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By Glenn Beck: The Overton Window [Audiobook]

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Unabridged audio version of the 2010 book. A work of fiction by Glenn Beck.


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Unabridged audio version of the 2010 book. A work of fiction by Glenn Beck.

30 review for By Glenn Beck: The Overton Window [Audiobook]

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    “I think we are seeing where intellectualisam [sic:]has gotten us. Many brains and no commen [sic:] sense is a disater [sic:] as we can see with our current administration. Worldly knowledge is not doing so well for us right now. Intellectual work is killing this country right now. Let us get back on track and do what is right. Palin may not be the right person but anything is better than this group of geniuses we have now.” ~Anonymous Poster on Politico.com July 14, 2010 A commenter on GR yester “I think we are seeing where intellectualisam [sic:]has gotten us. Many brains and no commen [sic:] sense is a disater [sic:] as we can see with our current administration. Worldly knowledge is not doing so well for us right now. Intellectual work is killing this country right now. Let us get back on track and do what is right. Palin may not be the right person but anything is better than this group of geniuses we have now.” ~Anonymous Poster on Politico.com July 14, 2010 A commenter on GR yesterday chided me for using Sarah Palin rather negatively in a review I’d written. However, after following the last presidential election closely and noting the persistent strain of anti-intellectualism that has continued, figures like Sarah Palin and Glenn Beck scare the hell out of me. As you can see in the quotation from Politico above, there is a relentless dichotomy: a true American leads by his/her gut instinct and common sense (whatever that is) vs. the anti-American/intellectual whose knowledge of world affairs, history, and even matters outside of the political arena (gasp) is viewed as suspect and even unpatriotic. Though a novel, The Overton Window by Glenn Beck prompted my curiosity enough so that I downloaded the first chapter or so. Consider this a preview-review-orama. Beck states, in his overly long “A Note from the Author” that he hopes the book “costs you as much sleep reading it as it cost me creating it.” Given that Beck hired three people to write the book – and, in particular, Jack Henderson who, as Beck puts it, “went in and put the words down” (isn’t that the author?), I don’t think a reader needs to invest much time at all. And in case you’re wondering what etiquette exists for acknowledging ghostwriters, judging from Beck’s book it looks like this: Beck distinguishes his novel from thrillers that merely seek to entertain by dubbing his book “faction,” a blend of fiction and nonfiction that both thrills and enlightens. Perhaps. Beck also cautions that “certain scenes and characters will likely feel familiar to you.” He would be right. Though Beck means he’s not using people or incidents from real life, the familiarity you feel reading this book stems from the fact that it is riddled with clichés and stock characters. The first scene involves a man, Eli Churchill, at a phone booth (do those exist anymore?) fumbling with quarters as he tries—frantically—to tell “Beverly” (who is unidentified except for her name) of a group ready to “set up the economy to fall like a house of cards” and who have the “media all lined up.” There are also “eleven nuclear weapons unaccounted for.” In short, the world is in danger. But—surprise, surprise—Churchill sees a “glint of brilliant red light on the wall of the booth” and knows he's about to die. Churchill’s final prayer is ended by “a silenced gunshot" [why bother with a silencer? He’s in the middle of the Mojave desert on a “rutted dirt road”?:]; "a .357 semi-jacketed hollow point was the last thing to go through his mind.” The next chapter and a half--which is as far as I read--is bodice ripper stuff. Our two protagonists, Noah (think Biblical) and Molly Ross (think Betsy Ross) meet. The chapter starts with Noah, turning 28, and thinking of the big 3-0, pondering his life and concluding, “it takes two to tango.” Fortunately, his dance partner arrives at that precise moment: “It was in the middle of these deep ruminations on life and love that the woman of his dreams first caught his eye.” Now, I’ll grant that there’s some irony in this line, but it doesn’t excuse the writing, which only gets worse. Noah’s descriptions of Molly go on for pages and pages. Here is a sampling: “she was hot, but it was an aloof and effortless hotness” [she has ”line,” which is explained at length prior to this quote:]: “[She had:] that same exquisite line, from the toes of her sandals all the long, lovely way up to her fingertips….he knew right then he was in love.” “Something about this woman defied a traditional chick-at-a-glance inventory. Without a doubt all the goodies were in the right places…” “Though he’d been in her presence for less than a minute, her soul had locked itself onto his senses, far more than her substance had” (emphasis mine). Right, he’s penetrated her soul by describing her physical assets. Works for me. The descriptions of her “soul” continue on for pages. …Perhaps this book gets better, but somehow I doubt it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    What happens when government and big business conspire to manipulate national and world events... oh, wait, that's already happening. Okay, how about this -- what happens when corrupt politicians and government officials ignore the laws of the land to bring about their own agenda... wait a minute, that's already happening, too! Well then, what happens when a radio talk-show host and TV personality writes a novel based on all the things he's discussing on his program that are happening in today's What happens when government and big business conspire to manipulate national and world events... oh, wait, that's already happening. Okay, how about this -- what happens when corrupt politicians and government officials ignore the laws of the land to bring about their own agenda... wait a minute, that's already happening, too! Well then, what happens when a radio talk-show host and TV personality writes a novel based on all the things he's discussing on his program that are happening in today's events... you get the Overton Window. Believable, scary, hard to put down - I finished it in a long weekend. It's a great story with interesting "good guys" and really despicable villains. There's only one catch -- it's based on very conservative political idealism -- the real heros in this story are the American Founding Fathers; and hope for the future is firmly based in restoring the federal government to it's original and upright position. If you find the book interesting, tune in to Fox News in the afternoon (5:00 Central)...you may be shocked to find out what's really going on in the country and the world. Beck has a gift for connecting the dots in real life events and painting the big picture. It's worth tuning into at least once or twice (record it if you're lucky enough to still have a job)...but I warn you, you may become addicted. It's like the book -- hard to put down.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Craig Meads

    This book is a very fast read and I read it in just a few days. I will admit that although Beck and I are the same religion I despise the man. I think most of the pundits like him are worthless, thankfully though he's a few steps up from the arrogant Rush. However I saw this book at the library and said what the heck. I picked it up and read through it very quickly. I was surprised that I liked it so much, it's very well written. The story scared the crap out of me as well. I have no doubt there' This book is a very fast read and I read it in just a few days. I will admit that although Beck and I are the same religion I despise the man. I think most of the pundits like him are worthless, thankfully though he's a few steps up from the arrogant Rush. However I saw this book at the library and said what the heck. I picked it up and read through it very quickly. I was surprised that I liked it so much, it's very well written. The story scared the crap out of me as well. I have no doubt there's a group of people headed by an Arthur Gardner type person trying to rule the world. How big they are or are not I have no idea. I thought it was interesting that Beck left the ending of the book a bit vague. What I'm saying is I think there's going to be a sequel. When it comes out I plan on reading that too. A sign of a good fiction writer is that the reader cares for the characters. I quite like both Molly and Noah. I think Noah's name is a hint of what kind of character he is. I think Beck very intentionally gave him that name. It's irrelevant what your political beliefs this is a very good book. The truth should rule over all political affiliations.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marvin

