web site hit counter NUKED: I Was A Guinea Pig For The U.S. Army - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

NUKED: I Was A Guinea Pig For The U.S. Army

Availability: Ready to download

THE FIVE ATOMIC F-WORDS: FIREBALL, FALLOUT, FUSION, FISSION, F*CKED UP In 1956—from Saturday, May 5 to Sunday, July 22—17 high yield nuclear devices (otherwise known as H-Bombs) were detonated in top secret tests.  Ground Zero was located in the South Pacific because, according to the Department of Defense, the weapons “could not be tested in Nevada.” Why? They were “unsa THE FIVE ATOMIC F-WORDS: FIREBALL, FALLOUT, FUSION, FISSION, F*CKED UP In 1956—from Saturday, May 5 to Sunday, July 22—17 high yield nuclear devices (otherwise known as H-Bombs) were detonated in top secret tests.  Ground Zero was located in the South Pacific because, according to the Department of Defense, the weapons “could not be tested in Nevada.” Why? They were “unsafe.” NUKED (19,000 words) focuses primarily on these explosions, codenamed Operation Redwing, and tells the story of What Went Wrong. What was dangerous.  What it felt like being a human guinea pig. 1,612 army men (including me, a draftee) were exposed to radiation. So was the rest of the all male contingent (civilians and members of other armed forces), a total of 14,643.  We were left to fend for ourselves and had to face radioactivity and military incompetence without recourse, relief or protective gear. NUKED, by Michael Harris, is a companion to his memoir, THE ATOMIC TIMES:  My H-Bomb Year at the Pacific Proving Ground, nominated by Random House for a Pulitzer Prize. “THE ATOMIC TIMES is a gripping memoir of the first H-bomb tests by one of the small groups of servicemen stationed at Ground Zero on Eniwetok Atoll.  Leavened by humor, loyalty and pride of accomplishment, this book is also a tribute to the resilience, courage and patriotism of the American soldier.” — Dr. Henry Kissinger THE ATOMIC TIMES is available in an e-book edition at Kindle.


Compare

THE FIVE ATOMIC F-WORDS: FIREBALL, FALLOUT, FUSION, FISSION, F*CKED UP In 1956—from Saturday, May 5 to Sunday, July 22—17 high yield nuclear devices (otherwise known as H-Bombs) were detonated in top secret tests.  Ground Zero was located in the South Pacific because, according to the Department of Defense, the weapons “could not be tested in Nevada.” Why? They were “unsa THE FIVE ATOMIC F-WORDS: FIREBALL, FALLOUT, FUSION, FISSION, F*CKED UP In 1956—from Saturday, May 5 to Sunday, July 22—17 high yield nuclear devices (otherwise known as H-Bombs) were detonated in top secret tests.  Ground Zero was located in the South Pacific because, according to the Department of Defense, the weapons “could not be tested in Nevada.” Why? They were “unsafe.” NUKED (19,000 words) focuses primarily on these explosions, codenamed Operation Redwing, and tells the story of What Went Wrong. What was dangerous.  What it felt like being a human guinea pig. 1,612 army men (including me, a draftee) were exposed to radiation. So was the rest of the all male contingent (civilians and members of other armed forces), a total of 14,643.  We were left to fend for ourselves and had to face radioactivity and military incompetence without recourse, relief or protective gear. NUKED, by Michael Harris, is a companion to his memoir, THE ATOMIC TIMES:  My H-Bomb Year at the Pacific Proving Ground, nominated by Random House for a Pulitzer Prize. “THE ATOMIC TIMES is a gripping memoir of the first H-bomb tests by one of the small groups of servicemen stationed at Ground Zero on Eniwetok Atoll.  Leavened by humor, loyalty and pride of accomplishment, this book is also a tribute to the resilience, courage and patriotism of the American soldier.” — Dr. Henry Kissinger THE ATOMIC TIMES is available in an e-book edition at Kindle.

