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Who Let Muddy Boots Into the White House?: A Story of Andrew Jackson

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21 review for Who Let Muddy Boots Into the White House?: A Story of Andrew Jackson

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael Fitzgerald

    Well done biography that shows the varied sides of Jackson. I learned some new things, like the fact that he adopted an orphaned Indian child (in fact, he adopted two Indian boys). Many would like to oversimplify this complex man. This book, even as a juvenile biography, shows that this is not the case.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    This book provides a very good overview of Jackson's life. It does however need to be supplemented with another appropriate age-level children's book on Indian Relocation, as even elementary school age children need to begin to understand such topics so as to hopefully become more empathetic to the plight of their fellow people. This reader suggests pairing this book with Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve's The Cherokees ( http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/46... ) This book provides a very good overview of Jackson's life. It does however need to be supplemented with another appropriate age-level children's book on Indian Relocation, as even elementary school age children need to begin to understand such topics so as to hopefully become more empathetic to the plight of their fellow people. This reader suggests pairing this book with Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve's The Cherokees ( http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/46... )

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tracyesine

    Oh, Robert Quackenbush. Quackenbush's history books are engaging, funny, and well illustrated. Unfortunately, they would also fit well in the history curriculum of an outlandishly rightwing public school system. No mention is made of the Indian Removal Act, though space is found to mention a large wheel of cheese President Jackson was given while living in the White House. The "kid reader" cartoons that supplement Quackenbush's text are, to put it very kindly, "outdated" (more bluntly, sexist), f Oh, Robert Quackenbush. Quackenbush's history books are engaging, funny, and well illustrated. Unfortunately, they would also fit well in the history curriculum of an outlandishly rightwing public school system. No mention is made of the Indian Removal Act, though space is found to mention a large wheel of cheese President Jackson was given while living in the White House. The "kid reader" cartoons that supplement Quackenbush's text are, to put it very kindly, "outdated" (more bluntly, sexist), featuring a girl who knows nothing and a boy who is able to expertly answer all of her questions, even though they appear to be the same age. We will continue to read Quackenbush's histories, but always among many others on the same subject. This is good policy, generally, but especially important given Quackenbush's glaring omission here.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cara Noyes

    A great kids book with funny illustrations.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kenyan

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin

  7. 4 out of 5

    Liquidlasagna

  8. 4 out of 5

    Charles Herald

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katie Fitzgerald

  10. 5 out of 5

    Logan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sh

  13. 5 out of 5

    Puppy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becca'sChild

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wendi N

  16. 5 out of 5

    Roberta

  17. 4 out of 5

    FitzFamily

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rodopa

  19. 4 out of 5

    ZeMichael Atnafu

  20. 4 out of 5

    Spark E

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Evans

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