    Yes, I'm actually reading this. Stop laughing, Michelle. ..... It is well known the Glenn Beck did not write this. Mr. Beck said so himself. Although the idea "was all mine" he attributes the actual writing of the novel to three "contributors"; Kevin Balfe, Emily Bestler, and Jack Henderson. The last writer is already a published author and some critics have noticed that Beck's novel has a not-so-coincidental similarity to Henderson's Circumference of Darkness. Be that as it may, the trick for the Yes, I'm actually reading this. Stop laughing, Michelle. ..... It is well known the Glenn Beck did not write this. Mr. Beck said so himself. Although the idea "was all mine" he attributes the actual writing of the novel to three "contributors"; Kevin Balfe, Emily Bestler, and Jack Henderson. The last writer is already a published author and some critics have noticed that Beck's novel has a not-so-coincidental similarity to Henderson's Circumference of Darkness. Be that as it may, the trick for the book reviewer is how to review a book that is the stated author's ideas but not his actual printed words. My solution is to separate the writing and the ideas. The writing... You think that with all Beck's money he could have bought better writers. The first thing that shouts at you is an overwrought cartoon style of prose. Descriptions like "liberated chestnut curls framed a handsome face made twice as radiant by the mysteries surely waiting just behind those light green eyes" and a sexually charged moment that include the phrase "Don't tease the panther" (It works for me in those pick-up bars...not!) represent the highlight of literary prose in this book. Basically, it makes Dan Brown look like John LeCarre but mercifully not so excruciatingly painful as the Left Behind series. The plot, what there is of it, isn't much better. A powerful group of goverment leaders and evil corporation types are planning to detonate a nuclear bomb and attribute it to well-meaning tea partiers and defenders of the constitution in order to create a world-wide Fascist government. Our hero Noah Gardner, the son of the main conspirator, discovers this and attempts to foil the plot. Not really. He's too busy being smitten by the beauty of Molly (the one who is teasing the panther) and being drugged up and waterboarded to really do anything. Frankly, nothing much happens. There is a murder in the first 10 ten pages of the book that is simply dropped. The rare action is all anti-climatic as is the ending. (Hint: watch for a sequel) The "plot" is simply a way to tie in a bunch of lectures that illustrates Beck's ideas. Even this was accomplished much better by Ayn Rand. So on with... The ideas. Well, It's Glenn Beck. Yes, I've read Beck's non-fiction books and I would recommend them over this if you wish to get a sampling of where he is coming from. I'm not going to dissect his philosophy except to say he tends to an extreme libertarian viewpoint and is an expert as selecting facts out of history, and out of context, to support even the oddest conclusions like net neutrality is a plot to take away your freedom of speech.. The ideas expressed in The Overton Window seems a bit muddled at times. After all, we're talking about a plot to destroy the constitution that started with Teddy Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson. Since he throws in the ACLU, corporations that sell bottled water, and every world leader, "Them" seems to be rather all-inclusive. The bottom line is that Beck is preaching to the choir with this novel. It won't change anyone's mind. Beck fans will love it and Beck haters will hate it. Again, dubiously comparing it to Ayn Rands' novels of ideas like Atlas Shrugged, at least Rand makes you think. Beck lovers will nod their heads and say "See. I told you" while the rest of us place the book in the recycle bin and beg for another book by... well...anyone... even Dan Brown or Ayn Rand!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mac

    Whether the premise of this book it real or not, the window is REAL and I have watch it work its wonders on this nation's people for the past 69 years. You think $3.21 gas is not bad looking at the rest of so called modern nations, dumb...its the same gas that I used to fill Grandpa's old Packard up for $5.00 a tank, its not the gas has gotten more expensive, it that the USD (FEDERAL RESERVE NOTE) is WORTH LESS. The plastic numbered society is so easy, just give me my(equal)share and I'll shut u Whether the premise of this book it real or not, the window is REAL and I have watch it work its wonders on this nation's people for the past 69 years. You think $3.21 gas is not bad looking at the rest of so called modern nations, dumb...its the same gas that I used to fill Grandpa's old Packard up for $5.00 a tank, its not the gas has gotten more expensive, it that the USD (FEDERAL RESERVE NOTE) is WORTH LESS. The plastic numbered society is so easy, just give me my(equal)share and I'll shut up NOT....I want to be equal to Ophra Winfrey, Bill Gates, George Sorors, Al Gore, the big money boys, of course most of their wealth is in properties, actual metals not paper or plastic. They have use the window on our systems in Education, Communications, Health, Transportation, Banking, name something that they don't control. From your cell phone, computer, credit cards, car and Drivers License those chips are not for freedom of movement but control, knowledge of who, what and where you are. Discard this book for time wasted, however when the power goes off make sure you have a jar of actual metal change so that you can put some of that cheap (considering the rest of the world) gas in you tank.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Wilson

    A very scary book. The writing wasn't great but not bad for Mr. Beck's first foray into the world of fiction. I listened to the book and the narration was great. I really enjoyed hearing from Glen in the beginning and again after the completion of the book. I am a Glen Beck fan, so take my review with that in mind. Some of my favorite parts were when Beck quotes the founding fathers through his protagonists. It was great for me to hear our founders words in many cases for the first time. I was in A very scary book. The writing wasn't great but not bad for Mr. Beck's first foray into the world of fiction. I listened to the book and the narration was great. I really enjoyed hearing from Glen in the beginning and again after the completion of the book. I am a Glen Beck fan, so take my review with that in mind. Some of my favorite parts were when Beck quotes the founding fathers through his protagonists. It was great for me to hear our founders words in many cases for the first time. I was inspired by these words and I came to a realization that I have not been the best citizen of the USA. I have let my own feelings of frustration and maybe fear of being ostracized by my liberal friends keep me mostly silent as our country has moved further and further from the ideals of our Founders. I am resolved to no longer sit silent when I hear my friends and relatives promote their progressive ideas. I must be willing to sacrifice popularity and friendship for freedom. I liked the fact Beck doesn't blame the democrats for all the problems nor are the bad guys given some party designation. In fact Beck goes after Bush's policies with more venom than Obama's policies. The bad guys are all the politicians who have sold their souls for power and reelection. One stunning statistic quoted in the book is that congress has a 15% approval rating, yet a 90% of congress are reelected. This points directly to us the voters who think some other state's senator is doing a terrible job but ours is really serving us well by getting us all that federal money. It is this short sighted thinking by the electorate that has given us politicians who have no honor. In the end I have come to the conclusion that it is mine and each of us that have lost our honor. We no longer take the long view of what is best for the future we are selling our souls for the quick fix. We are not willing to sacrifice our own comforts to help insure the comforts of our children and generations to come. Loved the book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brent McGregor