30 review for NUKED: I Was A Guinea Pig For The U.S. Army

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richard Buro

    The short version first... Nuked by Michael Harris is a short version of also by Mr. Harris. Both works are memoirs about a year spent in the U.S. Army on the small island of Eniwetok, an atoll in the Marshall Islands, about as far as it is possible to get from any major land mass in the Southern Pacific Ocean. The reason for the mission of Joint Task Force 7 (JTF7) was to participate in a classified series of nuclear weapons (mostly thermonuclear fusion devices) detonations including some on th The short version first... Nuked by Michael Harris is a short version of also by Mr. Harris. Both works are memoirs about a year spent in the U.S. Army on the small island of Eniwetok, an atoll in the Marshall Islands, about as far as it is possible to get from any major land mass in the Southern Pacific Ocean. The reason for the mission of Joint Task Force 7 (JTF7) was to participate in a classified series of nuclear weapons (mostly thermonuclear fusion devices) detonations including some on the nearby Bikini Atoll as well. All of the tests were conducted under the code-named Operation Red Wing. The operation was a joint effort between the United States Air Force, Army, Atomic Energy Commission, and Navy. The University of California Radiation Laboratory (UCRL), later renamed to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), at the University of California Berkeley also provided some support and a test item or two for the Red Wing list of test devices that were detonated during the Project which was held in 1956. Nuked is a personal account, and (as such) certain things can and should be expected. Most obviously is a personal (first person) rendition of the events and facts around the topics in the story. As with all of the information from these types of tests very little information was allowed to be published until recently. When certain projects were declassified in the late 1990s (1997 for most) written as well as filmed information was made available to public. The information can also be found on various media sites on-line as well. Mr. Harris's account is completely from his perspective, and in this except from the longer the reader is only looking at vignettes from the tests with only a smattering of the humor, terror, and error, that can be expected when testing anything that is new and potentially quite hazardous to the point of lethality. Of course, everyone was told that it was perfectly safe, and their safety was of paramount concern. The humor of this work centers on the reaction and recreation aspects of the mission in the non-testing times especially when the personnel were relaxing and visiting with each other. The terror aspect was ever present. Between the tests themselves, the effects of the tests (despite the distances away from Ground Zero were also several miles or more) and the obvious evidence of lingering effects from earlier experiments were in many ways unexpected, grotesque, and disturbing both to the personnel involved as well as the reader. The error aspect of the work was sadly obvious with miscommunication, mistakes in deploying the test objects from aircraft, and unexpected after effects being the most serious culprits in a literal pantheon of "Ooopsies" that are recorded after the events occurred. Fortunately, the errors were "minor" according to the testing authorities, although the descriptions of the resulting effects from the errors seemed far more problematic than the authorities might have expected. Of a more serious note, the main problems that effected then members of JTF7 was the isolation associated with the operation. There was nothing on the small island, 12 feet above sea level, other than the concrete of the airstrip, barracks and support buildings and the testing office itself. While recreational activities were available, some required going outside to participate, and occasionally, the personnel might find unusual denizens of their operation base that were unexpected with some mutations and other unusual characteristics which were not as things might normally be. There was very limited access to water activities as poisonous fish and also some unusual creatures were found in the waters in and around the operations island. It was also made clear that when tests were conducted, after effects were possible and on some occasions there were concerning. On several occasions, the personnel were ordered to stay inside and close windows and doors to buildings due to unexpected, measurable radioactive debris from the test that precipitated from rain clouds that formed and released their rain with associated debris that was measured with monitoring stations on the island. According to the accounts, you could hear the raindrops striking the ground while the monitoring devices were recording and reporting the amount of radioactivity in the contaminated rainfall. Usually the harder the rain fell, the more rapid the reporting from the audible sensors in the monitoring stations. All outside activities were curtailed, and all personnel were kept inside buildings during these events where exposure to fallout was likely. Nuked is an excerpt from Mr. Harris's longer memoir, Nuked, therefore, should be read as a "free sample" type of work. It teases the reader to consider reading the longer work. Mr. Harris's writing style is engaging, and at times, chilling. If you choose to read the works by Mr. Harris on the topic of Operation Red Wing, expect elements to be concerning and disturbing. You should also consider the environment within which these soldiers were required to live and work during their tours of duty with JTF7. Radioactivity is dangerous, and its effects (in both immediate exposure and long term potential for other types of harm) are clearly explained in detail that can be concerning and chilling to readers sensitive to suffering and illness. Nuked is recommended for anyone interested in the Cold War of the latter half of the 20th century, nuclear effects and testing, and effects of isolation and hazardous duty required for these intrepid men who participated as a captive audience to some of the most destructive weapons ever made by man. I would not recommend this book to anyone below middle school age, and even then, parental considerations and support would be wise before recommending for student reading. It was a superb book, and one of the most interesting ones I have read on this subject.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    The dropping of H-Bombs around army draftees is another horrible disgusting thing our government did in 1956. Why? For the greater good? Ha. Just because they can.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave Wallace

