly given the responsibility of his tribe, to being a man who conquered half the world. The Khan's insurmountable bravery and determination made him a major threat for anyone in his way, and his loyalty to his customs and traditions is what gained him his followers' respect. The book presented Khan's life in a manner that was easy to follow, all the while keeping the reader engaged by describing the difficult conditions in which the people of that time had to live in. Sheikh Adnan Rashid, a historian whose talks I was fortunate to have attended, emphasized quite a lot on knowing history by saying "if you forget your history, history will forget you"; so I will definitely be reading more biographies and history-related books after this.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Juniper Danielsen

    Stumbled upon this book at a secondhand store. I don't recall learning anything in school about Genghis Kahn and only knew the vague "he conquered the world" narrative, but nothing else. I bought it on a whim, and in reading the first 10 pages was enthralled and beyond excited by what I read. This book is basically a really condensed timeline of his conquest and "Mongol culture"-- what is known of it. I just purchased a second book that's more focused on the Yassa and Genghis Kahn as a person, a Stumbled upon this book at a secondhand store. I don't recall learning anything in school about Genghis Kahn and only knew the vague "he conquered the world" narrative, but nothing else. I bought it on a whim, and in reading the first 10 pages was enthralled and beyond excited by what I read. This book is basically a really condensed timeline of his conquest and "Mongol culture"-- what is known of it. I just purchased a second book that's more focused on the Yassa and Genghis Kahn as a person, after being introduced to all the new information I found on these pages. Great read. Couldn't put it down.

  27. 5 out of 5

    SAJID KHAN

    Very good presentation

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    The first of a number of books passed on to me from my grandmother's collection, this was a generally informative, though a tad sympathetic, chronicling of the rise of young chieftan-son Temujin of the Gobi Desert into a merciless supreme emperor and arguably the most successful military commander of all time. The author has managed to compile a surprisingly complete account of events from the a culture largely without a written history. Indeed, a majority of the historical accounts of his battl The first of a number of books passed on to me from my grandmother's collection, this was a generally informative, though a tad sympathetic, chronicling of the rise of young chieftan-son Temujin of the Gobi Desert into a merciless supreme emperor and arguably the most successful military commander of all time. The author has managed to compile a surprisingly complete account of events from the a culture largely without a written history. Indeed, a majority of the historical accounts of his battles are from the records of the defeated; somewhat remarkable as when the Mongol Horde ovverran your civilization, they tended to put an end to everything.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michael McCue

    I read this entire book on a plane going from San Francisco to New York. It was a 1957 paperback copy of a 1927 book. Genghis Khan: Emperor of All Men was the first of many biographies that Lamb wrote. The biography was well researched and written. An extensive bibliography and index are included. Genghis Khan conquered more of the earth than Alexander the Great or the entire Roman empire. His treatment of defeated enemies was sometimes brutal and cruel but he was tolerant of all religions. Whil I read this entire book on a plane going from San Francisco to New York. It was a 1957 paperback copy of a 1927 book. Genghis Khan: Emperor of All Men was the first of many biographies that Lamb wrote. The biography was well researched and written. An extensive bibliography and index are included. Genghis Khan conquered more of the earth than Alexander the Great or the entire Roman empire. His treatment of defeated enemies was sometimes brutal and cruel but he was tolerant of all religions. While his enemies said he had a horde of millions of followers he probably never had more than 150,000 soldiers when he defeated most of the armies of Europe and Asia.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cliff Davis

    Lamb's great book has stood the test of time. Still quite readable after nearly a century. Genghis Khan was less a man than a terrible force of nature, but Lamb manages to capture and portray that which is human about him. Lamb's great book has stood the test of time. Still quite readable after nearly a century. Genghis Khan was less a man than a terrible force of nature, but Lamb manages to capture and portray that which is human about him.

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