    Really great read. Reason for 4stars is that the book is about 200-300 pages too short. The premise is based on fact: that America is being run by ad agencies that sell their ability to create false realities in the minds of hundreds of millions of people--even billions--and then twist public thinking into a knot that politicians, huge corporations, government agencies, and the like all use to gain more power. The idea of moving what the public is willing to believe into areas of complete madnes Really great read. Reason for 4stars is that the book is about 200-300 pages too short. The premise is based on fact: that America is being run by ad agencies that sell their ability to create false realities in the minds of hundreds of millions of people--even billions--and then twist public thinking into a knot that politicians, huge corporations, government agencies, and the like all use to gain more power. The idea of moving what the public is willing to believe into areas of complete madness and then taking power was an idea first made popular by Edward Bernays. Why we have never heard of him alone is curious. The man that inspired Goebbels clear down to Zinn and Chomsky. This is where Beck shines. He is able to tie together these elements, including a fantastic poem by Kipling, "Gods of the Copy Books", and create a narrative that is now becoming popularized as FACTION. Where I have a problem with this new type of literature is that the characters aren't fully explored and the plot is rushed. Our hero, Noah Gardner is moved along quickly from heir apparent to the largest influence peddling agency to a patriot with moral beliefs. The book starts out great and lays a good foundation, but hastens along to the transition. Don't get me wrong, I did like the book a lot. It just needs to be more detailed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    I picked this one up in an airport on a whim. I had been hearing people froth about it, and wanted to see if it was as bad as they were saying, which apparently was bad enough to make the back teeth ache. But, as it turns out, it wasn't. Beck wrote a fictional pop-thriller, which means the prose has to be assembled out of two by fours, but as a result it was sturdy. And Beck is clever, and so gets a number of good lines off. But not surprisingly his main problem is theological, which I may write I picked this one up in an airport on a whim. I had been hearing people froth about it, and wanted to see if it was as bad as they were saying, which apparently was bad enough to make the back teeth ache. But, as it turns out, it wasn't. Beck wrote a fictional pop-thriller, which means the prose has to be assembled out of two by fours, but as a result it was sturdy. And Beck is clever, and so gets a number of good lines off. But not surprisingly his main problem is theological, which I may write more about over at Blog and Mablog. As much as Beck loves his country, and wants to fight for it, his theological anthropology is the rot in our foundational timbers.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Neil

    Apparently this book was not actually written by Glenn Beck, but by a collaborative team of three other 'authors'. It has a rather clunky style to it, in places it is good but there are quite a few areas where the writing doesn't seem up to scratch. Overall a disappointment, as the book doesn't do justice to the research which has gone into it. Some areas did make me stop and think, so in that aspect it worked. It does make various political statements, and would probably appeal to those who enj Apparently this book was not actually written by Glenn Beck, but by a collaborative team of three other 'authors'. It has a rather clunky style to it, in places it is good but there are quite a few areas where the writing doesn't seem up to scratch. Overall a disappointment, as the book doesn't do justice to the research which has gone into it. Some areas did make me stop and think, so in that aspect it worked. It does make various political statements, and would probably appeal to those who enjoy reading about conspiracies, either real or imagined. The book largely deals with how PR and spin can affect the mindset of the general population. In this case the erosion of civil liberties. I just feel that with a little more care and attention this book could have been so much better.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