    I came for the bombs and betrayal but found some pretty good writing and startling descriptions of both the dysfunction of the entire army post on Eniwetok, silly little mistakes like a H-bomb being dropped on the wrong side of the islands (oops) and quotable phrases such as "And on all sides I was surrounded by men. Yet I felt completely alone, the way I did every other morning I saw and heard and felt an H-bomb explode. More alone than at any other time in my life. Before or since. At first I I came for the bombs and betrayal but found some pretty good writing and startling descriptions of both the dysfunction of the entire army post on Eniwetok, silly little mistakes like a H-bomb being dropped on the wrong side of the islands (oops) and quotable phrases such as "And on all sides I was surrounded by men. Yet I felt completely alone, the way I did every other morning I saw and heard and felt an H-bomb explode. More alone than at any other time in my life. Before or since. At first I thought I was the only one. Eventually I learned it was not just me." I found this to be the meat of this book more than descriptions of the sky being ripped apart. A very short book, in fact I believe it's only a few chapters pulled from a longer book. 4 stars for being a teaser for the full book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    During the late 1950s, the US tested a number of hydrogen bombs on Eniwetek and Bikini Atolls in the Marshall Islands. A group of US soldiers and sailors were used as guinea pigs during these tests so that the limits of radiation exposure for troops in a combat setting could be determined. Private Michael Harris was exposed to all 17 of the h-bomb tests conducted in 1956. This is his story. Although I knew that these bombs were tested in the Marshall Islands, I did not know that some of our troo During the late 1950s, the US tested a number of hydrogen bombs on Eniwetek and Bikini Atolls in the Marshall Islands. A group of US soldiers and sailors were used as guinea pigs during these tests so that the limits of radiation exposure for troops in a combat setting could be determined. Private Michael Harris was exposed to all 17 of the h-bomb tests conducted in 1956. This is his story. Although I knew that these bombs were tested in the Marshall Islands, I did not know that some of our troops were exposed to massive doses of radiation on purpose during these tests. A sobering thought... Harris describes how each test affected him, the other military personnel near the test sites, and in some cases, what happened to them years later. An eye-opener to say the least!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Debra Gephart

    Interesting historical read Being placed on a barren island and told all is safe, not to worry, and being a witness to bombing...... Mr. Harris paints a picture that keeps you reading.....

  6. 4 out of 5

    Giddy Girlie

    I picked this up as a free ebook with the understanding that it is an EXCERPT from Harris's memoir and not the full version. Now that there is a price attached to this edition, I think it is fair to differentiate the difference. This is NOT the full book. The excerpt, however, is quite lengthy and gives some high-level information about Harris and his squad as they were positioned at the Pacific Proving Ground where atomic bombs were first tested by the US military. The idea of human beings being I picked this up as a free ebook with the understanding that it is an EXCERPT from Harris's memoir and not the full version. Now that there is a price attached to this edition, I think it is fair to differentiate the difference. This is NOT the full book. The excerpt, however, is quite lengthy and gives some high-level information about Harris and his squad as they were positioned at the Pacific Proving Ground where atomic bombs were first tested by the US military. The idea of human beings being so close and absolutely unprotected (the squad was not provided with any protection or even goggles as they stood at Attention to witness the detonation of several bombs at close range) is astounding. The fact that Harris is here to tell the tale is amazing -- many of his comrades have since died at an early age from radiation exposure-related illnesses. It is a powerful story that absolutely needs to be told. The world's militaries routinely use their troops as 'guinea pigs' without their consent; whether it's for better footwear or for nuclear exposure data. My only 'problem' with the edition of the book that I downloaded was that it seemed to have the same excerpt twice, but the writing was different. Perhaps an early draft with a more polished one? In any case, it doubled the length of the preview but was essentially the same information. Based on this excerpt I am very interested in purchasing the full book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    This is a very short book, basically an excerpt from the authors book The Atomic Times: My H-Bomb Year at the Pacific Proving Ground. I can't believe our soldiers were subject to things like this. I will definitely read the authors other book. This is a very short book, basically an excerpt from the authors book The Atomic Times: My H-Bomb Year at the Pacific Proving Ground. I can't believe our soldiers were subject to things like this. I will definitely read the authors other book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    I laughed out loud reading this book. If you have ever been in the military you will understand his perspective.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katia M. Davis

    This was a disconcerting little read. I'd read other books about nuclear testing on the atolls, but this was the first I'd read that was written by someone who was there. It was a very powerful read that takes into account not only the physical dangers but the psychological, environmental and ethnographic. It was an insider's view on something that was glossed over and spun for what were essentially propaganda purposes. I wasn't sure whether to be sad, horrified, terrified, amazed or all of the This was a disconcerting little read. I'd read other books about nuclear testing on the atolls, but this was the first I'd read that was written by someone who was there. It was a very powerful read that takes into account not only the physical dangers but the psychological, environmental and ethnographic. It was an insider's view on something that was glossed over and spun for what were essentially propaganda purposes. I wasn't sure whether to be sad, horrified, terrified, amazed or all of the above. Safe to say I would not liked to have been one of the people acting as 'support' for the testing. I recommend this book to anyone interested in the history of nuclear weaponry.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Semilitrovka

  11. 5 out of 5

    Canaan Taaffe

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Carpenter

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carlos David Salazar Aspiazo

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brandi Page

  15. 5 out of 5

    M

  16. 4 out of 5

    Annett Ritter

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paul Mamani

  18. 5 out of 5

    kc

  19. 4 out of 5

    douglas billings

  20. 4 out of 5

    milinda johnson

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  22. 4 out of 5

    gerry zanzalari

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ted Powell

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Edward E. Seidel

  26. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Reeks

  27. 4 out of 5

    John Stevenson

  28. 4 out of 5

    James Harms

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rob Hurt

  30. 4 out of 5

    Monty

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.