    Quite a thought-provoking book. Glenn Beck (with the help of three of his friends, I believe)writes a fictional thriller with the intent of causing his readers to 'think' about what they are being taught and manipulated into believing and accepting....based on the theory that the most extreme thoughts we are exposed to cause us to shift just a little bit at a time towards that thought becoming a reality. His intent was successful...the novel was just a bit lacking in substance. Favorite Quotes: Mol Quite a thought-provoking book. Glenn Beck (with the help of three of his friends, I believe)writes a fictional thriller with the intent of causing his readers to 'think' about what they are being taught and manipulated into believing and accepting....based on the theory that the most extreme thoughts we are exposed to cause us to shift just a little bit at a time towards that thought becoming a reality. His intent was successful...the novel was just a bit lacking in substance. Favorite Quotes: Molly...pointed out a bracketed rectangle that enclosed part of the illustration on the slide in front of them. What's that box? She said. "It's called the Overton Window. My father stole the concept from a think tank in the Midwest; it's a way of describing what the public is currently ready to accept on any issue, so you can decide how best to move them toward what you want." I don't understand...how does it work? "The ends of this long line"---Noah walked up to indicate the starting point---"represent the extreme possibilities. At this end of the scale is the unthinkable, and all the way over at the other end is something else you can't imagine ever happening, but in the opposite way. Too much good here, too much evil over there. If we were talking about government, it would be too much liberty at this end---which would be anarchy---and a complete top-down Orwellian tyranny at the other, so no liberty at all. Those in-between points are milestones along the way." "Use airline security as an example...Forty years ago people could pull up to the airport a few minutes before their flight, be treated with courtesy and respect, present no ID, just a ticket, and then get on the plane with just about anyting in their pockets and their bags. There was some security, but it was almost invisible. Today that's unthinkable, right? It seems like we could never go back to those days. Now at the other end of the spectrum, let's make the passengers arrive four hours early for the security line, allow no carry-ons, enforce a mandatory strip search, full-body Xray, a cavity probe for everyone, and you have to stay in your seat the entire flight with a stun bracelet on your wrist in case you try to get up to go to the bathroom---which, of course, no longer exists. ....If you suddenly had to go through everything I just mentioned you'd give up flying, correct? And with no security at all, you'd also never set foot on an airplane. So your Overton Window is somewhere in the middle, within this box. But my goal is to get you to accept more of those radical things over there, one step at a time. ... Let's say tomorrow some idiot makes his way onto a flight with a little tiny homemade explosive of some kind. It'd be all over the news for weeks, whether the guy actually did any damage or not. You get scared, and the TV is telling you that all we have to do is buy some more expensive screening machines, hire some more of the same people who let that nut on the plane in the first place, and give up a little more dignity at the checkpoints, and we'll be safe. That, of course, is a lie, but it has the desired effect." It moves the window. Right, we put a false extreme at both ends to make the choices in the middle look moderate by comparison. And then, with a little nudge, you can be made to agree to something you would never have swallowed last week." And this Overton Window, it's used all the time? "All the time, everywhere you look. We never let a good crisis go to waste, and if no crisis exists, it's easy enough to make one. "So even if they can't get us to accept everything at once, they're satisfied to move us a little closer toward the end." p145-147 Faith Hope Charity Faith--our rights come from a higher power. Men can't grant them, and men can't take them away. That's the difference, I think, between what happened in the French Revolution and what we achieved in ours. We believed we had the will of God behind us, and they believed in the words of Godwin. One endures, and the other fell to human weakness. Hope--That means we believe in the strongest part of the human spirit. Hope and truth are tied together; if everything we know is a lie, we don't have a chance. When a doctor tells you you're sick, you don't blame her for the diagnosis. You have the truth, then, no matter how bad it is, and you can make a plan to get better. That's hope. To know that even when things look darkest, there can be a better day tomorrow. Charity--Charity is simple. We believe that it's up to each of us to help one another get to that better tomorrow. Ben Franklin explained my whole bracelet when the president of Yale asked him to sum up the American religion. He answered; that there is a God, that there is life after this one and He will hold us accountable for our actions in this life, and that the best way to serve Him is to serve our fellow man. That's faith, hope, and charity." p 167-8 "When you lie for a living, you sometimes can't see the truth even when it's staring you right in the face. That's a weakness that could clearly be exploited." "A thousand things were flying through his mind. It was a condition that his father referred to as a 'topical storm', a state in which so many conflicting thoughts are doing battle in your brain that you lose your ability to discern and to act on any of them. This state was regularly induced by PR experts to cloud and control issues in the public discourse, to keep thinking people depressed and apathetic on election days, and to discourage those who might be tempted to actually take a stand on a complex issue." p 288 "Remember, the Overton Window concept is that only the few scenarios that currently sit inside an established window of acceptable debate will be taken seriously by the public. To move the Window toward their ultimate goal, those pushing an agenda have the introduce radical ideas that fall outside of the current comfort zone. While those fringe ideas will normally be dismissed, the Window will also be subtly nudged in their direction. This allows ideas that would've previously seemed unthinkable to be introduced and, eventually, even seriously considered as solutions." p 293

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    The Overton Window by Glenn Beck (pp. 336) A modern-day conspiracy thriller by one of the more polarizing voices in America. The problem with reviewing a fiction book by Glenn Beck is that his personality is so pervasive in the media that it’s hard to separate the book from the man and his ideology. I have no specific politic and consider myself pretty down the middle, so Glenn Beck neither offends me nor am I sitting front-and-center hanging on his every word like it was my 9 year old in his fir The Overton Window by Glenn Beck (pp. 336) A modern-day conspiracy thriller by one of the more polarizing voices in America. The problem with reviewing a fiction book by Glenn Beck is that his personality is so pervasive in the media that it’s hard to separate the book from the man and his ideology. I have no specific politic and consider myself pretty down the middle, so Glenn Beck neither offends me nor am I sitting front-and-center hanging on his every word like it was my 9 year old in his first Oscar winning role at the school assembly. That being said, this book is awful. To call it a thriller is really stretching the word. It’s choppy, lacks a fundamental central plot that actually moves, has incredibly static stereotypical characters, one wishy-washy main foil who’s supposed to make you think but really just comes across as a patsy, and contains way too many ripped-from-the-headlines-while-in-buddy-cop movie moments, not to mention that it is horribly edited. (‘Law and Order’ has the patent on being derivative of itself.). And on the very long list of military, conspiracy, and political thrillers I’ve read feels like it was written by committee in an ‘Intro to Fiction Writing’ Discover Center class. It’s actually offensive to call it a thriller. It’s clear that the only reason that this was published is that it was written by Glenn Beck. Without his name attached, this would have never been published. What boggles my mind is that it’s been so persistent on the best seller list. Regardless of your politics, a good political thriller can be appreciated by any political view, but this leaves me slackjawed. Even the open ending - ON A THRILLER- left me wanting to punch a wall. Mr. Beck, these were a very lazy 336 pages for a man who can spout the equivalent words in a day and be more interesting. So where’s the good stuff? Beck does pull inspiration from a wide-scope of news articles, government published documents and historical writings. His intent to try to get the average person to think about how a few behind the shadows fringe groups are (potentially) influencing the direction of America (you decide) gets made, but again at the failing of a decent story and clear plot line. And while, yeah, you made your point, you can have written a much better book with the same content if you edited, provided a more interesting main character who wasn’t just a talky mouth piece, or changed the format to a Socratic chapter-by-chapter questioning of different aspects of the documents you cite. Adding the flavor without the layered substance makes for a poorly presented idea if your goal is to be thought provoking and fact based. Beck has a clearer voice in his radio and TV programs when he’s off the cuff than what was presented here. Good for him for trying. Bad for him that he foisted on the public what clearly is a rambling first draft that should have been refined. If part of your goal is to teach by example, here you’re shooting yourself in the foot by communicating to the world that a name and some fast, poorly written fiction with jumbled ideas is exactly what the Founding Fathers had hoped for in the future and potential of America that you so often revere and expound. Also, to the thriller authors who supplied review blurbs for the dust jacket: I respect your writing, but you need to stop having your agent and PR people submit these quotes. You obviously did not read the book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Doreen

    I know most of the stuff in this book really has occurred in real life. Even though this is a fictional book I wouldn't be surprised if it ALL was really going on (replacing names with people who currently hold power within the government). This book definitely makes you think about your own personal overton window. I like the notes at the end of the book. Next time I read this I will go through the notes at the end of the book as I'm reading. [Side note: I don't believe in the 9/11 rumors of ou I know most of the stuff in this book really has occurred in real life. Even though this is a fictional book I wouldn't be surprised if it ALL was really going on (replacing names with people who currently hold power within the government). This book definitely makes you think about your own personal overton window. I like the notes at the end of the book. Next time I read this I will go through the notes at the end of the book as I'm reading. [Side note: I don't believe in the 9/11 rumors of our government having a hand in that attack and didn't understand why anyone would think this lie until reading the notes at the end of this book. Specifically the part where a HUGE amount of money (2.3 TRILLION dollars) was reported "missing" by the government the day before the attack. Once nearly 3000 people died the next day in the Twin towers the trillions of missing dollars was a story that was quickly buried.] I really enjoyed this book mainly because it so closely relates to what is currently going on in The Land that I love.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Doran Barton

    If you know me, you know I’m a pretty big fan of Glenn Beck. I’ve been listening to his radio show for about five years now and have followed his forays into television, live stage performances, and books. It may be no surprise, then, that I liked “The Overton Window,” Glenn’s latest book, a fiction thriller. Now that I’ve said that, let me qualify it. “The Overton Window” is a simple story, really. It has its plots and twists like a good thriller should, but its overall story arc is pretty straig If you know me, you know I’m a pretty big fan of Glenn Beck. I’ve been listening to his radio show for about five years now and have followed his forays into television, live stage performances, and books. It may be no surprise, then, that I liked “The Overton Window,” Glenn’s latest book, a fiction thriller. Now that I’ve said that, let me qualify it. “The Overton Window” is a simple story, really. It has its plots and twists like a good thriller should, but its overall story arc is pretty straightforward. The protagonist is an unlikely good-guy, just an average Joe named Noah Gardner. He’s a young, single public relations guy at a big firm in New York City. The bad guy? Barack Obama. I’m kidding, but that answer is not that far from the truth. The antagonists in this story is a group of rich, powerful socialists, one of which happens to be Noah’s father. Having declared the old ways of the constitution and freedom-loving America to be a failed experiment, they’re ready to transform the country into what it should be: controlled by a knows-better big-government. Noah meets Molly Ross, a smart, beautiful seemingly easy-going girl who is has an odd quirk: she’s heavily involved in a movement to get America back to its founding roots. Intent on getting to know Molly better, Noah attends a meeting at a club in New York, his first Tea Party as it were. While the speakers tell story after story about how the government and those in power are intent on destroying the Constitution and eliminating people’s individual liberties, Noah’s cycnicism and realism boils over. When he utters something loud enough for those around him to overhear, he is asked to explain himself with a microphone so that everyone can hear. “The United States was built to run on individual freedom, that’s true, but because you’ve let these control freaks have their way with it for about a hundred years, your country now runs on debt. Today Goldman Sachs is the engine, and in case you haven’t realized it yet, the American people are nothing but the fuel.” Noah goes on to explain all the conspiracy theories bantied about like the Bildeberg Group, the Trilateral Commission, etc. are all true and they’re wealthy beyond believe and they’re globalists. Noah knows all this because these powerful organizations have long been using PR firms like his father’s to push their transformative ideas on the people of the world. “There’s no respect for you in Washington. They laugh at you. You say you want a revolution? That Constitution the lady was holding up a while ago? It gives you the power to revolt at every single election. Do you realize in a couple of weeks every last seat in the U.S. House of Representatives will be up for grabs? And the presidency? And one-third of the Senate seats? “The approval rating for Congress is somewhere around fifteen percent. You could turn the tables and put them all out of a job on that one day. But do you know what’s going to happen instead? I do. The presidency is going to change hands, but the corruption will accelerate. Over ninety percent of those people in Congress— people who are deeper into the pockets of the lobbyists every day they spend in Washington— over ninety percent of them are going to get reelected.” The story puts Noah on a collision course with destiny. What he learns both from his new friends in the freedom movement and via his ties to the powerful forces through the PR business helps him shed his cynicism and start to believe in the cause. Now, this book is a very easy read. It’s 321 pages but it goes by fast. My only real complaint about the writing is that much of dialogue between characters doesn’t read like believable dialogue. It reads like it’s written, not spoken. You could easily say the same thing about any fiction written by Ayn Rand, but Beck’s dialogue is a lot easier to comprehend. The Afterword, the last chapter in the book, contains a surprising amount of information about items in the story that are actually based in truth.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    Another Booksquirm Book Club pick. Thankfully, this book did not make it past month 2! Our 2 month assignment for this book had us suffer through the Prologue through Chapter 4. Here are the thoughts I posted for the book club. Prologue - Chapter 2 observations: How exactly did Mr. Beck think that I would take him seriously when he writes on page 8 "Top psychologists tell us in Maxim magazine..." Really??? You expect me to believe that people who are at the top of the psychological field would rea Another Booksquirm Book Club pick. Thankfully, this book did not make it past month 2! Our 2 month assignment for this book had us suffer through the Prologue through Chapter 4. Here are the thoughts I posted for the book club. Prologue - Chapter 2 observations: How exactly did Mr. Beck think that I would take him seriously when he writes on page 8 "Top psychologists tell us in Maxim magazine..." Really??? You expect me to believe that people who are at the top of the psychological field would really honestly take the time write for Maxim? I know that men only get that magazine to read the articles, but I wouldn't think the foremost experts in psychology would publish there! All in all, it's not the worst book I've read... (Then again, we were reading Rogue by Danielle Steel that month as well) Chapters 3 - 4 observations: First, I would like to thank my fellow booksquirm members for feeling the same way as I feel about this book. It looks like it will thankfully be voted off the island. I felt like my soul was dirty after reading the assigned chapters this month, and I wanted to quickly sneak the book back into the return slot at the library before anyone noticed I had it checked out! lol. The one thing that stuck in my mind from reading this was the list of "red flagged" individuals (not comprehensive, as it was noted). After reading the list - 3 times to be certain - I was left wondering if there was anyone left (other than, of course, the author) that didn't fit into at least ONE of the "to be watched" groups. I think I fit in more than one category! I can honestly say that I don't even know what the book was supposed to be about... I missed character/plot development entirely - being too distracted with idiocracy of it all! I would like to thank wikipedia for giving me some insight into what Mr. Beck was go adept at making me miss! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overton_...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Before reading this book, you have to view this trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uW4Iiw... This Rudyard Kipling poem, chilling (and true) on its own, plays a great role in the story, and it really helps to hear the poem as read in the trailer. Anyone who still doesn't believe there are evil forces trying to take down this country need to read this book. It is fiction, but based on so much fact, as evidenced by the sourced research in the back of the book. The book started out as more of a lo Before reading this book, you have to view this trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uW4Iiw... This Rudyard Kipling poem, chilling (and true) on its own, plays a great role in the story, and it really helps to hear the poem as read in the trailer. Anyone who still doesn't believe there are evil forces trying to take down this country need to read this book. It is fiction, but based on so much fact, as evidenced by the sourced research in the back of the book. The book started out as more of a love story than a thriller, and it kind of bothered me, but the deeper the story goes the more I saw the need for the love story, and it ended up being a great twist. A sequel would be very welcome.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I'll give Glenn (and his collaborators) 2 Stars for this one. The concept was fine but the book was too short to accommodate what he wanted to get across. The characters and situations are just too cardboard and disjointed. Glenn knows his history and will make sure he gets his points across, like a slap upside the head. I like Glenn but he needed to spend more time and words to get this one right. I'll give Glenn (and his collaborators) 2 Stars for this one. The concept was fine but the book was too short to accommodate what he wanted to get across. The characters and situations are just too cardboard and disjointed. Glenn knows his history and will make sure he gets his points across, like a slap upside the head. I like Glenn but he needed to spend more time and words to get this one right.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Not as bad as lefties want it to be, not as good as Beck's fans want it to be. A pretty good first effort on Beck's part, though. It started off great, but was slow to get to any action. What little of it there was was largely unsatisfying. And Beck was more interested in setting up a sequel for an apparent series than he was in crafting a good ending. I'm sure I'll pick up the next book, anyway. Not as bad as lefties want it to be, not as good as Beck's fans want it to be. A pretty good first effort on Beck's part, though. It started off great, but was slow to get to any action. What little of it there was was largely unsatisfying. And Beck was more interested in setting up a sequel for an apparent series than he was in crafting a good ending. I'm sure I'll pick up the next book, anyway.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    I'm not the biggest fan of political thrillers or even politics in general, but Glenn Beck spins a great yarn, and the ending makes me want to get my hands on the sequel as soon as possible. I'm not the biggest fan of political thrillers or even politics in general, but Glenn Beck spins a great yarn, and the ending makes me want to get my hands on the sequel as soon as possible.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    This is Glenn Beck's attempt to put all his rhetoric and ideas into a fictional setting. I don't necessarily disagree with the premise, but it is not "Atlas Shrugged." There is no plot worthy to uphold all his lofty ideals. When I got to part three I was finally excited to see some action and adventure, and then..... nothing. WTH!? So, read if you want some thinking and a little Glenn Beck time. To everyone else, avoid. This is Glenn Beck's attempt to put all his rhetoric and ideas into a fictional setting. I don't necessarily disagree with the premise, but it is not "Atlas Shrugged." There is no plot worthy to uphold all his lofty ideals. When I got to part three I was finally excited to see some action and adventure, and then..... nothing. WTH!? So, read if you want some thinking and a little Glenn Beck time. To everyone else, avoid.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    It ended up being pretty interesting, but it seemed to start slow and then a lot of stuff happened all at once. I don't regret reading it, but I also likely won't add it to my permanent library. I do plan to read Eye of Moloch though. It ended up being pretty interesting, but it seemed to start slow and then a lot of stuff happened all at once. I don't regret reading it, but I also likely won't add it to my permanent library. I do plan to read Eye of Moloch though.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jdobrilovich

    Not a boring book, but if I was supposed to solve mysteries, I'd have called Scooby-Doo, for I did not understand a thing in here. Not a boring book, but if I was supposed to solve mysteries, I'd have called Scooby-Doo, for I did not understand a thing in here.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Candice

    I almost wish Glenn Beck's name was not on the cover of this book because I know that his name will turn people off. This book was much better than I expected it to be, it had an almost Orwellian vibe to it. Beck made it very clear in a note at the beginning of the book that this was a piece of "faction," a fictional book based on facts. Beck not only created a thrilling story around the concept of The Overton Window, but tested the window on the reader. He presented an extreme scenario rooted j I almost wish Glenn Beck's name was not on the cover of this book because I know that his name will turn people off. This book was much better than I expected it to be, it had an almost Orwellian vibe to it. Beck made it very clear in a note at the beginning of the book that this was a piece of "faction," a fictional book based on facts. Beck not only created a thrilling story around the concept of The Overton Window, but tested the window on the reader. He presented an extreme scenario rooted just enough in reality to make the reader consider some of the implications of the facts in the story. In the Afterword, Beck presented pages and pages of endnotes for the facts he incorporated into his story - this both surprised and thrilled me. I think everyone should read this book. It doesn't present 100% reality . . . but it doesn't present an entirely fictional world either. There were numerous passages I enjoyed, specifically: "[T]o the realists of modern politics, ideology was just another interchangeable means to an end." - p. 35 "It's not that New Yorkers set out to be rude as they walk along; there simply want to get where they're going." - p. 46 "Corruption is a virus, always floating in the halls of power, ready to infect and spread among those whose immune systems are compromised by greed and blind ambition. This is the way it's always been, and our system of government was made like it was, with a division of powers among three seperate branches of government, all constrained by limited scope and commonsense principles. Our founding documents established this new form of government to protect us from the sickness that has destroyed freedom since the dawn of civilization: the inevitable rise of tyranny from the greed and gluttony of the ruling class." - p. 62 "[T]he power to tax involves the power to destroy." - p. 66 "If our government won't answer our appeals and do what's right, if they've forsaken their oath to defend the Constitution, then an appeal to arms and to the grace of God Almighty is all they've left us." - p. 83 "You can't take away the freedom of an aware, informed populace; they have to give it up themselves." - p. 105 "You can hold on to the smallest doubt and take comfort in it, stay in denial and go on with your carefree life, until one day you're finally cornered by a truth that can no longer be ignored." - p. 151 "Ask an elementary school kid what they know about George Washington and it's more likely you'll hear the lies about him, like the cherry-tree story or that he had wooden dentures, than about anything that really made him the father of our country. Ask a kid in high school about Ronald Reagan and they'll probably tell you that he was a B-list-actor-turned-politician, or that he was the guy who happened to be in office when Gorbachev ended the Cold War. Ask a college kid about Social Security and they'll probably tell you that it was invented to provide guaranteed retirement income for all Americans. Ask a thirty-year-old about World War II and they'll recite what they remember from Saving Private Ryan. Do you see? No one really needs to rewrite history; they just have to make sure that no one remembers it." - p. 162 "In the vacuum created by fear and ignorance and hunger and want, it's evil, not good that rushes in to fill the void." - p. 210 "In their silence the people of the United States have spoken." - p. 211 "[I]f the occasional visionaries actually make it into office, their corruption begins immediately." - p. 277

  23. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Edmund

    Like my other Glenn Beck reviews, I feel it would be unethical not to begin by saying that I am not a fan of Mr Beck nor do I agree (for the most part) with his opinions. In saying that I tried to take his work of fiction The Overton Window with a grain of open-mindedness, and plunged right in... Or tried to. Unfortunately Glenn decided to introduce his novel with the old “some people won’t like this, but others will look past the politics” type spiel. One questions the decision to do this as obvi Like my other Glenn Beck reviews, I feel it would be unethical not to begin by saying that I am not a fan of Mr Beck nor do I agree (for the most part) with his opinions. In saying that I tried to take his work of fiction The Overton Window with a grain of open-mindedness, and plunged right in... Or tried to. Unfortunately Glenn decided to introduce his novel with the old “some people won’t like this, but others will look past the politics” type spiel. One questions the decision to do this as obviously any non-fans will likely just get more annoyed (judging from my reaction) and fans don’t need any encouragement, and generally speaking, even if it is in a foreword an author must be cautious with what material they present within their product. Beck’s apologetic introduction succeeds only at reminding us that he is a political commentator with what many consider extreme (if only in irritation value) views and not in fact a fiction author. Anyway once you get past the foreword we get onto the real fiction. Beck spins a tale of Noah, the son of a Public Relation’s trillionaire who stumbles into a relationship with a rebellious, maybe terrorist, activist. Beck doesn’t do too bad with this tale – the tension formed by Noah being caught between his scheming father and revolutionary girlfriend is well done, that’s even with the worst dialogue since the 80’s. While it is fairly clear in Beck’s writing that Noah’s father is the villain, there is also good drama in trying to determine whether Noah’s GF is on the side of right, or at least actually interested in Noah beyond manipulating him for personal gain. Not too shockingly there are many downsides to Beck’s novel. To say his prose was stilted would be like saying Edmond’s Cookbook lacked flair – Glenn takes American plain-speak to another level (perhaps appealing to his fans again). Gunfire is described as sounding like a paper bag being popped too close, everyday incidence is used as comparison in analogies and by far too much of the story was told in summary rather than really happening to our main character. In terms of plot – Overton Window could have been a short story if you cut all the political ranting out (you could probably just insert links to Glenn’s youtube and get the same dialogue), it was pretty obvious Beck was trying to reach Orwellian 1984 greatness, especially with his “the enemy won, but we fight on” feel good ending but ultimately the plot felt to unlikely, too exaggerated, and with two pointless characters thrown in like forgotten edit outs. Overall Overton was better than I expected – while much of the premise was ridiculous, and some scenes like when Noah's love interest pretends to be Natalie Portman were similarily stupid, there weren’t quite as many caricatures as I predicted there would be and there was some genuine drama in the plot. Reading the book didn’t leave me wanting to claw my eyes out. (why I am risking my eyes by reading such books? Don’t ask) Still the book is an absolute hack job of writing – fair enough, if I already had fame I would capitalise on it through writing, I might take a couple of courses first though...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Martha

    Noah Gardner is a lackluster son of a highly powerful, political puppet master, Arthur Gardner. Noah is lured in by Molly Ross who intrigues him with her disdain as well as her passion for the cause of American freedom. She is part of a group known as the Founder’s Keepers, who seek to peaceably preserve American freedoms as set out in the Constitution. Noah is embroiled in Molly’s schemes to gain access and information from his father’s computers. They learn that Arthur Gardner is part of a gro Noah Gardner is a lackluster son of a highly powerful, political puppet master, Arthur Gardner. Noah is lured in by Molly Ross who intrigues him with her disdain as well as her passion for the cause of American freedom. She is part of a group known as the Founder’s Keepers, who seek to peaceably preserve American freedoms as set out in the Constitution. Noah is embroiled in Molly’s schemes to gain access and information from his father’s computers. They learn that Arthur Gardner is part of a group of elite power brokers who are seeking to bring about a one world government. These men will use money, power, manipulation, bribery, coercion, and whatever other means necessary to achieve their goal. Molly (and the reader) learn of a tool known as “the Overton Window” which measures public opinion. This tool allows the monied powers to manipulate public opinion by setting up events that slowly push the boundaries of public acceptance closer and closer to the desired controls sought by the puppet masters. Noah is kidnapped and it becomes clear that Molly used him from the outset. Yet he thinks there was more between them than the obvious lies. Noah again seeks to help Molly as a nefarious terrorist plot slowly unfolds -- a horrible act of violence that is being arranged by the puppet masters but will be blamed on Molly’s group. The beginning was a bit slow as I wondered at the detailed descriptions of Noah’s obsessive interest in Molly. However that is understandable as the plot progresses. After an hour or two in I was glued to listening to this story until it finished. I was impressed with the writing skills as well as the characterization and plot. All of the elements reveal the extreme intelligence of the author – regardless of what one might think of his political and religious views. Does it contain a message on politics and religion? Yes - clearly on politics and subtly on religion. Is it a good thriller? Absolutely. Beck starts the book with a preface that declares the work to be in the nature of “faction” – a fictional story woven around facts. The story presents a present day situation that should open eyes and make each of us look at the circumstances around us to see if we can really discern truth from intentionally manipulated PR. I loved the story and am anxious to begin the next book, The Eye of Molech, which I am reviewing for Simon and Schuster through Audiobook Jukebox. Audio Notes: This story was good on its own but the narration enhanced my enjoyment and made it move much more quickly than if I had read a print or ebook version. James Daniels does a really good job keying into the character personalities. I will look for other works narrated by Mr. Daniels.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    I was intrigued by the description on the back of the book. This was a pretty good conspiracy type thriller. The story sets up a rather scary scenario where rich and powerful members of society have been working, for many years, to control the populace by declaring that the old ways of America, its constitution and the idea of freedom, are a failed experiment. Their plan is to transform America slowly , until they finally have complete control. When the son of one of the staunch supporters of th I was intrigued by the description on the back of the book. This was a pretty good conspiracy type thriller. The story sets up a rather scary scenario where rich and powerful members of society have been working, for many years, to control the populace by declaring that the old ways of America, its constitution and the idea of freedom, are a failed experiment. Their plan is to transform America slowly , until they finally have complete control. When the son of one of the staunch supporters of this plan understands what this all means, he becomes involved in a way that he never dreamed possible.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Richelle

    This is the first book I have read by Glenn Beck, and although I do not watch his show either, I am generally familiar with his political views. The characters and scenarios in the book are all fictional, but the plot involves many facts from recent events and headline news. Glenn described the book as being "faction" (fact and fiction) and he does include about 15 pages of sources that you can look up in his afterword following the story. I thought the characters seemed like two-dimensional ste This is the first book I have read by Glenn Beck, and although I do not watch his show either, I am generally familiar with his political views. The characters and scenarios in the book are all fictional, but the plot involves many facts from recent events and headline news. Glenn described the book as being "faction" (fact and fiction) and he does include about 15 pages of sources that you can look up in his afterword following the story. I thought the characters seemed like two-dimensional stereotypes who usually sounded either like the devil or Glenn Beck when they spoke. It was always really obvious who "the bad guys" were, and I usually enjoy books more if it's not that obvious. If I read the book and didn't know that Glenn Beck had wrote it, I wonder if I would have heard his voice in my head during so much of the dialogue. It was distracting to be reading what was supposed to be the voice of a female character, but it kept sounding exactly like Glenn Beck in my mind. The plot was fast-paced and interesting, however, it didn't allow for developing the characters very much, but I guess that wasn't the point of the story and is the reason the writer used stereotypes so often. I did enjoy many of the quotes from the founding fathers and the book did make me think and consider things I hadn't before. Here's a weird one: after reading the book, I actually had a couple of conversations with people about purchasing guns. I don't have a gun, I don't know how to use a gun, and I don't really want a gun, but for some reason I guess the book got me thinking maybe I should. I don't think that was the point of the book at all! I'm sure the idea will wear off soon.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jason Mccool

    A very good entry into the thriller genre for Glenn. A quick read, but hard to put down, especially with the very short chapters that tease you to read "just one more". The plot is certainly plausible, and the close connection to the current political shenanigans certainly makes it spookily good right now, although that quality might be the same one that keeps it from being a classic after times have changed (unless things take a turn for the worse so that it seems almost prophetic like some oth A very good entry into the thriller genre for Glenn. A quick read, but hard to put down, especially with the very short chapters that tease you to read "just one more". The plot is certainly plausible, and the close connection to the current political shenanigans certainly makes it spookily good right now, although that quality might be the same one that keeps it from being a classic after times have changed (unless things take a turn for the worse so that it seems almost prophetic like some other thrillers of the last 20 years). There were some cheesy parts where the characters were reciting dialogue straight off of Glenn's show that I just can't see that character saying at that point in their lives. While I generally agree with Glenn, I thought having the lead character, Noah Gardner, say some of the things he said early in the book detracted from his dramatic transformation in the book from a shallow leech to a principled young man fighting for truth. All in all, Glenn did well at framing the classic tale of outnumbered "good guys" facing insurmountable odds against the "evil empire" in an all-too-real and close-to-home setting. Enjoy the suspense, but take the message to heart: "The price of freedom is eternal vigilance."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    This is an entertaining book, but like other books I have read in this genre, I found it simplistic. I generally refer to books like this as “cotton candy.” It is fun to read, but not a lot of substance to it. It delivers what it says; a conspiracy driven fast paced plot, but none of the layers of world building that make other books so good. Overall the story was enjoyable. It is about a PR firm using the Overton Window technique to shift public attention and acceptance to fit in with a plan fo This is an entertaining book, but like other books I have read in this genre, I found it simplistic. I generally refer to books like this as “cotton candy.” It is fun to read, but not a lot of substance to it. It delivers what it says; a conspiracy driven fast paced plot, but none of the layers of world building that make other books so good. Overall the story was enjoyable. It is about a PR firm using the Overton Window technique to shift public attention and acceptance to fit in with a plan for dissolving the United States and forming a dictatorship. There is a group of people fighting against this, and (spoiler) the son of the President of the PR firm ends up in the middle of it. Throw in a beautiful girl and a couple nukes, and you get this terrorist attack meets a Jason Bourne story. The shaky resolution at the end of the book leaves it wide open for a sequel, and attempts to pose the question that while this is a worst case scenario, the nuts and bolts of the story is alive and well in the world. There is an afterward in the book that provides you with resources to investigate things for yourself, and prompts you to dig deeper on your own. I would recommend this book to people who like thrillers with a side of conspiracy.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy

    The Overton Window concerns the range of policies and principles that the public accepts as socially or politically acceptable at a given time. Show a man the most extreme on both sides, and perhaps you can push him to be more accepting of those ideas further to one or the other side, because they're not "as bad" as what he saw before. In this novel, by Glenn Beck, we're given the tale of a public relations executive, Noah Gardner, who seems that he'd rather be anywhere else than under the thumb The Overton Window concerns the range of policies and principles that the public accepts as socially or politically acceptable at a given time. Show a man the most extreme on both sides, and perhaps you can push him to be more accepting of those ideas further to one or the other side, because they're not "as bad" as what he saw before. In this novel, by Glenn Beck, we're given the tale of a public relations executive, Noah Gardner, who seems that he'd rather be anywhere else than under the thumb of his rich and powerful father. When he meets Molly Ross, a woman intent on saving the nation from a pending ideological collapse, his loyalties and interests are put to the test.. especially in light of a possible terrorist attack. While the story was engaging, I'm not sure I could adequately call it "thrilling". And, if you've read it.. what did you think about the whole "Natalie Portman" scene? Was that supposed to be endearing? Ugh. I wasn't crazy about the ending, either. To be fair, I don't read much in this genre, so I may not be the best judge here. Parts entertained me, but as a whole it just isn't one I'd recommend in the future.

  30. 5 out of 5

    John Harder

    I am a Glenn Beck fan but I have to say that The Overton Window just barely reaches mediocre. This may be because of my aversion to thrillers. The writing seems flat, but I feel the same way about Dan Brown and Scott Turow, yet everyone else finds these guys riveting – it must be the genre that I do not understand. The Overton window as a political concept is the theory that at any given time and population will accept a political policy somewhere between a set of extremes. For instance no-one wo I am a Glenn Beck fan but I have to say that The Overton Window just barely reaches mediocre. This may be because of my aversion to thrillers. The writing seems flat, but I feel the same way about Dan Brown and Scott Turow, yet everyone else finds these guys riveting – it must be the genre that I do not understand. The Overton window as a political concept is the theory that at any given time and population will accept a political policy somewhere between a set of extremes. For instance no-one would accept our current tax rates if they were suddenly introduced 100 years ago, but if you slowly slide into socialism through incremental means it is eventually accepted as the norm. The Plot: Noah Garner and the son of a public relations powerhouse. Noah knows the public is being manipulated and being told what to think. The most effective way to change public opinion and create new oppressive policies is to create a problem and then someone, likely the government, steps in to solve the problem (think of the global warming fraud). Eventually Noah grows a conscience and everyone knows how inconvenient a conscience is.

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